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VOL.19 ISSUE 26 MAY 9-15, 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.COM
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY ME ME EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEENT NT NT NNNT NT NT NT NT NT NT NNNT NT NT NT NT N FFFFFFFFFFFFFFRE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE W EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK K EK EK EK EK EKLY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LLY
ROB ZOMBIE, MEGADETH AND LACUNA COIL
KICK OFF SUMMER CONCERT SEASON
THE RALPHIE REPORT indulges your inner tween with this NKOTB member, p. 29 • Chloe Grace Moretz trades superheros for the supernatural with ‘Dark Shadows’ role, p. 33
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Letter from the editor
social
Chris C. Turner
Online comment
of the week.
Everyone between the age of
20 and 40 should be allowed
to leave work right now and
go drink Brass Monkey.
#RIPMCA #BeastieBoys
The Weekender has 9,560
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
I think it’s safe to say that one
of the best seasons in Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania is summer
concert season. In my humble
opinion, it’s tied with autumn —
and church-bazaar season, nat-
urally.
This year, I’m excited that the
season kicks off Saturday, May
12 at Toyota Pavilion at Montage
Mountain with the one-two
punch of co-headliners Rob
Zombie and Megadeth. While
I’m a classic-rock girl through
and through, my teenage metal-
head will most likely be raising a
devil horn or two at the show that
also features Italy’s Lacuna Coil
as the opening act. You can read
interviews with all three acts in
this week’s cover story (pgs.
14-15) — and if you want to
throw up a preemptive devil horn
as you read, you’ll find no judg-
ment here.
Also in this week’s issue, you
can find a story on the
good folks of Indraloka
Animal Sanctuary in
Mehoopany, who are in
the running to win a truck
from Toyota as part of the
car company’s 100 Cars
for Good program. Find
out more — and how you
can help — on p. 24.
By now, you’ve prob-
ably seen commercials or
posters for the Johnny
Depp/Tim Burton reboot
of the classic and campy
TV show “Dark Shad-
ows.” Well, on p. 33 you
can read an interview with one of
the film’s stars, Chloe Grace
Moretz, who you might recog-
nize from “Kick-Ass” and the
Oscar-winning “Hugo.”
Speaking of kicking ass, many
masters from the world of martial
arts will travel to NEPA this
week as part of the Mega Martial
Arts Weekend that kicks off
Thursday, some on their very
first trip to the States, said orga-
nizer Eric Kovaleski of Master
Kovaleski’s Tang Soo Karate
USA in Dickson City. You can
find out all about this event on p.
58.
There’s plenty more in this
issue, but I’m about out of space
so you’re on your own. See you
right here next week — and
thanks for reading!
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY ME MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEENT NT NT NNNT NT NT NT NT NT NT NNNT NT NT NT NT N FFFFFFFFFFFFFFRE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE WE W EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK EK K EK EK EK EK EKLY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LY LLY
ROB ZOMBIE, MEGADETH AND LACUNA COIL
KICK OFF SUMMER CONCERT SEASON
HE RALPHIE REPORT indulges your inner tween with this NKOTB member, p. 29 • Chloe Grace Moretz trades superheros for the supernatural with ‘Dark Shadows’ role, p. 33
staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Dale Culp, Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin,
Amy Longsdorf, Jayne Moore, Mystery Mouth, Kacy Muir, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Jeff & Amanda from 98.5 KRZ,
Jim Rising, Lisa Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky
Interns
Nicole Orlando
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com
Online theweekender.com • myspace.com/weekender93 • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr
Circulation
The weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7398 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130
Editorial policy
the weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.
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* Scarborough Research
Rachel A. Pugh
General manager • 570.831.7398
rpugh@theweekender.com
Steve Husted
Creative director • 570.970.7401
shusted@theweekender.com
John Popko
Sr. account executive • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
Mike Golubiewski
Production editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
Stephanie DeBalko
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
sdebalko@theweekender.com
Nikki M. Mascali
Editor • 570.831.7322
nmascali@theweekender.com
Tell
@wkdr what
concert you
are most
looking
forward to
this summer
“The Philharmonic’s ‘A Tribute
to Benny Goodman’ at the F.M.
Kirby Center.”
“Fiona Apple.” “Eve 6 at Croc Rock since that
is the only one I have tickets to
so far.”
Kieran Inglis
Account executive • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
Shelby Kremski
Account executive • 570.829.7204
skremski@theweekender.com
“Bamboozle, but most likely
won’t be able to make it unless
someone wants to give me
tickets for $Free.99.”
“None planned at the moment.”
“Beach Boys.”
“Probably The Peach Music
Festival or New Found Glory at
Warped.”
“I’m pretty stoked about seeing
Rob Zombie, Motorhead and
Iron Maiden. It’s my Summer of
Metal!”
What concert are you most
looking forward to this summer?
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Mon-Fri 3-2am • Sat-Sun 11-2am • 570-779-1800 • Corner of State and Nesbitt, Larksville
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Call Mark C. Krasavage Plumbing for all of your plumbing needs • 570-287-1273
Check us out on menusnepa.com for food specials and Facebook for food and drink specials
Konefal’s is now open for breakfast midnight-4am...meet us there
YOU BELONG HERE!
Pub & Grub
Rob s Rob s
FRIDAY
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
Mark Baynock, my
grandmother wants her
varicose veins back!
HAPPY
MOTHER’S DAY
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MOTHER’S
DAY
$6 PITCHERS, $2 FIREWATERS,
$2 AMERICAN HONEY SHOTS,
50¢ JELLO SHOTS 9-11PM
50¢DRAFTS 9-11 P.M.
20¢ CLAMS
BEST CLAMS AROUND
FREE POOL
KARAOKE @ 9 P.M.
DJ DANCE
PARTY W/
DJ DANG
DJ
DIABLO
SOFTBALL SUNDAYS
$6 PITCHERS 8-12 • $6 PIZZAS (IHO)
$1.50 PINTS AND $1 DRAFTS ALL DAY
35¢ WINGS (IHO)
NEPA BEER
PONG
$2 FIREWATERS
$6 PITCHERS &
50¢ JELLO SHOTS 9-11
$6 LARGE PIES (IHO)
ALL MOTHERS, AFTER YOU HAVE A WONDERFUL DINNER WITH THE FAMILY,
JOIN US AT ROB’S PUB & GRUB TO GET BOMBED
AND MAYBE PREGNANT AGAIN!
THEY’RE BACK
TWISTED TUESDAYS
FREE POOL &
FREE JUKEBOX
20¢ WINGS
$2 LOOPY BOMBS
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9-11 P.M.
BOOM!!!
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PONG
WE HAVE THE
MLB PACKAGE AND COMCAST
FOR PHILLIES! CATCH ALL OF
THE GAMES HERE!
$2 WELL MIXERS
$1 DOMESTIC MUGS
9-11 P.M.
$3 BOMBS
$2 SNAKE BITES
$2 BLUE MOTHER
F’ER SHOTS
Plum
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HIRING BARTENDERS AND WAITRESSES
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24
WHEELS IN MOTION: Help Indraloka Animal Sanctuary land a new truck from
Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good program.
55
MOTORHEAD
Whose hood is this under?
47
DISH
Get yourself to the Greek -
Food Festival that is.
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COVER STORY
14-15
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN ... 7
CONCERTS ... 20-21
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ... 22
THEATER ... 31
AGENDA ... 34-38, 42, 45, 48
SPEAK & SEE ... 57-57
MUSIC
THE DAMSELS OF DARKNESS …16
ALBUM REVIEWS ... 18
CHARTS ... 18
LEROY JUSTICE … 25
STAGE & SCREEN
MOVIE REVIEW… 27
STARSTRUCK … 29
THE RALPHIE REPORT … 29
NOVEL APPROACH … 31
CHLOE GRACE MORETZ … 33
FOOD, FUN &
FASHION
NEWS OF THE WEIRD ... 10
INDRALOKA ANIMAL SANCTUARY …
24
BUT THEN AGAIN … 28
PUZZLE … 34
STYLE FILES … 44
DISH … 47
BITCH & BRAG … 59
WHO IS … 52
MISC.
TECH TALK …17
SORRY MOM & DAD … 48
JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT … 49
MOTORHEAD … 55
SHOWUS SOME SKIN … 55
SIGN LANGUAGE … 56
MEGA MARTIAL ARTS WEEKEND …
59
MAN OF THE WEEK … 69
MODEL OF THE WEEK … 70
ON THE COVER
DESIGN BY STEVE HUSTED
PHOTO BY RICK FAGANVOLUME 19 •
ISSUE 26
index
May 9-15, 2012
this just in
By Weekender Staff
weekender@theweekender.com
WALKON
The Lackawanna Heritage
Valley National andState Heri-
tage Area will host a groundbreak-
ing ceremony for the Scranton
Taylor Trail, the newest section of
the Lackawanna River Heritage
Trail, Monday, May14 at 11a.m. at
the ElmStreet trailhead in Scran-
ton.
RichardJ. Allen, secretary of
the Pennsylvania Department of
ConservationandNatural Re-
sources, will give remarks during
the program.
Free parking is located one
block fromthe trailhead in the
PNCBankparking lot on the
corner of ElmStreet and South
Washington Avenue; handicapped
parking is available at the trailhead.
CURTAIN!
The Grove Theatre (5177
Nuangola Road, Nuangola) has
announced its 2012 season, which
will be produced by Cutting Edge
Productions. Cutting Edge Pro-
ductions is owned and operated by
Michael Marone, the former
artistic director of Pennsylvania
Theatre of Performing Arts in
Hazleton.
This year’s productions kick off
with “Nunsense 2: The Second
Coming,” which will be perform-
ed June15-16, 22-23 at 8 p.m. and
June17 and 24 at 3 p.m. “No Sex
Please, We’re British” follows
Aug. 3-4, 10-11at 8 p.m. and Au-
gust 5 and12 at 3 p.m. “My Way:
AMusical Tribute to Frank
Sinatra” will be performed Sept.
7-8, 14-15 at 8 p.m. and Sept. 9 and
16 at 3 p.m.
Tickets for musicals are $20 and
$18 for plays; a “Season Pass” is
also available for $50. Reserva-
tions are being taken nowvia
570.868.3582 or GroveTick-
ets@frontier.com.
GETDOWNTONIGHT
Mount Airy Casino Resort (44
Woodland Road, Mount Pocono)
has announced its summer-concert
series lineup, which kicks off with
KCandthe Sunshine Band
Friday, July 20 at 9 p.m. Tickets are
$40-$55.
Country crooner CollinRaye
follows Friday, Aug. 17 at 9 p.m.;
tickets are $20-$30. GrandFunk
Railroadwill performSunday,
Aug. 18 at 9 p.m.; tickets are $25-
$40.
The resort also announced that
JWowwof MTV’s “Jersey
Shore” will appear Saturday, July
21at 10 p.m. inside Gypsies. Tick-
ets are $15.
For more info or to purchase
tickets for any of the aforemen-
tioned events, call 866.468.7619 or
visit mountairycasino.com.
MEALSTHROUGH
THEMAIL
The National Associationof
Letter Carriers’ StampOut
Hunger FoodDrive will take
place Saturday, May12.
To participate, collect and bag
non-perishable food items —such
as canned meats, fish, soup, juice,
vegetables, pasta, cereal and rice
(no expired items or those in glass
containers) —and place by your
mailbox for your letter carrier to
deliver to a local food bank or
pantry.
For more info, visit helpstam-
pouthunger.com.
ROOTSANDRECYCLING
The Honesdale Roots and
RhythmMusic andArts Festival
was recognized by the Profession-
al Recyclers of Pennsylvania for
going above and beyond what is
mandated under Act 101, the Mu-
nicipal Waste Planning, Recy-
cling andWaste ReductionAct.
The recognition came about due
to the festival’s “green” initiative in
2010, which successfully diverted a
significant amount of festival
waste for recycling purposes.
To volunteer for this year’s fes-
tival, set for Saturday, June16,
e-mail bfulp@himalayaninstu-
tite.org, and put “R&RVolunteer”
in the subject. For recycling ques-
tions, e-mail ghp@visithones-
dalepa.com.
LIVE‘IDOLS’
The “AmericanIdol Live” tour
returns to MoheganSunArena
(255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-
Barre Twp.) Thursday, Sept. 6 at 7
p.m.
The tour features the Top10
finalists fromthe show’s11th sea-
son: ColtonDixon, DeAndre
Brackensick, Elise Testone,
Erika VanPelt, HeejunHan,
Hollie Cavanagh, Jessica San-
chez, Joshua Ledet, PhillipPhil-
lips and Skylar Laine.
Tickets are $29.50-$65 and go
on sale Friday, May11at 10 a.m.
via Ticketmaster, AmericanIdol-
.com, aeglive.comor the box of-
fice. The season finale of “Amer-
ican Idol” airs Wednesday, May 23
on Fox.
SINGITLOUD
Acapella group Straight No
Chaser will come back to the F.M.
Kirby Center (71Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre) Saturday, Oct. 27 at
8 p.m.
The10-piece ensemble has had
more than 35 million YouTube
viewers, sold out hundreds of
concerts and sold more than
500,000 albums in its12-year
history.
Tickets are $29.50-$39.50 and
go on sale Friday, May11at 10 a.m.
via the venue box office and Tick-
etmaster. Aspecial Kirby members
pre-sale begins Thursday, May10
at 10 a.m. For more info, visit
kirbycenter.org. W
Straight No Chaser will return to the F.M. Kirby Center
in Wilkes-Barre Oct. 27.
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GUEST BARTENDER BECKY MAY
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CLOSED! HAPPY
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DAY!
CD RELEASE PARTY!
news of the weird
By Chuck Shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
START YOUR ENGINES …
& YOUR STEREOS
Sophisticated automobile
technology makes high-perform-
ance engines purr in relative
silence, but automakers fear that
their most demanding drivers are
emotionally attached to the en-
gines’ roar. Consequently, as Car
and Driver reported in April, the
2012 BMW M5, with 560 horse-
power tempered with sound
deadeners, has installed pre-
recorded engine noise, channeled
into the car’s cabin via the stereo
system. A computer program
matches the amplitude of the
engine’s growl to the driver’s
accelerator-revving. In other
automobile tech news, Peugeot
technicians announced in March
that they were preparing “mood
paint” for the body of the compa-
ny’s iconic RCZ model. The
paint’s molecular structure would
be alterable by heat sensors in the
steering wheel and elsewhere that
measure a driver’s stress levels. A
calm driver might see his car turn
green, for instance — but watch
out for road-rage red!
THE CONTINUING CRISIS
-- With only 30,000 hotel
rooms in Rio de Janeiro, and
50,000 visitors expected for the
June United Nations Conference
on Sustainable Development,
officials persuaded owners of
many of the city’s short-time
“love hotels” (typically renting
for four hours at a time) to
change business plans for a few
days to accommodate the dele-
gates. A BBC News stringer
reported that the hotels will re-
move some special fixtures and
furniture, such as “erotic chairs”
and velvet wall coverings, but
that the large, round beds would
stay. Fortunately, the conference
does not begin until June 13. The
night of June 12 (“Lovers Day”)
is a big income-producer for
short-stay hotels.
-- At a March Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra performance,
the music continued uninterrupt-
ed as two patrons engaged in a
fistfight over box seating. Con-
ductor Riccardo Muti “never
stopped conducting,” said a pa-
tron. “He very gracefully, with-
out missing a beat — literally —
he brought (the second move-
ment) to a very quiet and sub-
dued close.”
NAMES IN THE NEWS
(1) Arrested for felony battery
in Bloomington, Ind., in April:
Ms. Fellony Silas, 30. (2) An-
nounced as eligible for parole in
June by the Kansas Prison Re-
view Board: Mr. Wilford Mo-
lester Galloway. (3) Arrested for
hit-and-run in April in Roseville,
Calif.: Mr. Obiwan Kenobi, 37.
(4) Arrested on drug and weap-
ons charges in Clarkstown, N.Y.,
in April, Mr. Genghis Khan. (5)
Among the silly town names
uncovered in an April report on
SmarterTravel.com: Why, Ariz.,
Whynot, Miss., Hell, Mich., Pig,
Ky., Elephant Butte, N.M., Mon-
keys Eyebrow, Ky., and Embar-
rass, Minn. The report also found
towns in Wales and New Zealand
that are 58 and 57 letters long,
respectively.
BRIGHT IDEAS
-- Following her recent holiday
in the United States, in which she
passed through Boring, Ore.
(pop. 12,000), Scotswoman El-
izabeth Leighton returned home
to suggest that officials in her
hometown of Dull, Scotland,
arrange for the two towns to
become “sister cities,” even
though they did not qualify under
normal protocols because of
Boring’s larger size. (The Oregon
town was named for a Civil War
soldier, William H. Boring.)
-- Some villagers in China’s
Shandong Province who are too
poor or isolated to hook up to
home-heating fuel service have
an alternative, according to a
March report by China News
Center. They take giant, heavy-
duty balloons that resemble 15-
foot-long condoms and walk to
filling stations to inflate them
with natural gas every four or
five days. The danger of explo-
sion is high, but the balloons
remain many villagers’ best
option.
OOPS!
-- Clumsy: (1) In March, Ger-
many’s celebrity rabbit — the
genetically “earless” bunny Tiny
Til — was accidentally crushed
to death in a zoo in Limbach-
Oberfrohna when a cameraman
accidentally stepped on it while
setting up for a news conference.
(2) In 2011, a photographer snap-
ping pictures for an art magazine
moved a 2,630-year-old African
sculpture to get a better shot and
accidentally smashed it (“to
smithereens,” according to the
owner, Corice Arman, who filed
a $300,000 lawsuit in April 2012
against the photographer and his
magazine).
PEOPLE DIFFERENT
FROMUS
Lawrence Cobbold, 38, has a
house in Plympton, England, but
has to make living arrangements
at his parents’ home or elsewhere
because his place is totally taken
over by his 21,000-item collec-
tion of bird ornaments and doo-
dads. Before heading off to sleep
elsewhere, he spends an average
of four hours a day tidying up the
collection. His dad (who de-
scribed his other son as “com-
pletely normal”) said, “I just
hope I die before (Lawrence). I
don’t want to (have to) clear all
this out.”
W
For more info, visit
NewsoftheWeird.blogspot.com.
At the 10th Arab Shooting Championships in Kuwait in March, as medals were pre-
sented and winners’ national anthems were played, officials were apparently ill-
prepared for medalist Maria Dmitrienko of Kazakhstan. Consequently, her “nation-
al anthem” was, inadvertently, the humorous ditty from the movie “Borat.” (Instead
of such lyrics as “sky of golden sun” and “legend of courage,” the audience heard
“Greatest country in the world / All other countries are run by little girls” and “Fil-
tration system a marvel to behold / It removes 80 percent of human solid waste.”)
Dmitrienko reportedly kept a mostly straight face throughout, although Kazakhstan
later demanded, and received, an official apology.
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RESERVEYOURTABLE FOR MOTHER’S DAYWEEKENDTODAY
FRIDAY MAY 11
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4:30PM* 6:30PM* 8:30PM*
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Look What
You Missed
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Awards Gala
Photos by: Photos courtesy of ShadowCatcher Ltd.
Photography
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CELEBRITY
EXTRA
By Cindy Elavsky
Marisol Nichols plays feisty
and independent real-estate
agent Heather Cruz. Marisol
told me recently why she loves
her character so much: “I could
understand what she had to do
to survive in this community,
and I felt like she was the most
grounded out of everybody. She
worked her butt off to get to
where she is: She didn’t inherit
a business; she wasn’t born into
money; she didn’t marry into it.
She had to make it on her own,
and that I can completely relate
to. I’ve been working odd jobs
since I was 12. I think I forged
my ID when I was a kid so that
I could work at 14. I wanted to
work; I didn’t want to have to ask
people for money.”
I can’t get enough “GCB,”
and I especially love
Heather Cruz. What can
you tell me about the
actress who plays her?
-- Deena A., Norfolk, Va.
Q:
A:
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Y
ou’d think most
people, when finished
with a daunting proj-
ect like, say, wrap-
ping up production
on a movie he wrote and directed,
would take some time off.
Well, Rob Zombie isn’t like most
people — but you’ve probably
guessed that from the moment he
rose to fame in the early ’90s with
former band White Zombie.
Instead of sitting back and enjoy-
ing that his sixth film, “The Lords
of Salem,” is done, Zombie is in-
stead moving on to the next thing:
Hitting the road for a co-headlining
tour with Megadeth. The tour kicks
off the season at Toyota Pavilion
at Montage Mountain in Scranton
Saturday, May 12 with opener La-
to make a heavy, dark, weird record
because I feel like that’s very
where we’re at and where things
are at and that makes the most
sense these days.”
Zombie feels that this is a great
time “in a certain sense” for music
— despite how bad the industry
and economy are — and the fact
that radio formatting “is pretty
uptight.”
“They seem to play the same
thing,” he said. “You’re still
competing with Led Zeppelin and
The Rolling Stones for airtime.
MTV stopped playing music videos
100 years ago, so it doesn’t really
matter; you can kind of just go off
on your own tangent, and it almost
works out better … even through
you’re not trying to write singles
because that doesn’t really matter
anymore — it’s freeing in a weird
sort of way.”
AMERICANWITCH
Z
ombie’s latest horror film,
“The Lords of Salem,” is
expected to hit screens this
year. It’s the story of a female DJ
at a radio station in Salem, Mass.,
who unsuspectingly spins a cursed
record that frees 300-year-old
witches who were confined and tor-
tured during the Salem Witch Trials
in the late 1600s. The idea came to
Zombie rather innocently.
“About five or six years ago, I
was in Massachusetts — I’m from
Massachusetts, so anything con-
cerning the Salem Witch Trials was
always something I remembered as
a kid — but I was in Massachusetts
for a wedding, of all things, and I
was hanging around the hotel,” he
began, “and in the gift store, I was
just bored, and I bought this book
on the Salem Witch Trials, and I
just started reading it and refresh-
ing my memory on what it was all
about. It just gave me these ideas
and from there, I just started writ-
ing a script.”
As many filmmakers can attest,
making movies is no easy task,
especially when dealing with studio
suits. This time around, Zombie
partnered with Haunted Films,
whose first two films were the hor-
ror hits “Paranormal Activity” and
“Insidious,” and had complete cre-
ative control, something he didn’t
have on his “Halloween” sets.
“I’ve always had basically com-
plete control and taking complete
control, I mean, you’re always at
war, sometimes more than others,
but this was the first time I ever had
it contractually,” Zombie clarified.
“It made life easier, because some-
times on the past couple films that
I’ve done, the battle with the studio
becomes so long and drawn out,
they really, really affect the creative
process because you’re just in a
miserable state of mind. You can’t
be expected to create great things
if you’re just on the phone arguing
with people all day long; you’re
just burnt out.”
NEVER GONNA STOP
I
n addition to music and movies,
Zombie has also directed com-
mercials, most notably was his
unusual vision for Woolite last year
with an ad entitled “The Torturer”
(Google it, you’ll remember); he
recently did three for Amdro Ant
Block, but this Renaissance man
isn’t looking for his next genre to
master.
“I don’t ever really worry about
doing new things; to me, it’s more
about trying to do the things that
I’m doing — better,” he stated.
“There are things that pop up here
and there that are new for me in a
way, like directing TV commercials
and stuff; they’re kind of fun to do,
and you don’t involve a lot of time
and years of your life.”
As for reports that Zombie is
launching his own channel on The
Nerdist’s YouTube following a very
well-received one-off video of him
(sort-of) impersonating Tom Baker,
the fourth incarnation of “Dr.
Who,” well, that’s a tad premature
for now.
“I actually haven’t done it yet,
we’re still in the creative early
stages, so I’m not sure,” he ex-
plained. “I have ideas, but I don’t
want to say what they are yet. They
could change, so I probably won’t
get to that until after the album’s
done.”
Even if Zombie does end up
doing the channel after recording,
“The Lords of Salem” will most
likely be released and there will
probably be 10 other things Zombie
will have in the works.
“It sounds really weird, but I’m
not really looking to relax from
anything,” he said, frankly. “I think
you’ll find the blessing and the
curse of being able to do what you
like to do for a living, there’s not
really an alternative to it — I could
do all these things every single
day, all day long and be completely
content.
“I don’t need (to go), ‘Oh, I’ve
got to get away from this and find
some other weird hobby.’ It’s all
good.” W
Call of the
Zombie
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
John 5, Rob Zombie, Piggy D and Ginger Fish.
cuna Coil, before Zombie hits the
studio to record a new album.
“Sometimes it’s hard, the worlds
are just so different and what’s
expected of you is just so differ-
ent, that’s why it’s nice that we
have this little tour with Megadeth
in between,” Zombie told the
Weekender during a recent phone
call from New York. “By the time
we’re done touring, we’ll be back
in music-mode mindset so making
the record will be OK, because I’ve
been working on this film now for
a year or more.”
Zombie, who has written and
directed “House of 1000 Corpses,”
“The Devil’s Rejects,” two “Hal-
loween” reboots and the animated
film “The Haunted World of El
Superbeasto,” shared that when
he’s doing a movie, music goes on
the back burner — and vice versa.
“I keep them separate because
there’s not enough time,” he said.
“Movies are very time consuming,
especially when you’re shooting,
there’s barely time to eat, you’re
just working all day long, there’s
not time for anything else; in fact,
I don’t even think about the other
things.
“My manager will call me with
things, and I’m like, ‘I can’t even
think about those things, I don’t
even care. I’ll care next week,’” he
added with a laugh.
HOWTO MAKE
A MONSTER
Z
ombie, a pensive intervie-
wee who quietly ponders
responses before answering,
doesn’t usually have the same plan
of attack when it comes to making
records. He and guitarist John 5,
bassist Piggy D and drummer Gin-
ger Fish will return to the studio for
the follow up to 2010’s “Hellbilly
Deluxe 2,” released 12 years after
Zombie went solo with “Hellbilly
Deluxe.”
“This is the first time I’ve kind
of come up with a game plan,”
Zombie said of the record that
should be out this year. “We want
“We
want to
make a
heavy,
dark,
weird
record.”
Rob Zombie on
recording a
new album
PHOTO BY RICK FAGAN
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I really like to listen to
a lot of different music,
I’m not just a metalhead,”
said Lacuna Coil guitarist
Cristiano Migliore when
he checked in with the Week-
ender from Fort Lauderdale, Fla.,
recently. “I just got the latest Lamb
of God album not too long ago, and
I think it’s really great, and I was
actually listening to Kylie Minogue
as well.”
The personable Migliore had no
problem admitting to his diverse
musical interests while also
mentioning that the band had had
just enjoyed a rainy day off from
its “Dark Legacy Tour.” While the
excursion is a headliner for Italy’s
Lacuna Coil, its members have
also made the rounds with some
of its musical peers, including the
aforementioned Lamb of God.
“I still remember when we did
Ozzfest in 2004 for the first time,
we were playing with a lot of bands
that were very extreme, you know,
Slipknot were headlining, Lamb of
God, Hatebreed and all metalcore
bands,” he shared in his disarming
Italian accent. “And we were like,
‘Oh, we hope that the crowd is not
really going to start throwing stuff
at us,’ because we are probably
the softest and most melodic band
onstage.
“We ended being the second
best-selling band on the tour after
Slipknot on our stage. So, you
never know.”
And if past experience dictates
the future, Lacuna Coil will fit in
just fine when it storms into Scran-
ton’s Toyota Pavilion at Montage
Mountain Saturday, May 12 to
open for co-headliners Rob Zombie
and Megadeth.
“We try to do what we do, and
people seem to like it no matter
what,” Migliore continued. “Some
people who came to see other
bands we played with actually
discovered our music, and they
became fans.”
Maybe that’s because of Lacuna
Coil’s appeal: Amelodic sound
with metal and gothic influences
complemented by female and male
vocals provided by Cristina Scab-
bia and Andrea Ferro. Its most re-
cent and sixth studio album, “Dark
Adrenaline,” dropped in January,
and Migliore noted that the band
seems to have found its sweet spot
with this new material in contrast
with the experimental tone of
2009’s “Shallow Life.”
“With ‘Dark Adrenaline,’
we took a completely differ-
ent approach, and we tried to do
an album that would be more
compact, like all toward a certain
direction,” Migliore stated. “With
‘Shallow Life,’ it was fun because
we had the chance to do stuff that
we wouldn’t normally do, and then
by touring and playing those songs
every night, you find out what
works for you.
“And that’s how we actually
ended up writing the songs for
‘Dark Adrenaline,’ because we
found out that that was the kind of
music that we really enjoyed play-
ing the most.” W
Melodic
metalheads
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
W
ith Megadeth
kicking off
Northeastern
Pennsylvania’s
summer concert
season with Rob Zombie and
Lacuna Coil, the Weekender
couldn’t help but ask the metal
band’s drummer Shawn Drover
what his very first concert was.
“That’s easy: Rush, 1981,
‘Moving Pictures’ tour in Mon-
treal,” replied Drover, a native
Montrealer. “I remember it viv-
idly. They’re my favorite band,
so that’s a really memorable
concert for me.”
The same year Drover saw
that show, Megadeth founder
Dave Mustaine left Metallica
and eventually formed Megadeth
in 1983. Now, nearly 30 years
later, despite numerous lineup
changes, the oft-petulant Mus-
taine and an ever-changing music
industry, Megadeth is having one
of the best critically received pe-
riods of its career, thanks to the
2011 release of its 13th album,
“Th1rt3en.” So what’s the secret
to such longevity?
“At the end of the day, the
quality of music has to be there
for you to be able to sustain a
career, I think,” Drover said,
calling in from his Atlanta home.
“Think of how many bands have
come and gone over the years,
and here we are, 28 years later,
and we’re still viable, and we’re
still valid, and we’re still current.
We’re not a nostalgia act crank-
ing out the hits.
“We want to be in the now,
and I think that’s part of what
drives us to try to make the best
records of our career. ‘Th1rt3en’
has a lot of critical acclaim, and
a lot of fans really dig that record
— as do we — so really, at the
end of the day, for a band to have
this kind of longevity, I think the
music has to transcend genera-
tions.”
Which is what albums like
“Peace Sells … but Who’s
Buying?,” “Rust in Peace,” and
“Countdown to Extinction” have
done.
“The children of the people
who were into the band 25 years
ago are now coming to the shows
in a lot of instances,” Drover
said. “I think that’s a really cool
thing.”
Having just finished its Gi-
gantour festival, which featured
Motorhead, Volbeat and La-
cuna Coil — who will open the
Zombie/Megadeth co-headlining
show Saturday, May 12 at Toyota
Pavilion at Montage Mountain
— Drover couldn’t say what fans
can expect from that Scranton
setlist.
“We never played with Rob
before, and if you listen to his
music, there’s no speed metal
involved, it’s really heavy stuff,
and I love it, but it’s not really
fast, so with that said, that’s a
good question,” Drover began.
“The answer is, ‘I don’t know.’
I would almost suspect that we
may play some stuff that’s a little
more mid-paced and heavier. But
you never know with us, we’re
always reworking our setlist.”
At press time, Drover believed
Megadeth opted to go on before
Zombie’s set on the tour, but “it
doesn’t matter with us. We’ll go
on first, we’ll go on last; we’re
going to do our show no matter
what. Whatever our situation is,
our mentality is to go in there
play as hard as we can — we try
to have the best show possible,
and have a good time doing it.”
W
‘We want to be
in the now’
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
The members of Italy’s Lacuna Coil.
Megadeth returns to NEPA on a co-headlining tour
with Rob Zombie.
Rob Zombie / Megadeth /
Lacuna Coil:
Sat., May 12, 7 p.m.,
Toyota Pavilion at Montage
Mountain
(1000 Montage Mountain
Road, Scranton).
$44-$65.50.
Info: livenation.com
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I’m completely anti main-
stream music.”
So says Aleigha Evens,
the founder and owner of inde-
pendent music label Born of
Chaos Records.
“It’s so commercialized and so
generic,” she continues. “A lot of
talented people go unrecognized
because that culture is so ad-
vertised that women think that’s
what they’re supposed to listen
to. We have to put ourselves out
there to for them to realize other-
wise.”
By “we,” she means females in
the heavy-metal scene.
Acknowledging that women
are a minority in the genre,
Evens suggested the imbalanced
ratio of males to females in metal
may be a self-propagating prob-
lem. In other words, the lack of
females in the limelight is a
roadblock for females to enter
the scene, which ultimately leav-
es fewer females in the limelight.
To break the cycle, Evens has
organized the “The Damsels of
Darkness” tour. Featuring a re-
volving roster of female-fronted
metal bands from Pennsylvania,
New York, New Jersey and
Washington, D.C., the tour will
come to Diane’s Deli & Internet
Cafe in Pittston Saturday, May
12.
The lineup for Saturday’s show
features headliners Our Ashes
Remain from Scranton and A
Sound of Thunder from Wash-
ington, D.C., with supporting
acts Mistress from Philadelphia,
Save the Zombies from Lancaster
and Forever Her Nightmare from
New York City.
Nina Osegueda grew up loving
some of the mainstream music
offerings Evens rails against.
Before becoming the frontwom-
an for A Sound of Thunder,
Osegueda’s tastes ran more to-
ward r&b and classical music.
Now a full-blooded metalhead,
Osegueda thinks the genre ap-
peals to women for much the
same reason she thinks it appeals
to men. It’s also the quality Ose-
gueda feels sets metal apart from
other genres: Authenticity.
“A lot of the time when you
listen to other music, especially
on the radio, it’s all very watered
down. It sounds very processed.
There’s no emotion behind it,”
she says. “With metal, there’s an
intensity to it. That’s what
grabbed my attention.”
Still, old influences die hard.
Osegueda’s previous proclivity
for r&b and classical music shine
through in her affinity for the
blues-based proto-metal of Black
Sabbath and the soaring power
metal of Blind Guardian.
While Osegueda’s interest in
metal didn’t come until her later
college years, for Jane Moser, the
roots run deeper.
“I’ve been into metal pretty
much since I was 8,” she shares.
“Then I got into the real heavy
stuff when I was about 14 or 15
years old.”
Though Moser previously
fronted Scranton-based death-
metal outfit Hellistic Threat and
now calls the ranks of metalcore
act Our Ashes Remain home, she
confesses that it hasn’t always
been easy feeling a sense of
belonging as a woman in a male-
dominated subculture. Over the
years, Moser’s love for the genre
has made her an outsider on both
sides of the gender line.
“Growing up, it was hard to
actually have many female
friends. Most of the friends I did
have weren’t into metal, so it was
hard for me to talk to them about
music, which was always one of
my main interests,” she explains.
“In school, I always felt like
everyone disliked me. It didn’t
bother me, though. In the end, it
just gave me more power. I was
different. I was unique.”
As part of the “Damsels of
Darkness” tour, Moser’s had the
chance to play alongside other
female musicians with similar
backgrounds. Though they’ve
each embraced different styles of
metal, she says there remains a
feeling of unity amongst them.
“None of us sound the same,
but we can all relate to each
other.” W
The Damsels of Darkness Tour,
Sat., May 12, 7 p.m., Diane’s
Deli & Internet Cafe (206 S.
Main St., Pittston). $5 at door.
Info: facebook.com/TheDam-
selsOfDarknessTour,
570.602.5200
Scranton band Our Ashes Remain is on ‘The Damsels of Darkness Tour’ that stops in
Pittston Saturday.
Scream queens
By Bill Thomas
Weekender Correspondent
A SOUND OF THUNDER.
PHOTO BY DUY TRAN
“With metal, there’s
an intensity to it.
That’s what grabbed
my attention.”
Nina Osegueda
of A Sound of Thunder
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tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
W
hen I heard about
BlackBerry manu-
facturer Research
In Motion’s hot new oper-
ating system, I thought
“Really? Those guys are
still around?”
BlackBerry is in big
trouble — the smartphone
manufacturer has been cir-
cling the drain for some
time now, due to its inability
to compete with the far
larger and more-dynamic
Android and Apple iOS
devices on the market and
because of massive and
infuriating service interrup-
tions.
There’s also not too much
you can say about its
recent product releases,
beyond describing them
as “clunky” — and that’s
being charitable.
Back when there were
no other good options, Black-
Berry was great, and even now
you can’t complain about its
e-mail security … when it works
and if you need that sort of
thing.
Now, just about any choice
will give you more apps or more
and better devices.
But RIM and BlackBerry
cling doggedly to their existing
market share, determined to
make a go of it.
During the launch of its new
operating system, Research In
Motion CEO Thorsten Heins
highlighted some key points of
the software that will drive the
next generation of BlackBerry
devices. Among them: True
support for full touchscreens,
without a physical keyboard.
This is a great advance for
BlackBerry and would be truly
remarkable if it were 2004.
While it is still going to offer
devices with keyboards for the
traditionalists out there, this is
not something to highlight in
2012.
The company is also planning
to offer better support for major
games, an improved camera,
improved developer tools and
added support for tablet devices
and vehicles.
Congratulations RIM, on ar-
riving at the party just in time to
help clean up the leftovers.
If RIM wants to be around
five years from now, they’re
going to have to beat Google and
Apple significantly from a fea-
tures standpoint — not match the
last generation of devices or
they’ll need to shift the mobile
paradigm in some fundamental
way.
Tomorrow’s BlackBerry will
be today’s dumbphone. When
you pull it out, people are going
to scoff at you or politely inquire
as to when your company is
planning on disposing of its
outdated devices. I should stress
that there is nothing inherently
wrong with the devices or the
technology behind them — it’s
the corporate management and
public perception that will need
to be addressed if BlackBerry is
going to continue to bear fruit. W
According to this tech writer,
‘tomorrow’s BlackBerry will be
today’s dumbphone,’ and it
seems the industry agrees.
BlackBerry late to the party
While BlackBerry is still going to offer
devices with keyboards for the traditionalists
out there, this is not something
to highlight in 2012.
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“Simple, yet refined” is a
phrase which best seems to de-
scribe “Blunderbuss,” the new
solo album from indie-rock hero
Jack White. The primitive-sound-
ing music that defined much of
his past career has been replaced
with something that is experi-
mental and not tied to one style,
yet is still to the point and never
overdone. Fans expecting “Blun-
derbuss” to sound like White’s
past work will hear many ele-
ments that do, but they also need
to try to listen to this album with
some fresh ears.
“Missing Pieces” gets the
album off to a slow, rambling
start and is immediately followed
up with the raw and in-your-face
“Sixteen Saltines.” This one-two
punch at the beginning of the
album is akin to a musical super-
nova — material and energy are
gathered into a large mass, then
explode dramatically, gradually
spreading out to form a wide
variety of new elements.
As “Blunderbuss” continues
on, its focus wanders from place
to place, with noisy, grating
numbers like “Freedom At 21” or
the spastic “I Guess I Should Go
To Sleep” interspersed with
quiet, elegant pieces such as
“Hypocritical Kiss” or “Love
Interruption.” While the mean-
dering feel of the album may be
difficult for some listeners to
handle, it is tied together with the
deliberateness in which White
performs each piece. “Blunder-
buss” does bounce from place to
place, but it does so because each
place is somewhere that White
needs to take the listener to.
In the end, “Blunderbuss” is an
album that is a lot of fun to listen
to. The music is generally tender
and sweet, starkly contrasted by
lyrics that often deal with loss
and pain. And, despite the fact
that most of the musical restric-
tions placed on White in his past
career have been self-imposed to
a degree, listeners will enjoy
hearing him be completely free
and explore sounds and styles
that — while not completely new
— are certainly a little different.
-- Michael Irwin
Weekender Correspondent
RATING:
W W W W
Jack White
“Blunderbuss”
ALBUM REVIEWS
A calculated 'Blunder'
charts
8. Gavin DeGraw: “Not Over
You”
7. Karmin: “Brokenhearted”
6. Adele: “Set Fire to the Rain”
5. One Direction: “What Makes
You Beautiful”
4. The Wanted: “Glad You
Came”
3. Calvin Harris: “Feel So Close”
2. Katy Perry: “Part of Me”
1. fun./Janelle Monae: “We Are
Young”
Top at 8 with Ralphie Aversa
1. Marilyn Manson: “Born Villain”
2. Tedeschi Trucks Band: “Live
Revelator EP”
3. Carrie Underwood: “Blown Away”
4. Jack White: “Blunderbuss”
5. Gotye: “Making Mirrors”
6. Willie Nelson: “Just Breathe”
7. George Harrison: “Early Takes V.1”
8. Adele: “21”
9. Various: “Now 42...”
10. Norah Jones: “Little Broken
Hearts”
Top 10 Local Albums at Gallery of Sound
Not a lot of rappers can say
they’re feuding mercilessly with
critical darlings Odd Future, model-
ing for fashion lines or collaborat-
ing with Chris Brown, Taylor Swift
and Morgan Freeman, all at about
the same time. That’s B.o.B.’s job.
The North Carolina-reared hip-hop
singer/MC made his first album,
“B.o.B Presents: The Adventures of
Bobby Ray,” into a genre-jumping,
conceptually schizoid affair. The
follow-up, “Strange Clouds,” bene-
fits from his debut’s messed-up mu-
sicality. “So Hard To Breathe” is a
hook-heavy honey of a cut with a
handsome jumble of tenderly acous-
tic and epically electric guitars.
“Where Are You (B.o.B vs. Bobby
Ray)” reflects his Southern upbring-
ing. “Arena,” featuring T.I. and salty
crooner Chris Brown, is aerated and
arena rock-hopping grand.
Although it lacks “Adventures’”
fantastical thematic through line,
“Clouds” still has the same melo-
dious singsong quality to B.o.B.’s
raps, whether going it alone (“Cir-
cles”), doing a brown-eyed soul
routine (“Castles,” with Trey
Songz), making nice with the voice
of God (Freeman on “Bombs
Away”) or doing a duet with Swift,
country-pop’s sweetheart of the ro-
deo.
Together, B.o.B. and Swift make
“Both of Us” into a buoyantly senti-
mental blend of ukulele-filled folk
and syrupy dubstep-lite. That’s some
dumb — but weirdly effective —
genre-jumping.
-- A.D. Amorosi
Weekender Wire Services
B.O.B.
“Strange Clouds”
Rating: W W W
'Clouds' full of
collaborations
There’s something refreshingly old-
school about July A.D.’s latest effort “In
Black.” It’s sometimes fuzzy, never pol-
ished and, honestly, the fact that it sounds
like a dusty bootleg found in a record-
store basement is among its biggest
charms.
The Brooklyn band’s sound ranges
from British-Invasion harmonies and
Bon-Scott-ish rasps (“On Your Knees”)
to ’80s hair-metal and garage jams
(“Prism”) on the 10-song album. Lead
track “Remember Love” gives the first
taste of the aforementioned Brit-influen-
ce vocals of Tim McCarthy, most evident
as he delivers the line “always having fun
with all my mates/ boy, are we a sight.”
“I Get A Little Close” features a very
gritty guitar/bass dance while “That’s Not
True” takes a bluesy turn into a smoke-
filled room and features harmonies akin
to a sunny ’60s-era pop group; all of it
totally works, making the song a stand-
out. “The Lonely Night” is like an ’80s
hair-metal slow burner that even features
a few Axl Rose-worthy nasal intonations.
As the airy “What Am I Going To Do”
takes listeners back to Britain, “In Rav-
ens Flight” touches on the best of ’70s
sludge — and ’90s grunge — with a
throaty bass throughout; the song is
another highlight. “Tablets Of Time”
keeps the punk vibe with a chunky riff.
Album closer “Can’t Stop Now” is
heavy, with distorted guitars that lead to
a fantastic solo and McCarthy channeling
classic Ozzy Osbourne.
To say that July A.D. runs the gamut
of sounds on “In Black” is an understate-
ment, and to say that the band wouldn’t
be out of place on classic-rock radio is
not an overstatement; it’s a fact.
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
Keeping the
past alive
July A.D.
“In Black”
Rating: W W W1/2
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Wilkes-Barre
315 Plaza, Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-235-1484
Hazleton
ROUTE 309, Hazle Township, PA
570-861-8161
THE AUTHORITY IN TATTOOING AND BODY PIERCING IN NEPA FOR NEARLY TWO DECADES
NEPATATTOO.COM
DICKSON CITY
749 SCRANTON CARBONDALE HIGHWAY
DICKSON CITY, PA
570-344-4744
ADAMS AVE
342 ADAMS AVE #2
SCRANTON, PA
570-348-0123
4
7
5
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concerts
15TH ANNUAL BRIGGS
FARM BLUESFEST
- July 6-7 at Briggs Farm, Nescopeck
Twp. Main Stage, Fri.: Eddy “The
Chief” Clearwater, Linsey Alexander,
Alexis P. Suter Band, Chris Beard;
Sat.: Bernard Allison, Moreland &
Arbuckle, Butterfield Blues Band,
Rory Block. Back Porch Stage, Fri.:
Lonnie Shields, The CKS Band, Clar-
ence Spady, Mikey Junior, Rare Form;
Sat.: Lonnie Shields, Sarah Ayers,
Michael Packer Sam Lay, Jesse
Lowey, Symphonic Haze. Info/direc-
tions: briggsfarm.com, 570.379.3342.
COVE HAVEN
ENTERTAINMENT RESORTS
1.877.800.5380
www.CPResorts.com
- Mya / Kel: May 27
- Boyz II Men: June 10
- Howie Mandel: July 22
- The Charlie Daniels Band: Sept. 2
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
Phone: 570.826.1100
- Willie Nelson and Family: May 11, 8
p.m., $43-$80
- Tony Bennett: June 2, 8 p.m., $70-
$126
- NEPA Philharmonic Tribute to
Benny Goodman: June 9, 8 p.m.,
$35.50-$73.45
- Zappa Plays Zappa: June 28, 7:30
p.m., $29.50-$75
- Jim Gaffigan: July 26, 7 p.m.
- Celtic Thunder: Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m.
$65-$75
KIWANIS WYOMING
COUNTY FAIR
Rt. 6, Meshoppen
Phone: 570.836.9992
www.wyomingcountyfair.com
- Colt Ford: Sept. 1, 7 p.m.
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe
570.325.0249
mauchchunkoperahouse.com
- Mike Farris: May 11, 8 p.m., $18
- Bennie and the Jets (Elton John
tribute): May 12, 8 p.m., $23
- Pianist Giorgi Latsabidze: May 13,
$20
- The Barr Brothers / Kishi Bashi: May
18, 8 p.m., $17
- Miz: May 19, 8 p.m., $15
- Bill Kirchen / Too Much Fun: May 26,
8 p.m., $23
- The “The Band” Band: June 1, 8 p.m.,
$20
- Cabinet: June 8, 8 p.m., $18 advance,
$20 day of
- Craig Thatcher’s Salute to the
Fillmore: June 9, 8 p.m., $20
- The Peek-A-Boo Revue: June 16, 8:30
p.m., $21
- Leon Redbone: June 22, 8 p.m., $33
- The Felice Brothers: June 23, 8 p.m.,
$25
- US Rails: June 29, 8 p.m., $14
- The Cast of Beatlemania: June 30, 8
p.m., $25
- Sierra Hull / Highway 111: July 7, 8
p.m., $20
- Red Horse: July 21, $25
- Dancin’ Machine: July 20, 8 p.m., $21
- The Persuasions: July 21, 8 p.m., $23
- Solas: July 26, 8 p.m., $28
- Hot Buttered Rum: July 27, 8 p.m.,
$23
- U2Nation: July 28, 8 p.m., $20
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre
Twp.
- WWE Smackdown: May 22, 7 p.m.,
$15-$95
- American Idol Live: Sept. 6, 7 p.m.,
$29.50-$65 (on sale 5/11, 10 a.m.)
- Disney’s Phineas and Ferb: The Best
LIVE Tour Ever: Dec. 2, 2 p.m., 5 p.m.
$26-$60
MOUNT LAUREL PAC
1 Tamiment Road, Tamiment
866.448.7849
mtlaurelpac.com
- The Guess Who: June 8, $37.50-
$67.50, 7 p.m.
- Robert Cray / Little Feat: June 9, 7
p.m., $45.50-$75.50
- Ziggy Marley: June 15, $42.50-
$72.50, 7 p.m.
- Three Dog Night: June 29
- The Fab Four: July 7
- Air Supply: July 13
- The Temptations: July 22, 4 p.m.,
$32.50-$62.50
- Lyle Lovett: July 29
- The Rock ’n’ Blues Fest ft. Johnny
Winter / Edgar Winter / Leslie West /
Rick Derringer / Kim Simmonds: Aug.
19, 6 p.m., $45.50-$75.50
- .38 Special: Aug. 24
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
44 Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono
Phone: 877.682.4791
www.mountairycasino.com
- Voices of Legends w/ Eric Kearns:
May 29, 2 p.m., $20, Gypsies
- Parrot Beach: May 27, 8 p.m., free
- Chippendales: June 9, 8 p.m., $20-
$30
- DJ Kay Jay: June 23, 10 p.m., Gyp-
sies, $10
- Colin Quinn: June 30, 8 p.m., Gyp-
sies, $30-$40
- KC & The Sunshine Band: July 20, 9
p.m., $40-$55
- JWoww from “Jersey Shore:” July
21, 10 p.m., Gypsies, $15
- Collin Raye: Aug. 17, 9 p.m., $20-$30
- Grand Funk Railroad: Aug. 18, 9 p.m.,
$25-$40
NEW VISIONS STUDIO &
GALLERY
201 Vine St., Scranton
570.878.3970
THRU EMAIL
- Terror on the Screen / Those Clever
Foxes / Days in Transit / Ions: May 19,
7:30 p.m. Ages show. $7 at door
- Tigers Jaw / Aglernon Chadwallader
/ tba: May 22, 7-10 p.m. $6 at door
13TH ANNUAL OATS
BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL
Benton Rodeo Grounds (Mendenhall
Lane, Benton)
www.oatsfestival.com, 908.464.9495
- June 28-July 1: Russell Moore & IIIrd
Tyme Out / Gibson Brothers / Valerie
Smith & Liberty Pike / Hillbilly Gyp-
sies / Cumberland River / The Roys /
Stained Grass Window / more. Camp-
ing, food, craft vendors. Workshops,
children’s program, music academy,
open jam tent. Weekend advance/
$70; weekend gate/$80; Thurs. $20;
Fri., Sat. $30; Sun. $10; under 15/free
with adult ticket, pets $10 weekend
only.
PENN’S PEAK
325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe
866.605.7325 or visit pennspeak.com.
- Dennis DeYoung: May 12, 8 p.m.,
$42.75-$48.25
- Dark Star Orchestra (Grateful Dead
tribute): May 31, 8 p.m., $32
- Kansas: June 1, CANCELED
- Nitty Gritty Dirt Band: June 2, 8
p.m., $32
- America: June 8, 8 p.m., $43.75-
$49.25
- Molly Hatchet / Blackfoot / Jimmie
Van Zant: June 9, 8 p.m., $33
- Kellie Pickler: June 14, 8 p.m., $32-
$37
- 7 Bridges (Eagles tribute): June 15, 8
p.m., $25
- The Machine: June 16, 8 p.m. $33-
$38.75
- Steven Wright: June 24, 8 p.m.,
$29-$34
- Foreigner: June 29, 8 p.m., $54.25-
$65.25
- Johnny Winter / Magic Slim & The
Teardrops: June 30, 8 p.m., $33
- Cinderella: July 1, 8 p.m., $38.75
- Arrival (Abba tribute): July 13, 8
p.m., $31-$36.75
- Raymond The Amish Comic: July 14,
8 p.m.
- Yonder Mountain String Band: July
15, 8 p.m.
- Uriah Heep: July 19, 8 p.m.
- Jim Messina: July 20, 8 p.m., $31
- 7 Walkers: July 27, 8 p.m.
- Vince Gill: Aug. 18, 8 p.m., $59.25-
$64.25
PENNSYLVANIA BLUES
FESTIVAL
Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton
610.826.7700
www.skibluemt.com
July 27, 8 p.m.-midnight; July 28, 1
p.m.-1:30 a.m.; July 29, noon-9 p.m.
Fri. main stage: Mikey Junior & The
Stone Cold Blues Band, Sat.: Marquise
Knox, Michael Burks, Big Sam’s Funky
Nation, Joe Louis Walker, Billy Branch
& The Sons of Blues w/ Lurrie Bell,
Carlos Johnson & Demetria Farr. Tent
stage: Dawn Tyler Watson & Paul
Deslauriers, Wallace Coleman, Billy
Branch & Lurrie Bell, Dawn Tyler
Watson & Paul Deslauriers, Wallace
Coleman, Big Sam’s Funky Nation,
Steve Guyger & The Excellos. Sun.
main stage: Naomi Shelton & The
Gospel Queens, Eugene Hideaway
Bridges, Teeny Tucker, Earl Thomas,
Brooks Family Blues Dynasty Ft.
Lonnie, Ronnie & Wayne Baker-
Brooks. Tent stage: Corey Harris, The
Brooks Family Acoustic, Eugene
Hideaway Bridges, Teeny Tucker.
On-site camping, visit website for
ticket prices/info.
POCONOTES LLC
888.800.POCO
www.poconotes.com
- “The Faces and Voices of the Blues”
ft. photos by Jim Gavenus / voice of
Toby Walker: June 8-10, Tripp House
(1011 N. Main Ave., Scranton). Three-
day pass: $35 VIP, $25 GA, $10 stu-
dents/seniors. $5 of tickets benefits
Tripp House preservation.
REDWOOD ART SPACE
740 Jumper Road, Plains Twp.
- Big D and the Kids Table / When
East Meets West / Stag-nation: May
12, 7:30 p.m.
- Ceremony / Screaming Females:
June 11, 7 p.m., $10, all-ages
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
667 N. River St., Plains
Phone: 570.822.2992
- George Wesley Band: May 11, 8 p.m.
- Leroy Justice / Suze: May 12, 8 p.m.
- Mahavishnu Project: May 18, 8 p.m.
- Cabinet: May 19, 8 p.m.
- The Indobox / Higher Organix: May
25, 8 p.m.
SHERMAN THEATER
524 Main St., Stroudsburg
Phone: 570.420.2808, www.sherman-
theater.com
- Howard Hewett / Blue Magic / Ray
Goodman / Brown: May 12, 8 p.m.,
$39.95
- Pinelawn Empire / Timmy Rot /
Obed / Teddy Hazard: May 15, 7 p.m.,
$5
- Horse / Tile: May 26, 7 p.m., $5
- This Good Robot / Refuse the Con-
formity / Twisting Life, more: June 1,
6 p.m., $10
- Survay Says: June 6, 6 p.m.
- David Bromberg: June 8, 8 p.m.,
$35-$45
- Marshall Tucker Band: June 9, 8:30
p.m., $15-$25
- Mayweather: June 19, 6 p.m., $8
- Hot Tuna Electric / Steve Kimock:
June 28, 8 p.m., $25-$40
- Halestorm / New Medicine / Em-
phatic: June 30, 8 p.m., $15 advance,
$17 day of
- 311 / Slightly Stoopid (Sherman
Summer Stage, Pocono Raceway,
Long Pond): July 31, 7 p.m., $49.50
THREE KINGS
603 Route 6, Jermyn
- The Plot in You / Existence / Kill the
Coward: May 14, 6:30 p.m., $12
- WXW Memorial Mayhem: May 19, 6
p.m.
- G. Love & Special Sauce: June 26,
8:30 p.m., $20 advance, $22 day of
TOYOTA PAVILION AT
MONTAGE MOUNTAIN
1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scran-
ton
- Megadeth / Rob Zombie / Lacuna
Coil: May 12, 7 p.m., $44-$65.50
- Dave Matthews Band: May 28, 7
p.m., $53.35-$89.90
- ZZ Top / 3 Doors Down / The Ben
Miller Band: May 30, 7 p.m., $40
- Miranda Lambert / Little Big Town /
Thomas Rhett: July 7, 7:30 p.m.,
$36.50-$60.10
- Vans Warped Tour ft. Taking Back
Sunday / New Found Glory / Motion-
less In White, more: July 18, noon,
$37.50
- Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem
Festival ft. Motorhead / Slayer /
Slipknot / As I Lay Dying / The Devil
Wears Prada / Asking Alexandria,
more: Aug. 4, $42-$74.50
- The Peach Music Festival ft. Allman
Brothers Band / Zac Brown Band /
Tedeschi Trucks Band / Warren
Haynes Band / O.A.R. /Cabinet / Miz,
more: Aug. 10-12, $99-$225
- Kiss / Motley Crue: Sept. 18, 7 p.m.,
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UNDER THE STARS
SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL
Wells Fargo Amphitheatre at Miser-
icordia University, Dallas.
Phone: 570.674.6719
www.misericordia.edu/theartsand-
more
- Neil Sedaka: July 27, 8 p.m. Tables
of 6/$420, amphitheater tickets/$45,
lawn seats/$30.
- Jazz in July concert feat. Midiri
Brothers Septet: July 9, 8 p.m. Tables
of 6/$120, amphitheater tickets/$15,
lawn seats/$8.
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
3421 Willow St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.LOVE.222
- Ingrid Michaelson: May 12, 8:30 p.m.
- Esperanza Spalding: May 13, 8 p.m.
- Thrice: May 25, 8 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE
TLA
334 South St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.922.1011
- Fear Factory / Shadows Fall, more:
May 10, 6 p.m.
- Spiritualized: May 11, 8 p.m.
- Mark Lanegan: May 12, 7 p.m.
- The Used / Stars In Stereo: May 15,
6:30 p.m.
- Yo Gotti / Gillie Da Kid / Zed Zilla:
May 16, 7 p.m.
- Meshuggah / Baroness / Decapitat-
ed: May 18, 7 p.m.
- Justin Townes Earle / Tristen: May
19, 8 p.m.
KESWICK THEATER
Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glenside,
Pa.
Phone: 215.572.7650
- Trailer Park Boys: May 9, 7:30 p.m.
- The Temptations / The Four Tops:
May 10, 8 p.m.
- Steve Tyrell: May 13, 7:30 p.m.
- Leann Rimes: May 18, 8 p.m.
- Tracy Morgan: May 19, 8 p.m.
TOWER THEATER
69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby
Phone: 610.352.2887
- Edward Sharpe / The Magnetic
Zeros: May 11, 8 p.m.
- Regina Spektor / Only Son: May 12, 8
p.m.
- Hall and Oates: May 19, 7 p.m.
TROCADERO
10th & Arch St, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.2000
- The 74s / Taking The Chance, more:
May 11, 6:30 p.m.
- Mickey Avalon: May 12, 8 p.m.
- Reggie Watts: May 19, 8 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK
CENTER
1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ.
Phone: 609.365.1300
- Lady Antebellum / Darius Rucker /
Thompson Square: May 19, 7 p.m.
- Godsmack / Shinedown / Slash,
more: May 20, noon
WELLS FARGO CENTER
Broad St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.3600
- Red Hot Chili Peppers / Sleigh Bells:
May 11, 8 p.m.
- Q102 Springle Ball ft. Cody Simpson
/ Adam Lambert / Hot Chelle Rae /
Flo Rida, more: May 22, 6 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
BRYCE JORDAN CENTER
Penn State University, State College,
Pa.
Phone: 814.865.5555
- Riverdance: May 31, 7:30 p.m.
CROCODILE ROCK
520 Hamilton St, Allentown
Phone: 610.434.460
- (hed) P.E. / Mushroomhead / Amer-
ican Head Charge / Corvus / Tenafly
Viper: May 16, 7:30 p.m., $13 advance,
$15 day of
GIANT CENTER
950 Hersheypark Dr., Hershey
Phone: 717.534.3911
- WWE Smackdown: May 15, 7 p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEM
77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem
Phone:
- Incubus: May 16, 8:30 p.m.
- The Beach Boys: May 17, 8 p.m.
- Glenn Fry: May 18, 8 p.m.
- Alan Jackson: May 19, 8 p.m.
- Blink-182: May 20, 7:30 p.m.
- Flogging Molly: May 24, 8 p.m.
- Melissa Etheridge: May 26, 8 p.m.
- Paul Anka: May 27, 8 p.m.
- NBC Fight Night @ The Sands: June
1, 6:30 p.m.
- Gavin DeGraw / Colbie Caillat: June
5, 7 p.m.
- Michael Bolton: June 6, 7 p.m.
- Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo: June 8,
8 p.m.
- Loretta Lynn: June 9, 7 p.m.
- Queen Extravaganza: June 10, 8 p.m.
- Kenny G: June 21, 8 p.m.
- Crosby, Stills & Nash: June 24, 7:30
p.m.
- Styx / Ted Nugent: June 29, 8 p.m.
- Alice Cooper: July 1, 8 p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
222 Market St., Harrisburg
Phone: 717.214.ARTS
- David Sanborn / Brian Culbertson:
June 30, 8 p.m.
NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY
BEACON THEATER
2124 Broadway, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.496.7070
- Beach Boys: May 9, 8 p.m.
- The Whispers / Valerie Simpson:
May 19, 8 p.m.
BETHEL WOODS CENTER
Bethel NY
www.bethelwoodscenter.org
- Suzanne Vega: May 13, 7:30 p.m.
- Navah Perlman: June 9, 7:30 p.m.
- Lady Antebellum / Darius Rucker /
Thompson Square: June 13, 7 p.m.
BROOME COUNTY ARENA
1 Stuart Street, Binghamton, NY
Phone: 670.778.6626
- TSO Beethoven’s Last Night: May 10,
7:30 p.m.
- Staind / Godsmack: May 13, 6:30 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT IRVING
PLAZA
17 Irving Place, New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Star Slinger: May 9, 7 p.m.
- Lotus: May 10-11, 7 p.m.
- Behemoth / Waitan: May 12, 6:30
p.m.
- Steel Panther: May 16, 7 p.m.
- Collective Soul: May 18, 7 p.m.
- 2 Skinnee J’s: May 19, 8 p.m.
ROSELAND BALLROOM
239 52nd Street, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic
Zeros / Fool’s Gold: May 9, 9 p.m.
- Flux Pavilion, more: May 10, 8 p.m.
BORGATA HOTEL AND
CASINO
Atlantic City, NJ
Phone:1.866.MYBORGATA.com
- Florence and The Machine: May 12, 8
p.m.
- Beach Boys: May 19, 8 p.m.
W
compiled by Nikki M. Mascali,
Weekender Editor
TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO
Good times
Willie Nelson and his Family Band will return to the area for a
show on Friday, May 11 at 8 p.m. at the F.M. Kirby Center (71
Public Square, Wilkes-Barre).
The singer/songwriter’s career has spanned six decades, and
he’s got the musical catalog to prove it. Nelson is also known for
his activism, as he lobbies against horse slaughter and was a
co-founder of Farm Aid, an annual concert and organization
aiming to raise awareness and funds to keep farm families on
their land.
Tickets are $43-$80 and are available through Ticketmaster or
by calling the venue at 570.826.1100.
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Wednesday:
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Brews Brothers West: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Hops & Barleys: Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Karaoke
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Open Mic Comedy Night & DJ EFX
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Rox 52: Open mic comedy night hosted by Mike Grady
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Hard Drive w/ Singles Night
Stan’s Caféé: Open Mic Night w/ Kyle Lucarnio
Woodlands: Streamside/Summer Deck Party w/ DJ Godfather
V-Spot: Eric Rudy Acoustic
Thursday:
Bar on Oak: The Tones
Bart & Urby’s: The Still Hand String Band
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Battle of the Bands Semi-Finals
Chacko’s: Bike Night w/ Kartune
Liam’s: Rahboo, Robb Brown & Jimmy Gee
My Lower End: Lee Strumski
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke
River Grille: DJ Tonez
River Street Jazz Caféé: The Blind Owl Band
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Free Pool, Karaoke
Rox 52: Beer Pong
Rum Runnerz, Dunmore: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: DJ K Mak
Woodlands: DJ Data & Red Bull Ron (Club HD)
V-Spot: Jackson Vee Acoustic
Friday:
Bar on Oak: Jeffery James Band
Bart & Urby’s: Free Jukebox
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Y.M.I.
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country night w/ DJ Crocket
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Classic Rock Express
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: John Smith
Hops & Barleys: Indoor summer deck party
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: DJ Liz
Liam’s: DJ Freddie Fabbri
My Lower End: DJ Phil
Ole Tyme Charley’s: This Time Around
Other Side Bar: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
River Street Jazz Caféé: George Wesley Exodus – tribute to Bob
Marley
Rob’s Pub & Grub: DJ Dance Party w/ DJ Dang
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Senunas’: Lemongelli
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Extract Dance Party
Sloppy Joe’s: Mr. Echo
Stan’s Caféé: 20LB. Head
Tommyboy’s Bar & Grill: Woods Duo 5:30-7:30 then later Eddy &
the Dreamers
Woodlands: (Evolution) DJ Kev, DJ Davey B, Nowhere Slow, Happy
Hour Deck Party, The Band Jax
V-Spot: The Curse of Sorrow w/ Special Guest RokBox
Saturday:
Bar on Oak: Iron Cowboy 200
th
show
Bart & Urby’s: The Band Jax
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: UUU
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Dance Party w/ DJ Mike Riley
The Getaway Lounge: 1 Year Anniversary Party w/ Bad Hair Day
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Oldies Karaoke
Liam’s: Chillin’ in Public
Micky Gannons, Scranton: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
My Lower End: Exitt Sixx
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karoake & Rage! DJ’s
OverPour: Free Jukebox
River Grille: DJ Ooh Wee
River Street Jazz Caféé: Leroy Justice & SUZE
Rob’s Pub & Grub: DJ Diablo
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Senunas’: DJ Hersh
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Jam and Beer Pong
Stan’s Caféé: Shitz n Gigglez
Surf Club: Mr. Echo
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Bobby Williams CD release party
Woodlands: (Evolution) DJ Kev, Exclusive & Soul Revival
V-Spot: Category 5
Sunday:
Banko’s: Mr. Echo
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Robb Brown
Carey’s Pub: DJ Santiago & Karaoke
The Getaway Lounge: Ronnie Williams w/ Adam Ditroia Sturgis
Party
River Street Jazz Caféé: Mothers Day Dinner w/ jazz music by
Angelo & Justin
Stan’s Caféé: Free Jukebox 7-11
Woodlands: The Tones w/ DJ Godfather
V-Spot: Gong Karaoke
Monday:
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Unplugged Monday - Open Mic
River Grille: Bean Bag Toss Tournaments
Rob’s Pub & Grub: NEPA Beer Pong
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin
Grotto, Harvey’s Lake: Sperazza Duo
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Huns’ West Side Caféé: AJ Jump and Dustin Drevitch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke & DJ Fiyawerx
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Free Jukebox, Free Pool
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Linda
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night
The Woodlands: Karaoke – DJ Godfather
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ENTERTAINMENT STARTS AT 8:30 ON FRI
Tuesday, May 15th
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Friday, May 11th
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GROTTO PIZZA OUTSIDE THE WYOMING VALLEY MALL
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Friday, May 11th
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MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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I have had cows in my SUV,
I have had sheep in my SUV.
I’ve had goats in my SUV. I
have had chickens in my SUV. I
mean, you name it. Pigs galore,”
Indraloka Animal Sanctuary
founder Indra Lahiri said, laugh-
ing. “So a truck obviously gives
us the ability to take the next
step, which is to get a proper
trailer and move animals in a way
in which we can do it more safely
and more comfortably and, obvi-
ously, do it more often.”
Enter the Toyota 100 Cars for
Good program, an initiative that
awards 100 vehicles to 100 non-
profit organizations over the
course of 100 days. Lahiri ap-
plied to the program on a whim,
and Indraloka was selected as a
finalist from more than 4,000
entries.
Beginning Monday, May 14,
five finalists will be profiled
daily at 100carsforgood.com, and
from those five, one will be
chosen by voters to receive a new
set of wheels. The Mehoopany-
based sanctuary will be up for
consideration Thursday, June 7
from10 a.m. to midnight, and
Lahiri has even gone so far as to
set up a causes.com site that can
be found through the sanctuary’s
Facebook page where you can
pledge your vote, and you’ll be
sent a reminder the day of.
In addition to actually trans-
porting animals, which are often
“coming from rescue groups,
humane societies, SPCAs or
humane police officers that call
us,” the sanctuary could use the
Toyota Tundra they’ve chosen for
a number of other things.
“We get over 1,500 pounds of
animal feed a week, and we need
to transport that,” Lahiri said.
“We go through over 2,000,
sometimes 2,500 bales of hay in
a year … We have some wonder-
ful grocery stores, for example
the Luzerne County Gerrity’s is
very generous about donating
vegetables for the animals to
enjoy, and that’s another thing
that we would be able to trans-
port in much larger quantities if
we had the truck.”
The sanctuary, founded in
2005, hasn’t been able to afford
to purchase an appropriate vehi-
cle because a lot of its funding,
which comes only from dona-
tions, is allocated for taking care
of its more than 150 special-
needs animals. Those animals
include cows, horses, goats,
ducks, cats, dogs and even a
peacock that live out their lives at
Indraloka.
“Even just taking care of their
vet bills and their special-care
needs, supplements or things like
that, and just feeding them, it
adds up,” Lahiri shared.
Johnny Braz has volunteered at
the sanctuary for about a year
and a half. As a filmmaker, he
originally signed on to help with
a film project aimed at raising
awareness and funds, and he now
spends part of almost every day
at Indraloka.
“(The animals) come here and
are healed,” he shared. “And then
people come who are kind of
wounded, and the animals heal
them. So it’s really mesmerizing
to watch this whole process, for
me personally.”
The idea of healing and caring
for not only the animals but also
the visitors is no accident. In-
draloka is a Sanskrit word mean-
ing “heaven for the gods.”
“It kind of underscores what
we do here, because we do be-
lieve that every life is sacred,
humans and other animals as
well,” Lahiri said. “And we want
to create a heaven on earth for all
species, and that includes the
humans who come and volunteer
and visit as well as every animal,
and that’s really what we strive to
do.” W
Toyota 100 Cars for Good:
Voting for Indraloka Animal
Sanctuary June 7, 10 a.m.-
midnight, 100carsforgood.com.
To volunteer/donate: PO Box
155, Mehoopany, PA, 18629;
570.763.2908. Visitors wel-
come, call for appointment.
The long haul
Local sanctuary provides refuge for animals,
hopes to win truck from Toyota
This peacock is one of the more than 150 special-needs animals living at Indraloka
Animal Sanctuary in Mehoopany. The sanctuary is in the running to win a Toyota
Tundra — but it needs the public to vote on Thursday, June 7.
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
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L
eroy Justice is a band that’s
made a name for itself after
about nine years of being
together by offering gritty, tight
roots rock with an emphasis on
innovation. Though originality
will still be the name of the game
with the quintet’s upcoming third
studio album, the band is work-
ing on pushing the envelope even
more.
“The older stuff is more South-
ern-rock based, whereas the
newer stuff, we’re trying out
different studio tricks and differ-
ent production techniques,” ex-
plained guitarist Justin Mazer.
“We’re trying to be as different
and as creative as possible, put-
ting all our heads together and
just trying to be different from
what else is going on in main-
stream music.”
The band will spend the sum-
mer recording with hopes for a
fall release. In the meantime,
Leroy Justice has been consis-
tently playing shows, including in
New York City and Colorado,
and just finished a three-day run
with the North Mississippi All-
stars.
The band hasn’t played many
local shows recently, which is
surprising given the fact that
Mazer, drummer Josh Karis and
lead singer/guitarist Jason Gal-
lagher are all NEPA natives. But
they’ll alleviate that problem
when they perform at the River
Street Jazz Cafe in Plains Twp.
Saturday, May 12.
“You know, it’s funny because
they’ve been a band for so long,
and even with me in the group
now, we don’t do a lot of shows
in the Wilkes-Barre area,” said
Mazer, who officially became a
member in September. “And
honestly, it’s just like somewhat
of a homecoming show for us, I
think.”
Mazer and Karis still live in
the area, but Gallagh-
er, along with bassist
Bradley Wegner and
keys player Sloan
Marshall, call Man-
hattan home.
“We also have a
studio here that we
rehearse and record
in,” Mazer said. “So
we’re in Wilkes-
Barre quite a bit.”
Recording and
rehearsing is a proc-
ess that, according to
Mazer, is a group
effort.
“Jason’s the chief songwriter,”
he began, “but basically he’ll
come in with an idea, and then
we’ll all kind of donate our parts
and hopefully come up with a
cool finished product.”
The result of that hard work —
the live show — is the bedrock of
Leroy Justice’s vintage yet con-
temporary sound and show-
manship.
“Definitely that’s the strong
point of our foundation,” Mazer
said. “High energy, very, very,
very loud. Excruciatingly loud,
but still enjoyable.”
That live-show energy and the
band’s roots are two things it’s
not likely to leave behind, no
matter how much it experiments.
“I mean, we’re certainly not
trying to reinvent the wheel,
we’re a rock band through and
through,” Mazer shared. “But
we’re trying to write songs and
do some different things, and we
like to leave a lot of room for
surprises and interpretation.” W
Leroy Justice / Suze: Sat., May
12, 8 p.m., River Street Jazz
Cafe (667 N. River St., Plains).
Info: 570.822.2992
Open for interpretation
Leroy Justice has roots in New York City and NEPA.
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
PHOTO BY CORY SCHWARTZ
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theweekender.com
weekender
760 N. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre • 822-2154
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movie review
M
ost contemporary block-
busters can be described
as “sense-obliterating” or
“serious-minded.” “The Aven-
gers,” director/writer Joss Whe-
don’s unabashed piece of sum-
mer fun, doesn’t fit into either
box. Thank God.
Uniting the Marvel heroes
from several summer’s worth of
event movies requires an event of
apocalyptic proportions. In this
case, the evil Loki (Tom Hiddles-
ton) has found his way to Earth.
Through a combination of
strength and mental manipula-
tion, he absconds with the Tesse-
ract, a glowing, powerful cube
last seen in “Captain America:
The First Avenger.” This will
allow Loki to dispatch an army
of gnarly-looking soldiers to
assist in his freedom-smashing
cause.
With global war imminent,
S.H.I.E.L.D., that friendly, in-
ternational shadow agency, has to
pull out all the stops. Its eye-
patch sporting, gun-wielding
honcho Nick Fury (Samuel L.
Jackson) summons a crew of
peacekeepers: Black Widow
(Scarlett Johansson), Iron Man
(Robert Downey Jr.), Captain
America (Chris Evans) and The
Hulk (Mark Ruffalo). Thor
(Chris Hemsworth), Loki’s broth-
er, drops in a little later.
My biggest fear with “The
Avengers” is that it would be-
come an exercise in excess, a
superhero buffet where quantity
rules. Here’s Thor’s ass-kicking
sequence. Explosion! Now, here’s
Iron Man with a pithy comment.
And scene! Whedon’s commit-
ment to giving us a good time is
thorough. Characters serve a
purpose, not contractual obliga-
tions or fanboy desires. Iron Man
and Captain America hate each
other because they represent
different values. In and out of his
metal suit, Tony Stark is all flash
and constant progress. The a-
nachronistic Cap represents
selflessness and leadership, qual-
ities Stark finds hokey and obso-
lete — and lacks. Thor is the big
brother a jealous Loki can never
surpass. Black Widow brings a
sexy poker face — she’s clearly
fond of her colleague in chaos
(played by Jeremy Renner) —
but her job requires emotional
distance. Who better than Jo-
hansson, so sultry and full-bod-
ied (pun fully intended) in
“Match Point,” for this kind of
work?
Hulk, as always, is Chernobyl
in torn pants — a CGI plaything,
but a very limited one. In a bril-
liant stroke, Whedon (the man
behind TV’s “Buffy the Vampire
Slayer”) uses the green menace’s
strength as comic punctuation.
Hulk throws Loki like a rag doll
when the aspiring dictator deliv-
ers another eye-rolling speech
and punches Thor when the
action subsides. Little things play
a big role in “The Avengers.”
Like Bruce Banner, Hulk’s calm
alter ego, entering the climatic
battle scene on a sputtering mo-
torcycle. Or Hiddleston playing
Loki with such sniveling, self-
serious glee — Whedon saddles
the character with a modus op-
erandi inspired by a freshman
philosophy major — that we can
hate him and not think about
Sept. 11, 2001. Or having a seri-
ous scene at S.H.I.E.L.D.’s super-
modern headquarters conclude
with an office drone covertly
playing an old-school video
game on his workstation.
Look, it’s a given that the spe-
cial effects in $220-million mo-
vies will dazzle us (unless it’s
“John Carter”). That’s a big rea-
son why we pay a lot of money to
stare at a giant screen. It becomes
a pointless exercise if all we get
is spectacle: There’s a good rea-
son why firework shows don’t
last for two hours. Blockbusters,
starting with “Spider-Man 2”,
have gotten more thoughtful,
sometimes too much. Whedon
entertains us straight up — ex-
pertly, relentlessly — without
artifice or agenda. Let directors
mimic that for a while.
Read more of Pete’s cinematic
musings on whatpeteswatching.
blogspot.com or follow
@PeteCroatto.
Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) and Captain America (Chris Evans) unite in ‘The
Avengers’ — much to their chagrin.
By Pete Croatto
Weekender Correspondent
Assembled
ensemble amazes
Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo) unleashes his other half,
The Hulk.
reel attractions
We don’t remember the board game being
that exciting. Hell hath no fury like a centuries-old witch …
Opening this week:
“Dark Shadows”
Coming next week:
“The Dictator”
“Battleship”
“What to Expect When You’re Expecting”
Rating: W W W W
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but then again ...
By Jim Rising
Weekender Correspondent
I
f you have an e-mail account
or three (if you don’t, have
you checked for a pulse late-
ly?) then you have received
countless amounts of spam. No
doubt you have gotten what some
refer to as the Nigerian Letter,
aka the 419 fraud, Nigerian scam,
Nigerian bank scam or Nigerian
money offer. That’s the one
where you get a solicitation to
aid someone, a prince or a barris-
ter or something like that, in
getting some money or gold out
of Nigeria and into the U.S.
where you can have a piece of it.
Of course, the catch is you have
to pony up some up-front cash to
make the deal work. And if you
do, that is the last you will see of
your dough.
It’s known as an advance-fee
fraud, a confidence trick that has
been around for as long as there
has been a sucker born and one
born to take him. I bring this up
because three Nigerian men were
sentenced to prison time and
restitution last week for their
involvement in schemes that have
targeted thousands of Pennsylva-
nians from York County and
elsewhere. These unarmed ban-
dits took more than $13.5 million
dollars from1,056 greedy Penn-
sylvanians. Wait. Did I say
greedy Pennsylvanians? Yep.
These scams only work if
the scamee, aka the sucker,
thinks they will gain
something. Something
worth sending men like
these enterprising Niger-
ians some hard-earned
cash. I am reminded of the tale of
the scorpion and the turtle. The
one that ends with, “You knew
what I was when you picked me
up.”
You have to wonder at the level
of either stupidity or greed in-
volved here. Enough Pa. citizens
to pretty much sellout the F.M.
Kirby Center got taken. The ones
we know about, anyway.
The fraud landed the men in
the jailhouse and, here’s the
laughable part if it wasn’t so sad,
they have been ordered to make
$2 million in restitutions. If you
are waiting on that money, I have
a bridge in Brooklyn you may be
interested in. But that’s another
scam. W
Reach Jim at
jmrising@comcast.net.
Even more rants are on
his blog at
jamesrising.com.
Scammed
by spam
Remember this face if you get a spam e-mail asking for
help — and money.
It’s known as an
advance-fee fraud,
a confidence trick
that has been
around for as long
as there has been
a sucker born
and one born
to take him.
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E L E C T R I C C
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R E S T A U R A N T W E E K
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RIBS
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
Ron Skamanich of Duryea with actor
George C. Scott during the filming
of the movie ’Taps’ in 1981.
ralphie report
the
By Ralphie Aversa
Special to the Weekender
B
efore One Direction
and The Wanted, before
’N Sync, The Back-
street Boys and 98 Degrees,
there was New Kids on the
Block. The music between the
aforementioned acts spans
three decades, and New Kids
singer Donnie Wahlberg is
happy the genre has exhibited
staying power.
“In some ways, (One Direc-
tion and The Wanted) validate
us,” the NKOTB star told me
via telephone. “And I think
our reunion has validated us
in many ways as well. The
fans that grew up with us
came back.”
Wahlberg speaks proudly on
not just his group’s return, but
also the new generation of
fans that have new music to
grow up with.
“I think there’s a place in
society for all different types
of music,” he explained. “I’m
glad that the young bands are
coming out now and doing
well because I think it vali-
dates what we did 25 years
ago.”
Generations will collide
Aug. 17-18 in Hershey when
New Kids on the Block, The
Backstreet Boys, The Wanted,
Kelly Clarkson, LL Cool J
and more converge on Her-
sheypark Stadium for the
inaugural “Summer MixTape
Fest.”
At 42, it’s easy for Wahl-
berg to reminisce on the path
his group helped blaze given
New Kids’ past success. The
trip down memory lane be-
comes a little sweeter, though,
when you factor in the
group’s current run, which has
lasted since 2008 and brought
the band to new destinations
that none of them thought
were possible.
“It’s a really humbling expe-
rience; it’s been an amazing
journey,” Wahlberg, who turns
43 the first day of the festiv-
al, said. “(The reunion) sort
of turned a 19-20 year old
sort of college-age experience
that I look back on fondly in
to a very mature and different
experience now.”
The experience continues to
play out, as New Kids will
tour across five continents in
2012. The performance on
Aug. 17 will be the group’s
first solo set in America in
more than two years. The
following night, NKOTBSB
reunites for the super-band’s
only North American perform-
ance of the year.
“We want to pull out some
new stuff that we weren’t able
to fit in to the big NKOTBSB
tour,” Wahlberg revealed.
“We’re gonna pull out some
new stuff and do some things
that the fans haven’t gotten to
see.”
Most fans, sans those that
happened to catch one partic-
ular performance inside Los
Angeles’ Staples Center,
haven’t seen NKOTBSB per-
form with Kevin Richardson.
Wahlberg noted that they’re
expecting the newly reunited
Backstreet Boy on stage in
Hershey. W
Listen to “The Ralphie
Radio Show” weeknights from
7 p.m.-midnight on 97 BHT.
Donnie Wahlberg of NKOTB looks back — and forward
while talking with Ralphie.
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theater listings
ACTORS CIRCLE AT
PROVIDENCE PLAYHOUSE
(1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reser-
vations: 570.342.9707, actorscir-
cle.org)
• “’Night Mother:” May 10-13, 18-20; 8
p.m. Thurs.-Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. $12/GA,
$10/seniors, $8/students. Discount
tickets preview night May 10, $8/GA,
seniors; $6/students.
APPLAUSE THEATRE
CO.
(applausetheatre.webs.com,
applausetheatre@gmail.com)
• “Diva-Alive and Kicking”
Fundraiser: May 11-12, Good
Shepherd (1780 N. Wash-
ington Ave., Scranton).
$30, pre-sale only.
Details on Facebook or
website. Info: 570.430.1149,
do not call church.
BLOOMSBURG
THEATRE ENSEMBLE
(Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center
St., Bloomsburg, 570.784.8181,
800.282.0283, bte.org)
Ticket prices: $9-$25
• “In the Next Room, or The Vibrator
Play:” through May 20, parental
discretion advised.
HIGHWIRE THEATRE
SCHOOL
(570.947.3484, HighwireTheatreS-
chool@gmail.com)
• Acting Classes: Wed., Fri., May
9-June 29, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Holy Ros-
ary School (312 William St., Scranton).
• Voice and Speech Workshop: May
9, 16, 23, 7-9 p.m.; May 12, 26, 1-5 p.m.,
4:30-6:30 p.m., Holy Rosary School
(312 William St., Scranton).
JASON MILLER
PLAYWRIGHTS’ PROJECT
(570.344.3656, SubVerseAphrodesia-
.com, nepaplaywrights@live.com)
• Dyonisia ’12 2nd Annual Jason
Miller Playwrights’ Project Invitation-
al Call for Proposals: Apocalypse
theme. One-page, 5-15-minute play, or
multimedia performance pieces
and/or theatrical projects with social
media platforms. Deadline May 20.
Microsoft Word/.pdf format, e-mail
attachment. Include: Name of author,
city, working title, character list (4),
plot synopsis, setting, notes re:
style/genre. Dates in Sept.
THE LAKESIDE PLAYERS
(Lakeville Community Hall, Route
590, Lakeville, across from Caesars
Cove Haven, 570.226.6207, lakesi-
deplayers.net)
• “2 Across:” May 11-13, 18-20; 7:30
p.m. Fri.-Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. $12; $10 for
groups of 10+.
MUSIC BOX PLAYERS
(196 Hughes St., Swoyersville:
570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY or
musicbox.org)
• Enrollment open for Music Box
Theatre Academy: Sessions begin
May 14. Musical theater workshop for
ages 13-20. $275. Perform June 15-17.
Learn techniques in acting, singing,
dancing. Call for enrollment forms.
• Auditions for “Fame Jr.:” May 17,
20, 6:30 p.m. Ages 12-20. Bring CD or
iPod w/karaoke track of song of
choice. Will be asked to read from
script. Performances in June.
• Musical “The Wizard of Oz:” May 18,
6 p.m., May 19, 1, 5 p.m., May 20, 1 p.m.
$12, includes McDonald’s Fun Meal.
• Auditions for “Avenue Q:” May 21,
23, 6:30 p.m. All roles open, ages
14-35. Bring sheet music of song of
choice. Accompanist provided. Par-
ticular emphasis on performers of
African American and Asian descent.
Performances in July.
PENNSYLVANIA THEATER
FOR PERFORMING ARTS
(JJ Ferrara Center, 212 W. Broad St.,
Hazleton, 570.454.5451, ptpash-
ows.org)
• “Steel Magnolias:” May 10-12, 7
p.m.; May 13, 3 p.m. Dinner buffet 90
min. before show. Show only: $16
adults, $14 seniors/students 12+, $10
under 12. Dinner/show: $32 adults,
$28 seniors/students, $20 children.
Discounts available.
THE PHOENIX
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
(409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenix-
pac.vpweb.com, phoenix-
pac08@aol.com)
• “Rent:” May 11, 8 p.m.,
May 12, 8 p.m. $12 ($1/every
ticket to benefit Red Cross
AIDS Awareness and
Prevention). For
mature audiences.
Reservations recom-
mended, call.
• Auditions for “Fosse”
the musical: May 19, 10
a.m.-noon, May 20, 5-7 p.m.
Ages 10-19. Short song to
show range and dance shoes,
jazz, ballet, tap (tap optional)
.Will be asked to perform dance
combinations and sing. Shows in
Aug.
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton)
• Ballet Theatre of Scranton’s “Snow
White and the Seven Dwarfs:” May 9,
7 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center (420
N. Washington Ave.), $20.90-$24.
SHAWNEE PLAYHOUSE
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplay-
house.com)
• “Lion in Winter:” May 13, 2 p.m.;
May 11-12, 8 p.m. $18/adults, $15/se-
niors, $10/children.
❏ Auditions:
• “High School Musical Jr.” and
“Aladdin Jr.:” May 12, 10 a.m.-noon,
Shawnee Playhouse. 18 years and
younger. Be prepared to sing 16 bars
of a song, CD player available. Bring
headshot/resume. W
-- compiled by Stephanie
DeBalko, Weekender Staff
Writer
Send your listings to:
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market Street
Wilkes-Barre PA18703 or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline for
publication is Mondays at 2 p.m.
novel approach
W
hether it’s thanks to a
sick sense of humor or
a genuine curiosity, the
title of Adam Marek’s “Instruc-
tion Manual for Swallowing”
easily grabs the attention of
potential readers. But what
keeps them interested is his
follow-through: He doesn’t just
lure a reader in with a punchy
title and then fall flat with his
fables. Instead, Marek delivers
bizarre, sometimes morbid
yarns that explore the depths of
the human experience while
offering up fantastically strange
scenarios.
“Instruction Manual for Swal-
lowing” is the new North Amer-
ican edition of Marek’s short
stories that includes two bonus
stories and an interview with the
author. The book wastes no time
getting off on the right foot,
opening with the absurd “The
Forty-Litre Monkey,” the title of
which pretty much sums up the
story.
“Belly Full of Rain” follows
suit with a tale about a couple
who finds out they’re expecting
37 babies. Instead of terminat-
ing the pregnancy, they discover
a doctor who finds a way to
expand the wife’s stomach and
allows the babies to be brought
to term. The utterly grotesque
scene Marek conjures calls to
mind aspects of Franz Kafka’s
1915 novel “The Metamorpho-
sis,” in which a man wakes up to
find himself turning into a giant
insect-like creature.
This isn’t the only time Marek
evokes that comparison, one
many of us would have buried
after high school or college
literature classes. In “The Centi-
pede’s Wife,” a giant speaking
centipede takes in a wounded
man, all the while thinking
about how much he wants to eat
him; the association there is
probably pretty clear.
But Marek doesn’t always go
for the completely odd. He also
includes a story about a man on
the verge of cheating who sud-
denly becomes violently ill and
one about a cat looking for help
for its hidden kittens.
In “Instruction Manual,” some
vignettes have benign characters
and bizarre plots while some are
the other way around, but all of
them center on the theme of the
human experience, almost exag-
gerating the problems everyone
faces at some point or another.
Relationships are also at the
heart of the book, as are the
strange things that sometimes
flit across your brain as you
allow your mind to wander.
What if there was someone
controlling the functions of our
bodies? In the title story, that
someone is Busta Rhymes.
Marek invites the reader into a
world of total whimsy, one
where the grotesque becomes
commonplace and normalcy
becomes relative. His final in-
stallment in the book, “Meaty’s
Boys,” is a narrative about a
restaurant catering to feeble
zombies, and it intertwines the
horrific notion of murder with
the touching sentiment of love.
It is so well written that when
it’s over, it’s hard not to release
an audible sigh of relief.
Morbidly fun
'Manual'
“Instruction Manual for
Swallowing”
by Adam Marek
Rating: W W W W W
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
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570 Union St., Luzerne • 570-283-9382 • Formerly Exit 6
inside the Luzerne shopping center - between Allstate and Big Lots
ONLY 1 MIN
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SUNDAY
TUESDAY
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FREE PIZZA ON US WHEN YOU RESERVE ONE OF OUR GINORMOUS TABLES (UP TO 20 PPL) FOR
YOUR BIRTHDAY/BACHELORETTE PARTY! CALL 570-283-9382 FOR INFO
$1.50 MILLER LITE
PINTS 9-11 P.M.
35¢ WINGS
$4.99 DOZ. CLAMS EVERY THURSDAY
$1 DOM DRAFTS
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$2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES
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PINNACLE WHIPPED VODKA
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$1.50 DOM. PINTS
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$3 IMPORT BTLS.
OPEN @ 3PM
HAPPY HOUR 5-7 P.M.
35¢ WINGS $4.50 1/2 TRAY
$8 FULLTRAY PIZZA $2 BOTTLES. 9-11PM
AJ JUMP &
DUSTIN DREVITCH
$2 MILLER LITE BTLS.
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C
hloe Grace Moretz is only
15 but you’d never know it
by talking to her. Poised
and self-confident, the actress
can already boast of having
worked with a handful of world-
class filmmakers, including
Matthew Vaughn (“Kick-Ass”),
Michael Bay (“The Amityville
Horror”), Martin Scorsese (“Hu-
go”) and Tim Burton (“Dark
Shadows”).
And there’s more to come. In
fact, Moretz is juggling so many
upcoming projects that she re-
cently snagged the Female Star
of Tomorrow prize from the
National Association of Theater
Owners. It’s an honor she can
add to a pile of trophies she’s
already won, including a pair of
MTV Movie Awards for Best
Breakout Star and Biggest Ba-
dass Star for “Kick-Ass.”
A native of Atlanta, Moretz
has been working since she was
5, but she’s managed to avoid
the pitfalls of most child stars.
This is an actress who’s never
encountered a challenge she
couldn’t meet, even if it meant
playing a centuries-old vampire
disguised as a tweener in “Let
Me In” or portraying a foul-
mouthed assassin who thinks
nothing of leaving a trail of
bodies in her wake in “Kick-
Ass.”
Given Moretz’s penchant for
playing misfits, outcasts and
orphans, it’s something of shock
to encounter her in Tim Burton’s
“Dark Shadows” embodying a
stereotypical rebellious teenager.
As Carolyn Stoddard, Moretz
has one goal in mind: To get out
from under her family’s control,
head to New York City and be
the person she wants to be.
“Carolyn’s this troubled young
teen who’s struggling to handle
all that’s going on in her life,”
says Moretz via phone from Los
Angeles. “She has a lot more
going on under the surface than
you’d ever imagine.”
Burton offered the role to
Moretz without asking her to
audition.
“Chloe latched onto that trou-
bled teenager thing, which I
don’t think she is, but she did it
really, really well,” the director
says. “She tapped into that in-
ternal anger and the feeling like
you’re alone and isolated — that
strange transitory time when
you’re changing from a kid into
something else.”
Moretz says the role wasn’t
quite as big a test of her talents
as some others she’s played.
“Carolyn is just like me, but a
heightened, ruder version of who
I am,” she notes.
For the actress, the big draw
of “Dark Shadows” was Burton.
She’s an enormous fan of his
movies, particularly “Edward
Scissorhands,” “Sleepy Hollow,”
and “Beetlejuice.” The inter-
weaving of humor and horror
which distinguishes those early
Burton films is also essential to
“Dark Shadows,” a soap opera
with a weird, supernatural un-
dercurrent.
“The movie has so many
different elements,” explains
Moretz. “It’s morbid. It’s come-
dic. There’s romance. It reminds
me of when Tim did ‘Sleepy
Hollow’ and ‘Beetlejuice’ and
‘Edward Scissorhands.’ It’s basi-
cally all three of those movies
mixed together.”
As longtime fans of “Dark
Shadows,” Burton and Depp
have been trying to launch their
big-screen adaptation of the
series for years. In 2011, the
time was right for the frequent
collaborators to adapt the ABC-
TV soap which ran 1,225 epi-
sodes from 1966-1971.
Depp stars as Barnabas Col-
lins, a wealthy gentleman in
1700s Maine who is turned into
a vampire and entombed until
1972 by a vengeful witch named
Angelique (Eva Green). After
waking up, he’s forced to move
in with his somewhat downtrod-
den descendents (Moretz, Mi-
chelle Pfeiffer, Jonny Lee Mill-
er) and their in-house psychia-
trist (Helena Bonham Carter).
While there’s plenty of fish-
out-of-water comedy — Barna-
bas is freaked out by TVs and
mini-skirts — there’s also a
classic love triangle between the
elegant neckbiter, his true love
Josette (Bella Heathcote) and
Angelique.
Fans of the original series
should watch closely during a
party sequence (or a Happening,
as it’s called in the film) at
Collinwood Manson. On hand
are Jonathan Frid, Kathryn
Leigh Scott and Lara Parker
who played, respectively, Barna-
bas, Josette and Angelique in
the original series. Also cameo-
ing is David Selby, who played
Quentin.
Everyone on the set was
clamoring to have their photos
taken with the quartet, shares
Moretz, who became a fan of
the series thanks to Pfeiffer’s
decision to play a handful of
episodes on a constant loop in
the makeup room.
The daughter of a nurse mom
and a plastic-surgeon father,
Moretz set her sights on acting
at age 5, when her brother Tre-
vor was accepted into the Pro-
fessional Performing Arts
School in New York, and she
became fascinated with the same
things that were obsessing him.
“I used to memorize all of my
brother’s monologues as a little
girl,” she recalls. “Eventually, I
said to my mom, ‘I want to do
that too.’ She was reluctant to
let me get into (acting) at the
beginning, but she let me try out
for some things and that’s how it
all kicked off and became what
it is now.”
Moretz has at least six films
in various stages of production,
including the runaway teen
thriller “Hick” which comes to
VOD on Friday. Also forth-
coming are a survivalist thriller
“The Rut,” a comedy anthology
“Red Band” and “The Drum-
mer,” a look at the ill-fated
romance between Beach Boy
Dennis Wilson (Aaron Eckhart)
and Fleetwood Mac’s Christine
McVie (Vera Farmiga).
Moretz hasn’t been on a mo-
vie set since Christmas, but on
June 1, she begins production on
‘Carrie,’ the Kimberly Peirce-
directed remake of the Sissy
Spacek classic. Moretz promises
the horror flick will be truer to
the Stephen King novel it’s
based on.
“I’m really looking forward to
re-tooling Carrie and finding out
who she is,” says Moretz.
“We’re doing the darker, more
psychological ‘Black Swan’-like
version.”
And how does Moretz see
Carrie?
“She’s a tormented young
girl,” she says. “She gets it from
all sides — from the kids at
school, from her mother, from
her principal. It’s going to be an
interesting movie.” W
Chloe Grace Moretz as Carolyn Stoddard and Gully McGrath as David Collins in a
scene from Tim Burton’s ‘Dark Shadows.’
On the 'Dark' side
Chloe Grace Moretz talks ‘Dark
Shadows,’ Tim Burton & ‘Carrie’
By Amy Longsdorf
Weekender Correspondent
Moretz, McGrath and Johnny Depp’s Barnabas Collins
in another scene from the film.
“Carolyn is just like me, but a
heightened, ruder version of who I am.”
Chloe Grace Moretz on her
‘Dark Shadows’ character
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agenda
CAR & BIKE EVENTS
Car Lover’s 7th Annual Car
Show June 10, gates 8 a.m., McDade
Park, Scranton. Coffee, doughnuts.
Awards for Top 25, 3 p.m. Pre-regis-
tration $8 by June 1, $10/day of.
Music by Joe Kruz. Proceeds benefit
Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Info:
570.457.7665. No alcohol, no pets by
cars.
Cruising at McDonald’s May 11,
6 p.m., McDonald’s, Route 590, Ham-
lin. Music by Ricki Z. Trophies, give-
aways, 50/50s. To benefit Ronald
McDonald House. Info: 570.969.8998
Montage Mountain Classics
• McDonald’s Southside Shopping
Center: May 11, 6-10 p.m.
• Jonny Rockets Montage Mountain:
May 19, 5-9 p.m.
• Cruise Pittston-Tomato Festival
Parking Lot: May 26, 5-9 p.m.
BENEFITS / CHARITY
EVENTS
2nd Annual Jorge’s Walk to
Defeat ALS May 19, 9 a.m.,
Bloomsburg Town Park, Bloomsburg.
Free food, music, tricky trays, 50/50.
To register visit alsphiladelphia.org,
contact fightingALS@hotmail.com,
570.458.4393. Proceeds benefit ALS
Association Greater Philadelphia
Chapter.
American Lung Association
• Fight For Air Kick-off Luncheon:
May 10, noon-1 p.m., Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs. Free. RSVP by calling
570.823.2212, e-mailing dreifler@lun-
ginfo.org.
Association for the Blind
• “Fun” Raiser: May 23, 6-9 p.m.,
Lucky’s Sporthouse. Celebrity bar-
tenders, music by Millennium. $25
reserves your bar stool for the night,
call 570.208.3267. Benefits programs/
services provided by the Association
for the Blind.
Bowl for Life May 12, 6-8 p.m.,
Chacko’s Family Bowling Center (195
N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre).
$20/person, teams of 5. Prizes,
raffles, 2 hours bowling, shoe rental,
one plain pizza, one pitcher soda. In
honor of Barbara Struckus. Info:
570.760.4083, 814.1056, 574.9820.
Proceeds benefit American Cancer
Society.
Candy’s Place (570.714.8800)
•15th Annual Rainbow Walk: May 12,
registration 9 a.m., walk 10 a.m., Kirby
Park Pavilion, Kingston. $25, pro-
ceeds benefit programs at Candy’s
Place. To register, call or visit can-
cerwellnessnepa.org.
Greater Pittston YMCA Sus-
quehanna Stride Half Mara-
thon & 5K May 27
Hazleton Art League
• “My life in Art” Dinner and Slide
lecture by Mark Charles Rooney: May
23, cash bar 5:30 p.m., dinner 6 p.m.,
Valley Country Club, Sugarloaf. $30,
proceeds benefit art league. RSVP by
May 14 to 570.454.0092. Info: hazle-
tonsartleague.org
High Five Charity Auction
May 15, 5:30 p.m., Desaki Restaurant
(Rte. 611, Swiftwater). $35. Chance to
bid on commercial real estate, travel,
entertainment, more. American Red
Cross, Monroe County Habitat for
Humanity, Pocono Services for Fam-
ilies and Children, The Salvation
Army, United Way of Monroe County.
For info/tickets, call 570.421.7466,
visit highfivecharityauction.com.
March of Dimes’ Annual
March for Babies May 20, regis-
tration 9 a.m., walk 10 a.m., King’s
College Betzler Fields. Face painting,
costumed characters, live music,
more. To register, visit marchforba-
bies.org or call 570.829.7000.
Schuyler Ave. Elementary
Family Fun Fest May 12, 9 a.m.-3
p.m., WVW Middle School back park-
ing lot, Hoyt St., Kingston. Free
admission. Rain or shine. Fundraiser
to benefit Schuyler Ave PTO General
Fund. 30+ vendors, homemade craf-
ters, raffles, food concessions, kids’
activities, more.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA
• 26th Annual Night at the Races:
May 17, doors 6 p.m., post time 7
p.m., Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs.
$15 GA, $20 Clubhouse (tables of 4),
includes racehorse. Free food, re-
freshments. 8 races, chance to win in
auction race. Tickets: 570.823.2191 ext
127. Proceeds benefit youth services
programming.
EVENTS
7th Annual Mothers Day
Intertribal Powwow May 12-13, 10
a.m., Noxen Fire Co. grounds, Stull
Road, Noxen. Free. Circle hours,
noon-4 p.m.,6-10 p.m. Sat., noon-5
p.m. Sun. All drums welcome. Native
American dancing, drumming, more.
Trade blanket, “49” dancing Sat. p.m.
Dogs must be leashed, cleaned up
after. Bring lawn chair. Alcohol,
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 35
puzzles
ACROSS
1 Pod occupant
4 Pedestal part
8 Rug type
12 Hosp. hookups
13 Satan’s specialty
14 Inlet
15 Old-style music
provider
17 Destruction
18 Incessantly
19 Chutzpah
20 Piece of hardware
22 Jane Lynch’s show
24 Pork cut
25Sweater with a
rounded collar
29 Qty.
30 Accordion feature
31 Noon, in a way
32 Worker’s
compensation
34 Bridge
35 Wheels of fortune?
36 Got up
37Oust
40 Friend of Dorothy
41 Met melody
42 Insignificant bit
46 Tirade
47 Emanation
48 Zero
49 Caustic solutions
50 Skating jump
51 Highlander’s hat
DOWN
1 Stone
2 Actress Longoria
3 Harshness
4 Moisten
5 State with conviction
6 Bracketed word
7 Wapiti
8 Mosquito thwarter
9 Session with a shrink
10 Tel -
11 Heredity component
16 Still
19 Mr. Gingrich
20 Hit Stooge-style
21 Prolonged sleep
22 - -Roman wrestling
23 Plumbing problem
25 Skelton’s
Kadiddlehopper
26 Champion of a cause
27 “Arrivederci”
28 Benevolent
30 Dr. McGraw
33 Baseball shoes
34 Put an end to
36 Twine fiber
37 Count counterpart
38 Picture of health?
39 Christmas tree, often
40 Muse’s instrument
42 Air safety org.
43 Illumination measure
44 Spy novel grp.
45 Airline to Amsterdam
last week
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See What Comes to Life...
Tickets at BethelWoodsCenter.org
8y Phohe 1.800.745.3000 º 8eIhel Woods 8ox O!!ce º 1ickeImasIer.com º Ih!o aI 1.866.781.2922 º 8eIhel, New York aI Ihe siIe o! Ihe 1969 WoodsIock !esIival
VISIT WEBSITE
FOR CALENDAR OF EVENTS
THRU NOVEMBER
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THE MUSEUM
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JUNE 13
SA1URDAY
JUNE 16
SUNDAY
JUNE 17
SA1URDAY
JUNE 30
SUNDAY
JULY 15
FRIDAY
JULY 20
1ULSDAY
AUG 7
SA1URDAY
JULY 14
THE DUPREES
JAY SIEGEL’S TOKENS
THE MARCELS
THE TYMES
THE EXCELLENTS
LINDA JANSEN
ELEGANTS
WITH SPECIAL GUEST
CODY SIMPSON
SA1URDAY
JULY 7
ADDITIONAL
CONCERTS:
AUC 10
BRAD PAISLEY
AUC 26
JASON ALDEAN
SEPT 15
THE FRESH BEAT
BAND
1UNL 9
NAVAH
PERLMAN
SLP1 22
PARKER
QUARTET
A TALE OF
TWO POSTERS
A SPECIAL EXHIBITION
THRU JULY 22
drugs, guns, politics prohibited.
Electricity, $5 per day up front.
Volunteers needed, call
570.947.2097, e-mail Wiste-
ria18704@yahoo.com. Benefits Noxen
Fire Co.
22nd Annual Northeastern
Pennsylvania Postal Cus-
tomer Council Golf Tourna-
ment June 5, Sand Springs Country
Club (10 Clubhouse Dr., Drums). Regis-
tration 8:30 a.m., shotgun 10 a.m.
Captain and crew, $85 includes green
fees, motor cart, steak dinner. Prizes.
$55/golf only, $30/dinner only, reser-
vations, payments must be made
before May 22, NEPAPCC.com. Info:
570.831.3420
Borrowdale Acres Open
Horse Show May 13, 8 a.m., Leh-
man Horse Show Grounds. For info,
call 570.675.8974.
Browndale Fire Co. (Route 247,
620 Marion St., Browndale,
43fire.com)
• Homemade Pierogi For Sale:
donation $6/dozen. Potato and
cheese. To order, contact any mem-
ber, call 570.499.4908, e-mail
jdoyle@nep.net, go online.
Cameo House Bus Tours
(Anne Postupack, 570.655.3420,
anne.cameo@verizon.net, checks to
933 Wyoming Ave., W. Pittston, Pa.
18643)
• 40th Annual Kips Bay Decorator
Showhouse: May 19, depart Wilkes-
Barre Wegmans 7:30 a.m., park row 1
by Applebee’s. Depart Scranton
Viewmont Mall 8 a.m., Sears parking
lot near Mexican restaurant. Be 15
min. early. Departs New York 7 p.m.
Pick ups in Hazleton, call. Private
luxury condo at Aldyn residences on
west side, Masonic Temple, Madison
Square Eats in the Park. $125, in-
cludes “follow us bus,” breakfast,
goodie bag, lunch, all admissions,
tips, more.
Choral Society
• Choral Artists Present “Renais-
sance and Baroque Masterworks:”
May 11, 8 p.m., St. Luke’s Episcopal
Church, Scranton. $15/adults, free/18
and younger, $3 discount for seniors,
students, Lackawanna Library Sys-
tem Card holders, members of WVIA,
Raymond Hood Room. Info:
570.343.6707, choralsociety.net
Clifford United Methodist
Church (Main St. Clifford)
• Chicken-n-Biscuit/Ham Dinner: May
16, 4-6 p.m. Take out or dine. $7.95
donation, includes dinner, dessert,
drink.
ConynghamUnited Metho-
dist Church (411 Main Street,
Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conyng-
hamumc.com)
• Rummage Sale: May 11, 9 a.m.-4
p.m.; May 12, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Crafters/
yard and potpourri sale. Rent space,
$20 (add $5 if borrowing a table). Set
up May 12, 7 a.m. Hot dogs, chips,
coffee.
• Human Food Chain: May 20, 9 a.m.
Benefits Valley Food Pantry. Prayer,
refreshment to follow in Christ UCC’s
social hall.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,
www.dietrichtheater.com) calendar
of events:
❏ Kids Classes:
• Quilting for Kids: “Monkey’s
Wrench:” Wed., through June 13,
3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6+. $6/class. Call to
register.
• Mask Making: Ages 5-8, May 9, 16,
23, 4-5:30 p.m.; Ages 9-12, May 10, 17,
24, 4-5:30 p.m. $40/4 classes. Call to
register.
• Young at Art: Mask Making for
Preschoolers: May 10, 17, 24, 10-10:45
a.m. Ages 4-5. $35. Call to register.
❏ Intergenerational Classes:
• Golden Days of Radio Players:
Tues., through May 22, 7-9 p.m. Free.
Call to register.
• Open Studio and Portfolio Prep:
Tues., 7-8:30 p.m. May 15, 22; ongoing,
$15/class, $60/all classes. Call to
register.
❏ Adult Classes:
• Pottery for Beginners: Series 2:
May 9, 16, 23; Series 3: May 30, June
6, 20, 27. Ages 13+. $60/class. Call to
register.
• Photography for Beginners: May
14, 21, June 4, 7-9 p.m.; Jun. 2, 1-3 p.m.
Ages 16+. $75. Call to register.
• Decorative Painting: May 16, 23, 30.
Ages 16+. $20/class plus cost of
painting surface. Pre-registration
required, call to register.
❏ Special Events:
• Dietrich Theater Radio Player’s
Performance: May 22, 7 p.m. Free,
tickets at door, can be reserved. Live
performance of favorite radio play,
call for info.
Doug Smith Music (dougsmith-
bass@comcast.net, 570.343.7271)
• May 12, 8:30-11 p.m., Skytop Lodge,
Skytop. 16-piece big band. Info:
595.7401
• May 13, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Skytop Lodge,
Skytop. Mother’s Day Brunch with
jazz duo. $28.50/adults, $14.25/child,
reservations required, 595.7401.
Endless Mountain Pilot’s
Association and Seaman’s
Airport International Learn
To Fly Day May 19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Seaman’s Airport (Airport Road &
Windsock Lane, Factoryville). Free.
Pilots, flight instructors, aircraft
owners available to talk. Airplane
rides available. Info: 570.945.5125
Flea Market Vendors Wanted
June 2, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Prince of Peace
Parish, Old Forge, St. Lawrence
Church parking lot, 620 Main St., Old
Forge. 10’ x 10’ space, $15. Bring ta-
bles. Call 570.498.2953 to reserve.
Payment can be sent to St. Mary’s
Rectory, 123 W. Grace St., Old Forge
after reservation made.
Franklin Twp. Volunteer Fire
Company Ladies Auxiliary
• Square Dance: May 19, 7-10 p.m.,
Franklin Twp. Volunteer Fire Compa-
ny (329 Orange Road, Orange). Just
Us Country Duo. $6. Food, refresh-
ments. Doors, kitchen open 6 p.m. All
welcome. Info: 570.333.4626, 333.5912
Geisinger Community Med-
ical Center
• The Many Faces of Breast Cancer:
May 31, 6 p.m., Scranton Cultural
Center, Shopland Hall, Scranton.
Professional speakers, free light fare,
cash bar, live music, regional ven-
dors. To register: 570.969.8986,
sharyn.wozniak@cmchealthsys.org
Johnson College (3427 N. Main
Ave., Scranton)
• 20th Annual Johnson College
Open: May 18, Blue Ridge Trail Golf-
Club, Mountaintop. Proceeds support
Presidential Scholarship Fund, bene-
fits Johnson College students. Info/
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 36
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 34
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to register: johnson.edu
Lackawanna College events
(Mellow Theater, 501 Vine St., Scran-
ton, 570.955.1455)
❏ Environmental Institute events:
(Rt. 435, Covington Twp.,
570.842.1506, www.lackawanna.edu)
• Natural Wonders: Inside of an Egg:
every other Thurs., through June 7,
1-2:30 p.m. Ages 3-5 and guardian.
$40/series of 6. Pre-registration
required.
McAdoo Fire Company
• 2012 Golf Tournament to Benefit
the Equipment Fund: June 2, 9 a.m.
shotgun start, 4 Man Scramble,
Mountain Valley Golf Course, Barnes-
ville. $75/person. Hole-in-one prizes
on all par 3s, lunch at the turn,
dinner following at firehouse, door
prizes, skins, par 3 prizes. Deadline
May 20. Info: 570.929.1079, mcadoofi-
reems.com
Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs (1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.)
• Winning Authors: Mary Higgins
Clark and Carol Higgins Clark: May 11,
discussion, 7 p.m., Seasons Ballroom;
book signing, 8 p.m., Sky Bridge.
Newport Twp. Fireman Ba-
zaar May 25-27, 5 p.m.-midnight, St
Faustina Grove, Sheatown. Iron
Cowboy, 40 lb Head, Gone Crazy,
Polka Naturals.

The Osterhout Free Library
events (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, www.osterhout.info,
570.821.1959)
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed.,
5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
• Knit & Crochet Group: May 12, 10:30
a.m.-noon. All ages.
• Note by Note: May 17, 6 p.m. Docu-
mentary following creation of Stein-
way Concert grand No. L 1037. Free.
Call to register.
• NAMI In Our Own Voice: May 19, 1
p.m. Wilkes-Barre Chapter of National
Alliance on Mental Illness. Free, call
to register.
• All-You-Can-Eat Pasta Dinner
Fundraiser: May 19, 4-7 p.m. North
Branch, 28 Oliver St., Wilkes-Barre.
Book and bake sale. Take-outs after
3 p.m., walk-ins welcome. $8/adults,
$4/8 and under, available at all
library locations. Info: 822.4660
Penn State Wilkes-Barre
events:
• PSU Day at Knoebel’s: May 12,
registration 11 a.m., Pavilion M with
lunch, entertainment, noon-1 p.m.,
Penn State Party, 3 p.m. in Pavilion L.
$20/GA, $10/child, both include $10/
food, ride booklet. $10/PSU lunch
only. Picnic lunch, prize raffles, $10
T-Shirt. Call 570.385.6262, visit
wb.psu.edu/Alumni/alumevents.htm.
Safe Haven Dog Rescue
(www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe-
Haven@epix.net)
• Volunteer Meeting: May 15, 6:30
p.m., Cherry’s Restaurant (Route 209,
Kresgeville). Volunteers, foster fam-
ilies always welcome. Volunteers
needed for adoption days, dog trans-
port, fundraising, clerical help, home
visits, more.
• Yard Sale: May 19, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.,
intersection of Rte 115, Toll Road, next
to Mad Anthony’s Bar, Blakeslee.
• Adoption Day: May 20, 11 a.m.-3
p.m., Tractor Supply (Route 209,
Brodheadsville). Dogs available to
meet and get to know. Pre-adoption
application with references, home
visit required prior to adoption.
St. Michael’s Church (corner of
Church/Winter Sts., Old Forge,
570.457.2875)
• Halupki Sale: May 19, pick up
11a.m.-2 p.m. $1/halupki, place orders
by May 14. Call 562.1434, 457.9280, or
leave message at church hall.
• Pierogie Sale: May 22, pick up 2-5
p.m., church hall. $6/dozen, place
orders by May 18. Call 562.1434,
457.9280, or leave message at
church hall.
St. Michael’s Ukrainian Or-
thodox Church (540 N. Main
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
St. Paul’s United Methodist
Church (Birch St./Prospect Ave.,
Scranton)
• Free Community Dinner: May 19,
4:30-6:30 p.m. All welcome.
• Heritage Sunday Hymn Sing and
Program: May 20, 10 a.m.
St. Stephen’s Episcopal Pro-
Cathedral (35 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600)
• Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.
• Clothing Closet: free clothing for
men, women, children. Open Tues.,
4-6:30 p.m., Wed., noon-3:30 p.m.
• Recital featuring Mark Laubach,
Cora Gamelin-Osenbach: May 11, 7:30
p.m. Free admission, free-will of-
fering received to support music
from St. Stephen’s and St. Stephen’s
Reach Ministry for those in need.
St. Thomas More Society (St.
Clare Church, 2301 N. Washington
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.0634, sttho-
masmoresociety.org)
• Guardian of the Redeemer Fellow-
ship: First, third Mon. of month for
men interested in adult discussion of
Catholic faith.
• YOUCAT Teen Group welcomes
post-Confirmation youth from all
parishes for discussion of Theology
of the Body for Teens. Meets first,
third Thurs. of month, 5:30 p.m.
Stanley Cooper, Sr., Trout
Unlimited
• Healing Waters Fishing Outing:
May 9. Free lunch. Will be guests at
Indian Mountain Rod & Gun Club near
Kresgeville. Info: baut.com
Unity: A Center for Spiritual
Living (140 South Grant St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.824.7722)
• A Course in Miracles / Holistic
Fitness-Yoga Sessions: Tues., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.
• Meditation Chakra Clearing
Deeksha: 2nd, 4th Mon., 7-8:30 p.m.
$8. Oneness meditation, chakra
clearing/energization, transfer of
Divine Energy. Welcome beginning,
experienced meditators, all paths.
Info: 587.0967, ernie@divinejoymi-
nistry.com.
The University of Scranton
events:
• New Director’s Workshop: May
10-12, 8 p.m., McDade Center for
Literary and Performing Arts. Tickets
vary. Call 570.941.4318.
Veterans Appreciation Cele-
bration May 9, 5:30 p.m., Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs Seasons Ball-
room. $25, net proceeds benefit
Team RED, WHITE & BLUE, Catholic
Social Services Homeless Veterans
Program, NEPA Veterans Multi-Care
Alliance. Tickets at door or at veter-
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 37
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 35
Look What
You Missed
Electric City Tattoo
Convention
Photos by Jason Riedmiller
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(570)820-7691 97 Oxford St. Hanover Twp. Pa 18706
Find us on Facebook • facebook.com/atonementtattoo
ansappreciation5912.eventbrite.com.
Info: 570.825.2600
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
events:
• “Waverly Waddle” 5K Walk/Run:
May 12, race 9 a.m., registration
8-8:45 a.m., back lawn. Register by
May 9, $12/adults, $6/12 and under.
After May 9, $15/adults, $8/12 and
under, family registration (4) $30/
advance, $35/race day.
West Pittston Chapter of
The Salvation Army 100th
Anniversary May 10-12. Banquet,
open house, more. Info:
570.655.5947, Sheryl.her-
shey@use.salvationarmy.org.
Women of the Orange United
Methodist Church (2293 West
8th St., Orange)
• Annual Spring Rummage Sale: May
18-19, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., church hall. Food,
refreshments, Welsh cookies for sale.
Info: 570.333.4626
Wyoming County Chamber
Of Commerce
• “The Danger of Disconnect:” May
9, 11:45 a.m.-1p.m., Twig’s Cafe, Tunk-
hannock. To reserve, contact
570.875.8325, Deborah@wyccc.com.
Wyoming Seminary Per-
forming Arts Institute (201
North Sprague Avenue, Kingston,
570.270.2186). Events free and open
to public.
• “Dance Portraits:” May 11-12, 8 p.m.,
Buckingham Performing Arts Center
(N. Sprague Ave., Kingston). Free,
open to public. Info: 270.2192
Wyoming Valley Barbershop
Harmony Chorus
• Special Guest Night: May 14, 7 p.m.,
Brooks Estate Community Center,
Wesley Village Campus, Pittston.
Open to area men who love to sing
four-part harmony a capella. Info:
570.883.7279, 696.3385
Wyoming Valley Mall events:
• Facebook Contest for Mother’s
Day: through May 9. Win overnight
getaway, $100 shopping spree. Regis-
ter on facebook.com/shopwyoming-
valleymall. 18+.
• McCann School of Business and
Technology Career Fair: May 12, 10
a.m.-2 p.m., Center Court. Free chair
massages, blood pressure screening.
Staff to review resumes, interviewing
skills, discuss placement/employ-
ment opportunities. Financial aid
representatives.
HISTORY
Eckley Miners’ Village (located
nine miles east of Hazleton, just off
Route 940; 570.636.2070; www.eck-
leyminers.org)
• Civil War and Victorian Era Fash-
ion Show: May 20, 2 p.m. $5. Tea and
cookies after show.
The Houdini Museum (1433 N.
Main Ave., Scranton)
Every weekend by reservation. Open
1 p.m., closes 4 p.m. Also available
weekdays for school groups, bus,
hotel groups. $17.95/adults, $14.95/11
and under.
• Ghost Tours: Scheduled daily, 7
p.m., reservations required. Secret
time/meeting place divulged upon
reservation, call 570.383.1821.$20/
adults, $15/11 and under. Rain or shine,
52 weeks/year. Daytime walks also
available on limited basis. Private
tours can be arranged for groups.
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232 Mon-
roe Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841)
• 3rd Annual You Live Here You
Should Know This Local History Game
Show: May 11-12, 7 p.m., Shopland Hall,
Scranton Cultural Center. Family
Feud style. Food/drinks for purchase.
$10 admission, $5 students. Open to
public.
Steamtown National Histor-
ic Site (I-81 to Exit 53, Scranton:
570.340.5200 or 888.693.9391,
www.nps.gov/stea)
• Ongoing: Interpretive programs,
visitor center, theater, a history
museum. Open daily, 9-5 p.m. $7
adults, $6 senior citizens, $2 children
ages 6-12.
LEARNING
A.C. Moore (2190 Wilkes-Barre
Twp. Marketplace, 570.820.0570)
• Mom and Me art classes: every
Fri., noon-1 p.m. $15, includes supplies.
Sign up 24 hours in advance, call to
register.
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton, 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.com)
• Children’s Art Start: Sat. through
May 12, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $80, ages 6-12.
Drawing, painting, clay.
• Theatre for Children: Wed. through
May 9, 4:30-6 p.m. $75, ages 4 and
up.
Academy of Northern Mar-
tial Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston)
Traditional Kung Fu & San Shou. For
Health and Defense. Adult & Chil-
dren’s Classes, Mon.-Thurs., Sat. First
class free. Walk-ins welcome, call
371.9919, 817.2161 for info.
Adult Kung Fu (Kung Fu & Tai Chi
Center, Wilkes-Barre: 570.829.2707)
Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30
p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art
open hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed.,
6:30 p.m. Covers Chinese style theo-
ries, concepts, applications. “Sport”
fighting concepts explained, prac-
ticed.
Art Classes at the Georgia-
na Cray Bart Studio (123 Brader
Dr., Wilkes-Barre, 570.947.8387,
gcraybart-artworks.com)
• Adult (Ages 13+): Mon., Tues.,
noon-4 p.m. (3 hrs painting, 1 hr
group critique), $30/class payable
monthly. Tues., Wed., 6-9 p.m. (stu-
dent chooses length of time), $15/1 hr,
$18/1 1/2 hrs, $20/2 hrs, $25/2 1/2 hrs,
$30/3 hrs, per class payable monthly.
• Children: Ages 9-12, Mon.-Wed.,
4:30-5:30 p.m., $15/class payable
monthly. Ages 13+, joins adult class,
individuals select amount of time to
participate. Portfolio prep instruction
available for college bound students.
Private lessons available.
ArtWorks Gallery & Studio
(502 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
570.207.1815):
❏ Children’s Spring Workshops:
• Art Start: Sat., through May 12,
12:30-1:30 p.m. $80 for 6-week series
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 38
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 36
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in drawing, painting, clay.
• Theatre: Wed., through May 9,
4:30-6 p.m.
Aikido of Scranton, Inc. (1627
N. Main Ave., Scranton, 570.963.0500)
• Self-Defense Class taught by
Aikido Master Ven Sensei, every Mon.
& Wed., 7-9 p.m. $10.
• Traditional Weapons Class, Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. $10.
Ballroom Dancing Class
through June 14, Thurs., 6-7 p.m.,
Mid-Valley Senior Center (310 Church
St., Jessup). $5/class 55+, $7/class
others. Taught by certified members
of Dance Educators of America
Joanne and Ed Samborski. Foxtrot,
waltz, swing, rumba, tango, samba,
hustle, more. Call 570.489.4415.
Beauty Lies Within School
of Pole Dance (32 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.793.5757, sl.beauty-
lieswithin@gmail.com). Hours by
appointment, free sample appoint-
ment. Call or e-mail for details.
Bridge. Beginning or Intermediate
Lessons, playing time for regular
games and tournaments. Jewish
Community Center (River Street,
Wilkes-Barre). Call Rick Evans at
570.824.4646 or Rev. Ken McCrea at
570.823.5957.
Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152,
www.dancecontours.com)
• Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
• Children/teen classes: ballet, tap,
CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of
dance blending basic Jazz Technique
with styles of street dance, hip hop.
• Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
• Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Danko’s Core Wrestling
Strength Training Camp
(DankosAllAmericanFitness.com)
• Four sessions/week, features two
clinics, two core strength. 4 ses-
sions/week. Increase power, speed,
agility. Group discounts, coaches,
teams, clubs, free stuff. Visit website
or call Larry Danko at 570.825.5989
for info.
Downtown Dojo Karate A-
cademy (84 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.262.1778)
Offering classes in traditional karate,
weapons, self defense. Mon-Thurs.,
5:30-8:45 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon.
• Zumba Classes: Tues., Thurs., 7-8
p.m.; Sat., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $5/class. Call
for info.
Drawing and Painting Les-
sons: Realist painter teaches tech-
niques of old masters. Private les-
sons Fri.-Sun. To schedule, call
570.820.0469, e-mail bekshev@ya-
hoo.com or visit www.artistvs.com.
Extreme M.M.A.(2424 Old Ber-
wick Rd., Bloomsburg. 570.854.2580)
• MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m.
First visit free. Wrestling funda-
mentals, basic Brazilian Ju-Jitsu No
Gi. Call for info.
• Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class:
Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free.
Non-combative class.
• Personal Training: Call 317.7250 for
info.
Fazio’s Hapkido Do Jang (61
Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Accepting new students. Children
(age 7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Teen/adult Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15 p.m.;
Tues.-Thurs., 6:30-8 p.m. Private
lesson also available.
Learn Hapkido. Self defense applica-
tions. $50 monthly, no contract.
GregWorks Professional
Fitness Training (107 B Haines
Court, Blakely, 570.499.2349, gregs-
bootcamp@hotmail.com, www.vip-
fitnesscamp.com)
• Beach Body Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri.,
6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m.
• Bridal Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 &
8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. Bridal party group
training, couples personal training
available.
• Fitness Bootcamp: 4-week ses-
sions, Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1
p.m.
• New Year’s Resolution Flab to Fab
Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.,
Sat., 1 p.m. Guaranteed results.
• Private/Semi-Private sessions
available, e-mail for info.

Guitar & Bass Lessons avail-
able from Fox Studios (11 Rhine Creek
Rd., Drums) Mon.-Thurs. 1-10 p.m. $16
per hour. All ages, all styles of music,
all levels. Call 570.788.4797 for info.
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music Instruction
• Private Ballroom Lessons
• Private Vocal Instruction: Tues.
evenings.
• Private Guitar Instruction: Classi-
cal, acoustic, electric for all ages.
• Dragons’ Tale Karate: Mon., 5:30-7
p.m.; Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 5+.
• Tumbling: Fri., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages
5+. $30/month.
Horse Back Riding Lessons
Elk Stables, Uniondale, by appoint-
ment only. All levels welcome. Call
570.575.8649 to schedule.
Kwonkodo Lessons – by reser-
vation at The Hapkido Teakwondo
Institute (210 Division St., Kingston).
$40/month. Call 570.287.4290 for
info.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton,
570.878.3970, newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, newvisionsstu-
dio.com)
• B/W Photography Class: Wed., May
16-June 6, 6-9 p.m. $199.99, all chem-
icals/paper included. Student must
purchase min. one roll of b/w film,
must bring camera to first class. No
experience needed. Wear comfy
clothes or bring apron. Call or e-mail
to sign up, deposit required.
Northeastern Ju-Jitsu (1047
Main St., Swoyersville, 570.714.3839,
nejujitsu.com)
Open 7 days/week, offers training in
Traditional Karate, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu,
boxing, Judo, Women’s self defense.
Group, private self defense classes
available by appointment.
Osterhout Library (71 S. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.821.1959)
• ESL Class: May 22, 29, 5:30-6:30
p.m. Adult English as a second lan-
guage for non-native speakers. Free.
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb-
.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com)
• Dimensions in Dance w/ Lee La-
Chette: Jazz, tap, ballet for adults &
kids. $10/hour, $5/second class.
E-mail or call 991.1817.
• Vocal lessons w/ Joelle Colombo
Witner: Wed., Sun. E-mail or call
991.1817.
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
❏ Ongoing Adult Classes
• Oil Painting: May 10, 17, 24, 31,
6:30-8:30 p.m. $72/members; $80/
non-members; $60/seniors members;
$65/senior non-members. Materials
list.
• Acrylic Painting: May 14, 21, 28, 9:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m. $85/members; $95/
non-members; $65/senior members;
$70/senior non-members. Materials
list.
❏ Adult Classes
• Drawing Workshop: May 9, 16, 23,
30, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $72/members;
$80/non-members; $60/senior mem-
bers; $65/senior non-members.
Materials list.
• Watercolor Painting: May 14, 21, 28,
1:30-4:30 p.m. No previous drawing
ability required. $72/members; $80/
non-members; $60/senior members;
$65/senior non-members. Materials
list.
• Woven Paper Baskets Workshop:
May 15, 1-3 p.m. $40/members; $45/
non-members; $30/senior members;
$35/senior non-members. Materials
list.
Royce Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Net-
work, Scranton. Day, evening class-
es for men, women, children. Ongo-
ing classes 6 days/week. Covers
sport, combat, self-defense aspects
of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. For info visit
gracie-nepa.com or call 570.347.1107.
Shaolin White Crane Fist
(Wyoming)
Teaching traditional Chinese martial
arts of Shaolin White Crane Fist, Wing
Chun Gong Fu, Yang Style Taijiquan,
Qigong-Energy work, Shauijiao-
Chinese Wrestling, more. $35/week,
first week free. Three levels of train-
ing, ages 15+. Contact Master Mike
DiMeglio 570.371.8898.
Sil-Lum Kung-Fu & Tai-Chi
Academy (509 Pittston Ave.,
Scranton)
• Yang Style Tai-Chi: Taiji Qigong,
Taiji Sequence, Taiji Stationary Push-
ing Hands, Taiji weapons classes. For
info, call Master Mark Seidel,
570.249.1087.
Something Special: (23 West
Walnut Street Kingston,
570.540.6376, angiethear-
tist@aol.com, www.angelademu-
roart.com)
• MANGA Art Class: (Japanese Car-
tooning) Wed., 4-5 p.m. Learn the art
of Japanese cartooning. 4-week
session, supplies included: $60 per
child. Call or e-mail to register.
Southside Senior Center (425
Alder St., Scranton, 570.346.2487)
• Language Partnership English &
Spanish Classes: Fri., 10 a.m. Free,
open to all. For info, call 346.0759.
St. Joseph’s School classes
(1627 N. Main Ave., Scranton,
570.963.0500):
• Traditional Weapons Class: Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. Self-defense techniques
using cane, club, short stick, wooden
sword, escrima sticks, more. Learn
history principles, practical use. No
prior martial arts experience. $10/
class.
• Women’s Self-Defense Class: Sat.,
10 a.m.-12 p.m. Self-defense tech-
niques to protect from variety of
attacks. No prior martial arts experi-
ence. Wear loose fitting clothes.
$10/class.
Wyoming Valley Art League
• Painting with Irina Krawitz: $15/
hour, $120/4-weeks. Call 570.793.3992
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 42
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 37
Fine points
“In the Details,” works by Erika Baez, Omar Rodriguez Jr. and
Allison Maslow, will be on display at Marquis Art & Frame (122
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre) Friday, May 11 through Saturday, July
7. There will be an opening reception Friday, May 11 from 5-8
p.m.
Baez’s goal is to convey emotions and tell stories by infusing her
imaginative concepts with her contemporary style. Born in
Scranton, Rodriguez uses his passionate experiences to shape
and mold his work, and Shavertown’s Maslow is interested in
exploring architecture as a metaphor within our lives.
The gallery is open daily Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. For
more info, call 570.823.0518. Above, a piece by Maslow.
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* Total average circulation excludes branded editions. Source: ABC FAS FAX six months ending
March 31, 2012 as filed with the Audit Bureau of Circulations, subject to audit.
STILL DOMINATES
THE MARKET
LATEST AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
MARCH 2012 FAS FAX CONFIRMS
*
DAILY
22.5% MORE PAID CIRCULATION
THAN
SUNDAY
45.9% MORE PAID CIRCULATION
THAN
timesleader.com
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MY LOWEREND
BAR&RESTAURANT
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IN LARKSVILLE PA”
Bar Hours: Mon-Thurs 11am-2am • Fri-Sat 7am-2am • Sun 11am-2am
462 W. State St. Larksville • 570.779.9186
wednesday
friday
sunday
tuesday
monday
thursday
saturday
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$2 FIREWATER
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$1 DOM MUGS,
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BUY-S E L L -T RAD E
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PS1 & 2,XBox,N intendo,Sega,A tari,Coleco,Vectrex,
Gam eboy,Genesis,Etc.A lso Buying DVDs,VHS & CDs
M o n day - Satu rday
12 P M - 6 P M
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N ext to G allery o f So u n d
1150 S.M ain A v e.
Scran to n • 941-9908
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Look What
You Missed
Battle of the Sexes
contest, Brews Brothers
Photos by Rachel A. Pugh
LACKAWANNA
COUNTY
BUSINESSES,
CALL
KIERAN
TO
ADVERTISE
831.7321
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for info.
MIND AND BODY
2&4 Hand Drumming Circle
Freestyle drum circle, every second/
fourth Sat., any time between 1-4
p.m., Everything Natural (426 S. State
St., Clarks Summit). All ages, new-
comers, old timers welcome. Hand
drums, percussion provided. Free, no
pressure.
Absolute Pilates with Leslie
(263 Carbondale Rd., Clarks Summit,
www.pilateswithleslie.com)
• Classes: Mon., Wed., Fri., 9-10 a.m.
Private training on Cadillac, Reform-
er and Wunda Chair, along with
Pilates mat classes, stability ball
core classes, more. Check website
for updates.
Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
❏ Studio J, 2nd floor
• Meditation in tradition of Gurd-
jieff, Ospensky: Sun., 12-1 p.m., $5
• Children’s Meditation: Thurs., 6-7
p.m. Ages 9-14, $5
• Tarot Card Readings, by appoint-
ment. $20 first half hour, $10 addi-
tional half hours.
Club Fit (1 West Broad St., Hazle-
ton, 570.497.4700, www.clubfithazle-
ton.com)
• Boxing classes w/ Rich Pastorella
(pastorella.net26.net). Mon., 7-8 p.m.
$40/month.
Dietrich Theater, Tunkhan-
nock (60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock:
570.996.1500)
• Yoga for You: Wed., 10-11:15 a.m.
Series 1: May 9, 16; Series 2: May 23,
30, June 6, 13, 20, 27, $60/6 classes,
$15/single class. Call to register.
• Kundalini Yoga: May 12, 19, 10-11:30
a.m. Ages 16+. $60/series of 6 class-
es, $15/single class. Bring yoga mat,
blanket. Call to register.
Egyptian Belly Dance Class-
es with Dianna Shahein. Call
570.343.2033 for various times/
locations. Private/group classes
available.
Endless Mt. Zendo (104 Hollow
Rd., Stillwater, 570.925.5077,
www.endlessmountainzendo.org,
endless@epix.net)
• One-Month Kessei: through June
2. Residential Zen training. Non-
residential Zen students welcome
morning/evening zazen, samu work
period Tues.-Sun. a.m. Full Kessei:
$1,000, $800/members; Part-time
$75/night, $45/members. $300/week,
$270/members. Work exchange may
be possible. Commuter Kessei: Open
donation basket.
• Sunday zazen Gatherings: May 13,
20, 8:30-10:30 a.m. Arrival pre-sit
facing wall from 30 min. prior. Public
welcome. Open donation basket.
Vegetarian snacks welcome. Tea/
conversation after. Comfortable/
loose clothing in solid neutral colors.
Please no tank tops or shorts. Out-
door slip-on shoes helpful. E-mail to
attend.
• Evening Zazen Gatherings: May
9,16, 22, 5:30-8:30 p.m. or 6:30-8:30
p.m. Open donation basket. Zazen,
chanting, kinhin walking. Tea after.
E-mail to attend.
Goddess Creations Shop &
Gallery (214 Depot St., Clarks
Summit, 570.575.8649, info@god-
desscreations.net)
• Tarot Card Readings by Rev.
Whitney Mulqueen by appointment.
Call.
• Tarot Readings: Thurs., 6-9:30 p.m.
at Montrose Inn, Restaurant & Tav-
ern (26 S. Main St., Montrose). $25
for 15-20 min.
• Monthly astrology workshop with
Holly Avila: first Sun., $45. Call.
Haifa Belly Dance (Haifabelly-
dance.com, 570.836.7399)
• Mon., 5:15 p.m., Serenity Wellness &
Dance Center (135 Main St., Luzerne)
• Wed., 6 p.m., Holistic Health Cen-
ter (Route 6, Tunkhannock)
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
718.0673)
• Cardio Kickboxing: Wed., 7-8 p.m.;
Sat., 9-10 a.m. $5/class. Call for info.
• Hoop Fitness Techniques: Mon.,
7:30-8:30 p.m. $5/class. Call for info.
Jeet Kune Do Fighting Con-
cepts Teaches theories of move-
ment in Martial Arts. $100/month.
Call instructor Mike DiMeglio for info,
570.371.8898.
Kwon Kodo Lessons: Learn
self-defense system that combines
Korean Martial Arts such as Hapkido,
Taekwondo & Kuk Sool. Lessons held
at Hapkido Taekwondo Institute (150
Welles St., Forty Fort). $40/month.
For info, call 570.287.4290 or visit
htkdi.com.
Leverage Fitness Studio (900
Rutter Ave., Forty Fort, 570.338.2386,
www.leveragetrainingstudio.com)
• Morning Wake-Up Workout: Full
body metabolic, Mon., Wed., Fri.,
7-7:45 a.m.
• Primal Scream Classes: Tues.,
Thurs. 7-8 p.m.
• Inferno: High Intensity Interval
Training: Sat., 10 a.m.
All classes free to members, $10
non-members.
Maximum Health and Fit-
ness (310 Market St., Kingston,
570.283.2804)
• Ab Lab with Amy: Sat., 8:30 a.m.;
Mon., 7:30 p.m. Call for info.
Motivations Fitness Center
(112 Prospect St., Dunmore.
570.341.7665)
• Sandstorm Fitness with Rachel
“Kali” Dare: Learn various techniques
and shed pounds. Call for info.
NutriFitness Boot Camp (311
Market St., Kingston, 570.288.2409)
• Free week of Boot Camp for new
members: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m., 5:30
p.m.
• Wirred: Mon., Wed., 6:45 p.m., Sat.,
10 a.m. $5.
• Yoga: Thurs. 7 p.m. $10.
• Tang Soo Do Karate Classes: Mon.,
Wed., 6:45 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. Call to
register.
Odyssey Fitness (401 Coal St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.2661, odyssey-
fitnesscenter.com)
• Yoga Classes: Sun., 12:30 p.m.;
Mon., 7:15 a.m.; Tues., 7 a.m., 5 p.m.;
Wed., 8 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Thurs., 6:30
p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m. All levels wel-
come.
• ZumbAtomic: Lil Starz, ages 4-7:
5:30 p.m.; Big Starz, ages 8-12: 6:15
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 45
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 38
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www.theweekender.com
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Got Green? Grow It!
Need Green? Get It!
570-823-7676
www.choiceone.org
7 George Ave.
(PARSONS SECTION)
Wilkes-Barre • 270-3976
30 Hanover Street
Wilkes-Barre • 970-4460
Fred... Frank... Food & Fun!
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Fuel Up Contest Rules:
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Humphrey’s Bootery & Bags
Cartridge World
Schiel’s Family
Markets - 2 locations
Malacari’s Produce & Deli
Ochman’s Coins & Jewelry
Now through May. 19, 2012 The Times Leader is giving away a $25 gas card every single day! Register
for your chance to win by filling out the official entry form below and dropping it off at a participating location.
Additional entry forms may be available at store locations. Enter as often as you like at any location. No
purchase necessary. Read The Times Leader every day from May 6th through May 26th to see if you’re a
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$25 gas card will publish on Saturday, May 26th.)
All contest forms will be picked up each Thursday during the contest period and seven winners will be
selected through a random drawing of all entries collected for that week—one winner for each day.
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Style files
By Rachel A. Pugh
Weekender General Manager
N
ick Conroy
of Scranton
is a versatile
man. Working
in dietary at
Allied Services, performing
as a full-time drummer in
local band EverRage and
helping others get in shape as a
personal trainer at Penn Foster
Career School all describe his
professional life.
But his eye for fashion
and photogenic appeal may
just prove beneficial for his
aspirations of becoming a
model. Working with many
local photographers, Nick has
created quite the portfolio. The
Weekender caught up with this
multitasker to find out more
about his personal fashion tastes
Style Pick:
Nick Conroy
— and to get a little fashion
advice for the fellas.
Favorite fashion
designer: LeAnn Nealz.
Favorite article of
clothing: Black V-necks.
Favorite place to shop:
Wherever has what I’m looking
for.
WEEKENDER: How
would you describe your
look?
CONROY: Social surfer with
a shot of classic rock.
WEEKENDER: I’ve seen
that you have a lot of
modeling shots. Do you
model for any particular
agency?
CONROY: No, I don’t. I just
work with local photographers
for now. If something comes up,
perhaps I’ll pursue it.
WEEKENDER: What do
you think defnes good
taste in fashion?
CONROY: Realizing
your strongest features and
highlighting them with the
corresponding attire. Don’t try
too hard. Wear what fits you.
WEEKENDER: Have
you ever had a style that
you’ve looked back on
and thought, “What was I
thinking?”
CONROY: Of course, back
in 2007, before I had lost all
this weight, I was in a punk
stage, wearing all black. I had
medium length hair and wore
eyeliner. Yeah.
WEEKENDER: How do
you go about picking out
your attire for a night out?
CONROY: First it depends
on where I’ll be going, but
overall it kind of just comes
down to my mood and how
much I’ll be moving around.
For example, you don’t want to
do a lot of walking in flip-flops.
WEEKENDER: What do
you think is one of the
biggest fashion mistakes?
CONROY: Besides wearing
the wrong size for your body,
I don’t think you should be
wearing Crocs with every outfit.
WEEKENDER: What
would a girl be wearing to
turn your head?
CONROY: I like
personalized accessories, not
meaning names on things, but
more like little pieces of flair
that are there for a reason and
have meaning. For example,
one single dreadlock or a
bracelet of beads from the
Philippines.
WEEKENDER: Are you
into accessories?
CONROY: Yes, I love rings
and aviators.
WEEKENDER: If you
could overfow your closet
with one item, what would
it be?
CONROY: Definitely
V-necks.
WEEKENDER: What
fashion advice would you
give other guys?
CONROY: Always try to find
a way for your personality to
show through whatever it is that
you’re wearing. W
Nick Conroy has a penchant for V-necks ... but defnitely not Crocs.
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3 COUPLES BATTLED
IT OUT
LAST W
EDNESDAY AT
BREW
S BROTHERS, PITTSTON.
M
ICH
ELLE
&
RA
N
DY
W
O
N
A
N
IG
H
T’S
STAY
AT
A
H
ILTO
N
H
O
TEL
A
N
D
A
G
IFT
CA
RD
FRO
M
PO
SH
AT
TH
E
SCRA
N
TO
N
CLUB!
A
N
D
TH
E
W
IN
N
ER
IS...
M
IC
H
E
LLE
B
E
LLE
S
&
R
A
N
D
A
LL
JO
N
E
S
O
F
LE
H
M
A
N
!
p.m.
Open Your Eyes To Dream
(143 W. Main St., Bloomsburg,
570.239.7520, www.oyetd.com)
❏ Open-Eyed Yoga. Call 394.2251 or
go online for current updates/can-
cellations. E-mail: yoga@oyetd.com
• Beginner Vinyasa: Mon., 5:30-6:30
p.m.
• Level II Vinyasa: Mon., 7-8:30 p.m.
• Mixed Level Vinyasa: Tues., 9-10:30
a.m., Wed., 6:30-7:45 p.m.
Mats & props available. Student/
package discounts available. Bring
friend to first class, get two for price
of one.
Reiki Classes (570.387.6157,
reikictr@localnet.com) Sessions with
Sue Yarnes:
• Beginner to Advanced Reiki at our
locations or your home. Hospital
endorsed, training for professional
Usui Reiki teacher certification
available. Call or e-mail for info.
Sandy Seyler Studio (House of
Nutrition, 2nd floor, 50 Main St.,
Luzerne, 570.288.1785, SandySeyl-
er.com)
• Emotional Rescue Workshop: May
20, 2-5 p.m. $40.
❏ May Schedule
• Yoga: Mon., 6:30 p.m.; Wed., 10:30
a.m.; Thurs., 7:15 p.m.; Sat., 9:30 a.m.
Multi-level, beginners and intermedi-
ate. Hatha Yoga postures, Pranayam,
deep relaxation. $11.
• Meditation: Mon., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs.,
6 p.m. Pranayam/mantra meditation.
No experience necessary. $11.
Sheri Pilates Studio (703
Market St., Kingston, 570.331.0531)
• Beginner mat class: Tues., 5 p.m.
$50/10 classes.
• Equipment classes on reformer
and tower: $150/10 classes.
• Private training available on
reformer, cadillac, stability chair,
ladder barrel, cardiolates on reboun-
der.
Call studio for additional mat class/
equipment class schedule, all classes
taught by certified instructors.
Spine & SportCare (Old Forge,
570.451.1122)
• Pilates Mat Classes: Mon. 9:30
a.m.; Wed. noon; Thurs. 5:30 p.m.;
Yoga Flow: Tues. 5:30 p.m. $10/class,
$45/5 classes.
• Small Group Personal Training:
Personalized program changes w/
every session, similar to P90X cross-
fit. All levels, call for details.
Symmetry Studio (206 N. Main
Avenue, 3rd Floor, Scranton,
570.290.7242)
• Mon.: Gentle Yoga 5:30 p.m.; Core
Yoga 6:30 p.m.
• Tues.: Beginners Yoga 5 p.m.;
Yoga Strength and Flexibility 6 p.m.;
Cardio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m.
• Wed.: Slow Flow 5:30 p.m.; Core
Yoga 6:30 p.m.
• Thurs.: All Levels Vinyasa 5:30
p.m.; Cardio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m.
• Fri.: Community Ballroom (call for
registration details)
• Sat.: Prenatal Yoga 9:30 a.m.;
Essential Yoga All Levels 11 a.m.
• Sun.: Slow Flow 11 a.m.
The Vintage Theater (119 Penn
Avenue, Scranton, 570.589.0271,
www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
• The Ellen Doyle Dance Experience:
Tues., 8-10 p.m., ft. strength training,
cardio, stretching, dance warm-up
classics. Free and open to the public,
wear dance shoes/socks, bring yoga
mat/water.
Waering Stained Glass Stu-
dio (336 N. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre).
• Tarot Card Readings: $50/first half
hour, $10 additional. Appointment
only. Call 570.417.5020.
White Dragon Internal
Strength Chi Kung (330 Sandra
Dr., Jefferson Twp & Scranton,
570.906.9771) Tai chi, yoga, med-
itation, chi kung, white lotus, pai
lum, flowing water, inner tiger.
Beginners-advanced. Mon.-Fri., open
6 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Private and group. Any
ages.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA events
(570.823.2191)
• Zumbatomic: Sat., 1 p.m. $16/8
week session for YMCA members,
$20/non-members. Designed for ages
7-12, now offering parent class.
Pre-registration required.
• Camp Kresge: Father/Daughter:
Session 2, May 11-13. Father/Son:
Session 1, June 1-3; session 2, June
15-17, 5 p.m., check in, 11 a.m., depar-
ture YMCA Kresge. Download regis-
tration form at campkresge.com,
send to Camp Registrar, Rose War-
ner, Family YMCA of Easton, Phillips-
burg and Vicinity, 1225 West La-
fayette St., Easton, PA, 18042. Info:
570.823.2191 ext. 152, mcelhin-
ney@wbymca.org.
The Yoga Studio (210 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming, 570.301.7544)
• Yoga: Mon., 9:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.;
Wed., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs., 9:30 a.m.,
6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m.
• Zumba: Tues., 5:30 p.m.; Wed. 9
a.m., 7 p.m.; Fri., 5:30 p.m.
Zumba Fitness Classes
• Mon./Wed., 5:15 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m., at
TLC Fitness Center (bottom of Mor-
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 48
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 42
Mother’s Day
Actors Circle presents “’Night, Mother,” the final show of its
30th season, May 10-13 and 18-20 at Providence Playhouse (1256
Providence Road, Scranton).
Written by Marsha Norman and winner of the 1983 Pulitzer
Prize, the play explores the subjects of suicide and a tense rela-
tionship between mother and daughter.
The show will be presented at 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 2
p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $12, $10 for seniors and $8 for students.
There will be a preview performance Thursday, May 10 at 8
p.m., and tickets will be $8 for the general public and seniors
and $6 for students. For more info, call 570.342.9707 or visit
actorscircle.org.
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Melissa

s Mind
“June Bugs are the Kardashians
of the insect world. They’re
useless, they have giant asses,
and they’re IMPOSSIBLE to get
out of your house once you let
one in. Oh, AND they will only date
black fies – seriously, I looked
into it.”
Lissa of KRZ has a lot on
her mind, and she needs
to speak it. Check out the
Weekender every week
to read her deep thoughts
and philosophical
approach to life.
For more of Melissa’s wisdom, follow her on Facebook and read her blog.
facebook.com/melissakrahnke • 985krz.com/Lissa/11276840
PHOTO BY ROB LETTIERI PHOTOGRAPHY
dish
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
IT’S ALL GREEK
TO THEM
Just as surely as I can see
May flowers each year is an
event I always look forward to:
The spring edition of the An-
nunciation Greek Orthodox
Church’s Greek Food Festival,
which runs Wednesday, May
9-Saturday, May 12.
“It started a long time ago,
more than 40 years ago on
Public Square, we used to have
the Fine Arts Fiesta,” Theresa
Karambelas, president of the
church’s Philoptochos Society,
told Dish Friday. “Unfortunate-
ly, about 18 years or so ago, we
had to bow out.”
Thanks to a diminishing num-
ber of volunteers, fewer par-
ishioners and the cost of having
a stand on the Square as part of
the Fiesta rising, the church
took a few years off from pro-
viding its goodies to the public
until about 10 years ago.
“We decided to try to start
this all over again and do it in
our own church because we
have a very nice social room
and a fairly decent kitchen,”
Karambelas began. “It needs
upgrades, and that’s what we
keep working for, to buy a new
convection oven and to buy a
new freezer, so we could keep
up with the demands.
“And it helps us keep the
church paying the utility bills.
We’re struggling and doing the
best we can to make it work,
and hopefully we’ll still be
around for a few years to keep
it going.”
And I can attest, after seeing
the many happy eaters year
after year, that demand is high
for the festival that boasts such
Greek delicacies as manestra
(baked orzo in chicken broth
with parmesan cheese), spana-
kopita, dolmadakia (stuffed
grape leaves), gyros, baklava
and galaktoboureko (layers of
phyllo dough filled with custard
and covered with sweet syrup)
and much more.
“We’ve been working for
almost three months two or
three days a week,” Karambelas
said. “Yesterday, we were there
doing what we hope is the
final batch of cookies,
and we have to start
making salad dress-
ings, syrups for
some of the
cookies that get
baked that day
of the festival,
there are a lot
of preliminary
things to be
done now.”
While there are
about six or seven dishes that
can get made in advance, in-
cluding several pastries, most of
the food must be made each
day.
“We make the fresh gyros,
we make fresh chicken — we’re
always roasting chickens be-
cause we have the chicken din-
ners, we make fresh manestra,
so some of the things you can-
not make ahead,” Karambelas
said, adding that volunteers
usually start cooking at 7 a.m.,
four hours before doors open.
As always, I’m looking for-
ward to the church’s spanakop-
ita (spinach, feta and spices
between layers of phyllo), dol-
madakia and baklava (layers of
phyllo filled with walnuts, spic-
es and syrup), but Karambelas
can’t pick just one or two of
her favorite things.
“Oh, I love the macaroni and
meat with the bechamel sauce
called pastitsio,” she said.
“That’s a wonderful dish, and I
love the chicken dinner … An-
other thing I think is so good is
we have chicken on a stick that
we call souvlaki, and we have a
great lemon sauce that it’s
cooked in, and we put on a pita
bread with salad on the top.
“I don’t only have one favor-
ite, unfortunately,” she added,
laughing. “I have something for
every day.”
To find out more about the
Annunciation Greek Orthodox
Church’s Greek Food Festival,
visit the website below; the full
menu and a pre-order form can
also be found on the site —
and you’ll most likely find me
at the festival at least twice. W
Send your food and drink
news to
nmascali@theweekender.com
or call 570.831.7322.
Souvlaki is just one of the dishes offered at
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church’s Greek Food
Festival this week.
Spanakopita — spinach and feta
between layers of phyllo.
“We’re struggling and
doing the best we can to
make it work, and
hopefully we’ll still be
around for a few years
to keep it going.”
Theresa Karambelas
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gan Hwy., Scranton). $5/class. Call
570.558.7293 for info.
• Adult classes held at Fitwize 4
Kids Tues./Thurs., 7:15, Sun., 11 a.m. on
Keyser Ave. across from Keyser Oak
Shopping Center Call 348.9383 for
info.
OUTSIDE
Adventures in the Wilder-
ness (570.343.5144 or jane@hiking-
jane.com)
❏ Greater Scranton YMCA outings (Y
members/$5, non-members/$8):
• Stony Cabin Ridge (Glen Summit):
May 20, meet Y parking lot, Dun-
more. 4-5 miles moderate.
❏ Senior Citizens Outings (Y mem-
bers/$5, non-members/$8):
• Drakes Creek (Lake Harmony):
May 10, 9 a.m., meet Y lobby, Dun-
more. 3 miles moderate. Tokyo Tea
House.
Hickory Run State Park (1137
Honey Hole Road, 570.403.2006)
• Landscaping With a Purpose: Rain
Gardens in Your Backyard Workshop:
May 12, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Environmental
Education Center, Frances Slocum
State Park. Lunch, breaks, program
materials. To register visit ag-
sci.psu.edu/backyard/woods, call
825.1701.
• Greater Hazleton Rails to Trails
Hike: May 17, 9 a.m., Greater Hazleton
Rails to Trails trailhead, intersection
of Route 424, Route 93, Hazleton.
Info: hickoryrunenvedsp@pa.gov
Lacawac Sanctuary (94 Sanc-
tuary Rd., Lake Ariel, 570.689.9494,
director@lacawac.org)
❏ Music in the Forest Series:
• The Young Geezers: May 13, July
15, 3 p.m., Carriage House.
Lackawanna Audubon So-
ciety
• LAS High Count Day: May 11-12, 5
a.m.-5 p.m. Count as many species
as you can within a radius of Lacka-
wanna County Courthouse. Potluck
dinner 6 p.m., May 12, Church of the
Epiphany, Glenburn. Call
570.945.5226 for info.
• Nature walk along Dark Regions
Road and the Narrows: May 19, 8:30
a.m. Meet along road just south of
Falls bridge. Info: 570.586.8343
Lackawanna River Corridor
Assoc. (570.347.6311, www.lrca.org)
• Neighborhood Downspout Dis-
connection Workshop: May 12, 10
a.m.-noon, 2416 N. Main Ave., Scran-
ton. Demonstrates the process used
to disconnect rain gutters and
downspouts from perimeter drains
around residential foundations
connected to sanitary sewer system.
Info: director@lrca.org
Nescopeck State Park (1137
Honey Hole Rd., Drums,
570.403.2006) All events free, unless
noted otherwise. Reservations re-
quired.
• A Bird in the Hand: Songbird Mist
Netting: May 19, 9-11 a.m. Free.
Salt Springs State Park
(Montrose, 570.967.7275, www.friend-
sofsaltspringspark.org)
To register for classes, call
570.833.4034
• From Weeds to Seeds-Gardening
Series: May 12, 1 p.m. Fee and pre-
registration.
• Sunday Meditations: May 13, 1 p.m.
Five-session meditation series.
Scranton Ghost Walk (Scran-
tonGhostTours.com, 570.383.1821)
• Daily, 90-minute tours, usually
7:30 p.m., 9 p.m. $20/adults, $15/
under 11. Rain or shine. Reservations
required. Secret meeting place
divulged upon reservation. Daytime
walks available on limited basis. Call
to reserve.
Wallenpaupack Scenic Boat
Tour 11 a.m.-6 p.m., $14/regular,
$13/senior, $10/12 and under. Cele-
brating 50th year on the lake with
daily one-hour cruises. Info:
570.226.3293, wallenpaupackboat-
tour.com.
SOCIAL GROUPS
Alcohol Anonymous: Mon./Fri
7 p.m. (373 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre),
Tue. 7 p.m. (25 Church St., Wilkes-
Barre), Wed. 10:15 a.m. (301 Shoemak-
er St., Swoyersville), 7 p.m. (1000 E.
Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre), 8 p.m.
(562 Wyoming Ave., Kingston), Thurs.
10 a.m. (75 S. Prospect St., Nanti-
coke), 7:30 p.m. (301 Lake St., Dallas),
Fri. 7:30 p.m. (Triangle 24 Hour Club,
Dallas), Sat. 7:30 p.m. (1003 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort), Sun. 7 p.m. (128 W.
Washington St., Nanticoke). Call
570.288.9892 for info.
Food Addicts Anonymous
Meetings (St. Vincent DePaul
Church, Scranton: 570.344.7866)
Meetings every Fri. night, 8 p.m.
Monroe County Garden Club
• 85th Anniversary Celebration: May
9, 11:30 a.m., Chateau Resort and
Conference Center, Tannersville.
$20/person. Roaring Twenties Tea
Party, tea luncheon, raffle, best
dressed award. Encouraged to dress
in period costume, presentation on
herbal crafts. Info: 570.420.0283,
adeskus@ptd.net.
Nar-Anon Family Group
Meetings Sun. 7 p.m. Clear Brook
Bldg. (rear), Forty Fort; Wed., 7 p.m.
United Methodist Church, Mountain-
top. 570.288.9892.
Narcotic Anonymous Meet-
ings every Tues. at 7 p.m., down-
stairs in the Methodist Education
Building, located off Courthouse
Square, on the corner of Marion and
Warren Street in Tunkhannock. There
are no fees or dues. Newcomers
always welcome.
The National Association of
Women Business Owners,
NEPA Chapter (NAWBO)
• Top 25 Women in Business Cock-
tail Party: May 17, 6 p.m., Posh at
Scranton Club (404 N. Washington
Ave., Scranton). To celebrate women
that will be honored June 15, Hilton,
Scranton. $25. Open bar, hors
d’oeuvres. RSVP to krw@wentwor-
thandassoc.com by May 14. Cash/
checks (made payable to NAWBO)
accepted at door.
The NEPA Rainbow Alliance
(www.gaynepa.com)
• As part of the NEPA SafeZone
Project, NEPA RA is creating an “It
Gets Better” video. Video features
local representatives from the LGBT
community, allies and more offering
words of encouragement. To be a
sponsor, e-mail itgetsbetter@gayne-
pa.com; to be in the video, visit
gaynepa.com for details/application.
Oakwood Terrace (400 Gleason
Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171 ext. 116 or 101)
• Support Group Meetings: third
Wed. of each month, 6:30 p.m.
St Joseph’s Senior Social
Club
• Meeting: May 17, 1 p.m., St. Rocco’s
school auditorium (Oak St., Pittston).
Seats available for Niagara Falls trip
Sept. 5-7, deposit due. Trip to Cape
Cod, Mass. Oct. 15-19. Bring canned
goods for St. John’s food pantry.
Bingo/card games. Refreshments.
Info: 570.654.2967
Suicide Bereavement Sup-
port Group First/Third Thurs.
every month, 7 p.m., at Catholic
Social Services (33 E. Northampton
St., Wilkes-Barre). Call 570.822.7118
ext. 307 for info.
Wyoming Valley Home
School Network A support
group for home school or cyber
school parents throughout NEPA
providing monthly meetings, field
trips, park days, more. Visit
wvhsnetwork.webs.com or contact
Julie Lemardy at jmlemar-
dy@gmail.com for info. W
- compiled by Stephanie
DeBalko, Weekender Staff
Writer
Send your listings to
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18703 or fax to 570.831.7375
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 45
sorry mom&dad
By Justin Brown
Weekender Correspondent
D
ear Mom&Dad,
I never really got along
with the kids at my college
television station. For starters, their
idea of a wild Friday night out was
a road trip to Walmart to search
through the $5 movie bin. In hind-
sight, I’mconvinced they were
either Amish, home schooled or
raised by sister wives.
When it came to their delivery
on the station’s weekly live news-
cast, they were as angelically ab-
sentminded as the panel on “Fox &
Friends.” While they were report-
ing on the health fair in the student
center, I was reporting on stories I
knewstudents would actually
watch, like the time I did an exclu-
sive on cardio pole dancing by
joining a class. My reports usually
had my fellownews teamlook at
me like I was out of my mind, but it
was my interviewwith drunk drag
queens that really put their granny
panties in a bunch.
“You have to go to this drag-
queen showwith me tonight!” I
told my roommate Eddie.
“That’s where I drawthe line!”
Eddie argued.
“I’ll look like some kind of
pervert if I showup by myself at a
drag showwhile holding a video
camera,” I argued back.
Afewhours later I arrived at the
showwith my video camera and
my skeptical roommate. Since I
wanted to capture b-roll of the
event to accompany my interview,
Eddie and I sat front and center.
We soon realized the drag
queens were intrigued by their two
favorite things sitting in the front:
Straight boys and a TVcamera!
Thanks to the big camera on my
shoulder the entire time, they left
me alone. Eddie, on the other hand,
was their target all night as they
flirted with himand even tied him
up with a rope. His face was never
so red.
After the show, I instructed the
one drag queen to remain put while
I found the others who were drink-
ing liquor fromthe bottle in the
ladies’ room. When I returned, the
drag queen I ordered to stay put
was sitting in a baby’s high chair!
“Look! Drag queen in a high
chair eating a bowl of chips! Let’s
get this interviewstarted!” he/she
screamed.
I used that as the opening se-
quence in my segment, which
made my conservative news team
uncomfortable and pissed. That’s
the day I learned people fear what
they can’t understand and hate
what they can’t conquer.
Love,
Justin W
Justin’s interview with drunk drag queens was another
highlight of his college career.
Drag queen
in a high chair!
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just for the
health of it
By Tim Hlivia
Special to the Weekender
I
will never suggest “The Sit-
uation” as a role model, but
there is one lesson you can
take fromMTV’s “Jersey Shore”
loudmouth: The less body fat you
have, the better your muscle defi-
nition will show.
It’s that exciting time of year
when summer is around the corner
and all the newwarm-weather
fashion trends start to blossom.
This spring, make it your goal to
shed your winter fat so when
beach time arrives you’ll be ready
for less clothing.
Your best bet is to start this
transformation slowly, especially
if you’re just beginning. This will
increase the odds that you will
stick with the process. If you
aren’t sure where to start or have
failed in previous attempts, con-
sult a professional, qualified,
educated personal trainer.
Goal setting tips:
•Write it down. Goals must be
specific, measurable and attain-
able. Saying you want to be able to
do10 chin-ups in 30 days probably
isn’t attainable if you cannot do
one. Also, instead of saying “I
want to lose weight,” write it down
as “I want to lose five pounds of
fat by June1.” This forces you to
be accountable.
•Break a big goal into smaller
goals. As time passes, these mini
goals will become part of your
life. Implement one mini goal at a
time and once you achieve the first
one, incorporate the second, etc.
Do not try and implement themall
at once. You’ll be overwhelmed
and will have trouble reaching any.
•Stay committed. Don’t let
others sabotage your goals, this
goes for spouses, family members
and/or friends. Believe in yourself
and the process. The saying,
“Nothing worthwhile is ever easy,”
may not be always true but it cer-
tainly applies to changing your
body.
•If at first you don’t succeed,
don’t give up, ever. Take a step
back, regroup and refocus. This is
the time to re-evaluate your goals
and level of commitment.
•Sign on the dotted line. A
study in Psychology and Health
shows we only have so much
willpower and inevitably we will
veer off track if dieting for long
periods of time. The solution is to
set increments of time where you
stick to the plan. Consider a 30-
day contract where you abide by
the rules and include penalties.
As you start the process, re-
member you’re in it for the long
haul and not just the 30 days.
Wanting quick results is wishful
thinking, but it isn’t reality and
will only bring you down. Keep
reminding yourself what you’re
working toward, crank up the
tunes on your iPod, and lastly, take
responsibility for your short-
comings (i.e. coming home at 2
a.m. and eating a half of cake). W
Slimmer
for summer
If you set attainable goals for yourself, the days of you
being this guy (or gal) on the beach are numbered.
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Enter your pet for Weekender’s
PET OFTHEWEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed
if applicable, owner’s name and
hometown to:
weekender@theweekender.com
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner:
Lauren Heil, Scranton
Terrier
CHOPPER
bitch & brag
By Jeff and Amanda of 98.5 KRZ
Special to the Weekender
Amanda’s Bitch
One of the things that frus-
trates me the most is when a
business doesn’t answer its phone
or return phone calls. To make
matters worse, the one place we
all can’t stand to go is a place that
I’ve been trying to call: The
DMV.
I’ve tried them at least five
times in the past two weeks to
ask a question about getting a
new title, and I’ve yet to talk to
an actual person. I end up hang-
ing up because I can’t stand wait-
ing on the line any longer. I think
that’s its plan. It hopes the on-
hold message is so annoying that
everyone hangs up and it never
has to deal with you. Why bother
having a phone number if you
have no intention of answering it?
Thinking my experience may
have been an isolated one and I
may have just been calling on a
day with heavy phone traffic, I
asked other people if they’ve ever
tried to call the DMV. Every
single person I asked said they’ve
never been able to actually speak
to someone via phone.
I’ve tried different locations,
too, even other states, it’s not just
Pa. One recording tells you to go
on its website and find the an-
swer to your question. However, I
wouldn’t be calling you right now
if the answer to my question was
on its website because I’ve been
scanning its page for an hour
with no luck!
Same thing happened with a
spa I was calling to make an
appointment. It rang and rang
and rang. I left a voicemail and
never got a call back. The other
day, I called a business to ask
about a specific gift I planned to
order. The phone rang off the
hook! Does this piss anyone else
off? Sure, I’m a part of the in-
stant-gratification generation and
yes, I live on my iPhone and like
answers immediately, but come
on, why bother having a phone
number if you are going to leave
people hanging in frustration on
the other end?
Where has common courtesy
gone? Out the door with snail
mail and landlines, apparently. I
feel slightly better now that I’ve
bitched and gotten that off my
chest.
Jeff’s Brag
I had the greatest time at The
Woodlands Friday watching one
of the most gifted bands to ever
rise from the local music scene.
The Badlees were
appearing in a rare
night-club appear-
ance, and they rocked
hundreds until last
call. I’m not a big
concert kind of guy,
but I was mesmerized
by the collection of
unsung talent on the
stage.
For those who
weren’t around in the
mid ’90s, The Badlees
broke though nation-
ally with “Angeline is
Coming Home” and
“Fear of Falling”
hitting the charts.
Then, due to an indus-
try-wide consoli-
dation of record la-
bels, The Badlees got
caught up in the ugly side of the
business, where they were basi-
cally put on hold for three years.
By the time they got free of their
label, the momentum was gone.
So close to superstardom. But
listening on Friday, they sounded
as awesome as any band you’ll
see on Montage Mountain. The
band is tight as ever, Pete Palladi-
no’s vocals still soar, and, as
usual, at the core of The Badlees
is chief songwriter, Bret Alexan-
der. One of the most-respected
musicians and producers in the
area, Bret runs a successful re-
cording studio that works with all
the big area bands. I was thrilled
when he agreed to help produce
my Wackjob songs (but don’t
hold that against him).
The occasion for the local
appearance was to promote “See
Me As A Picture, The Best So
Far 1990-2012” which is available
at Gallery of Sound. The CD
features “Gwendolyn” and an
awesome, rockin’ cover of “Mag-
gie May,” but for me, the best
surprise was “Thinking In Ways.”
Although I was on the radio
through The Badlees heyday, I
somehow overlooked this gem.
It’s the haunting ballad of a pre-
paid funeral as a man approaches
the end. It has to be one of the
most addictive songs I’ve ever
heard.
Whether or not The Badlees
ever reach the level they deserve,
for once, NEPA is ahead of the
country. We know about some-
thing great that no one else
knows about! W
Hear Jeff & Amanda Bitch
and Brag Fridays at 3:30 p.m. on
98.5 KRZ.
If you own a business, maybe you should think about
answering this. Yeah, Amanda’s talking to you, DMV.
This week, Jeff’s bragging about
The Badlees.
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Joan is a mother of five and grandmother of four.
She takes so much pride in her family and has a
blessed and beauful marriage of 41 years with her
husband John.
Joan works as a fitness instructor and waitress, she
loves waking up everyday to cook, clean, and be with
her family.
Her daughters Genesis and Moriah
who both work at The Sapphire, share the same
spiritual inner and outer beauty.
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Austina
Giamber,
Mountain Top
A
ustina Giamber owns and operates Holier
Than Thou Tattoo Studio and Fine Arts
Gallery in Wyoming. An entrepreneur, artist,
music lover and community fundraiser,
Austina knows what it means to multitask.
Between juggling her busy schedule with her home life,
Austina is finding time to open a new art gallery/music
venue.
“The building we found is huge,” she shared. “I am
going to try and gear the majority of this project toward
teens. They need something more to do around here,
maybe a little more productive.”
Read some more about award-winning tattoo artist and
proactive NEPAcommunity member.
Favorite thing about your occupation: I have an
abundance of freedom and get to do what I love to make a
living.
Community involvement: I donate to each and every
charity that comes my way. I’ve held numerous charity
events at my studio. I planned and hosted Sk8Tacular in
2008, I had a huge benefit concert in 2009 to help raise
money for missing kids. I’m hoping to get an “awareness”
seminar together by the end of summer to inform the
public what they should be looking for in reference to their
safety when they go and get tattooed as well as making
better choices on the quality of the work that’s going to be
on them for a lifetime.
Awards/honors: I’ve had my tattoos published in
numerous magazines and websites. I just recently won an
award placing third for Best Realism at the Electric City
Tattoo Convention. I also won Best Tattoo Artist 2012 for
the Weekender Readers’ Choice.
Craziest tattoo you’ve done: Oh boy, I’ll try to be
as PG as I’m able to here: This lady came in and wanted
black leather panties tattooed on her entire ass … I also
had to adorn the panties with dangling handcuffs …
Strangest request: I tattooed a very professional man
away from the studio at an event that I was asked to attend,
and let’s just say he was a little “tied up and bound for the
occasion.”
What did you want to be when you grew up? A
rock star/singer, but I can’t sing for shit, so I traded my mic
in for a tattoo machine … much better.
Favorite quote: “Poor is the man whose pleasures
depend on the permission of another” — Madonna.
Three future goals: To be a better artist and more
recognized in my industry; to start doing a ton of traveling
within the next three years. Eventually though, I’d like to
settle down and raise a family and have at least two mini-
mes running around. So I need to get all of the selfish stuff
out of the way first.
...
Who is...
Holier ThanThou ,
tattoo artist/owner
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Mountaingrown
Music
Weekender/Mountaingrown
Original Music Series
SUPPORTING LOCAL MUSIC
... LIKE NEVER BEFORE
WEDNESDAY
5/16/12
at the Woodlands
no cover
Performance by:
Drew Kelly
Live radio broadcast from 10-11 p.m.
on 102.3-FM, The Mountain
Hosted by Alan K. Stout
weekender
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Mon & Tues Noon-6 PM
Wed-Thurs-Fri Noon-8 PM
Sat 10 AM-4 PM
• Sexy Lingerie
• Fantasy Wear
• Thigh Highs • Stockings
• Packaged Lingerie
• Leather & Vinyl
• Romance Enhancement
Essentials
Route 6, Scranton-Carbondale Highway
Exit 191A off I-81 • 570-489-7448
Gift Certificates
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enter our weekly contest. Each month, Weekender readers vote for their
favorite, and the winner receives a $75 gift certificate to Marc’s Tattooing.
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NEPATATTOO.COM
motorhead
Ride of
the Week
By Michael Golubiewski
Special to the Weekender
1971
CHEVROLET CAMARO Z28
Engine:
350-cubic inch
Owner:
Don Fiorucci of
Wilkes-Barre
“The ‘rocket ship’ has an upgraded
3-inch exhaust and an automatic with what
they call a ‘his-and-her shifter’ that you
can speed shift or drive normally,” Fiorucci
says. “Horsepower is 360 plus. (The) car
is very fast with the light body and larger
engine … lots of fun to drive.” W
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TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)
When the bandwidth of your communi-
cation with someone has dwindled to
dial-up, you need to find a way to get
broadband access back. Unfortunately,
something’s gone awry here, so you’re
not likely to get a lot of help from the
other person involved — they’re probably
feeling mostly bewildered, helpless and
frustrated. I bet you feel that stuff, too,
but this is one of those times when you’ll
have to be the one who tries to push past
that stuff. That feels like a lot of work, I
know. Try to forget about that whole
ideal of someone meeting you halfway
and just settle for a meeting, even if you
have to do most of the legwork. It’s better
than the alternative, trust me.
GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)
Your ego is your greatest enemy this
week. That pride is bound to get you into
all kinds of trouble. Yes, it may be gall-
ing to discover that you have to do things
you don’t want to do or that you consider
“beneath you,” but failing to do those
things doesn’t change the reality of the
situation. If you can’t be bothered, you
will probably be replaced. If you’re OK
with that, then go ahead and cling to
your pride. Hopefully it’ll keep you afloat
when other aspects of your life come
crashing down. If you let go of it now,
though, you’re less likely to have to sur-
vive a metaphorical tsunami.
CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)
I wish there were some universally
charming, witty, graceful way to deal
with the moronic boneheads you have to
occasionally encounter, but there isn’t.
There is a generally ineffective and stupid
way to deal with them — and that is to
allow them to ruffle your feathers and
make you upset. Unfortunately, that’s
frequently the tack you’ve been taking
lately. Try to shake it off and regroup and
reload your awesome sense of humor.
You can’t do much about how idiotic
some people are, but you can remember
to laugh about it. And that’s a whole lot
better than crying about it.
LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)
Leos, especially young Leos, are so
eager to be liked and accepted that some-
times you’ll bend over backwards in
order to fulfill people’s assumptions
about you. Afterwards, you often regret
or feel bad about it. Stick to your guns.
One of your great strengths is powerful
self-knowledge and expression. Bending
that to suit others’ perceptions is a huge,
pointless waste of time. Be who you are.
It’s incredibly freeing to accept that nu-
merous people will like you more for that
even though a handful won’t like you at
all. You’re great. Most of us know it.
Now prove you know it.
VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
There are people in your life whose
behavior is so far beyond the pale that it
feels like there’s no reasonable way to
deal with them. That may very well be
true. Of course, the normal solution for
such difficult people is to simply walk
away from them and not interact with
them any more. However, sometimes
that’s easier said than done and, in some
cases, not easily possible (when they’re
your in-laws, for example). If that’s the
situation you find yourself in, it’s still
best to stay as uninvolved as possible.
There’s a way to draw firm, clear bound-
aries without being mean or awful. Find
it.
LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
You love being a good friend, and it’s
wonderful how people can rely on you.
However, there are times when your own
needs or plans must and should take
precedent. You can’t always drop every-
thing and come running every time your
friend calls. This week, you may have to
fail to come through for someone be-
cause life has intervened. They need to
understand that — and so do you. Feeling
guilty about it serves no one. You’ll prob-
ably come through next time, as you have
so many times before, so stop feeling bad
about this time, and get on with your life.
SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
You feel everything so deeply and
intensely that sometimes it’s hard for
others to really help you. You’re swim-
ming in depths only the Loch Ness Mon-
ster could reach, so it may very well be
entirely up to you to find your way back
to the surface where someone can throw
you a life ring buoy and help tow you to
drier ground. There are plenty of people
on shore with floaties in hand, just wait-
ing for you to bob to the surface. Why
don’t you at least head in that direction?
You’ve hung out down here long enough.
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
Your ideas about yourself, while accu-
rate, may not always be in your own best
interest. Being willing to change or ex-
periment is something that children and
teenagers do freely and enthusiastically,
but adults are more resistant to. Be play-
ful, and allow yourself to constantly test
the boundaries of who you are. What was
true five years ago may no longer be the
case. If you’ve decided to stop growing
and changing, you’ve decided to stop
living. I hope that’s never the case. Since
this week provides ample opportunities to
expand the horizons of who you are or
could be, please seize them.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)
This week is all about being more
open-minded and less snobbish than you
have been in the past. Being willing to
overlook minor flaws (which are often
inflated in others’ minds to be major
shortcomings) will not only make you a
better, more gracious and happier person,
it’ll also make you a lot less lonely.
Much of your isolation is self-imposed,
because people don’t always meet your
exacting standards. Relax those standards,
and focus on less superficial traits, and
you will find that the overall quality of
your life goes up, not down — despite
allowing so many “lower-quality” people
into it.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
While it’s certainly safer to expect and
prepare for the worst possible outcome
(which ensures that most of your surpris-
es will be pleasant ones), it does make
for a rather grim, pessimistic outlook on
life. What happened to also hoping for
the best? Somehow, you’ve lost sight of
that, and it’s an important part of the
equation. Sure, girding yourself for a
worst-case scenario is fine, but remember
to envision and aim for a best-case scena-
rio while you’re at it. If you do so, it just
might happen — but if you’re not even
looking for it, you probably won’t even
see it.
PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)
Make yourself busier. Slowing down
may work for some people and might
even be the right solution for you at
times, but it’s not the correct solution
right now. You have too much time to
think at the moment, and your busy mind
has certainly taken advantage of it. Time
to cut it off. Many of your problems only
seem so insurmountable because you
actually have too many hours to dwell
upon them. Get busier, and several of
them might just evaporate. Even if they
don’t disappear completely, they’ll almost
certainly shrink to a much more manage-
able size.
ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,
they say — but it’s also contained other
places. Having a high degree of confi-
dence (not arrogance; be careful, Aries)
can make you a million times more at-
tractive to quality people. Winning the
genetic lottery is only part of the picture
— being proud of who you are ultimately
counts for a whole lot more. This week,
instead of worrying about all the super-
ficial stuff that you may not be as happy
with, own who you are and all the won-
derful qualities you actually have. Turn
up the shine, and watch how people re-
spond. You’ll be pretty pleased. W
To contact Caeriel, e-mail
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
ROSARIO DAWSON
May 9 1979
KENAN THOMPSON
May 10 1978
CORY MONTEITH
May 11 1982
EMILY VANCAMP
May 12 1986
ROBERT PATTINSON
May 13 1986
GEORGE LUCAS
(pictured)
May 14 1944
JAMIE-LYNN SIGLER
May 15 1981
sign language
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speak and see
POETIC
AnthologyBooks (515 Center St.,
Scranton, above Outrageous,
570.341.1443, scrantholo-
gy@gmail.com) All events free, unless
otherwise noted.
❏Book Groups
•Scranton Interplanetary Literary
Agency, a classic science fiction
discussion group: 2nd Tues., 6:30 p.m.
❏Writing Groups
•Open writers group: Sat., noon led
by KK Gordon and Leslee Clapp. Bring
piece of original writing to discuss
and critique.
Barnes &Noble Booksellers
(Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre,
570.829.4210)
❏Special events:
•“Wandering Cartoonist Day:” May12,
9 a.m.-11 p.m. Bob Heim, cartoonist and
author of “The Squeaking Earl,” will
showchildren howfun it is to produce
art and sign copies of book.
•Friends and Animals fromthe
Luzerne County SPCA: May12. Fun-
draiser for regional animal shelter.
Barnes &Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏Events/Book Clubs:
•Open Mic Night: last Tues. of every
month, 6:30 p.m.
•Writer’s Workgroup: Wyoming
Valley Wordsmiths: first/third Tues.
monthly, 7 p.m.
❏Children’s Events:
•Weekly Sat. morning story time, 11
a.m.-noon.
DietrichTheater (60 E. Tioga St.,
Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
•Writers Group: Thurs., 7-8:30 p.m.
Celebrates all types of writing styles,
formats. Join anytime. Free. Call to
register.
NewVisions Studio &Gallery
(201 Vine St., Scranton, www.new-
visionstudio.com, 570.878.3970)
•Writers Showcase: May12, 7 p.m.
Brian Fanelli, Jason Lucarelli. 3 poets,
3 prose writers. Free, donations
encouraged.
Osterhout Library(71 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.821.1959)
•Socrates Cafe Discussion Group:
May10, 6:30-8 p.m. Free.
•Seeking flood-related submissions
for Word Fountain publication: Hurri-
cane Agnes or Hurricane Irene. 1,000
words or less, any genre; original
photos, 2-D art. Deadline May12, send
to Osterhout Free Library, Attn: Word
Fountain, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18701 or wordfountain@os-
terhout.lib.pa.us. For sponsorships,
contact 823.0156.
•E-readers 101: May14, 6:30-8 p.m.
Learn howto use Kindle Touch, Nook.
Free, call to register.
•Poetry Series: May15, 6:30-8 p.m.
Free.
•Women’s Writer Discussion: May15,
6:30 p.m. Free, call to register.
PittstonMemorial Library(47
Broad St., 570.654.9565, pitmem-
lib@comcast.net)
•Crochet Club: Tues. 10 a.m.-noon,
Thurs. 6-7:45 p.m., 12+, registration
required. Participants bring their own
crochet hook, yarn. Call, stop to
register.
•Basic Computer Class for Adults:
Mon., 10:30 a.m. Call to register.
•Children’s Book Week: through
May12. Make-and-take book-
mark while supplies last.
•TAG Meeting: May10, 6
p.m.
•Furry Tails: May12,
10-11:30 a.m. Pre-
register at front desk.
•Monday Lego Club Group: May14, 4
p.m. Club is wait list only by calling.
The Vintage Theater (119 Penn
Avenue, Scranton, 570.589.0271,
www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
•Writer’s critique group: Sat., noon-2
p.m. Bring work samples. Free and
open to public, donations encouraged.
West PittstonLibrary(200
Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
•Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m.
Free. Informal discussion of member-
selected books.
•Weekly story time for children: Fri., 1
p.m. Free.
VISUAL
AFAGallery(514 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton: 570.969.1040 or Artists-
forart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m.
•Life Drawing sessions: every Mon.,
7-9 p.m. Contact ted@tedmichalow-
ski.comfor info.
•Drawing Socials: Sun., 6-9 p.m. $5
GA, $2 student.
•“Intramurals:” through May 25.
Free, open to public.
ArtWorks Gallery(502 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton. 570.207.1815,
artworksnepa.com)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sat., noon-3 p.m., or by appointment.
•Shirley Thomas: Small sculpture
and paintings fromrecycled materi-
als: through May 25.
The Butternut Gallery&
SecondStoryBooks (204
Church St, 2nd Floor, Montrose)
Gallery hours: Wed.-Sat., 11a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sun., 12 p.m.-4 p.m.
•“Better Enjoyed than Hidden:
Collector’s Work at Butternut Gallery:”
through May12. Paintings, sculptures,
jewelry, pottery fromart collectors.
Camerawork Gallery(Down-
stairs in the Marquis Gallery, Laundry
Building, 515 Center St., Scranton,
570.510.5028. www.camerawork-
gallery.org, rross233@aol.com) Gal-
lery hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
•Accepting submissions for new
shows during 2012 & 2013. Photog-
raphy only; all photographic methods
considered. Check out submissions
procedure on website for details.
Everhart Museum(1901 Mulberry
St., Scranton, PA, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
Admission $5 adults; $3 students/
seniors; $2 children 6-12; members
free.
•Titanic: Explore the Legend and100
Years in History: through June 24.
•“BEEyond,” featuring an artistic
exploration via the lens of photog-
rapher Rose-Lynn Fisher, and “Direct-
ing Sunbeams: Beekeeping in North-
east Pennsylvania:” through Sept. 3.
Galleryat the Pocono Com-
munityTheater (88 S. Courtland
St., East Stroudsburg, 570.421.3456.
poconocommunitytheater.org)
•“Wild About Flowers: through June
17. Front gallery, Andrea Robbins-
Rimberg.
•“Vacation Time:” through June17.
Back gallery, Penny Ross.
Luzerne CountyHistorical
SEE SPEAK & SEE, PAGE 58
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M
artial-arts masters from
all over the world will
converge in NEPA as the
Mega Martial Arts Weekend
begins Thursday, May 10. The
event is jam-packed with con-
tests, competitions, hands-on
training sessions, as well as the
opportunity to meet some big-
screen karate legends.
The event was designed to
celebrate skilled martial-arts
champions while passing down
their immense knowledge of the
art form to the next generation.
Our area was chosen for the
event thanks to a few local mas-
ters, including Master Eric Kova-
leski and five-time world karate
champion Grandmaster Cynthia
Rothrock, who went on quite a
journey to make it happen.
“Last year my father (Grand-
master Robert Kovaleski), Cyn-
thia, and myself led a team of
students to Korea to meet these
gentleman, and we planned the
event from there,” said Eric Ko-
valeski, owner of Master Kova-
leski’s Tang Soo Karate USA in
Dickson City. “Cynthia is from
Moosic, she made it big in Holly-
wood, but decided to hold the
event where she grew up. It’s her
hometown, along with mine and
my father’s.”
The busy weekend begins
Thursday with a full day of train-
ing seminars at Master Kova-
leski’s Karate USA with two of
the highest-ranking Grandmas-
ters in the world, Young Duk
Kim and Hee Suk Choi.
“They have the second and
third black belts ever recorded in
Korean martial-arts history,”
remarked Kovaleski. “The event
on Thursday isn’t held every
year; it’s the biggest Korean
martial-arts event to happen in
the past 65 years. People from all
over the world are coming to
attend.”
Festivities continue Friday at
Split Rock Resort & Golf Club
in Lake Harmony with the 14th
Annual USA National Karate
Championships. Approximately
350 competitors will be on hand
to show off their most advanced
karate moves.
“Competitions on Friday in-
clude demo teams, breaking and
jump-front and side-kick contests
with students from all over the
country and world competing,”
Kovaleski said. “It continues into
Saturday with traditional and
open forms, weapons and spar-
ring or free fighting. While com-
petitions are going on, all the
celebrities will be there for pic-
tures and autographs with their
fans.”
Following the competitions
Saturday is the 2nd Annual Leg-
ends of the Martial Arts Hall of
Fame Awards. Stars of sport and
film will be inducted this year
including Grandmaster Chang Il
Do a.k.a. Bruce Lai and Muham-
mad Ali, who won’t be in attend-
ance due to health issues.
“We’ve been truly blessed
because some of the guys com-
ing in from Korea have never
been to the U.S.,” Kovaleski said.
“Some are also action film stars;
Hwang Jang Lee fought Jackie
Chan in ‘Drunken Master’ and
Chang Il Do also had a film
career finishing Bruce Lee’s
movies when he passed away.”
Kovaleski noted that people
who aren’t familiar with martial
arts would also enjoy the family-
friendly event because it provides
a chance to see what the art form
is all about.
“It’s truly remarkable to have
these very famous guys who all
have such huge martial-arts ca-
reers coming here,” he began.
“We are so honored to have them
come to our school in Dickson
City out of all places in the U.S.”
W
Mega Martial Arts Weekend,
May 10-12. For complete info,
visit itsdmdka.com or call
570.307.5425
Chang Il Do, right, who will be on hand for Mega Martial
Arts Weekend, demonstrates a move.
A weekend
for kicks
Martial-arts masters
descend upon NEPA
By Noelle Vetrosky
Weekender Correspondent
GRANDMASTER HEE
SUK CHOI.
GRANDMASTER YOUNG
DUK KIM.
“It’s the biggest
Korean martial-arts
event to happen in
the past 65 years.
People from all over
the world are coming
to attend.”
Organizer Eric Kovaleski
SocietyMuseum(69 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.6244,
lchs@epix.net)
•“The Wonderful Story of Planters
Peanuts:” through Oct. 27. Will be on
display for National Convention of the
Peanut Pals collector’s club, held in
Wilkes-Barre, July.
MahadyGallery(Marywood
University, 570.348.6211 x 2428, mary-
wood.edu/galleries.)
Summer hours: Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3
p.m.
•Graduate Exhibition: through June
15. John Kolbek, Kelly Ufkin, Sarrah F.
Dibble, Niko J. Kallianiotis, Georgia
Test.
Marquis Art &Frame (122 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0518)
Gallery hours Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
•“In the Details”-works by Erika
Baez, Omar Rodriguez Jr. & Allison
Maslow: May11-July 7. Opening recep-
tion May11, 5-8 p.m.
Meeting of the Art Waters
(meetingoftheartwaters.com)
•An exhibit by seven international
photographers through June 30 at
T.W. Shoemaker Art (312 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming). Portion of proceeds
benefit North Branch Land Trust and
Blue Chip Farms Animal Refuge.
NewVisions Studio &Gallery
(201 Vine St., Scranton, www.new-
visionstudio.com, 570.878.3970)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6 p.m.
and by appointment.
•May Exhibit: “Visceral” by Bri Her-
manson / Blown-Glass Sculptures by
Michael Swanson / Camera for a Cure
by Timmy Walsh: through May18.
PaulyFriedmanArt Gallery
(Misericordia University,
570.674.6250, misericordia.edu/art)
Gallery Hours: Mon. closed, Tue.-
Thurs. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sat.-Sun. 1-5 p.m.
•“Exceptional Art-Exceptional Art-
ists:” 2nd floor, John J. Passan Hall,
lower campus. Artists from Deutsch
Institute’s Verve Vertu Art Studio.
Info: 674.8255, mdonato@miser-
icordia.edu
•“The Impact and History of Nursing
Education in Luzerne County, 1887-
2012:” through June 29.
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
•Art On Main: May19, 3-8 p.m.
•ARTventures Trip to Glynallyn: May
22, departs 9 a.m., returns 3:30 p.m.
$55/members, $65/non-members.
Includes chauffeured ride to and from
Morristown, N.J. Call or e-mailDeb-
bie@poconoarts.org.
SchulmanGallery(2nd floor of
LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S. Prospect
St., Nanticoke, www.luzerne.edu/
schulmangallery, 570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
•Annual Student Show: through
June 28. Graphics, paintings, photog-
raphy, computer graphics, portfolios.
Sordoni Art Galleryat Wilkes
University(150 S. River St., Stark
Learning Center)
Gallery hours: Daily, noon-4:30 p.m.
•“Detroit Forsaken:” through May
20.
STARGalleryat the Mall at
Steamtown(570.969.2537/
343.3048)
•“With Hearts On Our Sleeves:”
through May 31.
The Vintage Theater (119 Penn
Avenue, Scranton, 570.589.0271,
www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
Gallery hours: Wed., 6 p.m.-midnight;
Thurs.-Sat., noon-6 p.m.
•2nd Annual Rhythm of The Region:
through May 31.•Steampunk Mas-
querade Exhibit: July 6-July 28, seek-
ing submissions. E-mail photos of
works, brief artist bio, contact info to
info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com,
mail to theater. Early deadline June1.
W
-- compiled by Stephanie
DeBalko, Weekender Staff Writer
Send your listings to:
weekender@theweekender.com,
90 E. Market Street Wilkes-Barre
PA18703 or fax to 570.831.7375.
Deadline for publication is
Mondays at 2 p.m.
SPEAK & SEE, FROM
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100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
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TE A M E F F O RT CY CL E
12 80 Sa nsSouciPk w y,H a noverTw p,Pa .1870 6
570 -82 5-4581 w w w .tea m effortcycle.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
110 Lost
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vitos & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
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the directions!
LOST
Gold multi gem
stone earring with
omega back. Lost
approximately 1
month ago.
Reward offered.
570-639-1861,
leave message.
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `08 TL
Type S, automatic
and manual trans-
mission. 53,000
miles. $18,959
570-479-3452
DODGE `00 DURANGO
SPORT
4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd
row seat, runs
good, needs body
work $1900.
570-902-5623
412 Autos for Sale
Audi `01 A6 Quattro
123,000 miles, 4.2
liter V8, 300hp, sil-
ver with black
leather,heated
steering wheel, new
run flat tires, 17”
rims, 22 mpg, Ger-
man mechanic
owned.
Reduced $4995.
570-822-6785
HONDA ‘08 ACCORD
4 door, EXL with
navigation system.
4 cyl, silver w/
black interior. Satel-
lite radio, 6CD
changer, heated
leather seats, high,
highway miles. Well
maintained. Monthly
service record
available. Call Bob.
570-479-0195
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
412 Autos for Sale
‘11 DODGE
DAKOTA CREW
4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl.
14k, Factory
Warranty.
$21,399
‘11 Ford Escape
XLT, 4x4, 26k,
Factory Warranty,
6 Cylinder
$20,499
‘11 Nissan Rogue
AWD, 17k, Factory
Warranty.
$19,399
‘08 Chrysler
Sebring Conv.
Touring 6 cyl.
32k $12,899
‘08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42K. 5 speed,
Factory warranty.
$11,899
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
4x4 65k, a title.
$12,799
‘06 FORD FREESTAR
62k, Rear air A/C
$7999
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,199
‘11 Toyota Rav 4
4x4 AT
only 8,000 miles,
new condition
$23,099
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
412 Autos for Sale
VOLKSWAGEN ‘00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
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509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
503 Accounting/
Finance
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
503 Accounting/
Finance
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
ASSOCIATE
McCarthy Tire Service is seeking a full time
Accounts Payable Associate for our corpo-
rate operations in Wilkes-Barre. Qualified
candidate must be proficient in AP entry and
processing, must be able to work in a fast
paced environment and be detailed oriented.
Candidates must also be proficient in Excel
and have a working knowledge of Microsoft
office. Excellent written and verbal communi-
cation skills are essential.
We offer a competitive pay rate and benefits
package that includes medical, dental and
vision insurance, 401(K) program with com-
pany match, vacation and personal holiday
time off.
Interested applicants may send resume
with salary requirements to
tschooley@mccarthytire.com or to
Human Resources Department,
McCarthy Tire Service, 340 Kidder Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
WHEN: May 11, 2012
WHERE: Hampton Inn & Suites
876 Schechter Dr.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
TIME: 12:00 Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Turner Bros. is seeking qualified
candidates for the following positions:
NCCCO Operators - Conventional & Hydraulic,
Riggers, Wind Turbine Techs, QA/QC Inspectors
with wind industry experience, Mechanic,
Forklift Operators, Tower Washers and
General Laborers. Experience helpful.
Bring your resume and meet our
Leadership Team.
Turner Bros. is an Equal Opportunity Employer
JOB
FAIR
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
421 Boats &
Marinas
GRUMMAN ‘95 DEEPV
16’ 48hp Evinrude
50 lb thrust electric
motor. All tackle
and life vests
included. Live well,
fish finder. $4,000
570-579-3975
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
FREIGHTLINER ‘96
FL70
5.9L CUMMINS,
6 speed, 24’ box
with tail gate.
26000 lb.
$6995.00 or BO
570-655-2804
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘07
SCREAMING EAGLE
DYNA
Assembled by
Custom Vehicle
Operations. Very
Unique, Fast Bike.
1800cc. 10,000
miles. Performance
Rinehart pipes,
comfortable
Mustang seat with
back rest and
detachable rack ,
Kuryakyn pegs and
grips, color
matched frame, SE
heavy breather air
filter comes with
HD dust cover and
gold CVO owners
key. Excellent
condition. Silver
Rush/ Midnight
Black. Asking
$12,500
Call Ron @
570- 868-3330
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. 6 speed.
Cruise control. Back
rests, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories.
19,000miles. $13,250.
Williamsport, PA
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE
Golden Anniversary.
Silver/Black. New
Tires. Extras. Excel-
lent Condition.
19,000 miles
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
MATTIE
AUTOMOTIVE
220 Bennett
Street, Luzerne
Motorcycle State
Inspection,
Tire Sales &
Maintenance
570-283-1098
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
MOTORHOME
COACHMAN
2005 ENCORE
380DS 15,500
miles Cat engine,
Allison Auto trans,
New Tires, New
Aluminum Wheels,
new Brakes
Satellite antenna.
Has R-TITLE
repaired in 2008.
perfect condi-
tion.$74,500.
Any Questions call
570-655-2804
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE ‘05 CARAVAN
SXT Special Edition.
Stow and go, beau-
tiful van. Leather
heated seats with
sunroof, tinted win-
dows, luggage
rack. Brandy color,
85K miles.
$11,875 negotiable
570-301-4929
GMC `01 JIMMY
Less than 5,000
miles on engine.
4WD. Power acces-
sories. Inspected.
Runs great. $4,500
or best offer. Call
570-696-9518 or
570-690-3709
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $7595.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
506 Administrative/
Clerical
Church Administrative
Assistant
3 hours/day.
3 days/week. Expe-
rience as a secre-
tary with MS Office,
social media and
website mainte-
nance required.
Reply by 5/18/2012.
office@
firwoodumc.org
or call 570-823-7721
Leave message.
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTER/HELPER
Full time. Residential
remodeling. Experi-
ence helpful. Must
have valid PA Dri-
ver’s license and
reliable transporta-
tion. $12/hour to
start. Holidays and
one week paid
vacation after one
year. Call Monday
through Friday 6-
8pm. 570-696-2494
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
Automotive
Claims Assistant/
Customer Service
Applicants must
have a good work
ethic, should be well
organized and have
excellent phone
skills. Applicants
must be able to
communicate effec-
tively on the phone
and in person. The
applicant should
have basic typing
skills, and some
data entry experi-
ence is preferred.
Knowledge of Span-
ish is a plus. This
position is a full time
position.
Benefit package
available.
PLEASE E-MAIL
RESUMES TO
joann.Lombardo@
pennwarrantycorp.
com
522 Education/
Training
EMT/PARAMEDIC
INSTRUCTORS
DoH Instructor
required for Lec-
tures, also need skill
Instructors for new
Paramedic Program
starting up. Send
resume and letter of
intent to
Barbara.Reese@
mccann.edu
by May 30, 2012
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
STAFF WANTED
Must be profession-
al, energetic, hard-
working, with the
ability to multitask.
Cooking experience
required. Daytime
hours available.
Call for details at
570-674-4395,
or stop by 566
Memorial Highway,
Dallas to apply.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
To place your
ad call...829-7130
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HOUSEKEEPING
Full time. Morning,
Afternoon and
Evening Shifts.
Apply in person:
Wilkes-Barre Family
YMCA, 40 W.
Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers: $2,500
Sign-On Bonus
Home Nightly
Hazleton, PA
Dedicated Run.
CDL-A, 1 year expe-
rience required.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
GENERAL
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
West Side, semi re-
tired & home mak-
ers welcome, will
train. 570-288-8035
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CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit Waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 36 month lease 31,500 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and
$2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford
cash rebate. “Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford-Lincoln is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
Auto., CD, Aluminum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless
Entry, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 36 month lease 31,500 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.
Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side
Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite
Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 36 month lease 31,500 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.
, V6, CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 36 month
lease 31,500 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.
XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Air Bags, PL,
PW, CD, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof
Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite
Radio. Keyless Entry, Rear
Cargo Convenience Pkg.,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 36 month
lease 31,500 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.
XLT, Safety Canopy, PL, Side
Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PW,
CD, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass, Roof Rack,
16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, Rear
Cargo Convenience Pkg., Keyless
Entry,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 36 month lease 31,500 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/12.
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
506 Administrative/
Clerical
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
506 Administrative/
Clerical
468 Auto Parts
548 Medical/Health
468 Auto Parts
548 Medical/Health
Kingston Commons, a Long Term Care Facility
located in Kingston, PA, is looking for a Regis-
tered Dietician. Candidates for this full-time
position must possess a Bachelor’s degree in
Food & Nutrition, have clinical experience in
healthcare setting, have a current PA licensure
and registration with ADA.
REGISTERED DIETITIAN
Apply In Person:
Kingston Commons
615 Wyoming Ave. • Kingston, PA 18704
Fax: 570-288-8335, or email resume to:
administrator@kingstoncommons.com
Drug Free Work Place • E.O.E.
ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL
COMPANIES IN THE INDUSTRY
Proud of What We Do!
**Vocational Training or Industrial
Mechanical experience REQUIRED!
Maintenance Technicians Job Fair
Cargill Case Ready in Hazleton, PA is HIRING for
Day and Night Maintenance Techs!
12hr schedule pays up to $24.10/hr
Benefts include: medical, dental, vision and 401K
When: Saturday May 12, 2012
What Time: From 10:00am to 2:00 pm
Where: Cargill Plant. At 65 Green Mountain Rd. Hazleton, PA
570-384-8460
(We are located on the last entrance of the Humboldt Industrial Park
in Hazleton, PA, immediately pass Eagle Rock)
“On site applications and interviews”
Cargill is an Equal Employment Opportunity
and Affrmative Action employer
and a drug free place.
Applications will only be accepted
for Maintenance Tech
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Local manufacturing company is seeking a full-
time Customer Service Representative to join our
team. This position serves as the point of contact
for customers and proactively works to resolve
any customer issues, responsible for monitoring
all incoming customer orders and entering orders
through web-based software. Must demonstrate
strong, effective communication and problem
solving skills, promptly communicate with appro-
priate staff and management and customers to
ensure timely and quality delivery of orders, have
excellent organization skills with the ability to pri-
oritize tasks, and work well under pressure in a
fast-paced work environment. People skills are
essential in this position, and the ideal candidate
should be friendly, pleasant, and maintain a pro-
fessional demeanor at all times. Candidate should
have at least 4 years Customer Service experi-
ence. Even though not required for the position,
applicants with a College Degree and Supervisory
experience are strongly encouraged to apply. We
offer a competitive wage and benefits package.
Qualified applicants should apply by mailing a
resume to: c/o The Times Leader
Box 4010
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250
Two person crew, no experience necessary,
company will train. The work is outdoor,
fast-paced, very physical and will require the
applicant to be out of town for eight day intervals
followed by six days off. Applicants must have a
valid PA drivers license and clean driving record.
Starting wage is negotiable but will be no less than
$14.00 per with family health, dental and 401k.
ENTRY LEVEL
CONSTRUCTION LABORER
Apply at R.K. Hydro-Vac, Inc.
1075 Oak St., Pittston, PA 18640
E-mail resume to:
tcharney@rkhydrovacpa.com
or call 800-237-7474
Monday to Friday8:30 to 4:30
E.O.E. and Mandatory Drug Testing.
OFFICE MANAGER
Must have basic accounting skills, good phone
etiquette, and data entry skills. Will be respon-
sible for filing, reviewing payroll, vender inter-
actions, and various programs. Must be familiar
with MS Office products.
Interested individuals should apply in person at:
Keystone Automotive Operations, Inc.
100 Slocum Ave., Exeter, PA 18643
E.O.E. M/F/D/V
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Director of
Safety & Recruiting
BOLUS FREIGHT
SYSTEMS INC.,
One of the areas
premier
transportation
companies has a
tremendous sen-
ior management
opportunity avail-
able. This position
will allow you to
use your leader-
ship, experience
and skills to direct
and lead our
recruiting and
safety programs.
We are seeking
qualified, experi-
enced candidates
with solid under-
standing of the
transportation
industry, DOT
safety regulations
and driver recruit-
ing experience.
Excellent commu-
nication and orga-
nizational skills
are a must. This
senior manage-
ment position
offers a very com-
petitive salary and
benefit package.
Please send
resume to:
BOLUS FREIGHT
SYSTEMS INC.
700 N. KEYSER AVE
SCRANTON, PA
18504
ATTN: PRESIDENT
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
548 Medical/Health
CAREGIVERS
Looking for mature
& compassionate
people to work with
elderly in their
homes. Personal
care & transporta-
tion required.
All Shifts available.
Call: 570-338-2681
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Community Home
Workers
Full time week on
week off position
(including 7 asleep
overnight shifts)
working with indi-
viduals with devel-
opmental disabili-
ties in the Wilkes-
Barre Area! Valid
Drivers License is
required. Experi-
ence is helpful paid
training is provided.
Starting salary is
$22,048 plus Bene-
fits for full time
include health insur-
ance for employee,
vacation and holi-
day pay, 401K,
Life Insurance.
For information or
application, call
IMPACT SYSTEMS/
Keystone Human
Services. at 829-
3671. Drug Free
Workplace EOE
548 Medical/Health
HEALTHCARE
A Leader in the
Receivables Man-
agement Industry
has multiple posi-
tions available:
• Data Entry
• Cash Application
• A/R
Representatives
• Professional
Coding
Medical office
experience pre-
ferred. Ability to
work independently
a PLUS.
Fax resume to
570-208-5556.
LPNs/
Resident Care Aides
Looking for caring,
and compassionate
people for
Alzheimer’s assist-
ed living facility.
We are currently
hiring Part Time
LPNs (3rd shift).
Resident Care
Aides, all shifts.
Must be a high
school graduate,
experience pre-
ferred. NO PHONE
CALLS PLEASE.
Apply within.
Keystone
Garden Estates
100 Narrows Rd
Route 11
Larksville, PA 18651
OPTICIAN
Optician needed for
busy eye doctor
offices located in
Berwick & Blooms-
burg. 1 Full time and
1 part time per diem
position available.
Experience pre-
ferred but not need-
ed. Will train the
right person. Send
resume to: Dr.
Gary Finnegan,
133 West Front
Street, Berwick,
PA 18603
Part Time
Clinic Coordinator
(NON-NURSING
POSITION)
For one physician
medical practice in
Plains, PA. Office
and home work
combination. Expe-
rience in front office
medical practice
necessary.
Call 570-814-0657
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
551 Other
DELIVERY
SETUP PERSON
Part Time. 20-30
hours. Must have
PA driver’s license.
Must be available
Friday-Monday.
Call 570-283-3800
551 Other
Pet Groomer/Stylist
Experience required.
Must have knowl-
edge of grooming
standards for all
breeds. Must be
available to work
weekends.
Tools and uniforms
provided.
PREPPY PET SUITES
FAX RESUME TO
570-270-3720
554 Production/
Operations
MACHINE OPERATOR
TRAINEES/PRINT
OPERATOR TRAINEES
A major thermo-
forming plastics
company is seeking
full time positions
for Machine Opera-
tor Trainees/Print
Operator trainees.
Qualified candidates
must possess
strong mechanical
aptitude with good
written and oral
communication
skills. Starting
wage, $17.62/hr
with 3/4 day weeks-
12 hour shifts. Drug
screenings and
background checks
are conditions of
employment.
Applications are
accepted on-site: 8
AM-5 PM or you
may forward
resume to:
Fabri-Kal Corporation
ATTN:
Human Resources
Valmont Industrial
Park
150 Lions Drive
Hazleton, PA. 18202
Phone: 570-861-3303
procure@
Fabri-Kal.com
* * O P T I C A L O P T I C A L * *
• MACHINE
OPERATOR
3pm-8pm
Benefits for full
time. Send resume
or apply in person,
Monday-Friday,
8:30a - 6pm to:
LUZERNE OPTICAL
180 N. WILKES-
BARRE BLVD.
WILKES-BARRE, PA
18702
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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Classified’s got
the directions!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
Sales Inside/Outside
for Insurance Office
LOW SALARY/
HIGH COMMISSION
GO GETTERS ONLY
EMAIL RESUMES
STREMEL2@
NATIONWIDE.COM
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
M
A
Y
9
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
6
3
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
MAINTENANCE POSITIONS
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN I
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC II
MAINTENANCE TRAINEE
Fabri-Kal Corporation, a major thermoforming plastics
company, has immediate full time benefitted positions.
12 hour shifts.
Industrial Electrician: Conduit, emt and ridged pipe; Equip-
ment testing; AC/DC motors and drives; PLC systems. 3 Yrs
Exp. HS/GED required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Mechanic: Troubleshooting, hydraulic/pneumatic, machine
shop, plumbing, welding, rebuild mechanic devices, schemat-
ics, test equipment, basic electrical systems. 3 Yrs Exp.
HS/GED required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Maintenance Trainee: Associates Degree in Electronic field or
Technical Certification in Electronics to include AC/DC Funda-
mentals, Industrial Electricity, Motor Controls, AC/DC Drives,
PLC’s, Basic testing equipment/Multi-meter/Amp probes.
Drug & Alcohol screening and background checks are condi-
tions of employment. Competitive wage and benefits package:
Family Health Insurance, Prescription, Dental & Vision, Disabil-
ity, 401K, Education, Paid Leave. EOE. Apply on site
Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM; or forward resume to:
Fabri-Kal Corporation
ATTN: Human Resources
150 Lions Drive
Hazle Township, PA 18202
FAX (570) 501-0817; EMAIL: HRPA@Fabri-Kal.com
www.fabri-kal.com
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
Sales Representative
Full or part time.
Focus is primarily on
growing the com-
mercial and resi-
dential customer
base through face-
to-face solicitation
of targeted com-
mercial prospects
within a defined
area. Base income
in addition to resid-
ual commission with
car allowance.
Health benefits and
401(k).
Send resume to
Tulpehocken
Spring Water, P.O.
Box 1474, Scranton,
PA 18501, fax to
570-424-2349 or
email: tulp1@ptd.net
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
TURN KEY OPERATION
Located at
Wyoming Valley Mall
must sell. $125,000
negotiable. Ask for
Rob 570-693-3323
610 Business
Opportunities
FIRE FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!! YOUR BOSS!!!!
“WORK FOR
YOURSELF”
INVEST IN
YOURSELF
WITH
JAN – PRO
*Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
*Insurance &
Bonding
* Training & Ongoing
Support
* Low Start Up
Costs
*Veterans Financing
Program
* Accounts available
through
0ut Wilkes-Barre
& Scranton
570-824-5774
Janpro.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
COINS. Fine - Ex
Fine 56-P, 58-P, 60-
D, 61-D, 63-P $75.
570-287-4135
712 Baby Items
STROLLER. New 3
wheel jogger still in
box, never used.
Paid $249, asking
$225. Call
570-771-6081
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER.
Complete set up in-
cludes office size
desk & chair. E-
machines CPU with
XP Home. Craig flat
screen monitor,
Lexmark color print-
er. Excellent.
All $300
570-489-2675
744 Furniture &
Accessories
COMPUTER DESK:
Very good condition.
Black with slide key-
board shelf. $45.
570-740-1412 or
570-498-0439
Entertainment cen-
ter with glass stereo
cabinet. Very good
condition. Asking
$75. 570-239-6011
HUTCH, Lighted
Oak Dining Room. 2
pieces, bottom is
combination of
doors & drawers.
570-313-9763
Mattress
Queen Plush-Top
Set
New in Plastic
Must Sell ASAP
$150
Call Steve @
570-280-9628
ROCKER,
wood/tapestry,
$75. RECLINER,
Burgundy velour
cloth, $125.
SOFA, CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 6 PM
570-675-5046
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SOFA, LOVESEAT,
CHAIR. Brown. Fair
condition. FREE
570-3882388
750 Jewelry
CAROL IS BUYING
PAYING TOP
DOLLAR for your
gold, silver, co
ins, scrap jewel-
ry, rings, dia-
monds, neck-
laces,bracelets,
old antique cos-
tume jewelry.
Guaranteed to
be paid top dol-
lar. WE MAKE
HOUSE CALLS!
570-855 7197
570-328-3428
756 Medical
Equipment
Lift chair, mauve,
battery back up,
very good condition
$300 OBO.
570-287-6967 leave
message.
758 Miscellaneous
Car Rims. Honda, 4
pair 15” will fit any
model Accord,
Civic, and Del-Sol
cars. Brand new.
asking $175
570-239-6011.
Yard sale leftovers,
household items,
decorations, wood-
en shelf, etc.Asking
$200 for everything,
call 570-239-6011
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
774 Restaurant
Equipment
LIGHT, Neon, Coca-
Cola. $50, firm.
570-313-9763
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV. 60” HD Projec-
tion TV. Good condi-
tion. $200, OBO.
570-313-9763
786 Toys & Games
TRAX. Girl’s, kid’s,
18 months + up.
New in box, battery
& charger included.
Asking $50.
570-328-4927
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
WE PAY MORE
FOR YOUR
GOLD, SILVER
JEWELRY,
COINS SCRAP
JEWELRY, Bring
it on down for a
great price.
Anything old in
good condition,
trains, toys etc.
570-328-3428
570-855-7197
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTENS- FREE
Includes food, litter,
litter box & scoop,
chow & toys.
570-270-0124
leave message
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
BASSET HOUND PUPS
AKC & UKC regis-
tered. Try-lemon
and white. Excellent
hunters and great
pets.
(570) 490-1464
BRAZILIAN MASTIFF
PUPPIES
3 males, 1 female,
$600 males $650
females. De-
wormed. Ready to
go. Great mothers
day present!
570-328-2569
ENGLISH BULLDOG
PUPPIES
Call 570-379-3729
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES
Pure-Bred. Black &
Brown. $500. Call
570-840-4243
815 Dogs
CAVALIER KING
CHARLES SPANIEL
PUPPIES
Registration avail-
able, health certi-
fied. $700 to
$1,500.
HAVANESE
PUPPIES
All colors and both
genders available.
$700 to $1,300
www.willowspring
cavaliers.com
215-538-2179
POMERANIAN
AKC, 9 weeks, 1
female, & 1 male.
Chocolate &
White. Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. Home
Raised. $500.
570-864-2643
AKC DOBERMAN PUP
Male.Ready May 20.
Champion line. Call
570-788-2963
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
225-227 Boston Ave
Double block.
Wyoming Area
schools. Out of flood
zone. 1 side rented
to long term tenant
at $525 /month.
Other side remod-
eled - move in or
rent at $650/month.
3 bedrooms each
side, gas furnaces,
sunrooms, large
yard. $149,000. Call
570-357-0042
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner. Call Bob at
570-654-1490
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Lawn Care
Technician
Looking for career change?
We provide initial & ongoing training.
Our technicians apply fertilizer, lime & weed
preventatives as well as insect control & turf
aeration services for residential & commercial
customers. Full time work. Monday-Friday.
8 AM – 5 PM. Must have good math skills, clean
driving record & pass physical & drug test.
Apply online at:
www.grasshopperlawns.com
Or stop in for application at:
470 E. State Street Larksville, PA 18651
Questions? Email Brian Phillips at:
Grasshopper.jobs@gmail.com
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
912 Lots & Acreage
DURYEA
196 Foote Avenue
Corner lot, border-
ing Foote Ave and
McAlpine St. Com-
mercial zoning.
$10,000 or best
offer. Please Call
610-675-9132
915 Manufactured
Homes
EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE
(Formerly Pocono
Park) and San Souci
Park. Like new, sev-
eral to choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
Modern & spacious
1st floor, wall to wall
carpet. Appliances,
washer & dryer
hookup.
Off street parking.
Security, no pets.
$450 month.
570-655-1606
DALLAS
1 bedroom, 1st floor
1 bedroom.
$650/month all
inclusive. W/w car-
peting. Security,
No Pets.
570-690-1591
DUPONT
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room townhouse
style apartment.
Lots of closet
space, with new
carpets and com-
pletely repainted.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer hook up.
Nice yard & neigh-
borhood, no pets.
$595 + security. Call
570-479-6722
DUPONT
Totally renovated 5
room apartment
located on 1st floor.
Partially furnished,
brand new fridge/
electric range, elec-
tric washer & dryer.
Brand new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting/
flooring & energy
efficient windows. 1
bedroom with large
closet, living room,
laundry room, stor-
age room, base-
ment & large front
porch. Easy access
to I-81, airport &
casino. Off street
parking. No smok-
ing. $600 + utilities
& security. Call
570-762-8265
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EXETER
1st floor. 3 rooms +
bat h. Appl i ances
included & some
utilities. $520 +
electric, security &
references. No
pets, no smoking.
570-574-9561 or
570-696-3523
FORTY FORT
1 BEDROOM APTS
Very nice, clean,
great neighbor-
hood, hardwood
floors, a/c, washer
/dryer with newer
appliances, stor-
age, 1st/last/securi-
ty with one year
lease. References
required. $650-
$695 + utilities.
Water/sewer by
owner, no pets,
non-smoking.
Call 202-997-9185
for appointment
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 4 rooms,
wall to wall carpet,
heat, public water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Tile
bathroom with
shower. Attic &
yard. Stove & fridge
furnished. Washer /
dryer hookup. Good
location, off street
parking, No pets. 1
year lease & securi-
ty, $650. Call
570-655-0530
FORTY FORT
Ransom Street, 1st
floor, 1 bedroom,
dining room, oak
hardwood floors,
central air, range &
fridge included. Off
street parking.
$585/month utilities
by tenant. Security,
references, lease,
pets maybe? Hand-
icapped accessible
570-287-5775 or
570-332-1048.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
2 bedroom. $675/
month. Includes gas
heat. Security &
references required
No pets. Call
570-288-4200
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over-
sized executive
style apartment
in large historic
home. Two bed-
rooms, one bath,
granite kitchen,
hardwood floors,
dining room, liv-
ing room, base-
ment storage,
beautiful front
porch, washer/
dryer. $1,200
monthly plus util-
ities. No pets. No
smoking. Call
570-472-1110
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Freshly painted, 2
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove, wash-
er/dryer & water
provided, off-street
parking, no pets,
$525/month + heat,
electric &
security deposit.
Call (570)417-2919
KINGSTON
Nice area. Modern,
clean, 1 bedroom,
2nd floor. Recently
painted. Refriger-
ator & stove, wash-
er/ dryer hook up,
off-street parking,
no dogs. $550/
month & security,
includes heat, water
& sewer.
570-545-6057
KINGSTON
PETS PETS ALLOWED! ALLOWED!
Modern 1 bedroom
on the park
between Market &
Pierce Bridges.
$555/mo + electric
washer/dryer in apt.
Air, Dishwasher,
Free Internet,
Parking, Storage.
Call Jeff at
570-822-8577
KINGSTON/PRINGLE
Totally remodeled,
clean, 1 ½ bedroom
half double (apart-
ment size). All new
stainless appliances.
Backyard, large
driveway. No pets.
$625 + utilities &
security. Call Fadwa,
570-574-1818
LUZERNE
1 bedroom. Quiet,
nice neighborhood.
Off street parking.
Heat included. $525
Call 570-441-4101
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible. Equal
Housing Opportuni-
ty. 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
Immediate Openings!
NANTICOKE
1st floor. 1 bed-
room. ALL UTILI-
TIES INCLUDED!
Off street parking.
Fresh paint.
NO PETS
$525 + security
570-477-6018
leave message
SWOYERSVILLE
All new, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath.
stove, dishwasher
microwave, wash-
er/dryer hookup.
Off-street parking,
no pets. $560/
month, + utilities,
references, lease &
security.
(570) 301-7723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
Spacious 1 bed-
room 1st floor. New
carpeting, gas
range and fridge
included. Garage
parking, no dogs.
References and
security required.
$450/mo. Water,
sewer, garbage fee
incl. Tenant pays
gas and electric
570-696-3596
30+
DAY
BEING
REMODELED
NORTH
WILKES-BARRE
FIRST FLOOR
Spacious
1 bedroom with
aesthetic fire-
places, new
kitchens, wall-
to-wall, built in
appliances &
MORE. APPLI-
CATION/EMPLO
YMENT VERIFI-
CATION “being
considered” NO
PETS/SMOKING
2 YEARS @
$625+ UTILITIES.
MANAGED!
America Realty
288-1422
WEST PITTSTON
Large 2 bedroom,
2nd floor . Hard-
wood floors,
balcony, heat & hot
water included.
$775/month + secu-
rity. No smoking.
570-947-9340
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
155 W. River St.
1 bedroom, some
appliances included,
all utilities included
except electric,
hardwood floors,
Pet friendly. $600.
570-969-9268
WILKES-BARRE
King’s College
Campus
3 Large Bedrooms,
living room, wall to
wall, large kitchen &
bath with tile floors.
Stove, fridge, heat,
water & off street
parking included.
Shared yard. $900 +
security. That’s only
$300 per person.
570-823-0589
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,000 &
3,800 Sq. Ft.
WILL DIVIDE
OFFICE / RETAIL
Call 570-829-1206
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
3,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WEST PITTSTON
OFFICE SPACE
Containing Six
separate offices, 1
large meeting
room. Segregated
bathrooms. Kitch-
enette. Total
recent renovation.
Great location. Lot
parking in rear.
$3,500 monthly.
570-299-5471
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
1st floor laundry,
new carpeting and
paint. $590 + utilities
570-814-3838
PITTSTON
Remodeled 3 bed-
room double block.
Fenced yard. Pool.
$700. Includes
garbage, sewer &
heat. First / last
month’s rent +
security. No pets.
References. Avail-
able May 7. Call
570-954-0655
WILKES-BARRE
1/2 double. 3 bed-
rooms. Wall to wall
carpeting, washer /
dryer hookup.
Fenced in yard.
$475 plus utilities
and security. Call
570-472-2392
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
JACKSON TWP.
3 bedroom home
on Hillside Road.
$650/mo + utilities.
Lake Lehman
School District.
No pets.
Call American
Asphalt Paving Co.,
at 570-696-1181,
ext. 243 between
7:00AM and 3PM
Monday -Friday
DALLAS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
Single home in
gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Granite
countertops, hard-
wood floors, gas
fireplace, appli-
ances included.
Quiet 55 plus com-
munity. No Pets.
One year lease.
$1675/mo + utilities
& security. Monthly
maintenance fee
included.
570-592-3023
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
962 Rooms
ROOM WANTED
55+ male, Pittston
area. Would be
there 11am Monday
through 1am on Fri-
day. 732-803-8786
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
HOUSE CLEANING
We would love to
clean your home.
We clean around
your schedule.
We clean weekly,
bi-weekly, and
monthly. We also
do one time clean-
ing. Call Eddie
570-677-0344 or
online at www.
empresacleaning.
com
1057Construction &
Building
FS CONSTRUCTION
Specializing in all
types of home
improvements,
complete remodel-
ing from start to fin-
ish, additions, roof-
ing, siding, electrical
and plumbing, all
types of excavation
& demolition, side-
walks and concrete
work, new home
construction, with
new model on dis-
play. Free esti-
mates, licensed,
insured. Call Frank
at 570-479-1203
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Moving, Deliver-
ies, Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
1165 Lawn Care
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
YARD CLEAN UP
Attics & Basements
Complete clean ups
Garden tilling
Call for quotes
570-954-7699 or
570-926-9029
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
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SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
NOW INTR OD UCING
K ASE Y F R OM AF F INITY
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
TUE SD AY
2 F OR 1
TH UR SD AY
30 M INUTE S
$2 0
SATUR D AY
H AL F OF F AL L
SE SSIONS
NOW H IR ING —
1 P OSITION
P AR K ING IN TH E R E AR
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The Aroma A Spa
405 N. River Street • Wilkes-Barre
ORIENTAL SHIATSU
BODY MASSAGE
570-991-8566
10 AM
to 10 PM
DAILY
2
9
3
7
3
8
570-654-5550 570-654-5550
THE THE
Day Spa Day Spa
HOURS: HOURS:
MON. THRU SAT. 11 TO 9 MON. THRU SAT. 11 TO 9
SUN. 12 TO 9 SUN. 12 TO 9
PITTSTON, PENNSYLVANIA
EMPORIUM EMPORIUM
WELCOME GIAVANNA!
STILL HIRING — A COUPLE SHIFTS
LEFT. CASH BONUS AFTER 1 MONTH
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888888888
2
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3333333333333333
hot talk, local slngles
MeegztMeoI
B7O.BO4.Ø040
Get your local number: 1.800.811.1633
18+ www.vibeline.com
F
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19 Asian
Spa
Open 7 Days 10am-11:30pm
FEATURING BODY AND
FOOT MASSAGES
$10 OFF HOUR
SESSIONS
570-337-3966
Unit 19A Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
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Secret Moments
RELAXING BODY RUBS
PRIVATE AND DISCRETE
BY APPOINTMENT
10AM-8PM • IN CALL
570.344.5395 • SCRANTON
M&R Agency
Rt. 11, West Nanticoke
735-4150
SPECIAL
$30 OFF
HALF HOUR SESSION. W/COUPON
EXP 5-16-12
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
HOWHIRING
TS Katty TS Katty
100% Accurate Photos . Just Visiting 100% Accurate Photos . Just Visiting
215-678-7452 215-678-7452
CALL
SHELBY
TO
ADVERTISE
829.7204
T’APP INTO IT.
ADVERTISERS: CALL 829-7100
TOFINDHOWWE CANCUSTOMIZE AN
AFFORDABLE ADVERTSINGPACKAGE FORYOU
THAT INCLUDES ADS ONOUR APP.
3 EASYWAYS
Search and install
The Times Leader app
from the iPad store.
Go there direct,
http://tlgets.me/app
Scan our QR code.
OR
OR
GETTHE FREE TIMES LEADER APP ADDEDTOYOUR IPADNOW!
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We currently offer this employment opportunity
Part Time Customer Service Specialist working 15 hours per week. Ideal
candidate will enjoy speaking with customers to provide top-notch service
in a fast-paced environment.
Duties include, but are not limited to:
• Answer incoming calls from customers
• Make outgoing calls to current customers
• Some data entry
A regional multimedia company headquartered in Wilkes-Barre, we provide
news, information and entertainment across multiple media platforms.
Our fagship publication, The Times Leader, and several weekly and
specialized publication serve the readers and advertisers of northeastern
Pennsylvania well. We provide commercial and other services in the region
and surrounding states.
Building on our solid print foundation, we offer various multimedia products:
website development; social media marketing; search engine optimization
and marketing; QR code marketing and tracking; and many other services.
We need sales professionals with a strong desire to succeed. Must be
able to develop and maintain strong business relationships with clients,
understand and deliver clients’ media needs through all aspects of the job
to differentiate us from the competition.
This requires excellent customer service skills, strong organizational skills,
self-motivation and high energy. We have phone sales and outside territory
sales positions available.
We offer base salary plus commissions and benefts.
Weekend Customer Service Specialist
Media Sales Consultants
Earn Extra Cash
For Just A Few
Hours A Day.
Deliver
Available routes:
( No Col l ect i ons)
Wilkes-Barre North
$835 Monthly Profit + Tips
212 daily / 235 Sunday
Coal Street, Custer Street, North Empire Street,
North Grant Street, North Hancock Street,
McFarland Street, Hillside Street
Pringle/Courtdale
$900 Monthly Profit + Tips
193 daily / 215 Sunday
Pringle Street, Broad Street, Cooper Street,
Evans Street, Charles Street, Courtdale Avenue,
White Rock Terrace
West Pittston
$980 Monthly Profit + Tips
233 daily / 241 Sunday
Packer Avenue, Schooley Avenue, Susquehanna Avenue,
Wyoming Avenue, Atlantic Aveneue
Nanticoke
$820 Monthly Profit + Tips
190 daily / 228 Sunday
Agostina Drive, East Broad Street, East Church Street,
East Green Street, East Main Street
Wilkes-Barre South
$950 Monthly Profit + Tips
242 daily / 271 Sunday
W. Academy Street, Amherst Avenue, Catlin Avenue,
Crescent Avenue, Dagobert Street, Maffett Street
To find a route near you, call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Luzerne/Swoyersville
$960 Monthly Profit + Tips
204 daily / 223 Sunday
Bennett St., Charles St., Hughes St., Willard St.,
Broderick St., Diamond St., Oliver St.
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Seductive
Seductive
Pleasures
Pleasures
570-991-8444 570-991-8444
S P E C IA L S ! S P E C IA L S ! S P E C IA L S !
O P E N 24/ 7 N O W H IR IN G ! O P E N 24/ 7 N O W H IR IN G ! O P E N 24/ 7 N O W H IR IN G !
242 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
H E AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
S PE C IAL O F T HE W E E K !
$20 O F F AN Y
S E RV IC E
W IT H C O UPO N . E X PIRE S 5- 16 - 12
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Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
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ULTIMA II
1-866-858-4611
570-970-3971
CALL TO HEAR
OUR DAILY
SPECIALS!
NOW HIRING
PART TIME & FULL TIME
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
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MAKE A NIGHT OF IT!
Complementary admission into Club Evolution with dine in dinner.
STREAM SIDE DINNING.
Half price sushi Sunday all day & Mon-Sat 11am-3:30pm.
TAKE OUT AVAILABLE
Inside the Woodlands • 1073 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre 570.270.9168
Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11am-11pm • Sun 11:30am -10pm
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NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-12
12-6 pm Sunday
Aura
Massage
460 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre •970.4700
HALF HOUR
$20
HOUR
$40
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ELITE SPA
N E W S TA F F !
Orien ta l S ta ff
Body S ha m poo
M a ssa ge-Ta n n in g
318 W ilkes-Ba rre Tow n ship Blv d., R ou te 309
L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.852.3429
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539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e
570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k
Or ie n ta l Sta ff
M a ssa g e
B od y Sh a m p oo
Ta n n in g
Sa un a
539 SPA
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
www.theweekender.com
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Rt. 11 S. Plymouth Twp.
570.779.4145
Rt. 11 S. Plymouth Twp.
570.779.4145
HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4:30-6:30 $2.50 DOMESTIC BOTTLES
OPEN DAILY: MONDAY - SUNDAY 1PM-2AM
SATURDAY, MAY 12TH
THE GETAWAY’S
1ST YEAR ANNIVERSARY
FEAT. BAD HAIR DAY
9:30-1:30 • $3 COVER • FREE BUFFET
THURSDAY
OPEN CALL FOR DANCERS FROM 8-12
MAY 19TH
40 LB. HEAD 9:30-1:30 • $3 COVER
SUNDAY, MAY 13TH
RONNIE WILLIAMS W/ ADAM DITROIA
FORMERLY OF BAD HAIR DAY LIVE 8-12
STURGIS PARTY W/ GAMES AND PRIZES
COURTESY OF UNITY TATTOO • FREE BUFFET
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MAN OF
THE WEEK
Age: 25
Hometown: Scranton
Status: In a relationship
Occupation: Supervisor
Favorite body part: Shoulders
Favorite sport: Soccer
Favorite restaurant: Il Bastardo
If someone handed you a million dollars, what is
the frst thing you would buy?
A pontoon boat
Last movie you watched?
“Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story”
Guilty pleasure?
Scented candles and bubble baths
Funniest thing that happened to you while stuck
in traffic:
Got fashed by two 50-year-old women in a Mustang
One celebrity you wish would disappear:
The whole Kardashian family
If you had nothing to do all day, how would you
spend your time?
Partying on the beach
What do you think makes NEPA different than
everywhere else?
Their general lack of respect for the game of soccer
One thing most people don’t know about you:
I once auditioned to be in a reality-TV series
ERIC BRODFUEHRER
weekender
TO ENTER, SEND TWO RECENT PHOTOS TO MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
Include your age, full name, hometown and phone number. (must be 18+)
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF ERIC, VISIT US AT THEWEEKENDER.COM
PHOTOS BY NICOLE ORLANDO • SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE SAPPHIRE SALON
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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MODEL OF
THE WEEK
Age: 22
Hometown: Dunmore
Status: It’s complicated
Occupation: I work with special needs children
Favorite Weekender feature:
Model and Man of the Week
Favorite body part: My hips
Favorite body part on the opposite sex: Abs
Favorite sport: I’m not really into sports, but if I had to
choose it would be football.
Favorite restaurant: Sibio’s Restaurant
If someone handed you a million dollars, what is
the frst thing you would buy?
A beach home in South America
Last movie you watched?
“Like Crazy.” It was not my favorite
Most embarrassing moment?
Fortunately, I’ve never embarrassed myself too badly
to recall a specifc moment
If you could have a one-night stand with anyone,
no strings attached, who would it be?
It’s a tie between Adam Levine and Ryan Gosling.
But why no strings attached?
One celebrity you wish would disappear:
Owen Wilson, I don’t think he is attractive or funny
One thing most people don’t know about you:
I have a tattoo inspired by Katy Perry’s
“Teenage Dream”
TO ENTER, SEND TWO
RECENT PHOTOS TO
MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM
Include your age, full name, hometown and
phone number. (must be 18+)
weekender
LAUREN HREBIN
HAIR AND MAKEUP PROVIDED BY SAPPHIRE
SALON AND DAY SPA
Hair by Amy Hughes
Makeup by Nicole Dietrich
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF LAUREN,
VISIT US AT THEWEEKENDER.COM
PHOTOS BY NICOLE ORLANDO
SHOT ON LOCATION AT SAPPHIRE SALON
WARDROBE PROVIDED BY BRATTY
NATTY’S BOUTIQUE
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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L.T. VERRASTRO, INC. * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200
FEATURED ON DRAFT!
AT THESE NEPA TAVERN/RESTAURANTS
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CAMBRIA
FRATERNAL ORDER EAGLES
STROUDSBURG
INN AT LACKAWAXEN
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JESSUP
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LARKSVILLE
NAKED GRAPE
PLAINS
NORMAL SQUARE
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WILKES-BARRE
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SHEATOWN

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