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A JOURNAL OF FACT HOPE AND COURAGE

in this issue

THE SECOND
aN
OF

ND

THE TIMEPIECE

GOD
A n explanation respecting a complete change of calendar, with suggestions as to how the

Calendar sf Jehovah God


can be put into effect easily and naturalIy, without any confusion

every other WEDNESDAY


five cents a copy one dollar a year Canada B Foreign 1.25

VsH. XVL - NO. 404 March 13, 1935

Tax SECOXD ELXD THE IK r" BIMEPIECE OF GOD ( P a r t 1 )

Things P n t Forth ' ' 355 A n Intricate, Confu.sir?g Snbject 356 The Gregorian Calendar . . 356 Gregorian Calaldar A!,s._:i!cs 357 m ~ h Old Bosllafiilear . . . c 357 The Dlonth of Mains . . . 355 or0 ?'he BIonth cf .Anga:;t . . . The Days 2 n d the B;ls . . i:r : 3j .8 . . Hlet& Eccles:asi:cal I.,inddlill;. 359 A C m s i d ~ c i i o lof the T c ? . ~ 359 ~ TV11eli Do the Seasons E q i i B ~ : 353 On Solomon's Pcrel~-izl 361 The Lcngth of the Y. e : . 361 Extending the Gregoria:~ Cdendlar . . . . . , , 361 Projecting the Calenda~ Backward . . . . . . 352 Calcvlaiing the Eqainoscs . 362 O u t h e of Vernal Equ.iilose~. 363 Res-dt of Some Calculations . 354 Notes onProblems . . . 364 1111CX Date of k a t ~ m n a lEqr' 4129 B.C. . . . . . , 365 God's Love of tile Beantifu! 365 A Study of God's Months . 356 'A F z i t h f ~ d TYitness in E1eaven9' 366 Calendar for 6,062 Years . . , 367 God's Will R e g a r d i ~ gBlonihs 367

"l'lir: Precisi:.s

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PI ojcotion of the C rzgoriail

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Calendar Back to Creation 368 Lanetions Us'nctl i n 2 In f ear3 or Perisds of Imyortx~t; Eve-nts 370 Learning S o m ~ t h i ~ g iYbout, God's Biontlis . 370 Lunation E::per;cl:ce T;:,le 371 dstronolrrers 2Iust Iiove Truth 371 %ha 3loon E n ~ F r s t s , 372 -7Ietonic Cycle and tilo God of Orc"er 373 Chart of liullalions 1885-1911 A.D. 374 Chart of Lu~latiolis 1912-1937 A.D. . , a 12 Getting Eeady to E~.rpioro t'ne P a s t . . , . , 376 BIethod of Czlculating Lnnations 347 Calcn!ation Tables , . . 379 Chart for Changing Over Days and Hours of Gregoriar, Calendar to Days and Hours of Calendar of Jehovah God 380 "So Teach Us to N ~ l n b e r Onr Days" . . . 380 The Calendar of Jehovah God 380 Calendar Jehovzh's P e a r of Ransom 1903 381 "Nan Became R Living Soul 382 Zsing the Six-Thousand-Year Calendar . . 382

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Volume XVI

Brooklyn, N. Y , Wednesday, March 13, 1935 .

Number 404

The Second Hand in the Timepiece of God


(In 3 Parts-Part
1)
A N EXPLANATION RESPECTISG A COMPLETE CHANGE O F CALENDAR, WITH SUGGESTIONS AS T O HOW THE CALENDAR O F JEHOVAH G O D C A S BE PUT INTO EFFECT EASILY AKD NATURALLY, WITHOUT CONFUSION.

Copyright, i935, by Golden Age Publishing Co., Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., U.S.A, All Rights Reserved.

sharp MATTERS have arisen recently to calland its attention to the Gregorian calendar confusions, and to direct artention to the MTord of God on the subject of time, 11~itl1 consideraa tion of what nlay be called the timepiece of God, the beautiful and orderly arrangement of the sun and moon a s tile? 11-ereset in the heavens by the Creator "to rule over the day and over the night" (Genesis 1: 18), 'to be for s i p s , and for seasons, and for c l a ~ s ,and for years.'-Genesis 1:14. than This is no nonsense, or 11-OTS~ nonsense Prom the Great Pyramid in Egypt (built with unpaid slave labor), but there is 1101v a ~vealth of information regarcling the exact length of the year, and the exact lengtli of the Innation (from one new moon to another), tvhich malies all past history an open boo!<, here the number of years involved is k1101~-11,and ~vherethere is associated with those years some marlied reference to the moon. "'TJze Precious Things Put Forth" s t is an interestillg possibility illdicated by melltions *'the precious things Ibfoses lvhen put fortll by the nloon", (Deuteronomy 33 : 14) In the beautifully Tyorl<illgparts of His great tilllepiece Jellovah God has preserved evidence that will yet shame all the vise of the earth. Does it llot seem a ver? 1vonderful thing, a gift frolll Jehovah God, that Jehovah's people may now have a perfect calendar of the Lord's life, knowing, for example, in terms of the Gregorian calendar, with which all are familiar, the esact days of the week, month and year ~vlleiz, as a boy, H e remained behind in the temple, asking and answering questions; that they may know the exact date when 3Ioses came marching out of Egypt, the exact date the Jordan was crossed by the forces under Joshua, the exact
355

daie Noah and his family went into the ark, and the day they came out, a.nd the probable day of Adam's creation, all from the silent movements going on constantly by m-hich the sun and the moon never get out of place or out of order, as do other clocks, but are f a r enough away that no mischief-maker can get a t them to interfere? I t is so simple, ly\.hen olle gets into the sullject, that it is passing strange that. Jehovah's people never became interestecl in it before. Though the nloon has its variations in speed, yet the meall Innation, 29 days 12 hours 44 minutes 2.864976 secollds (2551442.864976 secollds), is one of the definite fixtures of the heavens, and its re1iabilitSr is such that astronolners meet aIld gravely discuss the reasons for differences of so small an alnonllt as 1/1000th of a second in a Innabion. ~ h llat,re of the oscillatiolls of the moon is , i,,, ;,,, mall). !-ears in advance, all,j will be laid before the reader, and he will be able to make ilitelligeiit predictions as to times of lunations himself. Kor 11-ill this knowledge, when understood, lessen confidence in the second hand of God's timepiece, but rather increase it. A man may run up and down the length of a swiftly movillg train 2nd thus move sl0~7eror fastel. through the surronndillg country, yet, after all, the net result is not changed if he quietly stays in his seat. That is the \Tray i t is respecting. the oscillations of the moon. I n his ~ ~ ~To e Calendar; I t s Hi.story, Struchr k itire aud In~pr.ol;enze+zt (puidished by the Macniillan Company) Prof. Alexander Philip, LL.B., F.R.S., of Edinbnrgh, says the exact length of the year is 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes 46.15 seconds. He made a careful study and had access to many works; in this production it is assumed that his statements are correct,

Jlldebtedness is aclinox-ledged to 220 works on astrononiy ; also to Dr. Clyde Fisher, Ph. D., LL.D., curator of the Department of Astronomy, The American Mnseum of Natural History, 77th street and Central Park \Vest, New York city. Dr. Fisher is rated the ablest astronomer in New Porlc. An Intricate, Confusing Subject Gentile scholars of eminence sadly say that years are '(incommensurable" ; an incorrect but excusable statement, in vien. of the dificulties involved. Tbere is only one way out: God's way; mhich may is simplicity itself, as mill appear in due couyse. That, the Jews are confnsed is self-evideilt. Here is what the International dictionary says of their efforts: '('The cornmoll year is said to be defective, reg~alaror perfect (or abundant) according as it has 353, 354 or 355 days. The leap year has an intescalary month, and a total of 383 (defective), 3@4(regular), or 385 (perfect, or abundant) clays. The calendar is coinplicated by various rules providing for the harof monious arral~geli~ent Festivals, etc., so that no simple perpetual calenciar can be constructed." I1 their calendar the Jews shom only 3,761 1 years in the era B.C., whereas the Scriptures, preservecl in their midst, shom that sollle;\7here9 someho~v, they have lost aeconlit of at the verr least 267 years. Jehovah's people ha\-e nothing to learn from the .Te\r~son this subject; the Jex-s have lost the "key of knowledge".-Luke li : 52. Jel~ovah's people are xot interested in the old Bornail calendar of ten molltlas in a yezlr, even though "Christendom' still aees the orininnl narnes of the last four months of that >-ear: September, October, Novern::er, Decen~ber. They are not inteze~tedin the old Greek calendar, the use of which cansed such confusion in the Roman empire that in the year 46 B.C. it T~lm necessary to add two months to the yesr, making it fonrteen months long, in order to brilzg the Peasons back to tl~eir proper position. They are not interested in the Julia:i caleildar, vlzic11 follo~rred,~mlessthey cl~anceto lir. in Greece, or unless they are astronomers. The first of the year, with the Greelrs, is thirte~ii days behind the one now in general me. The reason why the astroilomers cling to the Jalian reclconing is that it has been in use constantiy, in some sections of the world, 1,950 years, They merely use it as a convenient nleasaring rod, to connect up ;vith the past. Jnlian days, used

by all astronomers, begin to couat 250,310 days prior to the day of Adam's creation, and are to that extent in error. In this article the Edenic day, LC., the day from Adam's creation, is s ~ ~ b stituted for the Jnlian day; and it is hoped that in all astronon~ers, the interest of pure truth, vil1 adopt and accept and use the Edenic day exclusively. Jehovah's people disdain to consider for a noinent the Mohammedan calendar, ~17llich takes its start in July of the year 622 (A.D.), and which ere11 the Jlohanlnzedans no longer take seriously. Kaisoleon put an end to the Frencl~ Eevolution calendar, which began in November, 1793, and perished in 1805. Everything was supposed to be done by the decimal system. There mere 1 2 months of 30 days each, and five or six fete days at the end of the year, to balance things up.
The Gregoria~a Calendar

But though Jehovah's people ignore all of the fcjregoing, they cannot quite, in the irnmediaie present, ignore the Cregorian or papal calendar i~laaguratedin October, 1582, a t which time t~rr days \7;ere dropped from the J~ililiancalendar, the fifteenth of that month hooking up next to the fourth. I t was not until 1752 that, England adopted ihe Gregorian calendar. Tn this series of articles it mill be sho~%-n that all the fo;egoing calendars are calendars of the Ceril. If that is sl1ovn to be true regarding the Gregoriaa, it ~7illcertainly be true of all the o~llers. Please, now, take the time to examine scille of the necessary details of this intricate -.
su1;~e.l.

Zehovah God is no~r!iere mentioned in the Glegcxiaa calendar, I t ~ ~ o u snit Satan well ld to hai-e Bin1 lost sight of altogether. Christ is ~neiitioned, the year 1935 is not the year of but our Lord at all, for 61e was born in 2 B,C, ancl Gied ill A.D. 33* I ] these articles the Gregorian calendar is s y : :~!antecl 3.11~1 discarded by the unique espedielzt of extending it into the past, as if it hac! always bee11 in operation, using it to establish histo~ical poiilts in terms that will be uilderstood by those -. nor:- Ilriilg, and the11 letting it die an ignominiom death. The present pope is not sure, even, as to in v-li~t year Christ died. One of lzis alleged reasoils for extending the ' ' ~ o l yPear" to 1934 was that, so he said, he was not sure v~hether Christ

died in A.D. 33 or in A.D. 34. Of course, the real reason why he was making both ends of the year "holy" was that thus he could get collections a t both ends. The Gregorian calendar 'iTrTasthe work of a eouncil of theologians, professedly the successors of the apos'cles, but eager to hide the apostles from sight except as they might wish to shine in their reflected glory. One can see this in what the council did, and in what they failed to do.
I

II :

Gregordan Catendas and Apostles Let it be supposed that the Gregorian council had really desired to honor the apostles whose succefsors tliey claim to be. What a fine chance they had! For instance, they c o u l d h a v e changed January to James, in honor of the man to whom the Scriptures refer as the Lord's brother. But they preferred to have niillions of people everlsstiiigly writing down a name i i h0i10r of Janus, the original Roman "father". ~ J ~ Lwas two-faced. His snccessors have been IS like tlreir "father". He T - a s worshiped as the god of gods, supreme janitor of heaven and ezrtil. The word "janitor" takes its derivation from tlie word "Jsnus". A writer who macle a study of this subject sa5-s : "Sut here is t11c important fact that, till the pope 177a.s invested vith the title, which for a tliousand years had had attached to it tlie r,onTerof the keys of Janas and Cybele, no snch claims to pre-eminence, or anyil~ing approaching to it, was ever publicly made on his part, on the ground of his being the possessor of the Beys besto~vedon Peter." I n other words, he was J u ~ i t e rthe Devil, and naturally , those who claim to rule heaven, earth and hell, and ~ ~ 7 h o the nanle "father", did not wish love to part with anything that so well uplzeld their claims. The theologians had a seeond opportunity mith regard to the second month. On or about what is now February 15 the ancient pagan Romans had heathen priests, called the priests of Faunus, who clad themselves in goatskins, and made a circuit of the Palatine Hill, striking with goatskin thong5 all women encountered. The ostensible object was to insure fertility and easy delivery; the real object was to enable the grafting priests to keep their hold on the superstitious people. This ceremony mias supposed to "februare", or purify, the women. One can readily understand why the Roman Catholic

theologians wanted to retain this connection mith heathenism. I n connection wit11 tlle "februation" of the women the priests held a festival, the Lupercalia, in honor of Eupercus, the god of fertility. There is a brief account of a similar "festival" in Numbers 25 : 1, 2 : "And Israel abode in Shittim, and the people began to commit whoredom 'i~ciththe daugliters of IvIoab. And they called the people unto the sacrifices of their gods : and the people did eat, and bowed down to their gods." These alleged successors of tlie apostles who macle the Gregori~ln calendar could have named the second montli Boanerges, in meniory of James the brother of John, the one x7ho had the honor of being the first martyr among the Lord's chosen tmelve, but they preferred the old pagan name.
The Old BZomtk~kHear The old Roman year began with Ifarch, and its first mouth in the year was nzmed llartins, after Bfars, the god of war. The war priests of ancient Bome were the Salii, or leapers. Their job (contrasted with their present successors) was not so mnch the encouragement of the production of more Roman soldiers, but to see to it that Mars was well bribed by their leapings aiid other gymnastics. Their chief ceremony was on Ilareh i9. The Gregorian ecclesiastics hacI another good opportunity here. They might have nemed this month after Peter, for whom they profess to have so much attachment. But as between follo~ving advice of Peter to "seelr peace, and the ensue it" (1 Peter 3 : 11) his alleged successors haye done all possible to keep the world in wars aud turmoils throughout their entire history, aucl tomorrow, if another world Tar were to start, the Roinal~ Catholic theologians would be the very first to climb on the band wagon, for their full share of chaplaincies or whatever other graft was to be had, in every country involved. And the Protestant clergy would be scarcely one whit behind. And so one can see wily the Gregorians desired to retain the martial spirit, nlartial law and martial music of Mars rather than to have a month named after the humble fisherman who, in his writings, counseled peace a t least five times. The second month of the old Roinan year of ten months was Aprilis, from a word meaning

'to open', and probably signifj-ing that this was the mo:lth in ~7;hiehthe buds opea. There is r,o objection to tkis, surely, but, a s this was the nlonth in w\rl~cil Sr,vior died, what a chance the there was liere to coaimemorr,te that event upon s\-liich all human life depends. The month conld have bee21 calied Christ, and i t ~-ou-ld have bee;? 2n annual remiIider of man's deb', thzt can never be repaid. S31-16, thc th~clogiansp r e f g r ~ c d the old 112111:_c, with ~ ~ h i eao, donbt, some god. or goddess wes h in sonie xTayiii:7olved. Inciden+?ily, 2s ariil later be shom~iin this series of articles, there is ground for Ihe tradition thzt Christ x;as nailed to the tree on A p i l 1, and that the so-called "April fool" prailks on that dzy are intended loy the Devil t o biing ridicde 611 the h e who counted not His life dear unto Eimeelf, But gave it all up in tlie doing of J e h o ~ a h ' s ~i-ill and in the vindication or' Elis nenie. >la:- God l!eQ a11 of Jehovah's people to be like IZeii. ?,laster, and 66 fools" for His sake.--l Corinthians 4: 10.

I1 t.he old Woman calermdar the fifth month 1 was aa.mecl Qninti!ie, which merely meant that it was the fifth monih of their year. When Juliils Ga.esar reconstructed the calel;da,r, making the year one of twelve l~ionthsinskeaci of ten, m e 0-f the new ~ i l l ~ l ~ t2lsi ~ 7 named after himself, ancl Qnintiiis hecsme July. PIere again the -i-l.,eol~giaii~ n fine oppor-tnliity to elloose had hetween a great w a r ~ i ~ r the hmnb!! and and fuft.hfn1 Jude, ~ ~ ~ \ . ! short e2istle ccntains so iose mnch; aad so, because they more adnl:ireh niilitary conquerors than a hnn?b!e inessenger of peace, they chosc to retain tlie name of the 7:;ai.rior, born in thaJi liionth.

The Month o f AUQELI It v a s ?,lark dnionp, the politician, that fixed it up to have tlie sevenJ;h mcath of the year nai-ned after Ji11iv.s Caesar, l x ~ t JuEns' snccesSOY i l n g ~ e t c ~ 2 less mcclcsl. H e cllianged the s s name Sextilis, sixth month, to iln<yxst, and the Roman senate, to g r ~ k i f yhis vanity, took one day a m y from February aiid added i t to the The Month 0.6 figaim monih thus nanlled, Th?Lt is why February is The nlonth of IPaius in the old Roman calen- so short. dar, the present ?day, refers to Master Jupiter, Theologians love everythins that exdts men ; the great father god, v7ho had more wives than and so is-hen the q~~es'i;on came up, if it ever have been a rather nice did come up, of aami1:g tlie eighth month after Henry VIII. I t ~-vould thing far the theologians TT-hopretel~ded to the sposile Andrew, the suggestion mas voted thinlr so nzndi of the apostles if tliey had called do~~11100 percent in favor of retaining the name this mo:?th Isylatthe;v. But it n-as l i a t t h e ~ ~ ~ , of the publicity-seelrer ~7110started -ivorld-~vide in attention taxation. the 23d chapter, that specially d r e n ~ to the Lord's warning: "Gall no man your father Xep'iemloer, s e v e ~ t h Roman month, could old upon the earth: for one is your Father, ~vliich have nicely heen named after Philip, but i t is in heaven. Iqeither be ye called [?&aster] : ~l,-asuot. October, eighth old Roman month, for one is J-onr Master, eyen Christ." (Verses could have bee^ named sfter Thomas, but it was 9 and 10) A i d the theologians knew better than not. Nove~iberc o ~ ~ l d have been named after to draw the ettentioll of the people to the word Saihanael (Bartholome~v), it I I - ~ Snot ; and but of God which exposes their paternalistic method Decelilber could have been named after Simon of gaining control of the n x n throug!i control (Zelotes), i ~ n it mas not. The theologians did t of tlie ij7cnien. not want any of the rllolitlis named after the Juno, so the encyclopedia discloses, ~ v a s "the real apostles. They preferred that the old pamost exalted divinity of the Latin races in Italy ganisms which constitute their sole stock in next to Jupiter, of vhom she was the sister and trade should be perpetuated, as long as possible. svife. She was tlie queen of heaven and under Certainly. on no account do they wish the people the name of Regina (queen) was worshiped to have the Scriptures, or even to be reminded in Italy a t an early period". I t would have been of them, escept in so f a r as they can tvist these nice for the Gregorian tTieologialis to name the to seem to sustain their pretensions. sixth month after John, the one whom the Lord especially loved, but that JT-ould have been a The Days and the Hours hard blow a t nnariolatry; and so the Gregoriai~ The Devil, of course, was the one who induced of ecclesiastics, vho are so strong for the pagan the a~lcestors the present generation to name clueen-of-heaven idea, preferred to let the u a n e all the days of the week after heathen gods and June stand as i t is. goddesses. Neither God nor Christ, nor any

alle

GOLDEN AGE
Devil is determined to leave no stone unturllecl to dishonor God, and he also 117ell kno~vsthat as one error leads to another so one truth also leads to another, and is in terror lest great truths long covered should be brought to light. And so, with this preliminary examination, please turn to make a stz~dyof the various items that enter illto the making of calendars, a Scriptural as well as a scientific study, to which is invited the closest scrutiliy of astrononlers, mathematicians and others, as well as Jehovah's people. Should any errors be discovered in statements of fact or in calculations, be so good as to transmit them to The Goldeqz ,4ge as promptly as possible. I n this material, high-school 2nd college teachers have abundant opportunities to put the sliill of their pupils to the test and a t the same time exalt the llaine of Jehovah, the true and living God. The methods that will be pursued will be entirely different froin any ei-er before used. Tile place to begin is :I-ith tile year.

A Consideration o f the Year hcccrding to Genesis 1:14 God made 110th ihe sun and the n~ooilto be "for signs, and for seasons, niid for days, and years". The thought Latest Ecclesiastical Huddling that the signs here inentioned have anytl~ing to do with the signs of the zodiac is ali ~lonsense, Under the leadership of Doctor Cadman, expresident of the Federal C o ~ ~ c i l[Protestant] demonism. Tile word "signs" signifies "enof Cllurches in America, a still fu.rther mix-up in sips", as if here is sonie stmlciard thnt needs respect to calendars is in sight. Folloming a the attentioi: which mill now be given to it. big get-together council of all the most pompous The seasons recognized in the Scriptures are Prctestant theologians, a t Fanoe, Denmark, in but two, the sunllner and the x-inter, ~ ~ h l c h sea1934, the proposition was launched to malie soils will continue forever. "TThile the ea-rth reevery year one of 361 days, adding the 365tlz maineth, seecltilne aiid harvest, and cold ancl day as a11 "extra" Saturday, coming aln~ays be- heat, and suilinler and winter, and day and tween Becenlber 30 and Jailnary 1 ; then when night, shall not cease."-Genesis 8: 22. the year would have 366 days the "extra" day Jehovah's people are fanliliar n-it11 the inn-ould be inserted as an "extra" Saturday be- structions to Israel to '(keep the passover at his tveen June aiid July. By this plan, in which the appointed season" (Numbers 9 : 2), and know Scriptural arrangement of the days into weeks why Jehovah spoke of it as "the season that a-onld be entirely ignored, there would be four thou cainest forth out of Egypt". (Deu'ieronomy quarters of the year identical in length, each 16 : 6) They k 1 1 7 that the Lord, in the parable 104 containing three nionths of 31, 30 and 30 days, of the vineyard, spoke of "fruits in their seaand, if one is foolish enough to believe it, "any sons" (illatthew 21: 41), that the apostle also given date will fall on the same day of the week." mentioiled "fruitful seasons" (Acts 14: 17) ; the It is thus seen that the Devil and the children prophecy of Zechariah (I 4 : 8) speaks of sumof the Devil are greatly interested in having mer and winter as ever contiiiuing; and there everything different from the way God arranged are other references to the seasons in the Scripit, not only as respects the years and the months, tures, and yet the clergy have never recognized but as respects the weeks, the days, and even in any v a y these grand divisions of time in any the hours, and the reason for it is clear. The of their calendars. One would hare thought

prophet or apostle, is represented in the days of the weel< as now in colnrnon use. Sunday is nanied after the sun god; lionday, after the moon god; Tuesday, after Zeus, or Tyr ;TJTednesday, alter the god TVoden; Thursday, after Thor, the god of thunder; Friday, after Frigg, or Friga, Woden's wife; and Saturday, after Saturn. The theologians could have changed all this if they had wished to do so, but they did iiot. God made the day to 1:egin a t sundown, and so the Devil has changed that in almost every place, but not quite. I n most countries the beautiful robe of starlit aight is rent in twain and the day begins at midnight, which practice lyas handed do117n Iron1 the Egyptians and Romans. The Babylonialls began the day a t sunrise. Astronomers make it begin a t noon, and number the hours froin 1 to 24 consecutively, This system is follox-ed in some parts of Italy. I n all of these matters the theologians have gone along vith every schenie to dishonor the Maker of the stars and to stray farther and farther froin the TYord of God. They have seemed to instinctively realize that their protection consists in lieeping as close as possible to the Devil and the Devil's way of doing things.

that they ~ronlcl t least Kave named one nlontlz a after the opening o the vernal season or one E after the opening of the autumnal season, lsut tlie clergy have no zeal for the honoring of anyJehovah God has had anything thing ~ ~ i t I l ~ \ - h i c h to do. They are interested oiily in the things that bring dishoilor to Hiin and do bring honor to nien and to their master, the Devil, tvhose they are and ~1~11oi:lthey serve. On the other hand it seems that the attention of the truz people of God has beell directed to the vernal eqni~iox for centuries, and there must be some reason for it. To this day, Jehovah's people, striving for truth and obedience, seek the beginning of Xisan (the name is of heathen origin), tlie nioilth in lvhich Jesns died, and locate it ~7itll ileJ>tlie ixoon nearest to the said eq~~inox.
When D s %heSeasons Begin? For various reasons it is desirable that the new r e a r should have a fixed point s t which :o begin, and to end; and what better point than that made by Jehovah himself in the heaveas: ~vhexthe days a i d nights are of equal length a t every point on the globe? I t is the time of life, a time when all should specially turn tlieir minds and hearis to the great Creator wiio pi.@vided such a convenieizt daj7 for the sett!enlent of accouiits that are in the past and for the opeiaiilg of n e v vistzs for the future. "Tilon cro~vnestthe year ~17ith thy goociness."--Fsah 65 : 11. Years ago many of those ~ v h o EOIV J~ehoare vah's witnesses had the belisf that the trze time 01the year's beginning is in the fall, yet, ~i~lna,r;ever have been i h e reason, ia the tn-o may texts ~7:hei.e the two seasons are nielztionecl together the Punlmer is meationecl first.-See Genesis 8 : 22 ; Zechariah 14 : 8. ill1 il~telligeilt persons l;110~~7that on the equator the days and nights are a l ~ ~ ~of y s a equal length. They also know that t r i c e a year tlie shifts its position vith respect to sun al~parentiy there are the earth, and in liarch and Septeml~er ~vllat called eynil~oxes; are that is, the days and nights are of eqaal length in every place on the earth. The hnrnala faniily x a s first implanted in the Northern Henlispliere; there the Scriptures were ~i?ritlen; theie the Lord died. Hence the Scriptures tacitly recogaiae the fact. Aclclitionally, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land surface. The sunmer season (which men, bnt not the

Scriptures, divide into tn-o parts, one of which is named "spring") begins i March (in the n Northern Hemisphere) and eolitaine the growing and harvesting seasons of that part of the ii world, ~ ~ h e r e imost of the land surface of the earth is found. The cold seasons are inaugurated by the autumnal equinoxes. The Gregorian calendar does not begin a t either equiaos, and does not even beg-in any month with e i t h e ~ them, but it cannot quite of ignore these iniportant fixed points in terrestrial history, and so one generally finds in an alnlanac a brief inention of the time vhen the eq~~inox (usually the vernal) occurs. It is manifest that, in the mind of God, the true year T\-ouldhave its beginning at one of these points. TT70uld it not seen1 reasonable, since God made the sun to rnle the day and the moon to rnle the have the greater of these night, that He ~vould tv-o luminaries fix the length of tlie year and the lesser fix the length of the month9 Jehovah puts the mind a t rest on this subject of H s time for beginning the year. As the i a Israelites were aboct to leave Egypt (~vhic'n, s - \ d lbe shovn subsequently, v a s aboutthe tinie of the vernal equinox) He said to Moses : "This llronth sllall be unto you the beginnizg of mo~ltlis : it sliail be the first nionlh of the year to you."-Exodus 12 : 2. 3incli has been said of tlie observaiice of socsllled Sex-ish "New Year" a t the autmmal equinos, but the Devil has been after the Jews as ell as after the Christians. Can anybody show 11-here the Jems or anybody else n-as ever conlnlacderl or authorized to begin a new year a t any other time than that fixed by Jehovah God? IIe e ~ n n o t .It i s quite true that Exodus 34: 22 sneaks of "the feast of ingathering at the year's eilc!" (revolution of the year, nznrgi~e) but the ; reference is manifestly to the crop year, ~~11ich does indeed end in the fall, as is well kilown to erer:-body, Exodus 1 2 : 2 is the lazo on this subject. The foregoing text, therefore, ought to be sufftcient proof that the true time of the begii~nicg Llie year is with the vernal equinox; of 1:ut there is more, Kine months from the and tnmizal equinox mould be on or about June 23, a t nhich time in Palestine it is exceedingly lyarm. Nine months froin the vernal equinox i s about December 22. Here read Jeremiah 36 : 22: ''XOT~ king sat in the minter house, in the the ninth ~nonth: and there was a fire on the hearth

The

GOLDEN AGE
10117: 46, 45, 48, 54, 44, 05, 46, 48, 60, 27, 45, 45, 50, 13, 57, 81, 41, 52, 66, 60, 00, 60, 60, 60, 60, 21, 49, 53, 40, 56, 51, 48, 61, 40, 52, 58, 40, 51, 53: 49, 57, 46, 50, 55, 37, 47, 49, 45, 54, 40. This inforniatioil u7asgleaned from reference works in the Kern Yon.11 Public Lib]-ary. The general average foi- this particular period is 365 days 5 hours 46 minutes 45.6 seconds. The length of the year is influenced by conditions in the earth itself, near the equator, by the approach and recession of other planets, and by the precession of the equinoxes. I n the accompanyilig diagram (page 363), in the righthand lower corner is shown in graphic form h o ~ 7 influences that inalre one year shorter the thsn another are overcome in succeeding years. The small differences are not cumulative; the total divergences of less than an hour from the mean 117ould ilot be greater six thousand years ineans that one can tell accurately ago, ~ h i c h the time of the vernal eql~inox any year from in creation to date. Iforeover, its day in t'ne week call he ascertained, which is somet11i:lg quits n e v in the field of human interest, a path never before trodden.
Edi%e~ding Grsgsordan Calendczr %he

burning before him." Vvliat time that year started ought to be plain to all.

i
i

On Solomon's Porch-in Winter When Jesus -i17as here oil earth Mis every x-ord and act mas designed to be an honor to His Father's name. He v a s able to say, "I do always those things tliat please hi1n.j' (John 8 :29) Tlie Father himself said: "Thou art illy beloved Son; in thee I am well pleased."-Lulre 3 : 22. As a result of this close relationship, one may study with minute care erery detail of what Jesus said and did and al~~:ays find in it something that the. Father is telling Ris people by that means. There is this itein: "And it mas at Jernealem the feast of the dedication, and it was minter. And Jesus u~alkecl iii the temple in Solomon's porch."-John 10: 22! 23. Theologiaas have er~cleavoreci explain this to text, aimmg to sho-i17 that Jesus was trying in some way to participate in a feast of dedication not mentio~edin the Scriptnres, and in SO doing they have missed the ~soint. I n this passage the hea~enl;: Father seems to be gently hinting to the reader that there is a temple point in connection vith SO~OI~IOII'S that needs to 7se considerecl: it i e the time of its dedication. And if one 1ocl;a the lnatter up he fiiids that it as dedicated "in tlie monih E t113.nim" (the name itself is of heathen origin), "~vhichis the seven.th il~onth"(IICings 8 : 2), and the "feast of dedication", ide~tifiedwith the seveii-day dedicati~iiof tire altar, IT-as on the 8th to the 14th of that. moiltil. ( 2 Chronicles 7 : 9, 10) Tlie s6vent.h illoiltll v x s the first n~onth of the ~ r i i i t eseason. Additioiia!lp, it is 17;e:I ~ Irncxn that the day of atoncmeiit and the feast of tabernacles, vhich occnrred in the seventh mont,h, were observed when the Israelites had gathered in the fruits of the land afid Feye entering the 117inter season, (Leviticus 23 1 27,39) .Pt is t l ~ n s established b ~the month of four witnesses tliat the true begi:lning of the year is at the vernal equinox.
The L e ~ g t hof the Year The lexgth 01 %lieyear., fro111 17eri:al equinox to vernal equinox, is not an exact ~ l u ~ n bofrdays. e Beginning with the verszl equinox of the year 9886 (A.D.), he times 11et11~ect1-i vernal equithe aoxes for the next succeediiig fifty y e a x , clown to 1936 inclnsi-qe, are, in their order, 365 days 5 hours a i d the number of n~innteswhich foi-

Taking note of the fact that. there are 60 secc , onds in a ~ ~ i a ~ l '60eniinntes in an iionr, and 24 hours i a clay, it follows that in one of God's a years, a so-callecl solar 37ear, or t r o p i a l year, o r synodical pear, that is, from one vernal eqainox to araotl~ei., there are 31,556,226.15 wconde; in a ca!endxr pear of 365 days the ilumber of seconds is 31,536,003 ; so God's year is longer than man's jTear by 26,926,15 seconds. I n the Qregorian calendar arrangement mian puts iil a11 extra day once in fonr years; so in that time he has 1,461 days. I1 f o ~ ~ofr God's 1 l years there are 126,227,704.6 seconds. I n 1,461 calendar days there are 12$3,230,400 seconds; so a t the end of the fonr Sears man has horro~ved 2,695.4 seconds from the future, to niake up for his extra inse~ted day, Alter t~ventr-foulleap-year periods of fonr years each, lnan has l:orro~\-ed i~earlga day, Accordingly, 11-11cn the e ~ d the cenlary is of reached, the leap year is usually omitted. The norlnal ce!ltnry of nlail, therefore, has in it 24 leap years and 76 years that are not leap years. s The total of d a ~ in such century is 36,534 days, amounting to 3,155,673,600 seconds. Ia one hundred of God's years E e has 3,f 55,692,615,

seconds. At the end of a normal century, man has not used in his calendar all the time that has been made for his use, by 19,015 seconds. After four centuries, or rather, every fourth century, nian dincls it necessary to pnt in an extra leap year. These years, called quadricentesimal years, go in at the end of suclz centuries as are divisible by 400. The next oiie would be in the year A.D. 2000, but it will not be needed. The Lord has a much better 1va.i. I1 four of man's centnries he has 146,097 1 days: 97 leap days and 146,000 ordinary days. In seconds this amounts to 12,632,780,800. I n 400 of God's years there are 12 622,770,460 seconds; so at the end of each quaclricentesimal period of 400 years the inan has again borrowed fro111 the future a tatal of 10,340 seconds. Another shift is necessary after eight qnadriceiltesimal periods. I n that time man tvill hal-e borro\ved for his calendar 82,720 seconds that did not beloiig to him. This is almost a da:(there are 86,400 seconds in a daj7) ; according1;a t this point no quadricentesimal leap day occurs. The net difference, then, in 3,203 :-ears ainounts to 3,680 seconds, or 1 hour 1 nlillnte 20 seconds. A further correction ~vould neceebe sary after 23 such 3,200-year periods; and so on indefinitely.
3 Projecting the Calendar Backward If the Gregorian calendar can be projected forward it call also be projected Isacli~vasd;and this has been done in the accomp~~nying illnstration. The outline at the top (page 363) S ~ O T T -in S a general way the time of vernal equinox of every year from creation to date. Each centni.:is in a little diamond-shaped section by itself, except where the quaclricentesinlal leap clap occur, when two sections are merged ilz one. The latest date in each century when the eqninox could occur is named, and the earliest one. A little careful study of t11e enlarged diagrams ~e beneath the outline will show horn to map use of the outline. The qnadriceiitesimal leap years are fourteen in number; that is, 4000, 3600, 3200, 2800, 2400, 2000, 1600, 800,400, and I,B.C., and A.D. 400, 800, 1200 and 1600. The year 1200 B.C. is not a leap year, for the reason that i t is one of the correction places in the whole general scheme, as has already been fully esplained. I n using the Gregorian calenidar between centuries removed from each other, it is neces-

sary hen finding how f a r apart any two ~ q n i noxes are, if one is in a century E.C. and one is in an A.D. century, to rnnlre the total oiie year less than that indicated by adding the years together. I n compnting time from a B.C. date to a.n A.D. date the portion of the year that has elapsed rvnst Ine taken i ~ l t o consideration. That the exact nuniber of years is not to be had by siniply adding B.C. and A.D. dates togelher, a s so~rle long supposed, can be immediately denioiistrated. I n ilie spring of 1 E.C. Christ was h j year of age; He died 33 full years thereafter, but not in the spring of A.D. 32, as would be the case if it were correct to acld B.C. and A.D. dates together: the 33 years were not up till tlie spring of A.D. 33. If B.C. and A D . dates are addecl together, the total l i u m b ~ r years is of one less than the sum thus olstained. The year 4 B.C. is a leap year, though only three years away from the leap year of 1 B.C. ( a cluadricenltesimal pear). This feature is s1io;vii in one of the diagrams ( C ) below the outline.
Ccllculating the Equinoxes: Problem 2

Reference to the outline a t the top of page 363 shows that in the year 1935 A.D. the equinox is on tlie afternoon of Tliursday, JIarcli 21.* To be exact, it is at 52 seconds after 3:42 p.m., Jernsalem time, which is the proper time basis to nee in all human affairs, for reasons to be explained later. The time of eciniilos a t the 75th meridian west, commonly called Eastern Staidard Time, is 8: 18 a m , Idarch 21. This is 7 hours 24 minutes 52 seconcis later than Je~asalein time (used henceforth in calculating tke equinoxes). Eillarged section of tjne last :-ears of the nineteenth centnrp and the rernaining years to date shows more fully the tiines of eclzinoxes at Jerusalem in t!ie past century. See the diagram on opposite page for particulars. Jehovah's people have heretofore thought they had good evidence to b e l i e ~ ethat kclam 31-as created in 4128 (or fall of 4129) B.C., and Problem 1 is to ascertain tlie time of vernal ecl~linoxfor the year 4128 B.C. Reference to the small outline a t top slioms it was in the morning of March 21,4128 B.C. ;the enlarged section (12) of the first period after creation shows it \\-as very close to 10: 00 a.m. Exactly what time mas i i f
"Master chart, from which this greatly condensed outline vas drarn, is 15 feet 3 inches long; on file a t the Golden Age ofhe, where it, may be seen on application,

Eniargenent of section (A)showing tiine of t,rernal equinox f ~each noimal year (@)dnd lenn i yeer (o)of ills 4213 4 0 t h centuries a. C . to .

r ~ . -

...--..

,a

.+I

.--It t t t t i tt

6 I!

,, ,,

vernal equinox) fcr the CIPV years IESlB-f935;A.D. Mean length ofyear, 365 dey5,5 houq48 minukes, 46.15 seconds, Is shown by stmi$ht horizoniaf line.;

1 E.C. 4128 Sat. 10 : 24 a.m, and '-028 Thu. 3: 4 1 p.m. '' 3 " 2472 Fri. 12: 25 p.m. " 1 (.' 2372 Wed. 5 : 41 p.m. " 5 " 2045 " 1 0 30 p.m. " 1: 6 " 1945 Tue. 3 : 48 a.m. " 7 " 1920 Fri, 5 : 08 a.m. " 8 " 1615 Sat. 2 : 0 1 a.m. " 6 : 3 1 p.111, " 9 " 115.75 " Ir) 1515 T l x . 7 : 06 a.m. " 1 " 1475 " 1 : 5 s p.m. " 1 1 12 " 1469 Fri. 3 : 39 p.21. " 13 " 1035 " ': 27 p.m. " ( a ) Each of the 6,062 years had a t least 365 dnys . 6052x355 = 2,212.620 14 " 1028 Sun. 6 : 08 a.m. " 15 228 T~~~ 12: 3 1 p.m. l i ( b ) The 60 centuries hzd at 15 " 7t.5 Mono 7 : 10 p.m. " 1,ilC) least 24 leap days ecch 6 0 X 21 = 17 " 6 a l Thu. 1 :42 p.m. " 1 (c) 14 quadrieentesirnal years 6 had each a leap day . . 1 4 X 1= 14 18 " ' 0 Fri. 5: 20 a.m. " 19 " 537 Mon. 4 : 1 4 a.m. " ( d ) 8 leap doys in tllc 20th century , . , . . 8 X 1= S 20 " 4C8 Tuc. 9 : 21 p.m. 2 1 " 455 Thu. 12: 53 a.m. " ( e ) 6 leap d3ys in the pericd 3 Sat. 12: 16 p.m. " before 4100 B.C. . . 6X 1= 6 $g t i 23 S . U . 92 Tne. 9 : 33 p.m. " Total number of days . 2,214.098 24 33 Sun. 11 : 53 p.m. " Leap day for the year 4123 36 . ~ o u l c not be 25 " 1879 Fri. 2 : 1 a.m. " .1 l 1 counted, as the vernal eclninox is iiot as far IIRC!< 26 " 9884 Tliu. 7 : 15 a.m. " in the year as the point a t \vhic:1 the leap d a ~27 " 1914 Sat. 1:33 p.m.

From 4128 B.C. to A.D. 1935 is not 6,063 (4128f 1935) years, but 6,062 (4128+1935-1) years. The nuniber of seconds in 6,062 solar years, God's years, is 191,298,086,321.3; in 2,214,098 days, the total number of seconds is 191,298,067,200.0. The difference is 19,121.3 seconds, tvhich is 5 hours 18 minutes 41.3 scconds; to be figured back froin (before) 3 hours 42 minutes 52 seconds (3 :if2 5 2 ) p.m., the 11our of equinox on March 21, A.D. 1935. The answer is that the equinox oil March 21, 4129 B.G., was at 10.7 seconds after 10: 24 a.m. No~v,what day of the week was i t ? The 2,214,098 days f r o n ?!Iarc7i 21, 4128 B.C., to March 21, A.D. 1935, are found as follor~s :

time of equinox varied from the mean which the astronomers have provided.
Problem

No.
2
10.7 see., Blar. 2 1 5.7 " 21 5.1 " " 21 50.1 " " 20 21.15 " " 21 56.15 " " 21 9.9 " " 20 5.65 " '' 2 1 51.65 " '' 2,8 .E5 " " 21 46.65 " " 21 51.12 '' " 21 1.3.65 " " 21 3.5.7 " " 21 L.? .0 a ( l 22 1 . 5 " z21 15.75 " " 'El 2-1.85" " 2 1 15.35 " " 22 10 1 '' 2 1 19.65 " " 21 59.45 " 21 45.5.5 " " 20 51.7 " 21 47.5 " " 21 38.35 " " 20 2 4 2 . ~ ~u 5 ' 9 1 (::inns 1 4 min.) 47.2-,5sea., R'lar. 21 (~2inns14 min.) 52.05 set., Msr. 21 (pius 2 min.) 56.65 Mar. 2 1 !ml!?i~s9 rnin.) , . 47.4 sec., ?;Tar. 21 33.55 s ~ .Alar. 2,0 , (plus 1min.)
'(

.. ... .. . ..... . .. ... . .. . .. . ....

occurs. Another method of a,rriving a t the same resnlt is to take the number of leap years (l4CS) and multiply by 366; and then, deducting the ninniber of leap years from the total of 6063 (6062-3 468=4594), multiply the result by 355, as f 0110~17s :
1,468 leap years; 146SX366 = 4594x365 = 4,594 conlmon years; Total number of days 537,283 1,676,810 2,214,095

28

'"9918

Thu. 12: 53 p.m.

" "

29

"
(1

1922 Tue. 12: 08 p.m. 1926

30
31 32

sun. 11:23 a.me "


" "

"

"

1931 Sat,. 4 : 27 p.m. 1932 Sun. 10: 16 p.m.

I n 2,214,098 days there are 316,299 weeks a::d 5 days. I1 the year 1935 the 21st of Marc11 falls 1 on Thursday. In 4128 B.61. the 21st of 191arc11 fell five days earlier in the week, which day is Saturday. Therefore, the vernal equinox of 4128 6 . 6 . fell on Saturday, at 10: 24: 10.7 a.m.
09' Some CalcuI~tions Using exactly the saiile method as above, but without going over all the operations, the nest step in order is to give a considerable list of vernal equinox dates, in the past, and the present. After A.D. 1886 there is given a plus or minus number of minutes by which the actual

The Result

Notes on the Above Prsblents: Problems Kos. 2, 3, 6, 8, 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 22, present the same features as Problein No. I, and are solved by taking similar steps. Problems 25, 27, 29, 29, 30, nre siniilar to Problem 1, but, being 1~7110lly~vitliinthe A.D. period, the years that intervene zxe ascertained by subiracting the year in question from the year 1935. All other steps are the same as for KO. I. Problems 5, 16, 17, 20, 21, 31, axe simi1z.r to Problem 1,but fractions are large and must be watched; in each of these instances there are sufficient hours in the fractional days to lnalre them count as complete days.

Problems 4, 7, 9, 10, f I, 23, 24, 26, 32, show the vernal equinox for the desired year falls on March 20. By this trick of the calendar one full day is lost, a ~ l d must be accounted for in the answer. This is clearly seen in Problem 26. The 18,627 days involved are 2,661 weeks (fractions in the problem being too small to affect the answer). &larch 20,I935,4,D., is T$Tednesday. One migl1t inferfrom this that the equilloctial date of March 20 in the year 188.1: A.L). is an even number of weeks ax-a? from the equilloctial date of 1935 A.D.) TI-ouldalso be on a. Jvednesday, but it is on a Thursday (the sanie as in 1935). (See diagram [B] page 363.) Problems 15, 19, s h o the vernal equinox for ~ the desired year falls on SLarch 22, instead of the 21st. By this trick of the calendar one full day is borrowed, and nlnst be accounted for in the answer. These t v o prol~len~s, those in like the paragraph last above, require close reasoning. To aid students of these p~oblelllsthere is published, on pages 368, 369, a calendar from creation to date, occupj-iap t~i-o pages of The fall Golde 1% A g e , and grea.tl~eimpIi6-ing the arriving at correct dates in :lie renlote past, hot11 as to the ,jagTs of the nlolldl ancl 8s to the days of the weel~. Date of Autumn~~E Eqreinox 4129 BE. Inasmach as some hare held that Ada31 was created in the fall of 4129 B.C., a t a da'ce convenient to the a n t n ~ ~ i ec:ninox, the date of ~al that eqai~lox fixed Iqi the fo:lo~~~ing is accurate and convellieilt method : Autumnal equinox, 1924 A.D.. Jerusalem lirne, mas September 23, 8: 1 11.111. T-ernal equinox, 1 1935 AD., is, Jernsai;lLl 1i:i:e. >lar.ch 21, 3: 43 p.m. T h ~ r e f o r ethe le~?:!l of time froin the antnmilal equinox of 12% t o the verilal equinox of 1935 is 1'78 days 1 9 hou;,; 32 minutes. The year 4128 B.G, TT-as leap p a r ; therefor9 175 a days 19 liours 32 rnicntes b2.c.k froin the time of the vernal equinox of 41.75 E.C. Isrings us to September 24, 4129 B.C., at 13.7 seconds after 2: 52 pm. as the time of the antull~nalequinox of that year. Follols~ingare the vernal al~il an'inmnal eqninoxes, J e r n s a l ~ m time, 81 the years stated: Vcrnal Aut ~mna l
Y

1 : 10 p.m. Sepfember 23, 9 : 31 a.m. 1 5 : 00 a.m, " 23, 3 : l a p . m . 10: 55 '" " 23, 9 : 0 2 " 4:32p.m. " 24, 2:49a.m. : l9 " " 23, 8 : 4 1 6 ' 4 : 08 a.m. " 23, 2 : 26 p.m. 9 : 53 '' 23, S : 1 1 " ~ 4 ~ e r a g e vernal: Karch 21,7 : 41: 32 a.m. date, Average date, autumilal i Septeinber 23, 6 : 18 : 50 p.m. Average time, vernal equinox f o ~ w a r dto autumnal equinox, 186 d. 10 h. 36 m. 18 see. Average time, autumnal equinox fonvard to vernal equinox, inelnding the three leap days, in the 12 years, 178 d. 19 11. 23 rn. 42 see.

1928, March 20, 1929, "21. 1930, " 21, lg31, " 21, " 20, 1933, ", '1 1934, ,' 21,

As some l,vill be interested a t this point to consider them, two small items are now slightly anticipated in the following summary: Nelv moon rose SepteEber 22, 4129 B.c,, a t g : 23 :27.594592 ~~~~~~~l equinox 54% hours later, T ~ lras day, September 24, 4129 B.C., a t 2 : 52 p.m. h'ev mooll rose Tuesday, Ifarc11 11,4128 B.C., at 12: 47: 44.694448 gma Vernal eyuiilox was 94 hours later, Satnrda,y, March 21, 4128 B.C., at 10 : 24: 10.7 a.m. DO ally of Jehovah's ~'<itnesses, any of the Or Jonadalss (comra2es of Jehovah's -witnesses ; see TTiwdicatiou, Book Three), see anything iii the placenlent of these nioons ~vitlirespect to tl~e eqcinoses, or anything in the days of the I,!-eek on ~ ~ - h ithey occilrred, to specially incl~ dicate the hand of Bod, as one iuigl~t rensonab!y expect it to Le nlal~ifes-ted sucll an iateresting at time in earth's affairs: No such pleasing eridence appears. 2,iore on this point lster, l Its a proper p!xe, ~:11en careful consideration ~37ill b~ given to the det?.ils of the ca1enda.r of JelloT-zh Gqd; :vhic!: calendar, it is liep2d and bec.1lieved, %-illperi~~le:leni-ly replace, as far endars are concer:~ed, the efr"o;.ts of Satan to hide some of Gocl's beautifa1 truth, TIOW, sinae 9918, conling ozt froill His temple in such a refreshing streanl.

1523, March 21, 1924, " 20, 1925, " 21, 1926, " 21, 1927, " dl,

5 : 54 p.m. September 24, 11:45 " 23, 5: 38 a.m. ~3~ 1 : 27 " 1 " 23, 5:24p.m. '' 24,

God,s Love of ths BeaugifHI Penns;plIn the sumlilertime, in Pike coni~ty, vania, in a regioil where one may see a score o-i. more of ~vilci d2er in rz single day, deep down in the heart of the forest, a mile or more from the 4 : 29 a.m. : 24 L c highway, lives all alone a little old lady x ~ h o 4:09p.ms loves the truth. She got it by listening to 9 : 5 " , 4 V a t c h t o ~ ~ - e r programs over the radio station 3:42a.m, I X ? B T s R , o f N e ~ ~ P o r k c i t y .

TT;'hen this little old lady was found she \vent into ecstasies over the messages she had heard. Explaining her environment, and that she could live with her children in Xe1.v Yorl; city and in Philadelphia, if she chose, she said, "I prefer to live here, like a gypsy, in the illidst of Cocl's bouquets." The frost had just touched the h a r e s of the forest, tinting them ~ i t colors that begh gar descriptiol~. EIols~ ninch more God loves beauty ! Ar:d h o nmcli the most beautiful things of Xis crextiuii are all a little diff erent from one another ! Vhen men try to mnke things beautiful they i r to ~ nlelie thein ail alilie. Yo two f l o ~ ~ ein a flower garden were ever rs esacily alike; no two roses on a rose hush, n o two petals on a rose. rl million new-born infant. can be fingerprinted, or a billion of them, or tefi billion, for that matter, and no two sets of fin~erprints~villbe the sa.me. And thus o w comes to a conisideration of Cod's beantit'vJ months, 13;s lovely, exquisite n~ontlis,that the Illore they are stt~clieci, Illore they are to 11e the admired, because, v-liile all subs tan ti all^ alike. they are all slightly different,
A Study of God's Months The word "mor:t'il" coaes from the n-or:! "moon"; God's months were all arranged fnr hefore man appeared on the earth. I t is nlau'a proper place to inclnire humbly at God's feet respectirig the ~ ~ oofr His hands; it is not mnn's i ~ right to discard things ~vhichGod has mzde for Ilis government, nor to substitute o t h e ~ sin their place. "And God said, Let there be lights in tile fiririament of the heaven, to divide the day f on1 the night; and let them be for signs, ancl for seasons, and for days, and y e a ~ s and let thelll : be for lights in the firrnar~~ent the heaven, to of give light. upon the earth: and it mas so. Aiid God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rale the night: he made the stars also. And Gocl set then1 hi the firmament of the heaven, to give light upon the earth, and to rule over the da:ancl over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness: and G-od saw that it mas good." (Genesis 1:14-18) Herein is the first reference $0 the moon in the Scriptures. Even though the moon had not been mentioned a t all in Gods Word, man would be compelled to take note of it; it is too conspicnous i;l

the lieavelis t~ be ignored; and too beautiful; and too useful. Satan has endeavored to get men to hold Gc3's month a:~d its iiistrnlnent the riloon in little esteem; lieilce the terms "lunacy", "lunatip3D I oon-struck," and terms of similar import. (cn The cpostle does indeed say, "Let no man tlierefore jv.dce yon in meat, or in dril;!;, or in respect cf an holy clay, or of [feasts celel~rating]the ~nev,- lmool:, or of the sabbath dwys ; TI-hiehare a ~ ~i~aclorn thj.ngs to come; bat t.he body is of of Christ." (Coloseirns 2 : 16, 17) But this is far from urging me11 to set gside the plain state~le:it of God's 'iTTolil thnt God "c?y?oi:l!;ed the mcon for seasoils" (EPsalm 104: 1.9), rnoiithly seasons beiilg lnal~ifest'ly what is here meant.
" A P.siM%ul8.i/itngss i g e a c e ~ " n I t is true thet the prophet Isaiah lxi:?ys the meesr.ge to an idolatrous and rebellions people, "Tonr new nlooils a i d y o ~ apyointed feast,s my x COUI liateth" (Isaiah 1:14), but that does not change the fact that tlzc prophet Ezekiel writes of ':1x fntnre ofYerii~gs '(the prince" which are of io take placc "in thi: new moons". See Vi?zdicnt ! ' ~ ? ! , Three, pages 287,.293, 295? for comBook me:its and explanetions on references to the 1:;eiI-lncjons in Ezekiel 45 : 17 ; 4 4 : 1, 3, 6. These nlii? not be igizored OF set aside. Tliongli Isaiah llle~ltionsin the first chapter God's disgust with Israel's hypocritical observences of the u e v moons, he saj-s in the next to the last verse of his prophecy: "And if; shall ~01112to pass! that from one iie~-? nloon to al~other, arld from one sabbath to a~:other, el!all all flesh c o x e to ~vorshipbefore me, saith [Jehovah] ." (Isniali 66: 23) Of course, tha.t is after the oncoxling battie of Srniageddon has doile its W O T ~ C of clestroying Satan's organization, and the e2rth has been cleansed of all its de~!ements. Khen the psalmist said, ' T h e n I consider . . . the moon" (Psnhn S : 3), he mea~lt that he really clicl consider it. Especially sigilifizant is his statelllent of David's seed, that "it shall he established for ever as the moon, and as a faithfnl ~~;it.ness heaven". (Psalm 89: 37) The in noon is, indeed, a faithful ~vitaess heaven, a in ~ ~ - i t n ewhose testimony cannot be gainsaid. ss It is the voice of God, spenkiiig through Noses, that n~entions "yrecious things thrust the forth by the moons". (Deuteronoliiy 33 : 14, lizn.i-git2) 1Vlia.t son~e of t.hose precious things are it is now the privilege of Jehovah's wit-

I
1

nesses zlld their conpaniocs f i ~ chariot of reference to it in t!~e esplaslatlons o'f the Galthe Jehovah's organization to see and unde~stanc?. enda of Jellovah God ~vhiclifollow, Indeed, it is even possil~!e that there may be some direct reference to these p~eeent=lfolpd- G&'s Jt7iLk Regarding filonths rnl i n w s of trnth that God had ifi mfnd. ~~~he72 He ane years of God are not e a d ~ an equal of ? sald o::'this day S1la-i; "the ligh~t ';he mool; sl;ajl n ~ m b e r manths, fior of an eqcal nnnllxr of of of xeeks, nor of sn e p a l auml-~erI clays, nor of (' ; light Of the snll".-rsn+& 33: 26. ile 2s Anjq~:ay, it lvas -I ;at::. nl i.li:.-ise of G Q ~set a an eqnal ~:u~:l::er^~f ~ S ' I T T S ,nor of an eqnal im-a. second hand. in His i ~ m e p i x eend to :sat it c:at her of m:i:l-L1.;-s, c o y of all P Q C Z ~il~l-Ilj)erof , there in the s i ~ y 239,000 ~ r l l e . r.,T::ap, f a r efi3~:g11 ol?_ds,TiTan 112s n o right to igilore .;]less pears of t ~, m a y t@a,ttjln tl.ieo!~gia~sc-.:~ldnot gee at it Qod. It is his C:3?;yto ~l,.nmberl ; ~ .alld to mark l and io miill it, y;Il~ch t';_?;- i>,-o~~]d sare;y them i ~ ~ ensl the::. g, to use them to God's pra dolie 1 they had beell a5le t o so do. ?<<>~T,T s e , h:_ri :lot to endepL,i70rto fore- t!;elll to 1 begin or end nt scj;ne point in j s v;ay illdicated z it is ubou-t to pn"c t h e i ~ t::, s?-ar:le, r!i in the divine T,TITordsf fiLe @i.eatoro Pl C~kei..,d~r G,@Z Pears foghe montl~s God ere not of a 5rzecl nunl?~er oli' in the y.2ai.s of Gi.-od, mi'&fhathmLlselvss are l1or This 'issn8 cont&s, rill p~.gj....: $63, 369, ail they compcsed ezch of ail ess~-l.a! nv.ml:er of the essentials of a co!e:l&;. eo-;eri;;g all pest h-mlc?.rm history. A11 1;no~: 153; ill tlie :lorma1 weeks, nor ~f a a eqnal nu:nl>ei. of days, nor of of year there are 52 ~;:eel.:s R I I ~I 62:- al;ii that an equal n~~i;l>er hoilrs, aor of an equal nuillI -. ber of minntes, nor of an erpcl amnber of scctherefore ia the ~zex"i-?~cee;:ix~ i-e~i_', 11n1ess it , . i s a 1ea8.p 798"; the dap.3 of ~a.p:1111ol:t-h are oile aids. &Ian 122s 110 rlgil'i TO 1gcs;e these months ';h;,;i~, ig f;:n \-ear 1393 of God. It is his duty t o nnmber them, and to ! iiay later ill the -A.D. the 22d day of Jiarcl;.; ~ ? . L C011 \j-edne~day; mark them me!l as tlxy go, and to use then] to ? God's praise, bni, not to endeavor to force them in the year 1931 A.C. the 22!3. c1s.j- of to begin 7i~l;here years begin or to end ~ i ~ l ~ e r e the csme on Thursday, v:!li!e ill the :-em 1935 A.D. th! years end. the 22d day of &larch co:~~les Fi,iday. I n the i;n I s it necessary to s t a t a n237 ye2,r 011 July 4, year f 936, on aacoaxt of ?!,:at ~\-eai~l's Ixing a lenp or or year, the 22d day of > + l ~ . r c h c o r n ? 011 Sul:_*qs--\~. Thaaksgiviilg Dny, or Cnristn~as, WashThe use of the calendar is r e q - sklple. Every ington's Birthds.2-! or Lincoln's Bil-thdayt Not , year is represented. l r 8 $1-22 d:ly of the at all. Each of Jeko~ail'syears properly begins , enough, at lnoilth falls O i l Friday ia tlie J-ar1935, the dzy at a certain p o i ~ t almd, of the week o : ~ which that s a x e de:; of the month the beginning of a specific clay, as in the case . x~ill fall in other years is silo7:il at tile head of of the monllis, l x t iieitlie~the years nor the need to be inca c c o ~ d exthe colamn above the )-ear clesi~~il.. Perecns us- lnontils nor t,he ~~-ee!;s ing the c'aleildar r;lust considn;., in the case of actly, nor are t!xy in accord except by man's leap years, that dates in J~nuxr!-a116 February egotistic and destractive acts. The days in the mmths of God are cever less must be separately calzalatd. after some other T2ie date is B~o~i'lm. calendar TI-^! he fonad verg than 29; a.nd they zra never niore than thirty. tasefnl and va.l~able v-ihen the mamer of using There is a snre c?ilc! proper methsd of detarlniiii t has been mastered. It is ass~:rnecI that the ing how many da::.-s the month fihoulri have. li user has an ordinary caienCi~ranc! can readily J e h o ~ ~ aGo3 fixed ibe n~ethod.$Ie so arranged and ordered all the details conaeeted with the loca'te a Friday in 1935 or a Tilnrsday in 1934, from which information en:- o t i l ~ r clesised data sacrifice of I-lis on-n dear Sol1 that. that event, of in regarding past. days of il:e J T - F ? ~ ~ be a t once first ilxporla~~ce history, occurred at Jernll-~ay obtained. This is the fixt tilile the Gregorian salein on the fonrteenth day of the month, v.-!lei1 calendar, or any oiiler, hzs w e r been projected the rnoon x a s at its full. Tile fonrteenth day of each month, therefore, is 'chat day of the back t o creation. Besides the calendar for 6,062 years &ere is illo~ith when tke moon f s f n l l over Jerud s o presented a table of 'Znnstions Usherirlg salela. That automatically makes Jerusalem, the in the Pears or Perisds TT7licIi Contained the not, Qreen~~ich, time center of the eart'h. m Most Important Events in EIistory", Let tlie ;be w e e k are for mail, bat they are of God, t'able speak for itself. Tliere will be frequent a,nd no mall rniiSr c.llange the arra11gemer:t which
k
a
7

e,

L-"

Muv

PROJECTION OF T H E GREGORlAN GALENDAR BACK TO CREATIOR Table Shmvino that D a t a Falling on Sunday in 4128 B C will, i n 1935 A.D.. ..
F r Sa Sn Fdo We T h F r Sa P o h

6,062 Years Later, Fall an Friday (Leap year columns are i n light-faced t y p e )
Fr Sa Su Mo We T h Fr Sa Mo Tu

Tu We T h

Sa 5u Mo

Tu T h

F r Sa Su

Tu

We Th F r

Su Mo Tu We
BC. .. EC ..

We

Th Sa Su Mo TI! Th Fr Sa Su T u We Th F r 5 0

Mo Tu We

4128 KC.4101 B C .. 4100 B.C.. 4001 B G .. 4028 B.G. 4000 5.C.3901 BC ..

2 4 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 (4100 B C i s nol. a leap gear) .. 8 4 53 82 81 80 79 75 77 5 6 55 54 53 6 2 51 50 49 2 8 27 26 25 2 4 23 22 21 (4000 B G is a lcap ycar) .. 4000 91 98 97 9 3 95 94 93 72 71 70 69 6 8 67 66 65 4 4 43 42 41 4 0 39 38 37 1 6 15 14 13 1 2 1 10 09 1 (3930 6.C is not a lean year)

16 76 48 20 92 64 36 04

BC. ..
C.C.

n.c..
E.C.

3800 B C .. 3701 B C .. 3700 ex.3601 B C ..

.. (3800 B C i s not a leap year) 0 0 8 0 79 78 77 7 6 75 74 73 72 5 2 51 50 49 48 47 46 15 44 8 4 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 1 6 (3700 B C is not a leap year) .. 8 4 83 82 51 YO 79 '16 77 7 6 56 55 54 53 5 2 51 50 49 4 8 3 8 27 26 25 2 4 23 22 21 20

5.C.D.C.

KC:. B.C.

0 0 9'j 93 97 91; 95 9 4 93 32 91 72 71 70 69 6 8 67 66 65 64 63 44 43 42 11 40 39 38 37 :!li 35 16 15 1.1 13 1 2 11 10 ti9 li!i 07 3500B.C.- (3500 U.C. is rqrrl a Ic:nl~ yr;!rl .. I ) ; 9.1 I 3 3401 U C 7G 75 71 73 'i:! 71 70 69 (is 67 < 8 47 46 45 43 42 41 .4il 39 1

----

-.. .

." -

3501 B C ..

."". ,"-.,

(lC30 U C is not a leap year) .. 9 6 Si 94 93 '33 91 90 59 6 8 67 66 65 6 4 63 62 61 4 0 39 38 37 3 6 12 11 10 09 0 s (900 O C is not a leap year) .. 0 0 9 98 97 9 6 93 94 93 , 7 2 71 70 9 6s 67 66 65 14 43 42 41 4 0 39 38 37 10 15 14 13 1 2 11 10 G9 (GOO B.C. 1s a leap b 9 87 86 85 8 4 G 59 58 57 56 O dZ 31 J O 29 18 0 1 03 C.2 01 (700 B.?. is not a 33 91 90 89 39 64 03 E 61 (i0 2 36 35 34 3 3% ' 0 8 G 06 0 04 : ) (COO B.G. is t ~ c t a 06 ! 5 94 93 9 1 G8 67 66 65 0 1 40 39 33 C2 3G 1 2 11 10 09 0 8
IltI $3 9: $;-!I> -9j-<,.i~~!h 03 91 90 89 7:: 71 70 (9 ISa 6 1 66 0.5 (i-l 63 62 61 .1 1 43 . i l l ,411 3:) 3A 17 :.I; 135 31 33 ? I 3 Ili l'i 1 4 13 I:! 11 .lo 09 1)s 01 05 05 (,i(l0 11.c. I ; 11::~~~ yv;lr) ! ! 1;1 : , ' I l i ' r :.I >:.i .i I):! 1{1 !:I1 79 7s 77 1 (ill ','-I ' 8 ' 1 1 !>I; ';', 5.1 '1; !,:! .';I 1 0 117 :::! . 1 90 :!.'I :%!i26 2, Y l"32 21 : 21
~

90 89 8 8 87 86 85 !:4 83 g:! :I !I() 79 7s 7 76 75 7 79 ( 7 4 62 61 IiO 59 58 57 51; 55 54 53 54 51 'ill "9 I!:,I7 'I5 45 3 ) 23 3 2 1 1 30 23 2s 21 2i; 2 5 : : 1 23 22 21 ::(I 1 17 , . . 19 ;:. GG 05 ( 1 1 0 3 02 0 1
I 66

401 LC.

.-

: 1 ( I I : { I 1.6 , I I ; ; I I ; ! I'j'J I,:! 1'61 I:II .',I ' ~ 8 !,I, ' , ' I '87 !I.; :if5 3 1 :(I; ::'> 3 1 3 2 :;,: 21 30 :!9 :!s 7.1 > I:' . !, ! ,
1 )

41111 n . ~ . .
J

7 , -1-1

(8l.i

!>:! 2ml. ~ ~ l l 31,)

:!I 23 22 2 1

SS 87 86 85 84 83 E2 81 8 0 1iO 59 58 57 li(; : I 54 53 52 W ::Z 31 30 29 3Y 27 26 25 2.1 0 1 03 02 01 0 0 99 98 97 Ofi 71; 75 74 73 7 3 51 70 69 IiS ,IS '11 4 6 45 1.1 43 42 41 4 0 "I! 19 18 17 l r i 15 14 13 1 2

79 78 77 7 6 75 74 73 51 50 49 4 S 47 46 45 23 22 21 2 0 19 18 17 95 67 39 11 94 66 38 10 93 92 91 90 89 65 64 63 62 61 37 3 6 35 34 33 09 0 8 07 06 05

90
lj:,

34

(3300 B.C. is not a Icop ycnr) 81 83 82 81 8 0 79 i e 77 7~ 5 0 55 54 53 5 3 51 50 49 45 28 27 26 25 2 1 23 22 21 2 0 3200 B C - (3200 B.C. Is a leap year) .. 3101 B C .. 00 9 ) 98 97 0G 95 94 93 I12 : 72 71 70 69 6 8 67 66 65 6 4 4 1 43 42 41 4 0 39 35 37 :iG 2 1 6 15 14 13 1 2 11 10 09 0 s 3100 BC. (3100 B.C. is nut a leap year) .. 3001 B C .. 00 99 A 97 96 7 6 75 74 73 7 2 71 70 69 0 s 45 47 46 45 44 43 42 E 4 0 20 19 18 17 1 0 15 14 13 1 2 3000 B.t.- (3000 B.C. is nnt a lczp yoarl 00 2901 B C .. 80 79 78 77 7 6 75 71 73 5 2 53 51 50 49 43 47 46 45 4 1 2 1 23 22 21 2 0 19 13317 1 0 2908 0.C.- (2900 B.C. i s 1101, a Ic;~n yam) 84 83 02 81 80 79 78 77 71; 2801 B.C. 56 55 54 53 !;:I 51 . 0 I ! ) ,IS 5 2S 27 26 25 2 1 23 ' 2 2 2 0 2 1 2800 0.6.- (:0 20 L C . 1v a lrap ycar) 0 l 9 93 9/ 91; 95 9i 93 !I2 , 2701 B C .. 7 2 71 70 C9 G 67 66 65 S4 H 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 3 6 1 0 15 14 13 1 2 11 10 09 0 8 2700 K C . - (2700 B C is not a ieau Year) .. 2601 B.C. 0 0 99 '8 97 0 6 9 6 75 74 73 7 2 71 70 69 68 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 4 0 2 0 19 18 17 1 6 15 14 13 12 3300 KC.3201 B C ..

06 94
66 38 10
!" ;

200 6 6 .. 101 D.G.

K C . i:; 118,l 21 le;lp y r n r l 91 33 :;9 SS 81 fjG s.5 63 62 61 f i l l 5.)53 57 1 35 34 33 ;:2 31 30 29 07 06 05 C4 01 02 G1 (209 B.G. i s not a Ivan w a r ) 9n li 94 93 q'? 91 so x9

(300 !I2 (i.1 36 0S

so

7G 48

80

62
24

&?:L

26 86
--0 L--.

100 L1.C.4 R.C.

.. is

9; 97 n 6 95 sir 70 ( 6 3 67 66 9 42 41 40 39 33 14 13 1 2 11 10

not a lea9 y:'ar)

9s 65
37

L 9

R1 Eli 28

3 S.C.
A.D. 9 )

B.J
40

59 02
" 1 62 3.1 Ili;
:I?

G8
9G
A

D. ieo-

A.D. 139
n.D.

0s

Of,
:5'<

eoo-

n2
is. !(,I :I8 k.2 4 6 47 74 75
n 1ci:ll YC:!?) 211 2 1 :!$! 23

:1 ;1 11'1

A.D. 233
A.D '.POA.U. :.JJ

10
:Y!
r$ !

::: /I!) -511 .?L 71; 17 78 7 9

0.1 :I 2 (ill St( 00


"!i

26

66

34

95 67 39 11

94 93 66 65 38 37 10 09

A.D. 100- (A.0. 400 is a [sap yz:.r) 92 91 90 99 98 87 86 55 41 83 82 81 6 0 79 78 77 A.D.494 O!J ill 52 03 04. 05 06 G4 63 62 61 G 19 58 57 56 53 54 53 5 2 51 50 49 O 3.5 25 26 27 18 29 30 31 32 33 34 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 38 2 26 2S 22 23 22 2 , . 7 2 5: 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 t0 61 62 ' i 0 8 07 06 05 0.1 03 02 01 3 0 8 82 83 8 4 85 86 87 88 89 90 1

07 0 8 09 10 35 3 0 37 38 13 0 4 65 66 1 91 02 99 94

11 13 l3 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 73 . 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 67 BS 69 70 71 7 2 73 74 75 7 6 77 78 79 95 96 Yi 98 99

2600 6.C.2501 B.C.

(2600 B.C. is not a leap year)

nn

2500 B.C.2401 B.C. 2400 B.C.. 2301 B.C.

2300 K C . 2201 B.C.

(2500 U.C. is not a lcap year) 84 83 82 8 1 8 0 79 78 77 56 55 54 53 52 5 1 5 0 47 2 8 27 26 25 26 23 22 2 1 (2400 U.C. is a leap year) 0 0 99 98 97 06 95 9 1 93 7 2 7 1 70 69 G 67 66 65 8 44 43 42 4 1 4 0 39 38 37 16 15 14 13 13 1 1 0 09 1 (2300 B.C. i s no' a leap ycar) 0 0 99 ? 8 97 7fi 75 71 73 7 2 7 1 7 0 63 4 8 17 46 'I5 44 43 42 41 2 0 19 18 17 10 15 14 13 (2200 U C. i s nnt a 8 0 79 76 77 7C 52 5 1 0 47 4 3 24 23 22 2 1 20
leap year) 75 74 73 47 46 1 5 19 18 17

76 48 20 92 04 36

OX
!Ill

118 40 12 00 72 41 16 00 72 44 16
99 71 43 15 98 97 70 C9 $2 4 1 14 13 96 68 40 12 9 91 93 !I!? . 5 91 67 65 65 ii! 63 19 35 27 Z f i r 5 1 10 09 08 07 1 90 C2 34 06 89 61 33 05
RS 87 86

2100 B.C.2001 B.C. 2000 K C . 1901 B.C.

1900 B.C.1801 B.C.

(2100 B.C. i s not a leap year) 8 1 83 82 0 1 8 0 79 78 / I 76 75 74 73 5 6 55 54 53 52 5 1 50 49 4 8 47 46 45 28 27 26 25 34 23 22 2 1 20 19 18 17 (2000 B.C. is a lcap year) 00 92 93 97 06 95 94 93 02 7 2 7 1 70 69 68 67 66 65 BP 4 4 45 42 4 1 4 0 39 38 37 30 1 16 15 14 13 1 2 1 10 69 0 8 (1900 B.C. i s not a leap ysar) 0 0 93 28 91 96 76 75 74 73 72 7 1 52 69 68 1 8 47 46 45 4 4 43 $2 4 1 40 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 (1800 B.G. is not a lcap year) 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 52 5 1 LO 49 4 6 47 46 45 24 23 22 2 1 20 19 18 17
00

Cil 9Y 5:; 32 3 1 50 0 4 93 62

a leal1 ~ 8 8 1 . ) O 01 2 03 0 4 05 C5 07 0 8 C9 10 1 12 n 1 ! 3J 25 E& 27 2 3 29 30 31. 3 2 33 34 35 3 6 37 33 39 40 53 55 54 55 G G 57 58 59 on 6 1 62 63 6-1 65 66 67 65 Xi) 5 1 02 GZ 8 3 85 86 87 S G9 90 9 1 93 93 54 95 96 H a Icon yc::) 0 0 G1 02 03 0 4 05 06 07 08 20 21. 2 2 23 21 25 26 27 %S 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 . 48 49 50 51 a2 53 54 55 56 57 53 59 G 6 1 62 63 64 O 73 73 74 35 T t j 77 73 79 8,) 5 1 82 83 8 4 82 36 87 88 89 90 9 1 92 A.D. 700- (A.0. 700 ' i t not, a reap y?xr) 0 0 0 1 C2 03 04 A.D. 739 13 13 14 15 lii 17 18 19 20 2 1 22 23 34 25 26 27 2 8 29 30 3 1 32 40 41 42 43 4 4 45 45 '7 4 s 49 50 5 1 5 3 5 3 54 55 6 6 57 58 LY 60 ; (:S 6 2 70 71 7 % 73 7.3 75 'iti 27 78 79 SO 8 1 % 2 84 85 86 87 88 $1 5 7 3:; 99 1 ; A.D. ROO- (A.D. 800 is a I~;II y e w ) A.D. 8 , 9 ( 1 8 1 nl. 02 03 02 05 06 07 0s 09 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 0 1 :!I 75 :!5 27 :!;! 2'5, ?,I I 1 :::? 33 34 35 ::I; 37 33 39 -10 41 42 43 44 5:: 5 4 'j.1 ',5 1.1; ! ? 5 : : .,9 (;I! 61 62 G3 1;) 65 66 67 (is 69 70 7 1 $ 2 , hll :$.I I?:! 83 .'\I 8.5 !A :IS :'9 90 9 1 ! 2 93 94 95 DG 97 98 99 ; : ! : n.11 !rqc?tn.)~.' 0 0 i.! I ~ C I I a I!.:IIB yczir) I I O 1x1 o? u3 0 1 05 06 07 (IS 09 10 1 12 1 A.1'. !X,Y ::I! >'I?:! :i:i 2 1 21; :'.G 27 :::: 29 30 31. ::2 33 3 1 35 ::ii 37 35 37 4 0 1%; .:') '11 ',:I 6:: 5 : 'j.1 55 :,I; 57 9 1 59 (;I1 6 1 62 63 cil 6.5 G6 67 6 8 7li il 7 5 '79 S l l 81 1.2 C3 31 8 86 87 S!i t 9 90 9 1 !: 93 54 95 96 5 I : 4.R IWfl(A.5. I003 i r 11~11, I C : ~ O V ) n Y 0 0 0 1 02 0 3 0 1 05 06 07 08 A.0. TL39 Ill 17 18 1) : 0 2 1 2% 23 "1 25 26 21 38 29 30 3 1 32 33 34 35 36 : 4 85 4 1 45 46 47 $ 8 49 50 5 1 i ! 5-! -55 56 57 58 59 G 6 1 62 63 6.1 :53 o :7 72 73 74 75 7(j 77 78 79 8 0 8 1 82 83 84 85 86 87 58 69 90 9 1 82 29 h.0. 1100- (A.D. 11.03 i s not a lcap ycar) 0 0 0 1 02 03 04 U1 A.D. 11.9 'I2 13 14 15 16 17 1 ; 1 ; 2 0 2 1 22 23 2 4 25 26 27 38 29 39 3 1 33 ' 40 41 42 43 41 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 5 2 53 54 55 56 57 53 ' 9 00 68 69 70 7 1 7 2 13 74 75 7 6 77 78 79 80 8 1 82 83 84 85 86 87 SS 98 ! 7 9 59 ; A D. 7200. ( A D. 12CO a a leap year) A.D. 1249 r7 0 1 ( 2 C 04 05 CE 07 0 8 09 10 1 12 13 14 15 16 1 3 1 24 25 25 27 2Y 29 33 31. 23 3.3 34 35 :6 37 38 39 40 4 1 42 43 44 53 53 54 55 6 51 53 59 6 0 6 1 62 63 6 4 65 66 67 G 69 70 7 1 72 G S 80 6 1 E2 23 8 1 85 ZG 87 8 5 b9 90 9 1 92 93 94 95 3 6 97 96 99
A 8. GO-

A.D. r59

503 is nrn 29 2L 2;; 23 : 48 49 fO 5 1 7 6 71 73 79 A.D. 600- t A . 0 . COL' i s nnt lfi 17 18 19 A.D. 699 4 ! 45 46 4 7
(A.D.

13 41 69 97 C9 37 65 33 05 33 61 89

14 42 70 98 10 38 66 94 06 34 62 90

15 43 71 SY 1. 1 39 67 95 07 35 63 91

16 17 18 19 41 45 46 47 72 73 74 75 12 40 68 96 08 13 41 69 97 09 8 6 37 64 65 92 93 14 42 70 98 10 38 66 94 15 43 71 99 1 1 39 67 95

17 18 19 20 2 1 22 2.3 45 46 47 4 8 49 50 5 1 73 74 75 7 6 77 78 79 13 41 69 97 09 37 65 53 05 33 61 89 14 42 70 98 10 38 66 94 06 31 62 90 15 16 43 4 1 7 1 72 59 1 12 1 39 4 0 67 6 8 95 96 07 0 8 35 36 63 6 4 9 1 92 17 18 19 45 46 47 73 74 75 13 41 69 97 09 37 65 93 14 42 70 98 10 38 66 94 15 43 71 99 1 1 39 67 95

17 18 19 20 2 1 22 23 45 46 47 18 49 50 5 1 73 74 75 16 77 78 79

1860 6.C.1701 B.C.

72 44 16

A D.

1<"0.

1700 B.C.1601 B.C. 1600 K C . 1501 B.C.

(1700 B.5. i s not a leap y-ar) 8 4 63 82 3 1 8 0 79 i3 77 76 56 55 54 53 52 5 1 50 43 48 ZS 2 7 26 25 2 4 23 22 2 1 20 (1600 B.C. ts a lcap Y:ar) 91 ~3 35 . 07 . (1500 B.G. is not a I:ap Yznr) 00 99 ? S 97 96 76 J 74 73 72 7 1 70 U 68 4 8 47 46 45 44 43 42 4 1 40 20 19 16 17 1 6 15 14 13 12 (1400 B.C. 1s not a leap year)Oo SO 79 78 77 r 6 75 74 73 72 52 5 1 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 24 23 22 2 1 20 19 18 17 16 (1300 B.C. is nut a loap year) 8 4 63 S2 E l SO 79 78 77 7 G 56 55 54 53 5 2 5 1 4" 4 8 28 27 26 25 26 23 22 2 1 20 (1200 B . 6 . i s not a 8 8 81 86 E5 8.1 60 53 i 8 57 56 32 3 1 30 W 28 04 03 02 0 1 (1103 B.C. is not 92 9 1 90 69 8 5 64 63 62 6 1 60 36 Y 34 33 32 08 07 06 05 04 90 2 34 06 89 61 53 05

A.D. 1.S9
A F. l r " 0 A.D. 15L.3

( A D. 16 4: 74 (A.D. 12

PS I;O 02 04

87 i9 Z1 03

86 53 33 02

85 R 1 83 82 8 1 FO 79 78 77 7G 75 74 13 57 :6 55 4 55 r a r l ! I r:p ri: 47 4; ss $9 2 8 27 26 25 3.1 23 22 21 20 1: 18 17 J 01

4n

(38
A.D. 7'10A.D. 1C9J

nri .
21 53
SU

(A.D.

1500 K C . 1401 B.C.

1400 B.C.1301 B.C.

A.D. 1700- (A D. A.D. 1'1:9 20


I8

A.D. 1500A.U. l t 9 9 A.1" 1.909A.2. i5 :

13M) B.G.1201 B.C.

7(: (A.O. If; 44 72


(A.9.

13

(10 1490 is not a 17 18 l 8 0 2 1 L 22 2 4 25 26 27 28 i 45 46 47 $ 6 49 50 5 1 52 53 51 55 5 6 73 74 55 76 77 78 79 Sil 6 1 I72 83 Sl - 1TG3 is no1 a I c a y s x t r ) 13 1 4 1 I c i 17 1; , 20 2 1 22 23 24 ' . . I 41 42 43 4.1. 45 46 47 4:: 49 10 5 1 52 69 70 7 1 7 2 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 SO 57 . 3 99 - . 9- . . 1500 i a a llrrp yaar) llil (il L;2 C3 G4 0.5 06 C7 08 25 26 27 M 29 33 3 1 3 3 33 34 35 3 6 53 5 1 55 ::ti 57 53 19 ii0 6 1 62 63 U 5 1 L2 G3 8 4 85 SG 61 S i 89 53 9 1 63 1704,,is 13ct a lcnp 11.3;):10 03. 0:: 03 !?4 21 L,- 23 25 26 3 1 5 23 33 331 R'? : -?3 M 1 i,2 5.3 51 55 5 6 57 53 53 ti0 . 77 78 59 SO 5 1 Z2 03 84 05 b6 57 8S 00 l t 0 O i s l ~ a ta leap yo7.r) 17 18 lj 20 2 1 ':V 23 24 1 2: 27 28 45 46 47 :X 45 53 5 1 53 53 54 55 5 6 73 74 75 76 77 76 z so 6 1 82 83 m 1,300 i s >lot a lea? y?ar) 13 1 15 1 17 i 1'; 20 2 1 F 23 24 : G '

~ ~ ~ p ~ )
~ ~

0 1 C2 03 04 05 06 07 29 30 3 1 ::a Z3 34 35 57 50 59 63 6 1 E2 63 85 86 87 l i X 39 90 9 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 03 1 25 26 27 28 23 30 3 1 53 54 55 51; 57 58 59 3 1 $2 C3 R 85 86 87 09 10 3 38 7 65 66 93 94 05 06 3 3 34 6 1 62 89 90 0 1 02 29 30 57 53 35 36 25
1 12 1 39 40 67 (;X 95 3G 07 OR 35 :i6 C3 cil 9 1 92 03 (: 1 3 1 32 59 CO a7 8 3 00 B 27 2s

08 36 64 92 04

09 37 65 93 0.5 :33 33 60 61 8 8 89

10 1 12 1 39 39 4 0 66 67 6X 94 95 96 06 07 0 8 34 35 36 62 63 64 90 Y l 93

13 41 69 97 09 37 65 93

14 42 70 96 10 38 66

15 43 71 99 1 1 39 67 94 95

13 14 4 1 42 69 70 91 98 C9 1 0 37 38 65 66 93 ! ' 4 05 06 33 34 61 62 eg 90 0 1 02 29 30

15 1 6 43 4-1 7 1 72 99 1 12 1 39 4 0 67 GY 95 96 07 0 8 35 36 63 64 9 1 ss 03 04 N 1 '

17 18 19 20 2 1 22 23 45 E6 47 4 8 49 50 5 1 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 13 41 69 97 09 37 65 93 05 33 14 42 70 93 10 38 66 94 06 34 15 16 13 44 7 1 72 99 1 12 1 39 40 67 GS 95 9 6 07 0 8 35 17 18 19 45 46 47 73 74 75 13 41 69 97 09 14 42 70 9s 10 15 43 71 99

1 1

1200 U.G.1101 B.C.

lcap ?ar) PO 43 P ' 83 L;2 3 1 SO 79 78 77 7~ 75 74 13 11 ;? 55 54 53 62 5 1 5 7 4 ' ' s 47 4.; ( 5 !.I 4. '7 27 26 Z 21 23 22 2 1 2U S3 1 1'1 16 15 14 ; a lcap ycar) 87 86 85 84 59 58 57 56 3 1 30 29 Q 83 0 2 0 1

3 36 35 94. 93 : :!I (;>ic;/ c:i i5 41 4 ' 3 3 IF537 13 1% 1 10 ,i 1 !t

91 9 : -o r i : f 62 < ! . : :;,;35 3: 33 CS 0; G.. 05 6 :

1100 6.C.1001 B.C.


W

w Oa

H ? 73 11.6.-li;*hc,?i~y b - : ~ . k! 3511 B.C.-lh tt;,u?!::li3s lirth. R 3098 B.C.-Adam's death. E 3041 0.C.7 :'I ii.:..::::lted. 2: :3 I3.C.---C:"m3s birth. D 2373 [I.!'.-Dc!l;ga a:ld lil:thuse#ah's d:stll. C 1945 KC.: :i:r.t u;i:il A b r ~ , a , ' l . 1 1 2 0 n.?--lsxc's tirlli. 52 1870 B.C.-Shorn's dtatlt. X 1515 B.C.-Exodus. J 147; tf.C.-.Cr3::illq Jori1.n. U 1469 l3.C.-Judals bccin. 53 1119 6.C.-Saul entl~roned. Y 1035 0.G.1 Ki:;gs 6: 1 k,y. 0 1023 B.".!!onne Paishid. Dd 1027 0.C.-Dzdlcalion. Hz 745 D.C.--HczcLinIl. V 641 B.C. "..., --"...I .:ii cr:at r?::;c:r. G 607 5.C.-Gzntile Times b:nin. G2 537 0.C.-Edict of Cyrur. Ez 468 B.G.-Ezra. Nh 455 B.C.-Nohen!inh. 3 B.G.-LGGOS comes. BJ A.D. 12-Boy Jesus i n temple. R A.D. 33-Year of Ransom. Z 1879--iio!1's Watch Tower h"sun. \V 1854--:"atcli Towsr Eihl. 8 Tract Society incolnwated. K 1914-.King retsms. T 1913-Tcmplc. F 1922-Anaintlng of a l l flesh. B 192G--Time of blessednars. N 1931-New name.

El

,.

1932-Sanctuary

oieansed.

LUNATIOSS UBFZEZISG I N THE YEARS OR PEEIOCS TTyILICR CONTATS TIlE MOST ILIPORTANT ETENTS O F I-IISTOI;',Y, STATED I N TERIiIeIS O F T E E G;IESOXI.iS L'-'ILESDAR, "LND ASTROXOXI69LLP EXACT
( I n i k e dates ritrd kl:a aie also cited csrtiiin other l'at:s, p,,iO? t o Vsrfial Ejeir!os i:e. ZC3, hitherto much held in ertrss:)
Date #. . ! L 4123 Se Sp 2% 2 23 4125 Tu Mr 17 12 47 4025 F r MT 22 8 54 f i r ~ a l y s i scf t:?e Ticc C c n t c n t or' thr il:ts;i.ci~? Eo?r,s Frsctic- of vie:, Weeks at E s d s P::i:;' ! & 7th~ D. H. I-:. %??ribs 25.2 2 4 23 19.155515 5219-3 3 8 1 3.973312 1 811.5s-1 0 4 22 55.4E3-12
Aeaiysis of Days in InterIrrtrizi

liiter. Isier. vening vecinu

B.6.

Second 27.504538 1 1 74.694448 P 46.65375 P

Yrs. loons
6 100 1237 1556 13245

SIartirg vdith tho Mow l o o n Nearc s i t h e V ~ i o a l Eqei;;ox far the Ysa: 4028 B.6. 176 Ir Ve?n kaszr 36505 2 1 Easi Xi:3ni!1 W;sBs Dg :s Total Seconds 567911 376
Lp.

Ve!iiso Maor>s S e r i a l s a:,d Tot?.I;

n'

Ll!ue sl!o:r-n in each casz is Jerusalem time, 7 hours 20 ~;in:;s 52 seconds earlier than Ezstem Staudard time. Each crlcu!ation was checkeci to the one preceding aud the oc? f,-'ll-jn.ing!nzd in every instance wit11 the 1035 AD. date s!lon.n, with ~ h i c l lagreement is exact. The rxrintions r,? a 1 c ci e f g: nmol~ntingr e s p e c t i ~ e lto :,bout 8, 10, 14, 1 ~ 4 i , 10, 15, acci 3 lloure, after calcuiations extellding eyer 6.rt:jJ year- are nclt due to anx errors in the calculations b, tllen~sclrt.~! to variations froin the mean Innation; ez:.lnined in fnll in its propzr place. i n figuring eclipses s l ~ l c l bilt otl?!.r geriocis astronomer's calculate the mean time ber1rf;.3 lunations a s 25514~3.864370seconCs. (Their method ia to es1)ress the t h e in &ys and decimals thereof, but the req.ilr? are the salile either \my.) These figures, astronomicnllj- csact to a millionth of a second, are used in all tlie a i o w ca!culetions.

God made. KOman may alter the number of d a y earefally coll~pilecifrom recolZs in the New in a week; in ihess days (since the French R e ~ o - Tor!< Public Library, covering the fLty grenrs lukion calendar fiasco) none but, a theologian, from 1886 to date. The nioons are here num~vic.ithhnge coiiceit and no reverence for God. 1,ei.ecI by The Goldeqz Age, the o:?e for .Ja;ln1s-ould contemplate for a llloment such an act of 2 s ~3, 1836, beil;g nunbered 73131: t h r e a f t e r presu.mption, RIan may nn:i~ber his meelis tile:- are in sequence dotvn to 73761, ;he nn~nber there is no harm in so doing. Since God is so of the lmintion for December 13, 1936, w5ich is good as to give them, it wonld seem that, at as far as the compilaiion goes. This table is in least once a ;-ear, nian iiiight take note of their Jercsalem time, 7 hours 24 miimtes 52 seconds cr,;Iier than Eastern Standard time. I t is quite number. ?elf-espl~natory.God's months are of 29 or 30 Learning Something Absnt God's Months clay each; their moons rise at \-asions times of I t seenls strange that maa's mo~ilhs should 11.u tile day or night, o : ~vnriaus days in "iie \y;eeB, so different from God's months, that the tn70 as specified in the first eight colmllns, the teble kinds of months could be going along steadilv eoficluding v i t h the daies grouped under the "Actual". side by side, overlapping each other, etc., aad TT-ord The ( h e a n lunation" is nliiversaily agreed by yet most people know nest to nothing about the particular liilld of months that God provided asti.onomers to be 29.530588715 days. Otherwi~e for the noctnrl:al government of the earth. stated, this is 29 days 12 hours 44 minutes On page 371 begins a lnnaiion experience table, 2.864976 seconds; or it may be stated altogether

Lnnation Experience TabIe, Jerusalem Time


(Terusalein time is 2 hours 25 minutes* earlier [faster] than Greenwich; or 7 hours 25 minutes earlier than Eastern Standard time. To get Jerusalem time, therefore, add 7 hours 25 minutes t o Eastern Standard time.) (*24 minutes 52 seconds)
Actual Moon Days 73131 73132 73133 73134 73135 73136 73137 73138 73133 73140 73141 73142 73143 73144 30 30 29 30 29 30 29 29 29 30 29 ? O 30 30 Tu Th S a S u Tu W o Fr S a Su M o W e Th S a Date Time Mean Data Time 1886 A.D. Tu Jan 5 7:31pm Th Feb 4 8 : l j - m Fr Mar 5 8:59pm Su Apr 4 9:?3cm l o l a y 3 10:2:pm W jun 2 11:llam e Th Jul 1l l : 5 5 p n S a Ju! 3 1 12:39pm M Aog 30 1:23am o Tu S g 25 2:07pm e Th Oct 28 2:jlam Fr Nou25 3:35pm S u D~c.25 4:19.-m 83 Jln 24 5:03gm Campared Campared M i x with next with Mean o : . ~ Slsw Fajt Slow Fast 29 D hr mi hr mi hr mi hr mi s 1170 1130 586 792 613 491 440 413 564 597 723 877 1027 1119 646 666 3 42 28 9 18 2 32 Actlal Date Time Mean Date Time 1890 A.D. Tu Jan 2 1 8:llam W Feb 19 8:55pm e Fr Mar 2 1 9:39am S Apr 19 10:23pm a W o May 19 11:07am Tu Jun 17 11:51pm Th Jul 17 123:pm S Aug 16 1:19am a Su S p 14 2:03pm s Tu Oet 14 2:47am W N w 1 2 3:31pm e Fr D e 12 4:15am e 1831 A.D. a Jan 10 4:59pm Ma Feb 9 5:43am Tu Mar 10 6:27pm TI1 Apr 9 7:llam Fr May 6 7:55pm Su Jun 7 8:35am l o Jul 6 9:23~m W Aug 5 10:07am e Th S p 3 10:51pm e S a O c t 3 11:35am Mo Nov 2 12:19am Tu D c 1 1:03pm e Th Dec31 1:47am 1892 A.D. Fr Jan 29 2:31pm S Feb 28 4:15a1n u M Mar 28 3:59pm o W Apr 27 4:43am e Th Rlay 26 5:27pm S Jun 25 6:llam a Su lo124 6:55pm Tu Aug 23 7:39am W S p 2 1 8:2?pm e e Fr Oct 2 1 9:07am S Nov 19 9:51pm a l o D c 19 10:35am e 1893 A.D. T Jan 17 11:19pm 889 2 05 I Th Feb 16 12:03pm 737 S Mar 18 12:47am a 601 Su Apr 16 1:31pm 492 Tu May 16 2:15am 424 W Jun 14 2:5Spm 416 e Fr Jul 14 3:43am 481 Sa Aug 12 4:27pm 617 Ma S p 1 5:llam e 1 802 38 Tu O e i 13 5:55pm 950 3 46 Th Nov 9 6:39am 1123 5 59 Fr D c 8 7:23pm 1167 6 43 e Compared Compared lins. with next with Mean over Slow Fast Slow Fast 29 D hr mi hr mi hr mi hr mi s 639 633 665 733 819 892 930 933 912 873 813 734 2 05 21 1 139 31 55 2 08 2 46 2 49 2 28 149 49 5 53 7 58 10 09 1148 1 2 19 1 24 1 9 16 6 30 3 41 1 14

Maon Days 73181 73182 73183 73184 73165 73186 73187 73188 73189 73190 73191 73192

Jan 5 10:13am Feh 4 5:43am Mar 6 1233am Apr 4 4:59pm Rlay 4 6:llam Jun 2 4:24pm Jul 2 12:35am Ju131 7:55am Aug 29 3:23pm S E 27 11:47pm ~ Oct 27 9:44a111 ,Nov25 9:49pm D c 25 12:24pm e M J Jan 24 5:31am

29 Tu Jan 2 1 2:18am

29 W Feb 19 12:57pm e
30 29 30 30 29 30 30 29 30 Th a S u Tu Th Mar 20 1130pm Apr 19 10:35am May l S l l : 4 8 ~ m Jun 17 12:27pm Jui 17 3:19am Aug 15 6:49pm S p 14 10:22am e Oct 14 1:34am Nov 12 4:07pm D n 12 5:40am e

334 7 16 2 3 1 7 44 433 513 5 24 40 5 16 444 4 20 10 00 2 47 1 4 20 41 17 07 153 17 48 4 24 15 55 5 55 1 32 1

Fr

Su Tu W e 23 Fr

36 30 1 2 5

1857 A.D. 29 W Feb 23 12:lOam We Feh 23 5:47am e 30 Th Mar 24 6:39pm Th Mar 24 6:3lpm a 30 S Apr 23 11:22am S Api 23 7:lSam a 29 Mo May 23 1:3jam su l a y 2 2 7:SCpm 29 Tu Jun 2 1 1:22pm Tu Jun 21 8:43zm e 30 W Jul20 11:ljpm W Jnl 20 9:27;!11 e 29 F Aug 19 8:CDam Fr Aug 19 l 3 : l l a m : a 30 S Sep 17 4:29pm S Sep 17 10:jjpm a Ma Oct 17 11:39am 29 e n oct 17 1Oa : :m \ e ' l l o b 16 12:23zm 29 Tu Nov 15 10:3Bam ! 30 W D c 14 11:51pm Th D c 15 1:07pm e e c a 30 Fr Jan 13 11:08am S Jan 14 1 : j l a m 1538 A.D. Su Fet 12 2:3jpm Tu Mar13 3:19em \lie Api 1 4 ; 1 :: O m Fr M?jr 1 '?:?Tam 1 Sa Jnn 9 5:31pm Mn Jul 9 6:15am Tu Aug 7 6:59pm Th Stp 6 7::3am Fr ect 5 S:27pm S A u !; 4 9:llam E n D c 3 9:55pm z Tu Jan 2 103:an iZ89 A.D. Th Jan 3 1 11:23pl 771 S Mar 2 12:37pm 816 a hi0 Apr 1 l2:Slam 868 Tu Apr30 1:35pm 515 Ti: hia! 30 2:192n 934 W lcn 29 3:C39n 907 e S x 121 23 3:4;am 839 hlo Aug 25 4::lpm 762 W St925 5 :i -~ a n 704 e Th Oit24 5::9pm 578 S H c v B 6:43am 668 a S Dccl?. 7:27pm 657 u

S Jan 10 5:54pm a Bo Feb 9 4:41am Tu hlar 10 2:lOpm W Apr 8 11:26pm e Fr May 8 8:45am Sa Jun 6 6:55pm Mo Jul 6 6:25am TU AUO 4 7:42pm Th Sep 3 10:45am S Oct 3 3:27am a Su Nov 1 9:02pm Tu D c 1 2:14pm e Th D c 3 1 5:49am e

29 30 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 29 30

su FCS 12 2:22am M hlar 12 6:51pm o W Apr 1 11:37am e 1 Fr May 1 3:53am 1 S Jun 9 7:OQpm a ruo Jul 9 8:46an1 Tu Aug 7 E:%PX Th Sep 6 7:26am Fr Oet 5 5:04pn su Nov 4 232am hlo DCC 3 13i 2: :1 m Tu Jan l ll:37pnl

Fr Jan W 7:08pm Su Feb28 6:16am M Mar 28 3:47pm o W Apr 27 12:16ani e Th May 26 8:lBam Fr Jun 24 4:36pm Su lu124 2:OOam M o Auo 22 1:28pm W Sep 2 1 3:45am e Th Oct20 8:53pm Sa Nou 19 3:46pm Mo Dec 19 10:42am

73169 73170 73171 73172 73173 73174 73175 73176 73177 73138 73179 73130

30 29 30 29 30 30 29 30 29 30 29 30

Th Jan 3 1 11:393m S Mar 2 12:3Gam a Su B a r 3 1 2:CSpm Tu Apr S 4:34ae: O W May 29 7:49pm e Fr Jun 23 11:23am Su Jul 28 2:30am M Aug 26 4:29pm o W Sep25 5:llam e Ti1 0ct24 4:55pm S Wov23 4:13am a S D c 22 3:21pm u e

07 52 144 231 2 50 2 23 115

1 44 1 1 37 1 1 0 45 9 01 6 30 3 40 117

02 100 126 136 147

04 104 2 30 4 06

73218 73219 73220 73221 73222 73223 73224 73225 73226 73227 73228 73223

29 30 29 30 29 29 29 30 29 30 30 30

W e Th Sa Su Tu W e Th Fr Su M o W e Fr

Jan 18 3:57am Feb 16 6:46pm Mar 18 7:03am Apr 16 5 : 0 6 m May 16 1:16am Jun 14 8:20am Jui 13 3:16pm Aug 1 ll:17pm 1 S p 10 9:34am e Oct 9 10:55pm Nov 8 3:?6pm Dec 8 10:03am

4 38 27 6 43 2 43 6 16 4 32 3 33 5 40 59 5 48 639 4 43 12 27 2 27 17 10 19 3 1 1 8 59 15 13 9 14

in seconds as 2551442.S64976 seconds. This stating of time in such cletail as to take note of millionths of a secoilcl seems strange to most practical persolis, but is iil regular use among astrononiers.
Astsonorners ,Wust Love Truth It niay as well be settled that astronomers love truth in the abstract. They must; their business requires it. It 11-as of great interest in New Yorb city some years ago when an eclipse was due. The astronomers, as a matter of their

common duty to manliind, announced the exact time the eclipse 1170nld occur. Additionally, they stated that the edge of totality of the eclipse ~vould "soniewhere between 145th street and be 165th street i11 upper New Yorlr". \$Then the eclipse came, its edge of totality was a t 155th street, just halfway between. This 117asnot an accident, but the result of careful calculations. I n the year 1846 two astronomers, Adams in England, and Leverrier in France, located the planet 'Neptune (the existence of which was suspectecl, but not known) by the use of astro-

Actual Maan Days 73230 73231 73232 43233 73234 73235 73236 73237 73238 73239 73240 73241 73242 30 29 30 29 30 29 29 29 30 29 30 30 29 Date Tlma

Mean Date Time 1894 A.D.

Comparld Compared Mins. with next with Lean over slow Fast Slow Fast 29 Ds hr nli hr ml hr mi kr mi

S Jan 7 5:36am u Tu Feb 6 12:14arn We Mar 7 4:4ipm Fr Apr 6 6:Eam S May 5 5:llpm a Ifio Jun 4 1:25am Tu Jul 3 8:14am We Aup 1 2:53pm Th Aug 30 10:33pm Sa S p 29 8:13am e 28 6:25pm S 0~3 u Tu Nos 27 1123am Th Dec 27 4:49am

Su Jan 7 B:07am 1118 5 54


Ffio We Th Sa Su Tu Th Fr Su hlo Feb 5 8:51prn $93 3 49 Mar 7 9:35am 822 58 Apr 5 10:19pm 642 May 5 11:03am 494 Jan 3 11:47p1n 409 Jul 3 12:31pm 399 A g 2 1:15am u 460 A g 3 1 1:5?pm 580 u S p 35 2:43am 733 e Oct 29 3:27pm 899 2 13 W e Ncv 28 4:llarn 1046 4 42 Th Dec 27 4:55pn 1146 6 22 3 23 7 12 2 02 8 10 4 30 6 08 5 55 1 3 3 605 5 04 3 04 31

2 31

4 17 10 22 15 26 1630 19 0 1 16 43 12 06

73243 73244 73245 73246 73247 73248 73249 73250 73251 73252 73253 73254

30 30 30 29 30 29 29 29 30 29 30 30

Fr S u Tu Th Fr Sa

hlo
Tu

We
Fr S a Qo

Ian 25 11:55pm Feb 24 7:12pm Mar 26 12:54pm Apr 25 3:aOam May 24 3:15~m Jlln.23 12:20am Ju1 22 S:Olam Aug 20 325prn S p 18 11:24pm a Cct 18 6:393m Nov 16 7:40pm Dec 16 8:58arn

1895 4.D. a Jan 26 5:39am 1157 6 33 Su Feb 24 6:23pm 1062 4 58 49 Tu Mar 26 7:07am 885 2 02 5 47 W Apr 24 7:51pn1 695 e 1 0 9 7 49 i r May 24 8:35am 545 3 39 6 40 S JU!I 22 9:19prn a 461 5 03 3 0 1 Mo Jul 22 l0:03am 444 5 20 Tu Aug 20 10:47pm 479 4 45 TI1 S p 19 11:31am 555 e 3 29 a Cct 19 12:15pm 661 143 Su M v 17 12:59pm 798 3 4 o Tu Dec 17 1:43am 951 3 07 1896 A.D. W Jan 15 2 2 7 ~ m e Fr Feb 14 3:llarn Sa Mar 14 3:55?m Mo ADr 13 4:39am Tu l a y 1 2 5:23pm Th Jon 1 6:07am 1 Fr Jul 10 6:51pm Su Aun 9 7:35sm hlo S p 7 8:19pm o W O t 7 9:03am e e Tb M v 5 9:47pm e S Dec 5 10:31arn a 1697 A.D. Su Jan 3 11:15pnl Tu Feb 2 11:59am Th Mar 4 12:43-m Fr Apr 2 1:27pm Su Mzy 2 2 : l l a n rvd2 Hajj 3 1 2:55pa W Jun 30 3:392m e Th Jh129 4:233pm Sa AIIQ28 5:07a111 Su SDP 26 5::lpm TII Oet 26 6:35am W $nu 24 7:19arn e Fr Dee 24 S:03am

5 44

2 02 7 22 12 07 1536 17 19 16 45

73255 72256 73257 73258 73259 73260 73261 73262 73263 73284 73265 73266

23 30 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 29 29

W Jan 15 12:19am e Th Feb 13 6 42pm S Mar 14 1:178nl a l o Asr13 652am Tu Mag 12 10:16#m Th Jun 1 ll:12am 1 Fr Jul 10 10:04ya Su Aua 9 731am klo Sap 7 4:12pm We Oct 7 12:17am Th Nov 5 9:56am Fr Dec 4 8:lOpm

73267 73268 73269 72270 73271 73272 73273 73274 73275 73296 73277 73275 75279

20 30 30 29 30 30 29 30

S
30 29 29 30

Sa Jan 3 5:32an Mo Feb 110:42?m V:e Mar 3 2:25pm Fr AFr 2 1:53am Sz r.lay 1 l l : l ? p n l W o l a y 3 1 2:55va W Jan 30 5:24am a i h Js1 29 6:17prn S Aug 28 5:5&m a S sep 26 4:15prn u Tu Cct 26 1:59am We Ww24 11:49am TI; Dec 23 i0:2Spm

izomical calculations very similar to those used in this series of articles. I n figuring the mean calcuIatiolis shown In the central part of the tables, No. 73176, August 26, 1889, was talien as the starting point, because it was only about 2 minutes amay from the mean generally used by astrononlers for currezt calculations, that is, 29 days 12 hours 44 minutes (secoiids being dropped). From this starting point the calculations were carried back~vardto January, 1886, and foru-ard to December, 1936. The next colamn, entitled "Minutes over 29 Days", is a very useful one for purposes of study, Each moon is a period of 29 days and a certain number of minntes in addition. The total nnmber of minutes over 29 days between this iiioon and tlie one next following it is given. Thus, from the new moon of Tuesday, January 5, 1886, a t 10: 13 a.m., to tlie new moon of Thursday, February 4, 1886, at 5 : 43 a.m., m7as 29 days and 1,170 minntes. See Nos. 73131 and 73133. 1 1 the next t x o colum~lseach moon is corn1 pared with the one nest to it. Thus, it being taken for truth that the normal time from one nem- noon to another is 29 days, 12 hours and 44 minutes, that is, 29 days and 764 minutes, if a moon takes 29 days ar,d 1,170 minutes, it is slow b j b y the difference, which is 406 minntes (6 honrs 46 minutes).
The Moon Runs Fast

-4V-s

, ss lo
"7

73280 79281 73282 73223 73224 732-95 73286 73287 73236 732E9 73290 73291

29 30 30 29 30 23 30 30 29 30 29 30

S a SII T! I Th Fr Su Mo H a Fr Sa lo Tu

Jae 22 9:53arn Feb 20 1b:09pm Mar 22 11:06am W p i 2 1 12:@3am hl~y 20 3:27pm JU!I 19 6:38an1 Ju1 13 10:1611m Alig 17 1:03pm S p l G 2:39am e Oct 15 3:G6prn Wov 14 2:ISam Dec 13 2:22om

Ba Mo Tu Th Fr Su

Ta
We Fr S a Mo Tu

A.D. Jan 22 8:47pm Feb 2 1 ?3 ?r : 1 .n Nar22 10:15pm Apr 21 10:59aa1 May 20 ll:43prn JU!I 19 12:27pm Ju! 19 1:llam Aag 17 1:55prn S p i6 2:33am e Oct 15 3:21pm Nw 14 4:07sm Dsc 13 4:5:ps

1899 A.D. 73292 29 Tii Jan 12 l:18am Th la11 12 5:352m 73293 29 Fr Feh 10 12:10~rn Fr Feb 10 69 m :c 30 Sa l a r 1 10:2bpm S a Par 12 7:03am 1 29 Mo Apr 10 8:49arn ii?o Apr 10 7:47pm 30 id ISY 8:07p!n W May 10 83la1n 9 e 29 Tn Jun 8 8:4?am Th Jun 8 9:15pm 50 F i J I 7 11:OOpm a J ~ i l 8 9:59arn 30 Ss Aus 6 2:17pm S Aug 6 10:43pm I 29 Tu Eep 5 6:02am Tu Sep 5 11:27am 30 WE Oct 4 9:43grn T h Oot 5 12:llam 30 Fr Eov 3 12,5511n1 Fr Nwd 3 12:55pm 29 9 % Dec 3 5:lEam Su Dsc 3 13Sam

The experience tables shov tthi?t the nlosn has the habit of running ahead of its scliedule (if snc!l an e:;pressioii is perniissible). Thus, according to the "?iIean"'the iiioon on Jaiiuary 5, 1896, xTas not due to rise niitil 7: 31 p.m. of th2t day, but, as n matter of fact, it rose 3 honrs I S liriliutes earlier; so it was fast by that amount of ti12Ie. The lover of Jehoval: God wi!l nonTbe greatly iaterested in the accoiilpanging chart of lnnations whie!i silo~i-i-5 beautifnl a i d graceful the manner in vhieh the moon keeps care of the secontls of tlie great Greator. I t instantly appe2.r~that there is order, not the order of cogs ~ n c gears and ra'iitliiig machinery, but the order l of rhythnz on a inagnificent scale. But first another glance 2t the tables. Talie note of the last four eoluiilns of the tables and iiote h o v the iiiooil is usually for seven ilioons fast, then for seven moolls slow, etc., as compared with those that have gone before; it

he

GOLDEN AGE
is not always for seven fast an'd for seven slow, but is so 73 percent of the time, a few sixes, eights and nines being sprinkled in. Note again from the tables that the moon is in the habit of running fast not only with respect to the previous moon, but ~7i'ilirespect to its mean lnnatioll ; f o r about 91j2 /21ullationsit is fast with respect to its mean, and then, for 4 luiiations, slow .rv.ntil the balance is recovered. The way the astroliolners put it. is that the moon has a maximup1 eccentricity of orbit of 1.61959758103203 d-ays. That is to say, stating this in a manner suitable for the general reader, the variation over any period of years, no matter how remote, will be not more than 1 day 14 ~OLII-s n~inutcs13% seconds. But the differ52 ences +teed not be of such an ai~lount,and by proper care in teliing the right kind of starting point the total difference over so long a period a s 6,000 years will lse only ail hour or so, a s will be shom~n.
Metonic Cycle a ~ the God of Order d Men have been studying the nloor, Inany centuries. I t is nov about 2,400 years since the astronoiiler nletoli discovered thst after 235 lunatiol~sthe neTv moon usually rises on the same day of the n ~ o n t l ~ it did 19 years betliat fore. Thus, compare No. 73131, January 5,1886, with No. 73366, January 5, 1905, or any two moons 235 lunatioas apart, and i t will be found tliat this is ?~ea.rly exact. Tile Callippic cycle is a refinement of the ljfetonic, in ~vhich1. day is dropped every fourth Metonic c;rcle, to malie the Metonics come out more liearly exact over lonc~erperiods of time. Of niwh greater interest is the saros or eclipse cycle i 223 moons, used by ali astronf omers in ca!culating time of eclipses. Every 223 n~oollsthe in0011 is back where i t was, if such an expression map be used. The ckart (pages 374-375) helps to make this clear. Note again the data reyarding the first moon mentioned in the table, KO. 73131, of January 5, 1886; now note its position on the chart. Then add 223 moons, reaching to No. 73354, of January 17, 1904 ( a period of 6,585.32 days, or 18 years and 10.32 oi- 11.32 days, depending on how many leap years are in the period), and notice oil the chart that the moon is in the same relative position that i t m7as at first. Compare ally two moons 223 moons apart, and note the results. Take the time to pay very special attention to this eclipse cycle feature, as it is the key to

1
-..*

Actual
Moan Day3 73304 73305 73205 73307 7323% 73309 73310 73311 73312 73313 73314 73315 73316 30 23 29 30 29 30 29 30 23 30 30 30 29 Date Time Mo V/e ~h Sa Oatc

Mean
iime

Mins. w i t h next w i t h Mean ovcr slow Fast slow Fast 23 Ds hr mi hr mi hr m i hr m i 113 158 2 42 45 339 157 3 51 5 36 3 17 2 07 12 4 4 28 14 5 1 1519 13 53 1033

1coo
Bo Jan 1 4:21um We Jan 3 1 3:52am ~h Mar 1 1:54pm Fr Mar 30 10:59aln su Apr 29 7:52am M o Msy 28 5:19pm We Jun 27 3:56nm Th Jut26 4:12pm Sa AYO 25 6:223m su szp23 10:24pin Tu Gct23 3:5611m Th M v 22 9:46am o Sa Dee 22 2:32am

I
i

su
Tu We Fr S a KO Tu Th Fr

F "

'

A.D. Jan 1 2:23pm 691 Jan 3 1 3:07am 602 Mar 1 3:51pm 545 M u 3 1 4:35an! 533 Apr 29 5:1gpm 567 Ray 29 6:03am 637 Jun 27 6:47pm 736 Ju127 7 3 i a m 850 1 2 6 Aug 25 8:l:jm 954 3 20 Sep 24 8:jIzo 1050 4 46 Oct 23 ?:;?pm 1070 5 C6 Nov 22 10:27am 1004 4 GO Dec 2 1 1 1 : l l ~ s 875 1 5 1

547 41

3 19
35 5 10 2 35 4 3 5 4 00 1 5 9 4 43 2 OP 4 49 6 44 1 33 1 4 07 2 27 E 40 13 07 13 00 14 51 9 12 2 37

73317 1 ~ 1 73319 73320 73321 72322 73323 -, , 2 . ? ~ -2 -"or, 133-5 73326 73327 73328

---

30 5 29 30 2) 29 33 2) ~ 4 23

Su To W2 Fr Sa Su TII

We

$9 Th 30 5a 30 Y o 29 We
Th Sa Mo Tu T!I Fr a Su Tu We Fr Su

x: m Jan 20 5 Jp Fcb 19 5:14am b!ar 20 3:22:!11 F.pr 19 12:06a:n R?ay18 &:07aa J!in 15 4:02pm Jiil 15 12:32m Aug 14 10:56am Sep 12 11:47~!n O c t 12 3:iXpm Ncv 1 lO:O?no~ 1 Dec 1 5:22em 1

1901 A.D. Su Jan 23 11:5Sam 729 Tu Feh 13 123Sam 603 Y l e M?r 23 l:23p3 524 Fr Apr 19 2:Oizm 481 8a h:3y 18 2:5lpm 475 Pia Jrn 17 3:?lam 517 a : Jo1 1 5 4:lS:m 617 T b Ass 15 5:C?sm 771 07 Fr Srr 13 57 m :p ; 953 3 03 Eu O c i 13 631am 1103 5 39 k!o Nov l 7:15?m 1159 6 2 5 l h'% C:c 1 7S9am 1101 5 37 1

73529 73?30 73331 ,3332 -ox., ~ ~ 73334 73335

30 33 29 33 7 3 29 29 23 j ~ z 3 G 30 ,3227 29 73338 30 73339 30 73340 29 O 73341 S

--

1552 A.D. Jan 9 11:43gn1 Ti1 12.1 9 B:-l;;n Feb 8 3:5Cjm $ 8 izb 8 9:2iaa Mar 10 5:19am SB h:~? 9 1 : l i p m Apr 8 4:19;:r. Su A : 3 LC1:51.:;1 May 8 1:14ae H . I,!:j. e 7 11-5S?n Jan 6 8:4Cam Fr :?? 6 ::.Zcm Jul 5 3:2291il Sii :a! 5 1:Gi-m Atio 3 10:4Gpm K c A x 4 l : 5 l v n Sep 2 7:4Sym W:'4 S:p 3 2:?2n1 Oet 1 7:38am Ti1 C c t 2 ::Ihn C c t 31 10:42an S H:; i ::IS-rz? a Mov3O 433nm S u A:;X ?:-;T-@ Ma O c 29 11:53pm Tu Sic 33 3:51:o: e

967 EGi 60 525 S45 4: C 438 522 7L0 904 1071 1150 1154

3 23 45

3 00 62.3 1 4 4 7 08 3 43 5 24 5 18 1 3 5 556 5 26 3 42 54

223 507 636 6 30

3 43 9 39 15 05 18 47 19 4 1 17 2 1 1 2 14 5 58

1923 a.n. Wz Jan 26 7:07pm B e Jzn 23 6:152n Fr Feb 27 1 2 : 4 ~ n Fr i : b 2 T 6:2am FU Mar 23 3:552m B 1.13: 23 7:il;m a ! , : a hnr 27 4:Olpm 6 0 !.?r 27 8:27am Tu i :" C,:'' L O 2.--,.,? We W y 27 1:18a3r! a ~h Jsn 25 6:nOao: Th J!.n 25 5:51a,1 Fr JuI 2 1 3:15um Fr Jai 23 1::3S;"1 a Aug 22 10%"2a1 Eu Aog 23 11.2533 lllo S-p 2 1 7:COoa Tti S s 22 l2:Ciam 30 TY Oci23 5:598n 29 TI1 Nov 19 7:3??w 30 FF Oec l S ll:55pm 30 30 29 20 29 29 23 30 23
>XL?b'

73354 73355 73356 73357 73353 73359 73760 73?51 73362 73363 73354 73365
d .

30 30 ?O 29 29 30 29 29 30 29 20 23

S u Jan 17 6:15pm Tu Frb 16 1:33zm ~b Mar 17 8:03am Sa Apr 16 12:22am S b!ay 15 1:27pm u IPo Jun 13 1133pm We :ol 13 7:56am Th Au3 1 327pm 1 ~r Sep 9 11:123m Su Oct 9 7:54am Mo Pdov 7 6:OFlm We Dec 7 6:15am

1931 A.D. Mo Jan 13 ?03:n Tu F 16 3:+7?m ; b Ti1 h!3r 17 4,31rrn Fr Apr 15 5:L5pm S1 Wry 15 E:59?.m L!o Jnn 13 6:43:m We J c l 13 7:27am Th A" 1 6 : l l p n 1 S Srp 10 8:5Tam a Su Oct 9 93Spm Tu Hov 3 '10:232m W e O c 7 11:07pm e 1905 A.D. Fr Jan 6 11:51am Su Fcb 5 12JSpm Mu Alsr 6 1:lCpm \Ye Apr 5 2:@3am Th Way 4 2:47pm 5 3 Jun 3 3:31am Su Jul 2 4:l."pm Tu Aug 1 4:59am We Aug 30 5:4?pm Fr Sep 29 6:27am Sa Oct28 7:llpm ldo 8 0 v 27 755am Tu D c 26 8:39pm e

'3e"

rq

73366 73367 73355 73369 73370 73571 73372 73373 73374 73375 73376 73377 73378

50 30 30 29 30 23 30 29 30 29 29 30 29

Th Jan 5 8:46pm Sa Feb 4 1:35pm M a Mar 6 7:46am We Apr 5 1:52am Th Yay 4 6:19pm S lun 3 8:25am a Su Jul 2 8:19pm Tu Aug 1 631am We Aug M 3:42pm Fr Sep 29 12:28am S a Get 28 9:27am S u Nov 26 7:16pm Tu Dec 26 6:32am

1009 1093 1084 987

4 05 5 29 520 343 846 1 2 2 714 612 551 526 539 589 676

15 05 1 00 1 5 99 1I 332 50 4 54 2 3 2 C 04 333 132 3 58 2 01, 3 45 5 59 255 944 128 12 39

786

22

14 07

376

* CjOLBEN AGE
Days 30 30 29 30 30 23 30 29 30 29 29 30 Actual Date Tim% Bean Date Time Compared with Mean ~ 1 0 % Fast 29 D hr mi hr mi hr mi hr mi s Compared

BROOKLYN,Y. N.

Mins. with next over slow Fasf

loon
73379 73380 73381 73382 73383 73384 73385 73386 73387 73388 73389 73390

1906 A.D. W Jan 24 7:3spm ~h Jan 25 9:23am e Fr Feh 23 10:28am Fr Feb 23 10:07pm su Mar 25 2:21am su Mar 25 10:51am Mo Apr 23 6:35pm Mo Apr 23 11:35pm e W May 23 10:29am W May 23 12:19pm e Fr JU" 22 1:34am Fr ~ ~ " 2 2 ' 1:03am Sa J d 2 1 3:2Kpm Sa Iu121 1:47pm MU A U 20 3:56am M~ ~ ~ ~ 72:31am ~ . 0 Tu S p 18 3:02pm Tu Sep 18 3:15pm e Th Oct 8 a:l l lm l Th Oct 8 3:53Am l FF Rov 16 11:05am Fr Nov 16 4:43~m S Dzc 15 9:23pm S D c 16 5:27am a u e 1507 A.D. Mo Jan 14 6:llpm wc F Z 13 6J5am ~ Th M a r l 4 7:39pm S Ayr 13 8:23am a Su May 1 2 9:07pm Tu lun 1 9:;lam 1 W Ju110 1035pp e Fr Aus 9 11:19am su Sep 8 12:03am Yo Oct 7 12:47pm W NUV 6 1:31am e ~h D c 5 2:15pm e 1908 A.D. ~a Jail 4 2:59am Su Feb 2 3:43pm Tu Mar 3 4:27am W Apr 1 5:llpm e FF Ray 1 5:55am Sa May 30 6:39pm Mu Jun 29 7:23am Tu Ju128 8:07pm Th Au3 27 8:51am Fr Ssg 25 9:35pm S u Oct 25 10:19am n o NOV 11:03pm q 23 ~e D c 23 11:47am e

73391 73392 73393 73394 73395 73396 73397 73398 73399 73400 73401 73402

29 30 29 30 30 29 30 29 30 30 29 30

Jan 1 4 8:26am T U Feb 1 2 8:1211m Th Mar 14 8:34am Fr Apr 1 2 9:35pm Su May 1 2 11:28am Tu Jun 1 2:19am 1 W Jul 10 5:46~m e Fr Aug 9 9:06am S Sep 7 11:33pm a M Oct 7 12:50pm o wo NUV 6 1:08am ~h D e 512:52pm e

Mo

73403 73404 73405 7?406 73407 73408 73409 73410 73411 73412 73413 7?414 73415

'29 29 30 29 30 29 33 30 29 30 30 29

~a Jan 4 12:12am S Feb 2 11:05am u Mo Mar 2 9:26pm W Apr 1 7:31am e ~h Apr 30 6:02pm S.? May 30 5:13am S dull 28 6:50pn1 u Tu Ju128 9:45am Th Aug 27 1:28am Fr Sep 25 5:28pm S Oct 25 9:15am o T U NOV 24 12:22am 30 we Deo 23 2 : l ~ p m

unlocking the past, By means of this key astr02omers have located many events which occurred h~uldreds years before Christ. The chroniclers of ? 43 I a90 2 06 nientioned edipses with much exactness, with 953 3 09 1 39 1 the result that the dates could be exactly located. 374 3 30 30 954 3 10 5 33 Calculations in the Goldcriz Age ofiice show 905 2 2 1 150 834 1 0 1 31 that in six thousand years the eclipse cycle 748 16 1 4 1 locates a certain moon with absolute accuracyo 666 138 123 609 235 It is on this wise : There were 73,740 moons from $ 594 50 618 2 26 5 38 the lnaation nearest the sprillg equinox of 4023 663 141 & 04 B.C. to the 1u1ial;ion nearest the spring equinox of ,l.D. 1935. There are 223 moons in an eclipse 706 58 9 49 742 22 1343 cvcle; i.e., in '73,740 moons there are 330 eclipse .. OJ 781 97 833 1 0 9 IS I50 Besides. 891 2 07 -- c~c!es and back llloollsmoon No. Accordingly, 1.X moo?zs from 73740, nioon -; , 2 927 2 43 4 ~ 3 920 2 36 7.3590 (of February 15, 1923) should be in 2 13 867 1 4 3 ~ r a c t l y same position in the heavens as the the 797 33 5 738 26 03 CQIP ~ o n i e 5,950 years ea'rlier (in 4028 B.C.) ; and . 704 100 680 124 1 2 such is the case. -It 29.530588'715 days each; 73,590 moons 24 : 653 1 51 ~mrinllt,ill total, to 2,173,156 days alld about 621 223 i33 605 239 5 : 1 lllillutes over. I n 330 ee!i~pse cycles, at 6,555.32 631 2i3 5 -3 ::~z?-sper C Y C ~ ~the total days are 2,173,155.6 , 1 3; : 701 i 03 12 Sf 787 23 i : i ~ ~ s . 5,950 years the moon is in the same Iil -- * ,, 895 2 1 1 : --- --, .:l.~zition,and positively identifiable, with a total 943 2 59 -L-, =.-, 960 3 1 6 , .; - .in 947 3 03 - - . ~:~;nerence the two ca.lculations of less than 907 2 23 l l hours 3 minutes. i 836 1 1 2 119
LA

%,

c :O

Lj

,,:I

7 . - -

& -7

73416 73417 73418 73419 73420 73121 73422 73423 75424 73425 73426 73427

29 Fr Ja1122 2:40am 29 S Feh 20 1:20pm a 31) 8u Mar 2 1 10:40?m 29 Tu Apr 20 6:20an 30 We May 19 4:llpm 29 Fr Jue 18 1:57am 30 sa Jui 17 1:13pm 29 MO AUQ 16 2:23am 3 0 Tu SC? 14 5:3791n 30 Th Oct 14 10:62am 29 Sa Nov 13 4:47an 30 S Dec 12 10:27ps u

73428 73429 73430 73431 73432 73433 73434 73435 73436 73437 73438 73439 73440

30 29 29 30 29 29 30 29 30 30 29 30 30

73441 73442 73443 73444 73445 73446 73447 73448 73449 73450 73451 73452

30 29 30 29 29 29 30 29 30 29 30 30

Getting Ready tea Explore the Past TI-it11 this divinely provided measuring rod ?here 11-ill now be irlade an exploration of the ?:as:;. p~rticnlarly those passages in Fiolg Writ in . 7::ilch certain thiilgs care said to have taken .la,e ,- i , ,-, at such and such a time in such ancl such -z - - .- E xc?on. The right place t o start inquiry is with -- - . , 3 2: -. r L p nioon nearest at hand, say the one which is 3 .IS2 lienrest to the verna,l equinox in the year A.D. 1910 A.D. - 3. . This nen- moon makes its apaearanse, 7 ,5 .-' 1 Tu Jan 1 2:20pm Tu Jan 1 9:19am 1 zsti.onomical1~~ spealiing, at Los Angeles, Calif., Th Feh 10 3:42am W Feb 9 10:03pm a 1 Fr M a r l 1 2:41~m Fr Mar 1 lO:i7am FL.,t 4 . 1 a.m., TTTednesday,April 3; on the 75th 1 S Apr 911:54pm Sa Apr 9 11:31pm a R!o l a g 9 8:02am l o l a y 9 12:15?m xleridian, near Ne~v York and Philadelphia Tu J I ! ~ 7 3:45pm W Jur 8 12:59anl e 1 (Eastern Standard Time), a t 7 : 1 a.m. on the We Jul 6 11:4Spn1 Th Jnl 7 1:43um .. Fr Auo 5 9:06am S Aug 6 2:2%m 688 116 li 2 2 a 5ame day, a,nd a.t Jerusz.lei~ia t 2 :35 : 52 p.m. S S a 3 8:34pm S Sep 4 3:llpm a e 867 1 4 3 1 27 : u MU 3 11:01am T U 6rt 4 3:55am 1044 4 40 G the same day. I! We Nov 2 4:25am W Rov 2 4:39pm 1154 6 3 0 e 12 2 : It. is desirecl to ascsrtain as accurately as ~h D c I e ll:39pm Fr Oec 2 5:23am 1151 6 2 7 j;i sa DZC 3 1 6:50pm Sa DCC3 6:07~m 1043 4 39 : 43 l>assib!e ju.st lien, astronomically, the ne-rs1110oil 1911 A.D. i,ose, in &_he j7ear 40'28 B.c., at the time nearest Mu Jan 30 12:13~m M a Jan 30 6:51am 887 2 03 5 22 vernal equiiiox. Relnemhe~ing a.ccUraej; the W Mar 1 3:00am T U Fcb28 7:35~m 727 e 37 7 25 Th Mar 30 3:07pm Th Mar 30 8:19am 587 2 57 6 48 ,:I? the eclipse cycle, one could wish to start backS Apr 29 12:54am Fr Ayr 28 9:03pm 479 a 4 45 3 5 1 S May 28 8:53am su May 28 9:47am a 415 5 49 5 ~-:7l.d from the lnoen ~~srhicll exactly corresponds Mo Jun 26 3:49pm Mo Jnn 26 10:31pm 413 5 51 6 43 i~ its nicvements v i t h the one around the rnidcIZe Tu lul 25 i0:410m Y,e 26 11:15am 482 42 1 34 2 ~h ~ u 24 6:43am ~h A L 24 11:59pm g ~ 623 2 21 17 16 of Jiarch, 4028 Bee.,but to do this it lT~onld be Fr Sep 22 5 : W m Sa S p 23 12:43pm 812 48 e 19 37 SII OC: 22 638an YO @st 23 1:27am 1000 3 56 9s49 nzcessary to start with moon X O ~ '7330, of BC MOV 20 11:1Bun1 TII Mcv 2 1 2:llsm 1131 6 07 94 53 > Ps D c 20 6:09pm Th D e 2 1 2:559m 1170 6 46 e e $46 k e!)nsaqv .L>, LUZJ.
1909 A.D. Fr Jan 22 12:31am 640 Sa Feb 20 1:15pm 560 M Mar 22 l:59am o 520 Tu Apr20 2:43pm 531 Th May20 3:27am 586 Fr Jun 18 4:llpnl 676 S u Jui18 4:55am 790 26 Mo Auu 16 5:39pe 914 2 3 0 We Scg 15 6:23am 1025 4 2 1 Th Od 14 7:07on; 1085 5 2 1 Sa Nav 13 7:51a:n 1060 4 56 Su D c 12 8:35pm 953 3 09 o 2 04 2 C3 3 24 G5 4 04 3 13 3 53 . -2 58 1 15 : 128 1-11 -2 :
--.*
LZ
.<

742

22 2 5 1

>

O C ~

J1,

-rnran

The

CjOLDEN AGE

Lightday, the first day of the week, is corn- day ends a t 9: 00 D., coinmonly designated 3 :00 The day ends with t.lie12th honr, at 12 : 00D. memorative of the great gift of light in crea- p.n~. tive epoch No. 1. (Genesis 1: 3) For a fnll account of the work of this and the other creati7-e "iWan. Became a Living Soul" days, see the TV'atcli Tower publication f2j.e.a"The secret things belong unto [Jelio~-ah] our tion. Concerning this work a gentleman in God: but those things which are re^-ealecl 1;ePaterson, N. J., whose brother is a clerg~~niaii, long unto us, and to our children for eyer." said, "When 1obtained possession of this book I (Deuterononly 29 : 29) None may ERJ- at just hated God; when P had read it I loved Him." 7;-hat time "Jehovah God forined maii of the EIeavenday, second day of the TJeek, is colll- dnst of the groni~d,and breathed into his 110sa melllorative of the gift of a11 atniosphere, net-s- trils the breath of life; and man becai~c lil-ing SOLI~" (G-enesis 2: 7, A.R.V.), but. this series of sary to sustain the life of lIPeat,hingcreatnres,articles contains the strong evidence ;::at it n-as Genesis 1: 8. Earthday, third day of the sveeB, is cornmenlo- ill t!?e spring of the year 4060 Eej1ji.f ,!?n;iso.i.;z 42 rative of the making of the beautiful hollle ! 0 8 3.C.). The evidence has already been prese:ireil that whicll God made for mall and other breathing the vernal equinox that year \\-as RT ?:2l D., creatures.-Genesis 1: 10-612. Starday, fourth day of 'che week, is commemo- Lifeday, T e m p l e 28,4060 B.R. ( 3 : 4 p . ~ .Thnrs1 . clzi:-, Xarch 21, 4-028 B.C.). The se;- zoo11 apratire of t,he unfoldment of the maglifieilt pagealltry of t,heheavells, suns, lnoolls alld stara peared about 29 hours s ~ b s c ~ ~ ~ l2i:~ i tS.,. jli l ~ Gocisday, Tenrple 30, 4060 E.R. (5 : 53 p.nl., inconceivable in number and beaoty; the nlntellless spectacle of the universe. (Genesis 1:16) Friday, March 22, 4028 B.C.). If it s ~ : : ~ ~ ~ : ~ ~ ~ r n t l y hiln. all appears that Jesus, the Second Ad::.;-. -as borii "praise ye hirn, sull and moon into the world about the ninth hons clf :i night h. ye stars of light."-Psalm 148: 3. (heretofore called three o'clock in t3e .;.c!ri~iilg) Lifeday, fifth day of the meel;, will eter l ~ e J T - O I I ~ ~ be unreasonable to re-rerezr:? Ll;bld the it commemorative of the great epoch in ~vhich the thought that the first Adam rraa coxcl-;.ttcl abont Creator first bestowed upon earthly creatn~es the same hour? That he was creatil< ~~~iriletjlile the unspeakable boon of life.-Genesis 1: 26-24, l~eforesundown of that da;~cerrai~T7seems to Mansday, sixth day of the meek! mill ever rebe suggested by the reference to "slztli day" ]nilid man of the gracious act of God in making in Genesis 1:31. These t~:-o e ~ - e i ~ ~<;-:iiiosaiid ts. the hnrnsn creature and ~vill remind him of the new lnoon, rarely come so clvs? :,rs;.erller as time when he was not in existence. (Genesis they did on this occasion, a.11d tilt7 ;-case in the 1 : 2627) I t was not a-tall necessary '0 the happithat one if t~ rr of iiess of God that such a creature as man sllonld lnali occurred midway betn-eel1 tkt,. ever have lived. Concealed from clear vision beliisi:: rh2 mists, Godsday, seventh day @f the week, renlindj the first moon shining over -idey =-a; lllnon man for ever of the source of all his joys and yo. 0: month ~ i: ~ d ~ mar~ have ~ ~ hopes and the eternal resting place of his lore. that even before that firsr n,r,nth mas -Genesis 2: 2, 3. eilded he had need of the hope c~s~rained in The hours of the day, as God arranged Gocl's lnysterious statement, to ibr ,:r-et adyerare six hours ahead of those days rhic-11 inan betTieen ;kt? allcl the " mill put 1 starts a t midnight (and by iv11ic.h he rodel:- as- ?, and her seed; it , and betuTeell thy sumes to rend each beautiful night in t~x:aiil). illall bruise thy head, and liruise llis The hours of night are 12; the hours of daylight l l e e i ~ ( ~ ~: 15)~~h~~~ is no rrcorc-i to~ ~ ~ ~ 3 are 12. The first hour of the 24-ll~ur period tile nlllllber of the days of innocence aucl happigins with the hour 12 : 00 D. (or, Day), and ends ness in ~ d ~ ~ . a t 1:00 N.(or, Night). The sixth hour ends at midnight, 6: 00 N. The iwelftli hour is the last Using the Six-Thousand-Pear Calendar Glance now a t the six-thousand-rear calendar. hour of the night, and there, 12 : 00 N., begins the daylight period of the day. It stands mid\\-ay Sote the letter "I-I" in the year 3793 B.C. between midnight and the succeeding noon, (38.23 B.R., 235th cer+za'l equi;zox). The year is which point, 6 : 00 D., is properly called the close the year of the birth of Enos, Adam's grandson. of the 6th hour of the day. The 9th hour of the The Scriptures say that "the9z began men to call

.j

Volume XVI

Brooklyn,

N. Y , Wednesday, March 27, 1935 .

Number 405
il:

The Second Hand i the Timepiece of God n


(.In 3 Parts-Part
Eclipse Cycles Promote Accuracy* 4 RE are 238 eclipse cycles of 223 moons each from No. 20470 listed in the table below to No. 73544, L i f e d a y , L i f e 28, Edegzic d a y No. 2172798, P.R. 1887 (Thursday, May 29, 1919 A.D.). God's months Nos. 73544-73554 are the counterparts of Nos. 20470-20483. See Lunation Experience Table and Chart of Lnnations. Applying this corrective, the lunation on
2)

THE

Edenic day No. 604846 (2372 B.C.), listed below, at which day "the waters were dried np from off the earth", is found to have occurred a t 9 :40 p.m. of the day named in the table, instead of 9: 21 a.m., as shown in the table of lunations ushering in the most important events in history. The times of all the moons covering the period of the Flood are now shown as the eclipse cycles indicate them to have occurred:
Ensuing Month Year B.R. Eour Gregorian Date

Vernal Equinox

Moon No.

Hour

Day of Week

Edenic Day No.

Year
B.C.

1655
(6
6(
((

20470 20471 20472 20473 20474 20475 20476 20477 20478 20479 20480 20481 20482 20483

1 0 : 27 6 : 08 2:36 12:52 1 : 49 5:55 1 2 : 35 8:10 2: 42 6:50 8:21 6:58 3:40 10: 56

N . Mansday
D. G o d s d a y

N . Heavefzday D. E a r t k d a y N . Lifeda,y

D. M a n s d a y
D. L i g h t d a y
Eaq.tkday Lifeday Ma.lzsdazj Lightday D. Heaz;euzday N. Starday N, Lifeday

N. N. D. N.

604492 604521 604551 604580 604610 604639 604669 604699 604729 604758 604788 604917 604847 604876

R e d e m p t i o ~ z 2405 4 : 27 am Fri. Apr. 7 2373 Life ": '2 08 pan Sat, May 6 " 'Visitment 8 : 3 6 pm Sun. June 4 " " 6: 52 an1 Tue. July 4 " Ffeedom Vi?zdicatio?a " 7 :49 pm Wed. Bug. 2 ' 6 Hope " 11: 55 am Fri. Sep. I " Kiwg " 6: 35 am Sun. Oct. I '" Peace " 2 : 10 am Tue. Oct. 31 " Order 'V8: 42 pm Wed. Nov. 29 " " 12: 50 pm Fri. Dec. 29 " Logos Jehovah ' 1 am Sun. Jan. 28 2342 9 2: 1 " 12: 58 pm Mon. Feb. 26 " Temple Rederrnptiovb 2404 9 : 40 pm Tue. Mar. 26 Life " 4 : 56 am Thn. Apr. 25 "
(

The Story o f the Flood The story of the Flood is told, mostly in the lallguage of the Scriptures w<th %.hi& are now connected both of these nomenclatures. "A1.ld he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, 1make all thillgs new. And he said unto me, Jvrite; for these words are true and faithful." (Revelatioll 21: 5) I t takes longer for solne minds to get used to new things than it does for others ; but afterwards, how much the new things are enjoyed ! and how much better they are than the old! Who is there that would wish to return to the sanitary ( ?) conveniences of the "good old
"he twel-re hours of Joshua's long day are believed to have been subsequently con~pensated.
387

days"? its "churchest? its politics? its finance7 its "medicine"? its "education"% its inquisition? its newspapers? its radio? its wars? its oxcarts? its monasteries ? its vermin ? its wooden plows ? its priests? its poison gas? its convents? its theological seminaries? its manure piles? "In the six hundredth year of Noah's life, in the secoild month" (see No. 20471 in the table, for details), on the tenth day of the month (Genesis 7: 7-11], Noall and his family went into the ark. The first day of the month, beginning a t s ~ n d o ~ v nthe end of the day the moon at rose, was Edenic day No. 604522 ; the tenth day was Edenic day No. 604531. The day, therefore, when Moah and his family went into their place

of safety was E a ~ t h d a y ,Life 10 (Tuesday, May 1 6 ) . (They probably entered the ark the Monday evening previous, which, according to Bible usage, was a part of the day in question.) "'[On] the seventeenth day of the month," one week later, Earthday, Life 17, Ede:tic day No. 604538 (Tuesday, May 23), "the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the ~vindo~vs heaven mere opened. ia-ild of the rain nTas upon the earth forty days and forty nights." (Genesis 7: 11,12) It rained 14 days in that month and 26 in the next one, Visitment (see the table), ending or, Godsday, Edenic 2ay ATo. 604577 (Saturday, July 1). At the time, in the year 1933; A.D., when the lncnth Visitxent was named, it ~ 7 s s not kno\vn that this visitment of God applied so perfectly to this month. "And the waters prevailed upon the earth an hundred and fifty days" (Genesis 7 : 24), and were due to end, to be exact, a t the end of Life'day, Iiilzg 17, Edegzic day No. 604687 (Thnrsday, October 1 9 ) . And it v a s so ; that TI-as just what occurred. "And after the elid of the hundred and fifty days the waters v7ere abated. And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the rnountaiils of Ararat."-Genesis 8: 3, 4, Here Enters the Visibility Factor God helps man in the things in which he cannot help himself, but as soon as he has been provided adequate assistance he is left to his own resources. This call be seen in Petey's deliverance from prison. I n answer to t'ne prayers of the Jerusalem company of witnesses the angel came to him and found hini asleep in the care of his jailers. The angel gave him a little punch, set him up, and told him to get up the rest ofl the way himself. As he obeyed a11unseen angelic confederate unloclied Peter's haildcuffs, and the chains fell. Then the angel ordered Peter to gird himself, bind on his sandals, cast his garment about him, and follow him. He did so. As $hey came to various doors and gates other unseen confederate angels unlocked them, and Peter stepped into the street a free man. The angel escorted him down one block, just to steady Peter's nerves, and let hiin go the rest of the way alone. All will see that this method is right. Manifestly this is the way it was with Noah a t the time of the Flood. Although the earth had been illnminated a t night from the time of Adam

'down to moon KO. 20472, a t ~vliich Lime the DePuge was a t its height, yet probably not a human eye ever saly the moon until the Deluge had cleared the slries of the prevailing mists. On this point, a l ~ d t length, see Crentioqz, published hy a The Watch Tower. Further, even no3,$-,thousands of years after the Flood, the sun itself is somelimes not seen for many days, and indeed has not beell visible in Brooklya, New Yorlir, for four full days past, including the clay this is written. Revelation and Observation I t is very evident that Noah received his information about l~lcnths down to No. 20472, Visitnieni, inclusive, by revelation, and from that point onward by his o~vn observations, and those of his family. Viewed in this manner, the h story is consistent ~ - i t itself and with the facts. The first moon that Noah saw, therefore, was No, 20473, Freedom, which rose astronomical!y at the hour 12:52 D., Eartiday, Edenic day No. GO4580 (6 : 52 a.n?., Tuesday, July 4). It could have been seen that night; the earliest a nem moon may- be seen after its astroiiomical rising is sixteen hours; il is often forty hours. From the time observation was possible, it seeins to have been the custom to count the new month as beginning at sundo\u of the day following that in the new moon was seen. Referring now to the table, it is manifest that Noah's months, after observation was possible, begail to count about two days later than the astronomical rising. Thus, take nloon No. 20476, rising at 1,2:35 D.,Lightday, Edelzic day No. 604669 (6: 35 a.m., Sunday, October 1). I t x-as probably seen sornetiiiie i a the succeeding night, and the new month begaa to cownt wit11 sundown of what the heathen call Monday night, ~vhichday is in fact and in effect Earfhdag, King 1, Edenic day No. GO4671 (Tuesday, October 3). The seventeenth day of that month, King 17, Edelzic day No. 604687 (Thursday, Octobep 19), concludes, just where it should, the 150 days mentioned in the account. I1 other words, reve1 lation and observation conlbine to make the x c ord perfect. Theologians have tried to make people believe that Jfoses, the writer of Genesis, was influenced by his Egyptian education and that a t this point he followed the Egyptian custom of ignoring God's months and making 150 days to be exactly five months of 30 days each. This

argument answers itself. Moses was a nian of God, writing the record of God, for God's witnesses to use now, to put I-iis enemies to shame. IIoses was not infiueiaced by anything but a the desire to put do~7n record as it came from God, through God's faithful intermediate messengers, Shem and others. Moses' grandfather, Levi, wss a grandson of Isaac, living in the days of Shem.
Logos and Jehovah in the Record "And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month: in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, were the tops of the monntains seen.': (Genesis 8 : 5) The moon itself (No. 20479, Logos) rose astronomically a t 6 : 50 D., Ma?zsday, Edenic day No. 604758, 2405 B.R. (12: 50 p.m., Friday, December 29, 2373 B.C.), I t was probably not seen that night, Godsclay. Therefore the month did not begin uliiil 12:OO D., Heavenday (6: 00 p.m., Sunday, December 31). The next morning, corresponding to Monday, January 1, tlie tops of the mountains were seen, Ede~zicday No. G04SG1. "And it came to pass, a t the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the arlr which he had made: and he sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro, until the waters were dried up from off the earth. Also he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the gronnd: but the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she reiurned nnto him into the arlr, for the nraters were 011 the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in mito him into the arlr." (Genesis 8 : 6-9) The time indicated is Malzsday, Jehov a h 10, Edenic day No. 604800," God's mollth No. 20480, 2405 B.B. (probably Friday evening, February 9, 2372 B.C.).

--

sent forth the dove, which returned not again unto him any more." (Genesis 8: 12) The time indicated is Mansday, Jehovah 24, Edenic d a y No. 604814, Gocl's month No. 20480, 2405 B.R. (Friday evening, February 23, 2372 B.C.). "And it came to pass, in the six hundredth and first year, in the first month, the first day 01the month, the waters were dried up from off the earth: and Noah removed tlze covering of the ark, and loolied, and behold, the face 02 the ground was dry." (Genesis 8 : 13) The time indicated is Mar~sclay, Redemption 1, Edenic clay No. 604849, God's month No. 20482, 2401 B.R. (Friday, March 29, 2372 B.C.). "And in the second month, on the seven and twentieth day of the month, was the earth dried. And God spake nnto Noah, saying, Go forth of the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons' wives with thee." (Genesis 8: 14-16) The time indicated is Lifeday, Life 27, Edenic day No. 60g904, God's ~ ~ z o No. t20483, 2404 ~~ h B.R., vernal eqzcinox No. 1656 (Thursday, May 23, 2372 B.C.). And who shall say that this was not the ideal time for them to come forth from the ark and plant their first garden in the rich alluvial lands covered by the detritus from the Flood? And so there naturally follows, as the coiicludiiig verse of the chapter and of this part of the story: "While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and minter, and clay and night, shall not cease."-Genesis 8: 22.

The Covenant with Abraham The next place where one of the months of God is in evidence is a t the time of the covenant with Abrahani : see again the six-thonsand-year calendar and note the "C"in the pear 1945 B.C. (1.977 B.R. j. I t was in this year that the covenant mas made, and Jehovah God has been pleased Jehovah in the Record Thrice to reveal the day. "And he stayed yet other seven days, and Although the history of the making of the coveagain he sent forth the dove out of the arlr: ancl nant is recorded in the twelfth chapter of Genethe dove came in L him in the evening; and, sis, the day is not disclosed in the Genesis aeo lo, in her mouth mas an olive leaf, pluckt off; count (further than to make it clear that it was so Noah Imew that the waters were abated from the day Abraham crossed the Euphrates at off the earth." (Genesis 8 : 10, 11) The time in- I-iaran) ; but it is nieiltioned in Exodus 12: 41, dicated is Ma~mi!ny,Jehovah 17, Edenic day where it says, "And it came to pass a t the end No. 604807, Gocl's n ~ o x t h O . 20480, 2405 B.R. of the four hundred and thirty years, even the N (probably Friday evening, ~ e l x u a r ~ 2372 selfsame day it canie to pass, that all the hosts 16, B.C.). of [Jehovah] went out from the land of Egypt." "And he stayed yet other seven days, and I t is clear that the covenant was made on Heavendag, Redem,ption 14, E d e ~ i c day No. 760812, *There are just 604,800 seconds in one week.

Isaac Born i the A u Q ~ m n n Though Abrahani's birthday was evidently in the spring, about the time the covenant v a s made with him, there is reason for thinking The Time sf Hsaac's Birth that Isaac was born in the autumn, sometime Isaac was born in the year that Abraham was around October I. At thzt time Abraham would 100 years old, 1920 B.C. (1952 B.R.), but the still be spoken of as '(an hundred years old", for time of the year i s uncertain. Consider the when Christ v a s i2y2 years of age he tvas still circumstances. Abraham was circumcised wl~eli referred to as twelve, the half year being ighe tvas ninety-nine years of age. (Genesis 17 : 24) nored. He subsequently entertained angels unawares, The reasons for thinliing that Isaac was born the angels -who canie to destroy Sodom and to in the autumn are several. T'nere is the curious announce the forthcoming birth of Isaac. On reference to "the time appointed" (Genesis this occasion one of tliese angels made the 18 : 14), the delay occasioned by the journey to promise, to Sarah, "At the time appointed I the land of Abimelech and mhat there occurred, will return unto thee, according to the tinie of and the reference to "the set time of which God life, and Sarali shall have a son,'' There is a had spoken to him".-Genesis 21 : 1-5. reason to believe tbat the tinie of life" when the I n a very special sense ld3raham represented angel returned to fnlfill his promise was in the God and Isaac represented Christ Jesus; and month Logos, and that it v a s the Logos himself it pleased God that Christ should be born in the * The "time of life" here refexed to is 280 days, Therefore autumn. "By faith Abraham, when he was tried, w e ma? understand that if the birth of Isaac was on offered up Isaac; and he that had received the October 1, 1920, as is believed to hare been the case, the day promises offered up his only begotten son, of of the visit of the angels was hIarch 21, 1921 B.C., and the whom it was said, That ill Isaac shall thy seed day of conception mas December 26, 1921 B.G.

God's molzth No. 257G3, 19W R.R., tiernal eyui2003 (Pdonday, April 3,1945 B.C.). Shem li~red after the Flood, down through on the deflection in the days of Nimrod, the dividing of the land among the people, or possibly the rending of the continents asunder, in the days of Peleg, the buildiiig of the tomer of Babel and the confusion of tongues. Abraham's father, Terah, n-as horn, grew to manhood, lived to be 205 years of age, and died, aild Shem lived on. Abraham 11-&self was born and lived to be one hundred years of age, and Shem lived on. Refer again to the six-tbousand-year calendar and note the "I" in the year 1920 B.C.(1952 B.R.). Isaac was born in that year. Isaac grew to manhood, aud was married to Rebecca at forty years of age, and it nras not until ten years after that marriage that Shem passed away. See the "S2" in the year 1870 E.C. (1902 B.R.). Although there is no record that either Abraham or Isaac ever met Shein, there is nothing in reason nor in Scripturs to the contrary. It would seem reasonable that God had some reason for perpetuating the life of this man whose grandfather Methuselah must have k n o TV n Adzm well, and who had himself passed through all the experiences of the Flood, and that the reason was tbat he might conTey to some faithlIul soul like Abraham the things that he knew. Indeed, he might have conveyed the same information to Isaac.

nox No.

that made the promise. Sarah's conception was delayed nine months. Before the promise was fulfilled, Sodom was destroyed alzd Abraham left that part of the country, to dwell in the land of Abimelech. While he was in that land Abimelech seized Sarah, intending to have her for his wife, but "[Jehovah] had fast closed up all the womhs of the llouse of Abirnelech, because of Sarah, Abraham's wife''. (Genesis 20: 18) Jehovah defeated the Devil's plans to prevent the birth of the promised seed, but permitted him to go the limit to do mhat he eould to interfere. These experiences necessarily took sone time; so there was a delay. A f t e r this there is the simple record : "And [Jehovah] visited Sarah as he had said, and [Jehovah] did unto Sarah as he had spoken. For Sarah conceived, and bare Abrahani a son in his old age, at the set time of whicli God had spoken to him. An1 Abraham called the name of his son that mas born unto him, whom Sarah bare to him, Isaac. And Abraham circumcised his son Isaac, being eight days olcl, as God ljad comnanded him. And Abraham was an hundred years old when his son Isaac was bwn unto him."-Genesis 21 : 1-5.

* GOLDEN AGE
be called. Accounting that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead; from whence also 1 he received him in a figure." (Hebrews 1 : 17-19) "'CVhich things are ail allegory." (Galatians 4 : 24) when Jehovah God makes' allegories He makes them riglit. Isaac was Abrahanz's heir, heir of all that he had, He was to have tlle land of Palestine for his inheritance, and the Scriptures declare that he really got that inheritance (typically and, in a fuller sense, in his posterity), though his posterity, the children of Israel, had to wait about four hundred and fifty years for it. It was 450% years from the fall of the year 1920 B.C. (1952 B.R.), when Isaac was born, to the spring of the year 1469 B.C. (1501B.R.) at which time the division of the land among the twelve tribes of Israel occurred. Genesis 15: 13, 14 reads: "And he said unto Abrain, Know of a surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall afflict them four hundred years : and also that nation, whom they shall serve, will I judge: and afterward shall they come out with great substance." This scripture proves that fonr hundred years were up a t the exodus of the children of Israel from Egypt; they wandered in the wilclerness for lorty years more, and thereafter were occupied six years i n conquest of the land before the division of the land took place. This makes a total of 44-6 years. Isaac was born five years before these years began, making a grand total of 451 years, which is "about four hundred and fifty years". One of the most trustworthy of all the versions of the Holy Scriptures explains the entire matter as above set forth. Note carefully: "Ye men of Israel! and such as revere God! hearken :-The God of this people Israel chose our fathers, and the people he exalted by their sojourn in the land of Egypt,-and with a high arm brought he then1 out of i t ; and for the time of about forty years bare with their manners in the desert; and overthrowing seven nations in the land of Canaan gave them their land as an inheritance-about fonr hundred and fifty years. And after these things he gave thein judges until Samuel the prophet."-Acts 13: 16-20, Roth~1-ham. The Alnerican Revisecl Ye?-sin% the work of is many able scholars. Their rendering of verses 19 and 20 is similiar : "And when he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Canaan, he gave them their land for an inheritance, for about four hundred and fifty years : and a f t e r these things he gave them judges until Samuel the prophet." Another version much appreciated by many is the Weymouth. Dr. Weymouth, who made his living for many years teaching Greek in college, senders the last-cited passage : '"fter overthrowing seven nations in the land of Canaan, He divided that country among them for their inheritance for about four hundred and fifty years; and afterwards [after their 450% years of waiting for their inheritance were a t an end] He gave them judges down to the time of the Prophet Samuel." Isaac was born in the autumn. God now discloses, thrusting it forth as one of the 'precious things of the moons' (Deuteronomy 33 :14), that it is not necessary to mutilate or alter His Word, in order to force a chronology, as was done with 1Icings 6 : 1,where a "4" was changed to a "5" to make things fit better (9). All that is necessary is to keep faithfully on with His organization until such time as He sees fit to explain things theretofore obscure. But, anyway, even if Isaac was born in the spring, four hundred and fiftyone years is "abozrt four hundred and fifty years" and would be properly so mentioned.
God's Witness and the Exodus The next time months are mentioned in the Scriptures is in the record of the Exodus. As several are inentioned within the first fourteen months, and it is desirable that the exact time be linown, as near as possible, relerence is again had to the eclipse cycles, already used with good results. From the new moon which rose nearest to the time of the Exodus, in the spring of the year 1515 B.C. (1547 B.R.), there are 191 eclipse cycles of 223 nioons each down to No. 73674 (see Lunation Experience T a b l e and Lunation Chart). 30s. 31080-31097, of Moses' day, find their exact counterpart in Nos. 73673-73690, now but about five years in the past. Therefore, the following table shows, as near as may be calculated, just hen the lunations in those days occurred. Comparison of the second item with the corresponding one in the Lunation Table shows a correction of 3 hours 55 minutes, obtained by using the eclipse cycles at this point.

--

Moon No.

Nour

Dng of Teek

Edenic Day No.

Ensuing Month

Tear B.R.

'

Hoar

Day of Week

o f Month Day B.C.

Nnrne

Year

31080 31081 31082 31083 31084 31085 3108G 31087 31088 31089 31090 31091 31092 31093 32093 31095 31096 31097

11: 41 N. Lif edaay 4: 28 N . Godsday 11: 22 D. Lightday 6: 47 D. Earthday 1 : 13 D. Lifeday 5: 26 N. Godsdccy 6: 48 D. Lightday 5: 17 I. Earthday ? 1:27 D. Xtarduy 8: 22 1). Lifeduy 3: 17 N. Godsdc~y 11: 22 K. Liglztduy 9: 28 D. Iieacexday 20: 01 N. Xtardry 1: O j N . 2lIa?zsday 6: 16 W. Bodsdu y 12: 51 D. Henuenday 7 : 31 AT. htarday

917811 917841 917870 917900 911'930 917960 917983 928019 918048 918077 928107 918136 918165 918135 915295 918254 918284 918314

Tenzple 1548 Reden~ption " Life 1547 Visit~ne?.~t " Preedonz " T7ind?:cution " Hope " King " ' 1 Peace " Order " Logos " JcFovc~lz Tcn~pZe " Xa~zctuury " Redcnzption 1546 Life ' 7 Visitnzent " P?.eedonz '
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5: 41 a.m. 10: 2s p.m. 5 : 22 p.m. 12: 47 p.m. 7 : 13 a.m. 1 : 26 p.m. 1 12 : 48 p.m. : 17 p.m. 7 : 27 a.m. 2 : 22 p.m. 9 : 17' p.m. 5 : 22 a.m.
3 3: 28 4 4: 01 7 : 04 2 : 16 6 : 51 1: 31

Thu~sdayFebruary 6 1515 Briday Eisreh 7 " Sunday April 6 " Tuesday May 6 (' Thursday June 5. u Friday July 4 " Sunday August 3 " nfonday September 1 ( ' Wednesd. October 1 " Thursday October 30 " Friday November 28 " Sunday December 28 " January February March April May 26 1514 25 " 26 '" 25 (' 25 " 24 "

p.m. Monday a.m. Wednesd. p.m. Thursday p.m. Saturday a.m. BIonda,y a.m. JTTednesd.

Jane

Stirring Times in Egypt Jehovah God ~ u s have had some reason for t disclosing the time that elapsed between various acts of the drama of vi~ldicationand deliverance in the land of Egypt. It is manifest that the very days in \I-hich the Israelites were making all their preparations to leave the land of bondage were the days in which the plagues mere visited upon the Egyptians. It is so in the fulfillment. At this point the reader is urged to procure the book Jehovah, and to read it all, but especially Chapters I1 and 1 1 ancl there see what 1, the plagues upon Egypt f 0reshadov:ed. Briefly, these plagues, preceding the vindication of Jehovah's name in Egypt, foreshadowed the truth of God's mTord, at the hands of I3is witnesses, shining into every part of the Devil's organization, and revealihg that commerce is bloody and death-dealing; that all plans of hunian origin for the recovery of hnlllanity are frog-like in appearance and effect; that the visible organization of Satan is active for the same reason that a lousy persou is more active than one that is not lousy; that in clajlning to be the "'higher po~vers"Satan and his agents are disclosed as mere side-steppers, false fitters ; that the "Holy Year" scheme, and all similar schemes, aim, not to bear away the burdens of the people, but to add to them; that the League of Nations, the ;World Court, and all similar pretentious political projects, are just so many frauds; that the true people of God openly take their staind for gehovaka anci against Satan; that the 'locusts", -

which are such a pest to the Devil and his crowd, are really a great blessing to all that love truth; that the darkness which covers the earth, and great darkness the people, is because the Devil's crowd have neglected the JVord of God; and that the destruction of the Devil's firstborn impends. In this article there is no thougllt of more than mere mention of what the plagues represented. The intent liere is to pay close attention to what actually happelled in Egypt 3,449 years ago, the 'thiags thrust forth by the moon'. It a t once appears that the preliminaries and the plagues covered a total period of 21 days and that each of these da,ys may now be identified. Sorne tliinlc the plagues mere strung out for months. The thought herein presented takes an opposite view; but whichever 16e-w is taken the tenth plague terminated at the time and in the manner herein presented.
Identificadion o f the Days Identification of the days really begins with moon No. 31080, which rose at the hour 11:41 N., Lifeday, Edelzic dny No. 917811, 1548 B.R., verval! eqziivtox 2512 (5 : 41 a.m., Thursday, February 6, 1515 B.C.1. The month Temple began its 30-day course 3635 hours thereafter, &xe allowance being rnade for the usual visibility of the moon and proclamation. The story now proceeds in order, as set forth in the Scriptures, each day being accounted for down to the time of the departure from Egypt, on the 15th of the succeeding month.-Numbers 33 : 3-5.

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I t \+-as on Menvenday, Temple 24, Edewic day No. 917836, Cod's mont78 No. 31080, B.R. 1548 (Monday, March 3,1515 B.C.), that ''h1oses 2nd 'Aaron did so ; as Jehovah comriianded them, so did they. And Moses was fourscore years old, and Aaron fourscore and three years olel, when they spalie unto Pharaoh. And Jehovah spalce unto Moses: and unto Aaron, saying, T h e n Pharaoh shall speak unto you, saying, Sl~ow a wonder for you; then thou shalt say unto Aaron, Take thy rod, and cast it down before Pharaoh, that it become a serpent. And Moses and Aaron went in unto Pharaoh, and they did so, as Jehovah had commanded". Pharaohs heart mas while His bard; Jehovah knew it, and do~xbtless xitnesses stood there (as seems a t other subsequent times to have been the case) '(Jehovah said unto &Ioses, Pharaoh's heart is stubborn, he refuseth to let the people go". Within a fern hours followed the coin~liand to Moses and Aaron, "Get thee unto Pharaoh in the morningJ' and visit him with the first plague,-Exodus 7 : 6-10, 14, 15, A.R.V. Bright and early the next ~lzorning,Earthday, Teli%ple25, Edenic day N o . 917837, God's ?%o?zth 31050, B.R. 1548 (Tuesday, March 4, No. 1515 B.C.), "Moses and Aaron did so, as Jehovah commanded; and he lifted up the rod, and smote the waters that were in the river, in the sight of Pharaoh, and in the sight of his servants; and all the waters that were in the river were 7 : 20, A.R.V. turned to blood."--Exodus "And seven days were fulfilled, after that Jehovah had smitten the river." (Exodus 7: 25, A.R.V.) F o r one week there were no additional plagues visited upon Pharaoh. These seven days have a spmbolic meaning, but back in the days of Moses and Aaron and Pharaoh they served a very real and practical purpose.
Bnauguration of ce Nem Era I n the vi-eel<that followed it was Goc2's pnrpose t o inaugurate not only a new month, but a new year and a new era. During the week of the plague of blood rose a new moon, No. 31081, at 4:28 N., Godsdny, Edenic day No. 91iY641, B.R. I546 (10: 28 p.m., Friday, Axarch 7, 1515 B.C.). I t was seen the night Pol!owing, of Lightday, and the next day, -cvhich fol1011-ed the seven days of the plague, was the beginning of a new month, a new year, and a new era. I n the Scriptures, as in other literature, it is impractical to put into one chapter all the events

that occur at the same time, and it was maniRedemption 1, Edenic day festly Wenve+%dny, ATo. 917843 (after 6: 00 p.m., Sunday, March 9, 15315 B.C.), that Jehovah "spake unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, saying, This month shall be unto you the beginning of moilths: it shall be the first llionth of the year to you". (Exodus 12: 1 , 2 ) That day was the first day of the month, and the first day of a new era. The account goes on to specify what the Israelites should do on the tenth day, S t a ~ c l a y(after 6 : 00 p.m., Tnesday, March 18), and tlie fourteenth day, Lightday (after 6 : 00 p.m., Saturday, March %2),indicating that those days were yet future from when the instructions were given. The week while the plague of blood continued enabled Moses and Aaron, now with considerable prestige among the Israelites, to do sorllethiiig toward organizing the two million or more people that would be in the exodus. As soon as the week mas up additional plagues followed one another in rapid s-ilccessjon for twelve days, terminating with the passover and the exodus.
Srebsegrre~zt Plagues

TJTithoutdelay, on the morning of Earthday, Redemption 2, Edeqrl'c day ATo. 917844, God's ?no.lzfhNo. 31081, B.R. 1547 (Tuesday, March 1 , 1 15315 B.C.), the plague of frogs was visited up011 the Egyptians and produced results inlmecliately. "Then [the same day] Pharaoh called for Noses and Aaron, and said, Entreat Jehovah, that he take away the frogs from me, and from my people; and I will let the people go, that they may sacrifice unto Jelios7ah. Ancl Moses said unto Pharaoh, Have thou this glory over me: against whattime shall I entreat for thee, and for thy servants, and for thy people, that the frogs be destroyed from thee and tliyhouses, a.nd remain in the river only? And he said, Against to-morrow. And lie said, Be it according 8 :8-10, A.R.V. to thy word."--Exodus The plague of the frogs was lifted from Egypt on Stardny, Rede)~zptio~z Edenic clay No. 3, 917645, God's non nth No. 31081 (TTTednesclay, March 12). The very day that the pla,gue of frogs was lifted, and Pharaoh was again proven a liar and hard of heart, a plague of lice was upon him and his people ; and when this came, even his magicians had sense enough to admit that it was the finger of God.-Exodus 8: 19. Moses was instructed to "rise up early in the morning [Lifeday, Thursday], and stand before

Pharaoh9' (Exodus 8: 20) and tell him of the huge swarms of flies that would be upon him and all his people on the day following (Mansday) unless he yielded. To hurt him still worse, hc was also told that on this occasion a line would be drawn between the land of the Egyptians and the land of Goshen, where the Israelites dwelt: his ow11 people would suffer; the Israelites would not. The notice that the flies were coming was served on Pharaoh on Lifeday, Redemptio~z4, Edenic day No. 917846 (Thursday, March 13). When the notice was served, Moses said, "Tomorrow shall this sign be" (Exodus 8: 23) ; and i t was :the flies came on schedule, Malzsclay, Redemption 5, E d e ~ i day No. 917847, God's month c No. 31081 (Friday, March f 4).
Tomorrow-Tomorrow-Tomorrow As one reads the account of the plagues i t is striking how rapidly the events follow one another and how well every day is accounted for. It did not take Pharaoh long to get all the flies he wanted, and so he sent for Moses and Aaron, and, after some argument, told them they might go a little way into the wilderness and sacrifice to Jehovah God, but not to go veiy far. "And Moses said, Behold, I go out from thee, and I will entreat Jehovah that the swarms 01flies may depart from Pharaoh, from his servants, and from his people, to-morrow." (Exodus 8 : 29, X.R.V.) The plague of flies was lifted on Godsday, Redemption 6, Edenic day .No. 917848, God's moftth No. 31081 (Saturday, March 15). As soon as the plague of flies had been removed, "Pharaoh hardened his heart at this time also" (Exodus 8 : 32), and "then [the very same day] Jehovah said unto Moses, Go in unto Pharaoh, and tell him, Thus saith Jehovah, the God of the Hebrews, Let my people go, that they may serve me. For if thou refme to let them go, and wilt hold them still, behold, the hand of Jehovah is upon thy cattle which are in the-field. . And Jehovah appointed a set time, saying, To-morrow Jehovah shall do this thing in the land. And Jehovah did that thing on the morrow ; and all the cattle of Egypt died; but of the cattle of the children of Israel died not one". (Exodus 9: 1-6, A.R.V.) The plague upon thc cattle came on Lightday, Redempfion 7, Edenic day Ho. 917849, God's month No. 31081 (Sunday, March 16). Pharaoh did not repent, and so on that day (the same Egyptian day,

but not the same day of Jehovah God; probably about sundown) he received double punishment; that day (Heaver~day)came the boils on mall and beast.-Exodus 9 :7-12. Another plague followed hard upon its heels. "And Jehovah said unto Moses, Rise up early in the morning, and stand before Pharaoh, and sayunto him, Behold, to-morrow about this time I will cause it to rain a veiy grievous hail, such as hath not been in Egypt since the day i t was founded even until now." (Exodus 9: 13, 18, A.R.V.) This came to pass, the notice one day and the hail the next, the latter on Earthday, Redemptioqz 9, Edenic day No. 917851, God's rno?zt3~ 31081 (Tuesday, March 18). No.

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The Last Week in Captivity The last week in captivity was a stirring week. The first three days, a s above noted, brought in swift succession the plagues upon the cattle, boils on man and beast, and hail such as never before seen in the land, yet "when Pharaoh saw that the rain and the hail and the thunders were ceased'" (in answer to Moses' petition to God offered in the suburbs of the heathen city) "he sinned yet more, and hardened his heart, he and his servants". (Exodus 9: 34) Thereupon, "Jehovah said unto Moses, Go in [return into the city a t once] unto Pharaoh" with this message: "If thou refuse to let my people go, behold, to-morrow will I bring locusts into thy border."-Exodus 10: 1-4, A.R.V. All the rest of that day, and all that night (in the evening hours of Starday), Jehovah brought billions on billions of locusts, so that in the morning, the daylight hours of Starday, Redemption 10, Edenic day No. $17852, God's ruzont7z No. 31081 (Wednesday, March 19), they literally covered the earth. One glance a t then1 was enough. Badly frightened, "Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron in haste; and he said, I have sinned against Jehovah your God, and against you. Now therefore forgive, I pray thee, my sin only this once, and entreat Jehovah your God, that he niay take away from me this death only." (Exodus 10: 16,17, A.R.V.) Moses complied, and the plague was lifted. That day, Redemptio~z (March 19), the paschal lamb was 10 selected by each Hebrew family group. As usual, Pharaoh's repentance was merely a mouth repentance, and he still refused to let the people go. There then followed three days of pitch-black darkness. At the beginning of these

three days of darkness was the vernal e q u i ~ o z go, serve Jehovah, as ye have said. Take both No. 2513, a t 1:08 D., Lifeday, Redemption 11, your flocks and your herds, as pe have said, Edeaic day No. 917853, God's n~oqzthNo. 31081 and be gone; and bless me also. And the Egyp(7 : 08 a.m., Thursday, March 20). During those tians were urgent upon the people, to send them three days, ending Godsdny, R e d e ~ ~ p t i o l13 out of the land in haste; for they said, TJTe are t (Saturday, March 22), "they saw not one an- all dead men. And the people took their dongh other, neither rose any from his place for three before it was leavened, their kneading-troughs days: but all the children of Israel had light in being bound up in their clothes upon their their d~vel1ings."-Exodus 10 : 23. shoulders. And the children of Israel did acGod's hand in bringing the plague of darkness cording to the word of Moses; and they asked a t that time can be plainly seen. The Israelites of the Egyptians jewels of silver, anel jewels of had rest froni their tormentors. Also, they had gold, and raiment [back pay for unpaid labor the necessary t h e to pack up their belongings or ransom money by the Egyptians for themand get ready for the great trek, the Exodus. selves not all being killed] : and Jehovah gave There were final instractions to the companies; the people favor in the sight of the Egyptians, contact poiilts were assi,med. Everything was so that they let them have what they aslied. ready for the final great event, T~IEDICATION,and And they despoiled the Egyptians."-Exodus DELIVERANCE. If you have not read them, get 12 : 29-36, A.R.V. the TVatch Tower publications beariag these I t took the cavalcade eighteen hours to get point, Rameses, under v7ay. It left the co~itact titles and read them, carefully. a t sundown, the beginning of the next day, Tlte Passsoer and the Exodus Heavenday, Rede?~zption15, Edenic day No. Refer again to the lunation table published 917857, God's mont7z No. 31081, B.R. 1547, under the subhead "God's Witness and the Exo- vel-tin1 eqz~inox 2513 (Sunday evening, March 23, dus"; note moon No. 31081; and see its coanter- 1515 B.C.). "And they departed froin Rameses part in KO. 73674 in the Lunation Experience in the first month, on'the fifteenth day of the Table and Lunation Chart. This moon came to first month: on the nlorrom after the passover." the f1111, Jerusalem time, 14 days 21 hours 27 (Numbers 33: 3) The pilgrims had good light minutes after its astronomical rising, or, in for their journey. God's 'faithful witness in the other words, I :55 N., Lightday, R e d e l n p t i o ~ 14, heavens' (the n:oon) was furnishing illuminaEdenic day No. 91'7856, B.B. 1547 (7:55 p.m., tion then, even as it is @ving some to the reader Saturday, March 22, 1515 B.C.). non~.The nioon mas a'c ~ t full, providing, in the s About that time the pzscha.1 lamb was slain clear air of Egypt, ample il!uminaiioi~ for night and eaten, and its blood was sprinliled upon the travel. door posts and lintels of every home of the Hebrew people. That night the angel of death On the Sinaitde Peninsula Here and there, in the ~vanderingsof Israel would perform God's act, His strange act, in the land of Egypt. A11 the firstborll in Egypt 1l7ere in the Sinaitic peninsula, there is mention, when doomed, "from the firstborn of Phnrnoli that matters of unnsual interest occurred, of the sitteth upon his throne, even unto the firstborn exact time. One' of these is recorded in the of the maidservant that is behind the mill; and sixteen44 chapter of Exodus, which please see. God's '(second hand" in the heavens assists us all the firstborn of beasts."-Exodus 11: 5 . "And it came to pass a t midnight, that Jeho- in locating the events which took place in the vah smote all the first-lsorn in the iand of E g j p t , second month after leaving Egypt, the month from the first-born of Pharaoh that sat on his Life, the nex7 moon of which rose a t 1 1 : ? 2 Pa., No. 917871 (5 : 22 p.m., throne unto the first-born of the captive that Ligl:tday, Edevzic mas in the dungeon; and all the first-born of Sunday, April 6, 1515 B.C.). The moon iri question, No. 31082, has its cattle. And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he, and all his servants, and all the Egyptians ; and couilterpart in No. 73574. Reference to the there was a great cry in Egypt; for there was l~ulationexperience table shows that this moon not a house where there mas not one dead. And spanned 29 days and 1,134 minutes (29 days he called for Moses and Aaron by night, and 18 hours 54 minutes) ; one half of which is 14 said, Rise up, get you fort11 from among my days 21 hours and 27 miriutes. 31oon No. 31082 people, both ye and the children of Israel; and came to the full in the daytime, at 8347 D.,

Heavenday, Life 13, Edelnic day No. 917685, God's n t o ~ t 31082 (2 :47 p.m., Monday, April 21, h 1515 B.C.). The fourteenth day of the month began a t sundown of that day ; it could not have begun earlier; the moon would not have been a t the full. The fifteenth day of that month, therefore, was Starday, Life 15, corresponding to Wednesday, April 23.
In the Wilderness o f Sin "And they took their journey from Elim, and all the congregation of the children of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second month after their departing out of the land of Egypt [arrived at their destination

Starday, Life 15, Edenic day No. 9i7887, God's ~r~ovzt?z 31062, B.R. 1547, vernal eqzeilzox hTo. No. 2513 (Wednesday, April 23, 1515 B.C.)]." The first day at this point was no doubt taken up in getting settled, and it seems that a murmuring against Moses and Aaron arose without delay. Probably the very nest day a deputation of representative Inen came to Rioses and conveyed to hiin the sentiments of the people, who said, "Would that we had died by the hand of Jehovah in the land of Egypt, ~vhen sat by the fleshme pots, when me did eat bread to the full; for ye have brought us fort11 into this wilderness, to kill this whole asselnbiy with hunger."-Exodus 16 :1,3, A.R.V. The Israelites had been 011 the treli an entire month, and it is probable that the store of food which they had brought with them was about exhausted and the possibility of famine became a depressing shadow, since they apparently forgot to take into consideration all the wonders Jehovah had worlred on their behalf. Moses tooli the matter to Jehovah, who said to R/loses, "Bellold, I will rain bread from heaven for you; and the people shall go o-ut and gather a day's portion every day, that I may prove them, whether they will wall< in my law, or not. And it shall come to pass on the sixth day, that they shall prepare that which they bring in, and it sliall be twice as much as they gather daily,"Exodus 16 :4, 5, A.R.V. &loses and Aaron returned Jehovah's answer to the people, probably the following day, which was Zl/larzsday,Life 17 (Friday, April 25). They said to the people, "At even, then ye shall lmow that Jehovah hath brought you out from the land of Egypt; and in the morning [GodsdayJ Life 18 (Saturday, April 26)], then ye shall see

the glory of Jehovah; for that he heareth your murmurings against Jehovah : and what are we, that ye murmur against us? And RiIoses said, This shall be, when Jehovah shall give you in the evening [beginning Lightday, Life 191 flesh bread to eat, and in the morning [of L i g l ~ t d u y ] to the full; for that Jehovah heareth your murmurings which ye murmur against him: and what are we? your ~i~uriiiurings not against are us, but against Jehovah."-Exodus 16: 6-8, A.R.V. The foregoing is the part of the drama which mas enacted iii the short time, seemingly about three days, which elapsed between their arrival in the wilderness (which did not looli very good to them after the palm trees of Elim) and the day when the Lord mas ready to send them the manna. Moses had told the people to bc ready for the vision of Jehovah's glory in tlie morning.
Inauguration s f the Sabbath Sgstern "And Moses said nnto Aaron [Godsday,

L i f e 16, Edenic day 80.917890, God's moqzth No. 31082 (Saturday morning, April 26)], Say unto all the congregation of the children of Israel, Come near before Jehovah; for he hath heard your murmnrings. And it came to pass, as Aaron spake unto the whole congregation of the children of Israel, that they loolied toward the wilderness, and, behold, the glory of Jehovah appeared in the cloud. And Jehovah spalie unto Noses, saying, I have heard the murmnrings of the children of Israel: speak unto them, saying, At even [beginning of Lightday, Life 1 9 (Satnrday, April 26)] ye shall eat iiesh, and in the morning [of Lig7~2dny(Sunday, April 27)] ye shall be filled with bread ; and Fe shall Bnow that I am Jehovah your God."-Exodus 16 : 9-12,

B.R.V.
"And it came to pass at even [beginning Lightday, Life 191, that the quails up, and covered the camp :and in the morning [of Lighfd a y ] the dew lay round about the camp. S n d when the dew that lay u7as gone up, behold, upon the face of the wilderness a small round thing, small as the hoar-frost 011 the ground. And when the children of Israel saw it, they saicl one to a n o t h ~ rWhat is it! for they knew not what it , mas. And Moses said nnto them, I t is the bread which Jehovah hath given yon to eat. This is the thing which Jehovah hath commanded. Gather ye of it every man according to his cating ; an omer a head, according to the number of your persons, shall ye take it, every man for

The

GOLDEN AGE
month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of the land of Egypt, the same dax came they into the miicierlless of Sinai." Ir~asmuch as there is the plain statement of Scripture already noted that they came out "on the fifteenth day of the first month: on the morrow after the passover", it is taken that "the same day" nzeans the fifteenth day of the third month, in ~vliich they arrived at Sinai, Mansday, Visit-

them that are in his tent."-Exodus 16: 13-16, A.R.V. "And it came to pass, that on the sixth day [Ma?zsday,Life 24, E"i'dellicd a y hTo.,917896, God's m o n t h N o . 31082 (Friday, May 2)], they gathered twice as much bread, t v o omers for each one : and a11 the rulers of the congregation came and told Bfoses. And he said nnto them, This is that which Jehovah hath spoken, To-morrow [ G o d s d a y ] is a solemu rest, a holy sabbath unto Jehovah: bake that which ye will bake, and boil that ~vhichye ~17ill1:oil; and all that remainetb over lay np for yon to be kept until the niorning. And they laid it up till the morning, as Moses bade: and it did not become foul, neither was there any v o r m therein. And >doses said, E a t that to-clay; for to-day is a sabbath unto Jehovah godsd day, L i f e 25, E d e n i c d a y No. 917897, G o d ' s nzo~zthNo. 3108,2, B.R. 1547, vernal equinox 2513 (Sat.. May 3,1515 B.C.)] ." -Exodus 16 : 22-25, A.B.17.

v~e.izt15, Edeglic d a y Xo. 917.91'7,7 God's nzolzth N o . 31083, B.R. 1547, ventaZ equiqzox 2513 (Fri-

day, May 23, 1515 B.C.). I t was the beginning of the ratiiicatioil of the law covenant, for that same day Moses went LIP into the mountail1 for instructions and set before the people the monientons words of Jehovah, "If ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be mine own possession from among all peoples: for all the earth is niiile: and ye shaIl be unto rile a kingdoin of priests, and a holy nation." (Esodns 19: 5,6, A.E.V.) "And all the people ansmred together, and said, All that "In the Third Month the Same Day" Jehovah hath spoken we ~17illdo. And Moses The next place a dzy is mentioned in the reported the words of the people unto Jehovah." Scriptures which may now be identified 117itl1 -Exodus 19: 8, A.R.V. The people were told to sanctify themselves 1:easonable accuracy is the day mentiolied in E ~-- d u s19: 1, where we read: "In the third and to mash their clothes to be ready for the o

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* This day, Visitmeilt 15, when Israel camped at the base of the mcunt of God momentarily waiting until I-Ie should reveal himself, was a most mlusuel day. Manifestly it stands for or represents THE DAY OF JEHOVAH, just preceding God's great revelation of himself at Armageddon. See the account in Eebrems 12, "For ye are not come unto the mouilt . . . but r e are come unto mount Sion ," and coxsider how true it is that Jehovah mas then visitiilg His typical people as He Is in this d.ay of visitation. Consider now the number of this Edenic day, 917,917. The 9 and I may be grouped together in a rear~angement of thc digits thus: 7 10 10 7 The n~unber10 is synll~olic02 perfection to-ward earth as 7 is symbolic of perfection heavenly. Divisible hy 7, this number, 917,917, seems to point to Jehovah God, the Head. "The head of Christ is Gc;d."1 Corinthians 1 : 3. 1 Accepting the v~Iiolenumber as representing "God the Ju-dge of all", notice now that one of the factors is 7007. The number 1000 is composed of 10 X 10 X 10; so the number 7007 may be thought of as follows: 7 10 10 10

...

This is the same as the other grouping of digits, except that there is one more 10 enclosed within the other figu~es. "No man hath seen God a t any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him." (John 1: 18) So, besides coming to God the Judge of All, the arrival a t the mou.at of God is also a coming "to Jesus the mediatoi. of the new covenant ".-Hebre~s 12 : 24. I t further arpears that the number 1001 is a factor of the original number. This number may be set down in this manaer :

1
1000 "One . . . among a thousand have I found."-Ecelesiastes 7 : 28. Most yemarkable of all, ozle of the factors of the original l~umber is 131,131. nearrange the ciigits, adding 3 and 1 together to make 4 (as the 9 and 1 \+rere added together to make 10)' and the rearrangement becomes, by easy stages: 140,140, then 144,001, then

-144.000

1 1 .

"And I loolied, and, lo, a Lamb stood on the mount Sion, and with him an hundred forty and four thousand, having hls Father's name written in their foreheads. ' '-Revelation 14 : 1, The prinie factors of 917,917 are 7 X7 X I 1 X 13X131, __ _I,
A -

third day, when God himself ~vouldspeak to them. "And it came to pass on the third day [Lig7?tday, VisiCnzent 17, Edenic day No. 917919 (Sunday, May 25)], when it was morning, that there were thunders and lightnings, and a thick cloud upon the mount, and the voice of a trumpet exceeding loud ; and all the people that were in the camp trembled. And &!tosesbrought forth the people out of the camp to meet God; and they stood a t tlie nether part of the mount. And mount Sinai, the whole of it, smoked, because Jehovah descended upon it in fire; ancl the sllloke thereof ascended as the smoke of a fnrnace, and the whole mouiit quaked greatly. ,lncl when the voice of the trumpet waxed louder and louder, Moses spake, and God ans~vered him by a voice." (Exodus 19: 16-19, A.R.T7.) The ten commandments were the11 given, "and the people stood afar off, and RiIoses drew near unto the thick darkness where God \+-as" (Exodus 20 : 21, A.R.V.) and received snpplenientary instructions. "And Moses came and told the people all the words of Jehovah, and all the ordinances: and all the people answered with one voice, and said, All the words which Jehovah hath spoken will we do. And Moses wrote all the words of Jehovah, and rose up early in the morning [Heavenday, Visitnzeqtt 16, Edenic dug No. 917920, God's month No. 31083 (Monday, May 26)], and builded an altar under the mount, and twelve pillars, according to the twelve tribes of Israel." -Exodus 24 : 3,4, A.R.V.
Forty Days in the Mountain "And Jehovah said unto Moses, Come up to il me into the mount, and be there : a,nd I wl give thee the tables of stone. and the law and the commandment, which I have written, that thou mayest teach them. And Moses entered into the midst of the cloud, and went up into the mount: and Moses was in the mount forty days and forty nights." (Exodus 24: 12, 18, A.R.V.) The swnlmoniiig of Moses away from the elders, where they all "did eat and drink" in the presence of God (Esodus 24: I I ) , began after the glory of Jehovah had covered Mount Sinai for six days. (Esodus 24: 16) The first day of this glory was Visitnzent 17 (Sunday, May 25) ; the sixth day of it was Mansday, Visitwze~zt 22, Edenic day No. 917924, God's month No. 31063 (Friday, May 30). The day when Moses went into the midst of the cloud was Godsdug, Visit-

t~zent23 (Saturday, May 31) ; the day when he came down out of the mount and fonrid Israel worshiping the golden calf TI-as Li/'edc,y, T7igzdicatioqz 4, Edenic day No. 917965, Goci's ~1tor~i73 No. 31085, B.R. 1547, vernal eqz~iaox o . 2513 g B.C.). (Thursday, July 10, 1515 "Then Moses stood in the gate of the camp, and said, Whoso is on Jehovah's side, let hi111 come unto me. And all the sons of Levi gathered tliemselves together unto him. And he said unto them, Thus saith Jehovah, the God of Israel, P u t ye every man his sword upon his thigh, and go to and fro from gate to gate throughout the camp, and slay every man his brother, and every inan his companion, and every man liis neighbor. And the sons of Levi did according to llie ~irirord of Moses: and there fell of tlie peop!e that day about three thousand men. And lfoses said, Consecrate yourselves to-day to Jehovah, yea, every man against his son, and against his brother; that he may bestom upon you a blessing this day. And it came to pass on the morrow [Mansday, Vindication 5, Edenic dug No. 917966 (Friday, July I l ) ] , that Moses said unto the people, Ye have sinned a great sin: and now I will go up unto Jehovah; peradventure I shaU make atonement for your sins. And 3Ioses returned unto Jehovah, and said, 011,this people have sinned a great sin, slid have niade thenz gods of gold. Yet now, if thou wilt forgive their sin-; and if not, blot me, I pray thee, out of thy book which thou hast written." (Exodus 32: 26-32, A.R.V.) Moses' great aci; of iatcrcession took place on the s a x e day of the week on which Jesus died, the great Mediator between God and man. This strilxirlg correspondency appears clearly to prove the exactness of these figures.
Setting U p the Tabernacle The tabernacle was set up (Exodus 40 : 2) "on the first day of the first molith" of the second year after coming out of Egypt. Moon No. 31094 rose 1:04 N., Ma~zsday,Edenic day No. 916225 (7 : 04 p.m., Thursday, March 26, 1514 B.C.). It was first visible about twenty-four hours later, and the first day of the month Redemption began with the evening of the next clay; so that the tabernacle mas set up on Liglztday, Edenic day No. 916227, God's month 31094, B.R. 1546, vevnal eqz~inoxNo. 2514 (Sunday, March 29). Had it been reared a day earlier the labor on the sabbath day would have been a stumbling block to some.-Exodus 40 : 15.

MARCH 1935 27,

Q.3LDEGJ AGE

399

"And they kept the passover on the fourteenth day of the first month, a t even, in the wilderness of Sinai." (Nunlbers 9 : 5) TTTas it not superbly arranged by Jehovah God that this first memorial, which meant so much to the Jews, cams on their sabbath day? The passover was kept on Godsday, Redemptio~z14, Edelzic day No. 918240* (after sundown Friday night, April 10, 1514 B.C.), One can see a n appropriateness, also, in the sabbath's beginning the evening before the daylight period of the rest day arrived. The census mas taken "on the.first day of tha second month, in the second year after they mere come out of the land of Egypt" (Numbers 1:I ) , moo11 No. 31095, which rose on Godsday, (12 : 16 P.m., Saturday, April 25,1514 at 6 : I 6 B.C.), but v a s pmbably not seen until the nest night. The month began a t sundown abont 54 hours after the astronomical rising. The census, therefore, was on Earthday, Lqife April 28). "And it came to pass on the tnentietli day of the second month, iii tlie second year [Ligktdny, L i f e 20 (Sunday 17) 19 that the C h ~ d was talcen up from off the tabernacle of the testimany. And the children of Israel tool< their journeys out of the wilderness of Sinai; and the cloud rested in the wilderness of Paran." (Nunlbers 10: 11, 12) A good day to start on a long journey, the day after the sabbath of rest.

spalie unto the cliildren of Israel, according unto all that Jehovah had given liim in comm a l l h e n t -unto them." (Deuteronomy 1: 3, 2.B.V.) That was on LiglZtday, Edenic d a y N~~ 932408, ~~a~molztiLNo. 31574 January 19, 1475 B.Ca), "And Moses went aiid spcelce these words nnio all Israel. And he said unto them, I am a hundred alld twenty Years old this day; I Can no more go out and Come in: and Jellovah bath said unto me, Thou shalt not go over this Jordan." (Moses evidently died on his birthday, Lightday, Teni~zple 8, B.R. 1508, Edeqzic day No. 932437, God's month No. 31575 [Sunday, February 23,1475 B.C.] .) "And Jehovah said nilto Xoses, Behold, thy days approacli that thou die." ( ~ 31 : 1,2,14, A.R.v.) ~ G A lioses ~ ~TI.ent from the plains of &lonb .,to llio~llltP;ebo, to the top of Pisg&, that is over against Jericlio. Alid Jehovah showed him all the lalld of ~ i l ~ unto ,D ~ alld , ~ d ~ all ~ ~ ~ l ~ t ~ l land of xphrailll and alld the i , hranasseh, and all the land of Judah, ulito the hinder sea, and the south, and the -plain of the valley of the city of palm-trees, unto zoar.~~d Jehovah said unto hinl, hi^ is the land vllich I sll.are unto L4braham, unto I ~ and unto Jacob, saying, I will give it unto thjr seed: I have caused thee to see it with thine eyes, but thou shalt not go over thither. So After Forty Pears o f Wandering Moses the servant of Jehovah died there in the There are no Inore days located by the second hand in the timepiece of God until after the land of Noab, according to the word of Jehovah, forty years of wandering were nearly a t an end. And he buried him in the valley in the land of "And Aaron the priest went up into mount Hor Moab, over against Beth-peor: but no man a t the commandment of Jehovah, and died there, lcnometh of his sepulchre unto this day. And in the fortieth year after the children of Israel Moses was a huiidred and twenty years old when dim, nor his lj-ere come out of the laxid of EgJTt,in the fifth he died : his eye force abated. And the children of Israel wept month, on the first day of the month. And Aaron was a huiiclred and twenty and three )-ears old for Moses in the plains of Moah thirty days." -,hen he died ill mount Hol-i' (Numbers 33 : 38, (Deuteronomy 34: 1-8, A.R.V.) The mourning began on dthe day ~ his death, and , ended on of A.B.V.) H e died ~ ~ viii~icatiolZ ~ ~ ~ Earthdug, Rede~~zptio$aEdenic day No. 932467, 7, Edenic day No. 932225, week No. 133175, God's %lonth No. 31568, 3.R. 1508, ver?zal eqz~i?zox God's nzo?zhh No. 31576, B.R. 1507, vernal eqq~iLOX NO. 2553 (Tuesday, March 25, 1475 B.C.). No. 2552 (Friday, July 26, 1476 B.C.). Moses sv.rvived his brother by seven months Canaan and eight days. I n thirty-five days he wrote The tlie book of Denteronomy, and delivered his final "Now it came to pass after the death of Moses Joshua cornexhortation to those for whom, in the providence the servant of Jehovah, that of God, he had acted as mediator. "And it came mallded the . people, saying, Prepare you to pass in the fortieth year, in the eleventh victuals;. for within three days ye are to pass month, on the first day of the month, that Moses over this Jordan . And tlie people came up out of the Jordan on the tenth day of the first * The factors are interesting: 2 x ~ x 2 ~ 2 ~ 2 ~ 3 x 5 x 1 9 1 3 .

..

.. .

..

he

GOLDEN AGE

time in the spring of the yeas, a s appears from the following scripture : No. 932470, week No. 133210, God's nzofith "As Jehovah commanded Moses, so the chilNo, 31576 (Friday, Rlarch 28, 1475 B,C.)]."dren of Israel did; and they divided the land. Joshua 1:l,11;4: 19, A.R.V. "And the children of Israel encamped in Gil- Then the children of Judah drew nigh unto Joshna in Gilgal: and Caleb the son of Jephungal, and kept the passover on the fourteenth day neh the Kenizzite said unto him, Thou knowest of the month, at even, in the plains of Jericho the tliing that Jehovah spake unto Moses the [after sundown, a t the early beginning ol E a d h man of God concerning me and concerning thee day, Redemption 14, Edenic day No. 932474, God's month No. 31576 (Monday evening, March in Kadesh-barnea. Forty years old [but maybe 401/2, though counted a s 401 was I when Moses 31, 1475 B.C.)]." (Joshua 5 : 10) The new life the servant of Jehovah sent me from Kadeshof Israel in Canaan's "fair and happy land" was barnea to spy ont the land; and I brought him begun just 1,507 solar years before the day of word again as it was in my heart. Nevertheless Ransom, and 3,392 solar years before April 1, my brethren that went up with me made the 1918. heart of the people melt; but I wholly followed Jehovah m y - ~ o d . And &loses sware on that Division of the Land day, saying, Surely the land whereon thy foot One can estimate the time when bath trodden shall be an inheritance to thee the 'pies returned from out the 'and of and to thy children for ever, because thou hast Canaan, the year after leaving wholly followed Jehovah my God. And now, A chronology built on sueh a foundation ~ v o l l l ~ behold, Jehovah bath lrept me alive, as he spake, be somewhat shalry. Sinai was left on the twen- these forty and five years, from the time that tieth of the second (Numbers : 11) Jehovah spa]<e this Tvord unto &loses, while I n three Israel was complaining- (Numbers Israel walked in the wilderness : and now, 10, 1 10 : 33 ) Then follolved thirty full days of gorge an1 this day f omscore and fiveyears old.''ing themselves x i t h quail. (Numbers 11) Miri- ~~~h~~ 14: 5-10, A.R.V. am's leprosy detained the march seven days. ~t has been pointed out that it was 4503 ( N ~ b e r 12) The I1O-mile journey s Kaclesh- years from the llirtll of Isaac, in the fall of the barnea is estimated to have taken eleven days, year 1952 H.R. (1920 B.c.), to the tirne of the but there is no record : it may have taken nlore, division of the land among the twelve tribes of but would hardly have taken less. The spies in the spring of the year 1501 B.R, the be- (1469 B.C.), a t which time, as above shown, the were gone ginning of that year, about 140. The time in- division of the land dicated for the return is not earlier than Godsirhe scriptllres describe this period of time day, Vilzdicatio~z22 (Saturday, Jnly 18). On as "about 450 years". (See a c t s 13: 17-20, their return journey the brought POme- Rotlzerknrit, Weyiloztth, and Brizericaw Revised granates and figs, probably ripe, and one cluster versiolz.) of grapes, probably nearly ripe, so large that it toolr two men to carry it. I n P a l e s t i ~ e figs are From the Exodus to the Temp&@ Everything in the scriptures is written with ripe from the end of June on. In the valley of direct reference to the erection of the temple ~ ~grapes even now ~ ~ h grow as large as plums. l of The time of fullyripe is September. A of God and the subsequent vindicatio~~ His name. The exodus associated with one reasonable estimate, on the basis of these lqno~vn facts, would be that the spies set out on their grand pictnre of the coming vind;cation: the tl'p forty-day journey into Canaan about the time building of S ~ l ~ l n ~ l m s l e was a picture of the true temple, through which Jehovah vindliof the slllnmer solstice,say LigJltday, Freeis 17 (Sunday, June 21). R~ this admittedly cates His name and ~vhicli of God's building, not of man's. I n His Word Jehovah God has circuitous and relatively inexact methocl (but the best possible under the circumstances) the been pleased to join together these t v o pictures, date last named is here put forth as the birth- and to make them an integral and necessary day of Caleb, ~t may haVe been earlier by part of the divine record. Note the care with enabling one now several months ; it could hardly have been later, which the conllection is lna~le, The division of the land, therefore, was a t some (Contiqzued on page 413) month [Mn?zsday, Redemption 10, Edenic day

aom

about the time of the beginning of this work of 'to determine exactly when the construction of construction. The years that the judges ruled, as stated in the temple mas begun, to the very day, and exthe book of Judges, plus the years of the reigns actly how long i t was after the exodus. The two passages that cover the subject are now quoted: of Saul and David would, if pat end to end, be "And i t came to pass, in the four hundred and more than 460 years, but they are wisely adeightieth year after the children of Israel were mitted to be "broken, lapped and tangled", needcome out of the land of Egypt, in the fourth ing a text just like this to keep a true and aeyear of Solomon's reign over Israel, in the curate chronological record for the use of Jellomonth Zif [the name itself is of heathen origin], vah's people. It is highly important at this point that the which is the second month, that he began to build the house of [Jehovah] ." (I Kings 6 : 1) reader should familiarize himself with the con"And he began to build in the second day of the tents of the Watch Tower publication entitled second month, in the fourtli year of his reign." Preservation. On this subject of the miraculous manner in which Jehovah God maintained the -2 Chronicles 3 : 2. Some of the items that go to make up the 480 lineage of Christ Jesus, despite the great age of years from the esodus to the building of the many of His ancestors a t the time of the birth temple are known and may be set down, as fol- of the one nest in line, this work says, in part: lows : Here is stated the genealogy from Pharez to David. Between Obed and Jesse no one is mentioned. I s this Wanderings in the due to the lack of importance of conilecting links, or . 40 years wilderness did each one from Nahshon to Jesse live to be of a To the birth of Boaz (son very great age, anti each one in his extreme old age of Salmon, one of the wanderers, by Rahab) 1 " (91% 5 ) bring forth a son? This latter conclusion is supported by the words of the divine record: "And the three To the birth of Obed, eldest sons of Jesse went and followed Saul to the David's grandfather i " eg battle : . . and David was the youngest," and David To the birth of Jesse, was the eighth son o l Jesse. ( 1 Sam. 17 :13,14) "Now el David's father . , , ? '' David was the son of that Ephrathite of Bethlehem16 To the birth of David ? " judah, whose name mas Jesse; and he had eight sons: To the death of David 70 " and the man went among men for an old tnntt in the The fact that no days of Saul."--1 Sam. 17: 12. . To the 4th year of intermediary generations are mentioned in the gene.4 " Solomon's reign

(Contiwued from page 400)

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Total years , . 480 I n the past some thought it expedient, or wise, or necessary to say of this text that the four should be changed to a five (to agree mith a passage in Acts which they misread and misunderstood). I t would be folly to think that Jehovah God would make it necessary for any to resort to such a method of preserving the meaning of one of the most important texts in the Bible. This text is the one text that directly connects up the days of Moses with the days of the kings of Israel: in connection mith the accurate and reliable record of events preceding Moses' time, and the accurate and reliable record forward from Solomon's time, it enables one to say with full assurance that the building of the typical temple of God was completed just three thousand years after man appeared upon the earth; indeed, this item in itself is very suggestive that there was nothing accidental

alogy of the book of Ruth shows that each one of the men named lived to a p e a t age before begetting the son named in the genealogy. Thus it appears that there was continued difficulty in maintaining the royal line. Jehovah had given his word that the Vindicator should come from the tribe of Judah, hence Satan tried to interfere with the genealogy of that tribe. A t various times it appeared that Gcd's word would fail, and each time Jehovah stepped in a t the opportune hour, even as shown in the book of Ruth, , There does not seem to be any good reason, therefore, to conclude that in the genealogy there are links missing between Obed and Jesse.

I n the table just published the average age of the father a t the time of the birth of the child nest in the royal line was a t least 91% years. To change the divine record from the "four hundred and eighty years" to "five hundred and eighty years" would make the average age of the fathers a t least 116% years a t the time of the birth of such child; hence the wisdom of trying to force a chronologyby such a method

does not appezr. I t is CONNECTED EVENTS O F HISTORY better to take the Lord's Dat,ting from the creation of Adam, 2Munsdazj, Edenic clay No. 0, moon No. 0, Word as it is, unless vernul equinoz No. 0, B.R. 4060 (Friday, March 22, 4028 B.C.) some direct evidelice apVernal Interpears that the record Equinox Year Year Event Seriflure vening Citations Years has been tampered ~ ~ ~:i t Niln~ber B.R. B.C. li 3930 3898 Birth of Seth Gen. 5: 3 130 in this case those that 6 3825 3793 Birth of Enos 5: 6 205 most love God's TJTord 3735 3703 Birth of Cainan 5: 9 90 have seemed iii too great 6 3665 3633 Birth of Mahalaleel 5 : 12 70 6 haste. 3600 3568 Birth of Jared 5 : 15 65 3438 3406 Birth of Enoch 5: 18 would any of the "mil162 3373 3341 Birth of Alethuselah 5 : 21 65 lions now living" be 6 3286 3154 Birth of Lamech 5 : 25 187 stumbled by the discov3004 2972 Birth of Noah 5: 28 982 ery that they have a < 2404 2372 Flood dried up 7:6;8:13 600 hundred years longer to 2402 2370 Birth of Arphaxad 1 : 10 1 2 live than they once 2367 2335 Birth of Xalah 1 : 12 1 35 2337 2305 Birth of Eber 1 : 14 1 30 thought ? Hardly, TiTonld 2303 2271 Birth of Pelcg 1 : 15 1 34 tliey be stumbled be(6 2273 2241 Birih of Reu 1 : 18 1 30 cause they were conse2241 2209 Birth of Xerug 1 : 20 1 32 crated wit11 the under2211 2179 Birth of Nahor 1 : 22 1 30 standing on their part 2182 2150 Birth of Terah 1 : 24 1 29 <6 1977 1945 Terah's Death; Abraham that six "iiousand years 1 : 32; 12 : 1-7 1 crosses Euphrates aiid of human history ended enters Canaan Acts 7 : 2-4 205 in A.D. 18742 One can 1547 1515 Exodus from Egypt Ex. 12: 40-43 430 but smile at the thought. Gal. 3 : 17 'Any person consecrated 1067' 1035 Construction of temple 1Ki. 6: 1 480 with a condition or codhegun 1031 999 Rehohoam's reign begun 2 Chron. 9: 30'31 icil attached to his coa36 1014 982 Abijah's " 12 : 13-16 17 secration may as well I <c 1011 979 Asa's " 13:2;14:1 3 forget the whole matter : 970 938 Jehoshaphat's " " 16:13; 1 7 : l 41 he is not consecrated a t 945 913 Jehoram's " 6 " 20:31; 2 1 : l 25 all, and does not love 937 905 Ahaziali's I 21:20;22:1 8 God. 936 904 Athaliali's " " 22:2 1 930 898 Joash's " 22:12 Nothing in the Scrip6 890 858 Amaziah's " " 24:1,27 40 tures says that Christ 861 829 Uzziah's " 25: 1.28 29 Jesus would have to 4< 809 777 Jotham's " 26:l-3,23 52 wait until the beginning i 793 761 Ahaz's " 27:1,9 16 I of the seventh thousa~ld 77'7 745 Hezekiali 's ' " 28: 1'27 16 years of human history 748 716 i',lanzsseh's " " 2 9 : 1 : 3 2 : 3 3 29 693 661 Anon's 6 6 " 33: 1'20 55 before the second advent 4i 691 659 Josiah's " 33: 21 2 would occur and the Day '4 660 628 Jehoiakim's " " 34:l 31 of Jehovah begin, in 6c 649 617 Zcdekiah's " " 36:5 I1 which Christ, as Jeho639 607 Times of Gentiles " " 36: 1 1 10 vah's vicegerent, rules (in Zedekiah's eleventh year) in the midst of Plis ene569 537 End of seventy years of ths desolation of the land. Seventy years a mies. As a matter of part of the Gentile Times. 2 Chron. 36 : 22,23 fact these events ocY.R. A.D. curred in Y.B. 1882 1882 1914 End of Times of Gentiles (interven(1914 A.D.) ; not earlier, ing dates well established) and not later. 1903 1935 To the present
6

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table is follo~vedwith a list olf the times of Iunations thus Footnote on Calculating Future Eunations indicated. VThen the nurnber of "Minutes Over 29 Days" The duration of a n eclipse cycle is correctly stated on i s kno\vn, it is an easy matter to determine when the lunapage 373 of Tlie G o l d e ? ~ Age So. 404 as 6,585.32 days, ancl tions thelaselves will occur (the approximate days and the figures on page 3% s!~ould be carrected to correspond. hours), within an liour or so. (On the latter page also, forecasting the future, insert moon Three Eclipse Cycles Compart!d (Allnotes Over 29 Days9 No, 73766 irl~mecliatelybefore the inoon marked on the chart (a) (b) (c) (d) (el (a) (b) (c) (d) (el a s No. 'iZi6G and cl~ungethe latter number and all the remaining nurnbers to 1 higher.) I t will be o h s e r ~ e dby the careful student that from No. 73131 (.Janunry 6, 1886, 10: 13 a.m.) to No. 73354 629 (January 17, 1004, 6 : 1 5 p.111.) is 4 minutes longer thau 490 415 from No. 73354 to No. 73577 (J2nuary 28, 1022, 2: 1 3 a.m.). 415 As the sun is constantly making corupensations, a l t ~ r i l l g 435 the length of the )par slightly, so Tith the eclipse cycles 606 753 of the moon. The astronomers understand these latter very 903 well, arid the reasons for Ll~em,but i t is not the intention 1032 of 2'Ihe Boidelt Age to examine them. I n calculating future 1115 1120 lunations they should be noticed, but, even then, any figures 1029 the average Golden Age reader will make ~villbe subject to 863 ast~onomicaladjustments. 694 553 Persons desiring to forecast future lunntiorls should take 487 note of the following table. in whiclr is a list of the "Minutes 479 Over 29 Days" (9) for the eclipse cycle from No. 78131 to 520 599 KO. 7x54, ( b ) for the cpcle from KO. 73354 to h'o. 73377, 6-1 nr!d ( c ) for the inconiplete cycle from KO.73577 to No. 73803 ; 793 ancl ( d ) is the difference, plus or minus, betneexi the corre925 1019 sponding lunations of ( a ) and ( b ) . and ( e ) is the difference, 1057 plus or minus, between the corresponding 1ul:ations of 1011 (1-1) ailcl ( c ) . I t mill be observed that the figures, plus 01, 904 774 minus, necessary to make ( a ) agree with ( b ) are about the 632 same as are necessary to make ( b ) agree with ( c ) . Let 613 tlie aslroiiorl?ers battle over the difierencts of a minute or so. 575 566 r s i n g this ~uetliod,the lengths of the 38 lunations needed 587 to complete column ( c ) are shown in parentheses, and the 639
CALCULATED TIME O FUTURE LUNATIONS-Jersalcm F Time Camparcd Compared Mean Mins. with next w~th Approximate Mean 0v.r Slow Fazt Slow Fast 2 D hr mi hr mi hr ml hr mi 3 s Moon Days Date Time Date Time 73762 73763 73764 73765 73766 73767 73768 73769 73750 73771 73772 73773 30 29 30 29 29 50 29 30 29 30 30 29 Te Th Fr S u Mo Tu Tb Fr S u l o W e Fr Jan 12 7:02pm 1 Feb 1 9.53am Mar 1 2 9:52pm Apr 1 7:32am 1 May 10 3:38pm Jun 8 I l ' O l p m Jul 8 6:23am Aug 6 2:47pm Scp 5 1'02am Oct 4 2:05?m Nov 3 6:24am Dec 3 1:21am Tu Th Fr Su Mo Yle TI1 S a S a Tu W e Fr 1937 A.O. 891 207 Jcn12 2:15pm 719 Feb 1 2.59am 1 530 Mar 1 2 3:43pm 436 Apr11 4:27an 443 Kay 10 5:llpm <47 J I I ~ 9 55 m :a 439 JkI 8 6:39pm 615 Aug 7 7:23am S 5 5:Oipm 783 19 " Oct 5 8:51am 979 3 3 5 Nov 3 9'35gm 1137 6 1 3 Dee 3 10:19am 1191 7 07 4 47 45 6 54 3 04 6 09 4 33 3 05 5 21 133 5 17 6 54 425 1211 2 29 16 36 19 05 1 8 46 15 1 1 8 58 718 804 876 91.8 929 915 8x1 825 753 634 639 629 614 696 6E5 709 7r3 822 894 940 934 835 819 761 715 667 613 571 565 616 712 828 923 939 1006 931 913 809 684 572 499 482 520 604 7 22 RO G 999 1102 1123 1032 (891) (719) (580) (486) (443) (447 ) (499) (615) (783) (979) (1137)

73774 73775 73776 73777 73778 73779 73780 73781 73782 73783 73784 73785 73786

30 30 29 30 29 29 30 29 29 30 30 29 30

S Jan 1 9:12pm a Po Jan 3 1 3.558111 We C3r 2 8:C4am Th Mar 3 1 9:17pm S Apr 30 7:51am a Su May 29 4:20pm Bo Jun 27 11:26pm Vie Jul 27 6:06am f h Aun 25 1:26pm Fr SEP 10:40pm 23 Su Oct 23 10:46am TU Nov22 2:12am W Dec 2 1 8:19pm e

1938 A.D. Jan l l l : 0 3 p m B!o J ~ 3 1 11:47am R We Mar 2 12:31am Th I:r:l 1:15pm S Apr 30 l:T9am a Su May 29 2:43pm Tu Jun 28 3:27am W Ju127 4 : l l ~ m e Fr Aug26 4:55am Sa S p 24 5:39pm e K O Oct 24 6:23am Tu Nov22 7:07pm Th Dcc 22 7:51am Sa

1123 969 793 634 5C9 426 400 440 554 726 926 1087 1166

559 3 25

15 1 4 08 29 7 33 2 10 8 02 4 15 5 52 5 35 1 3 7 6 04 4 01 524 10 05 3 30 15 29 38 18 59 2 42 19 37 523 1 6 55 6 42 1 32 1
4 50 132 61 1 56 8 12 3 35 7 16 5 24 3 41 5 55 143 5 19 9 38 338 1257 117 1 6 35 17 52 1 6 42

73787 73788 73789 73790 73791 73792 73793 73794 33795 73796 73797 93798

30 30 29 30 29 29 30 29

29
30 29 30

Fr Jan 20 3:45pm Su Feb 19 10:51am Ta Mar 2 1 4:14am We A w l 9 6:59pm Fr May 19 6:47am S Jun 17 3:56pm a Su Jul 1611:16pm Tu Aug 15 6:05am We Sen 13 15Opm Th Oct 1210:36pm Sa Nov 1110:03am SU De6 10 11:57DIII

1939 A.D. Jan 20 8:35pm 1146 6 2 2 Feb 19 9:19am 1043 4 39 Mo Mar 20 10:03pm 885 2 0 1 W Aor 19 10:47am 708 e Th May 1 8 1 1 3 l p n 549 Sa Jun 17 12:15pn1 440 Mo Ju117 12:59am 409 Tu Aug 15 1:43pm 445 Th Sep 1 4 2:27am 546 Fr Oct 13 3:llpm 687 Su Nov 1 2 355am 834 1 1 0 P O Dec 1 4:39pm 1 970 3 26 Fr Su 1940 A.D.

13799 38 Tu Jan 9 4:07nm @800 30 Th Feb 810:05am

We Jan 1 0 5:23am 1078 5 1 4 Th 6eb 8 6:07pm 1128 6 0 4

13 16 8 02

Volume XVI

Brooklyn, N, Y., Wednesday, April 10, 1935

Number 406

The Second Hand in tlae Timepiece of God


(In 3 Parts-Part
3)

Building o f Solomon's Temple "In the fourth year was the foundation of I T IS a simple matter: nom, to ascertain tlie exact date when the construction of Solo- the house of [Jehovah] laid, in the month Zif mon's temple was begun. The new moon near- [naiae of heathen origin] : and in the eleventh est the vernal equinox rose a t 10: 55 N., LigAt- year, in the month Bul [name of heathen origin], d a y , Edewic d a y No. 1093164, B.R. 1067, uel-mat ~vhichis the eighth month, was the house finislied throughout a 11 the equilzox No. 2993 ( 4 :55 a.m., parts thereof, and accordS n n d a y, March 16, 1035 ing to all the fashion of it. B.C.). This mas the eounSo was he seven years iia terpart of No. 73590 in the building it."--1 Kings 6: Lnnation Experience Table. Making use of the eclipse I t is wished to locate the cJ-clesto prcamote greater of dedication of the accuracy, the next new moon , slid as i t is desirrose at 4 : 39 N., E a r t h d a y , be a s exact as E d e qz i c d a y No- 1093193 ecourse is ag.ain had (10 : 39 p.m., Monday, April to the eclipse cycles. No. 14). The moon was not seen nearest the vernal that night: hence the secof 1028 B.C., is the ond month did not begin counterpart of No. 73677, until 45 hours later, LifeFebruary 28, 1930, d a y , L i f e 1, E d e 91, i c d a y ., from which i t is No. 1093195, God's moath by 164 eclipsecyNo. 37019, v e r n a l eqtlillox 23 m o o n s each. No. 299.3 (6 : 00 pin, \vednesr the first eight day, April 16, 1035 B.C.). months f ollo~vs(overleaf). The s e c o n d d a y of the The poilit of special inmonth was 24 hours later; terest is moo11 No. 37111; the work of building tlie a correction of one 1101ar temple w0111d hardly have and 29 niiiiutes o v e r the been begun after sundown; therefore, the work oil the temple was begun "mean" lullation was obtained by using the Malzsday, Life 2, l0G7 B.R. (sometime Friday eclipse cycles. I n this ixonth the temple was llloriling or afternoon, April 18, 1035 B.C.). dedicated, before it was quite completed. Probably all that was clone that day mas to lay Dedication o f the Temple the corner stone. The dedication of the temple was forecast in * The asterisks a t top of the calendar on page 381 of T h e the follov-ing instructions to Moses : "The fifGoldelz Age NO. 404 represent days. each counted a s a part of Jehovah's Year of Ransom 1903. The first asterisk on teenth day of this seventh month is the feast that page (the one immediately beneath Lifednv, the day tabernacles for seven days untoJehovah, , of vernal equinox, L i f e d a y , 9 : 4 3 D., Jerusalem time) is no Besides the sabbaths of Jehovah . on the part of Jehovah's Year of Ransom 1903, but: belongs to the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye year previous.

..

Vernal Eqninox

Noon No.

Hour

Day of Week

Edenic, Day No.

Ensuing Month

Year I3.R.

Hour

Gregorian Date

Year B.C.

37105 37106 37107 37108 3n09 37110 37111 37112

5: 24 N . Eeas.e$zday 9 : 37 D. Ecirthday 20: 59 N . Litedciy 1 0 : 30 D. M a n s d a y 6 : 40 N . L i g h t d a y 1 :35 D. I_Teavel?,day 8: 40 D. Eart12day 4 : 45 N . Lif e d a y

20,95734 1095763 1095793 109582,2 209585n 1095881 1095910 2095940

R e d e ~ t p t i o n 1060 19 : 24 pm Sn:1. Nar. 28 1023

Lije

Visit;+zelzt "4: 59 Freedom " 4 : 30 ~i~zc~icatioiz " 12 : 40 Hope " 7 : 35 Iiing " 2 : 49 peace 10: 45
(

" 33: 37 PITI Tue. Apr. am Thn. May prn Fri. June am Snn. July an1 ?,Ion. Bug. pm Tne. Sep. pm TJTed. Oct.

24 27 25 25 23
29 20

" " " ''


< '

"
"

have gathered in the fruits of the laiid, ye shall lrcep the feast of Jehovah seven days: on the lirst day shall be 3 solemn rest and on the eighth day sha.11 be a solern11 rest . And ye shall rejoice before Jehovah your God seven daps. It is a statnte for ever throughout your generations."-Leviticus 23: 34, 38, 39, 40, 41, A.R.V. Allowing for the usual time for observatioll and proclamation, the eighth day of the seventh month began at sundo~n~n nifalzsday, Icing 6, E d e ~ z i c a y ATo.1095920, ~vliich d day began Thursday evening, Septelnber 30, and continued until sulido~m of October 1 (vernal equinox KO. 3000). On that day began the dedication of the altar, lasting for seven days. The day of atonement feil on the tenth day of the same month; very appropriately the dedication of the altar began TI TO days before. The figures are all unusually interesting. The Edenic day itself nshered in week No. 156560. This is a noteworthy number, being composed of 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 5 x 19 x 103, Falling on October 1of the year of creation No. 3000, and at the time of the beginning of the cledication of the altar of Solonion's teniple, tliis nimiber probably has some significance that sometime will be undersluod. The record of the dedication itself is as follo~vs: "And all the men of Israel assembled themselves unto king Solonion a t the feast, in the month Ethaaim [the name is of heathen origin], ~vliich the seventh month. And all the elders is of Israel came, and the priests took up the ark. And they brought up the ark of Jehovah, The]-e mas nothing in tho ark save the t ~ tables of stone, which Moses put there a t Horeb, when Jehovah made a covenant v i t h the children of Israel, when they eame out of the land of Egypt. And it eame to pass, when the priests were come out of the holy place, that the cloud iilled the house of Jehovah, so that the priests

. .

...

could not stand to minister by reason of the cloud; for the glory of Jehovali filled the house of Jehovah." ( 1 ICing-s 8 :2 , 3 , 9 - 1 , A .B.V.) "And oil the eighth day they held a solemn asseml;lp: for they kept the dedication of the altar seven days, and the feast [of tabernacles] seven days. And on the three and twentieth day of the sevellth month 1e sent the people : away unto their tents, joyful and glzd of heart for the goodness that Jehovah had showed unto David, and to Solomon, and to Israel liis people."-2 Chronicles 7 : 9,10, il.E.T7,
Another Astounding ~snkrmation Another a,stounding confirmatioli of the aecuracy of God's "faithful witness in the lieavens" now appears. TVhile, according to I3oly TTTrit (Leviticus 23 : 33-39), the feast of 'iabernacles ( ~ ~ h i began on the 15th of tliis month, ch 211d lasted sewn d a ~ s could have begull 011 any ) day of the TI-eel;: and ended on any day7 of the sveek, slid both of the days t ~ ~ uproperly have ld been counted as special sabbaths unto Jehovah God, yet what if infinite TTTisdoni had so arranged it lliat on t%is most extraordinary occasion these fifteen days ended in such a x-ay as t o coincide exactly ~ r i t h the regular v-eekly sabbath arrangement? That is just hat tooli place, for the Ywenty-third day' above specified was a \vee!<ly sabbath. The account is interesting a t this point; for instead of saying that Solomon sent the people home, it says that he sent them to their tents. They remained in their teiits another night, starting for home the o next morning, on the first day of the ~veek,as was meet. The dedication of the altar for sevea days, followed by the feast of tabernacles for seven days, and dismissal of the people on the next succeeding day, is set out in the f ollo13~ingtable :

...

The
Vernnl Equinox

GOLDEN AGE
Year B.R. Gregorian Date

Moon No.

Day of Week

Edenic Day

Day of Month

B'C' Year

Activity Specified

3000 3000 3000

37111 ~ V a n s d a y 1095920 7 1 1 1 d f a n s d a z ~ 1095927 37111 Godsday 1095935

Kiqq 8 K i n g 15 K i n g 23

1060 1060 1060

Fri. Oct. 1 1028 Altar dedicated Fri. Oct. 8 1028 Feast of tabernacles Sat. Oct. 16 1028 Final day

Horn did i t happen that Solomon, after the The cleansing work was not finished in time required time had elapsed for dedicatioil of for the passover to be held a t the regnlar time the altar and tlie temple, sent the people away (fourteenth day of first month), so, ia accorda day later "glad and nierry in heart" as God's ance with tine law, made elastic to tal- care ~e true people a r e as tliej7 read this account? The of just such an emergency (Numbers 9: 10, l l ) , table answers. The nest day was a stllsbath day arraiigements n7ere made "to keep the passover of rest and worship. For, be it linon-n, this in the second inontli" (2 Chronicles 30 : 2) and record was written for Jehovah's people that mwsengers were dispatched to every pnrt of are living now. Not until now were these ptlr- Palestine to have as large aild representative ticular 'precious things of tlie moons' "thrust a gathering as possible. forth" by the power of Jehovah Gocl. '%lid Jehovah hearkened to Hezeltiah, and The studelit \;rho reads tlie accounts in 1Kings healed the people. A i ~ d the children of Israel 8 and 2 C!lronicles 7 will note that not all the that were present a t Jerusalem kept the feast details of the teinple furnishings, eic., were of unleavened bread [beginning the nest day completed ~znlila few days alter the dedica- after the passovci.] se7e.i; days with great @adtion services hacl elided. Tlie exact time when aess; and the Le~riiesand the priests pralsed the last ve;sel T~,-P.S mnde ready is not stated; 3ehovah day bj7 dav, si11$-112 11-ith loud instruit is lnercly mentioned tliat it mas in the next inents unto Jehov?. il. And I-Iczeliiah spalic com111o11t11. fortably unto all the Levitcs that l1ad good unI t is so in the antiij-pe. The dedic2tion of derstanding in the service of Jehovah. So they the spiritual temple of God and its "altr,rV of did cat thronghont the feast for the sevel: days, the sacrifice of praise to Jehovali has been in oficring sacriiices or peace-oIieriii~;~, and niakfull sv:irig for years ; since 1918. JIThen ilie i ~ confeseioi~ to Jehovah, the Gocl of their ~ g work will all bc finished is not k1101~711. Probably fathers. Ancl the nhole assnmhly too!; counsel the end is near, bat it doas 119t matter ~ ~ h e t h e to Beep other seven days; and "r;icy kept other r it is or not. seven days Tith gladness. F o r IIezr;E;ah king of J u d z l ~ give to tha assembly for o@zriags did Cleansing the TempEe a thoncand bullocks 3iid seven thou~aiid sheep; The nest days in the Scriyture record thzt and tlie princes gave to the rssen~blya thoucan be defiiiitely located are those identified ?and bul!ocks and ten thousand sLcep: and a, b r with cleansing the temple in the first year of greet n ~ ~ n ~ ofe priests salictifiecl tllel~iselves. the reign of the gcod king Mezc-lii~h.His reign And all the assembly of Jndah, with the priests began in the year 777 B.E. (745 B.C.) EIezekiah and the Levites, and all the assembly t?iat came rs mas the good son of a bad man, Ahaz, in whose o::t of Israel, and tile s t r a ~ ~ g etliat came out ia days the worship in the temple was ~xeglectecl of the land of Israel, and Slat d~i~irslt Judah, and idolatry ~ 1 - a ~ practiced. The tenlple liaci ~ejoiced.So there as great joy in Jerasalem; become so filled with refuse of all sorts that it for since the time of Solomon the son of David not the like i11 Jerutook 14 men 16 days to clean it, a total of 224 1;i:ig of Israel there 1 ~ 2 s salem. Then the priests the Levites arose and days' morlc, After listing the worlcers the account says: blessed the people: and their voice xvas heard, "Now they began 011 the first day of the first accl their prayer came np to his holy habitation, unto heaven. Now when all this mss finmoiith to sanctify [clear away the rubbish], e ~ e n ished, all Israel that x e r e presei~tx-ent out to and on the eighth day of the month came they to the porch cf Jehovah; and they sanctified the cities of Judnh, and bralce in pieces the -n the house of Jehovall ill eight days: and .on pillars, and hewed d o ~ ~the Asherim, ail4 I~-r.alce down the high places and the altars out of all the sixteenth day of tlie first month they made Judah and Benjamin, in Ephrainl olzo and Baaan end."--2 Chronicles 29 : 17, A.R.V.

This was a work that could properly be pushed on any day of the weeli. The account says that on the eighth day, IT-hich 7t7as Maqzsday, Edeazic day N o . 1199lQO" (Friday, April I), ushering Eoecefir~g the Dags of Hezekinh in meek No. 171300, they came to the porcli of From the spril~gof rTr B.R. (745 B.C.) to Y.R. 1903 (1935 A D . ) tliere are 2,679 years. Jehovah, and on the eixieeaih of the n~oath, There a r e 12.2682 lunatiofis per year: total for n~hicli77-3s Godsday, Ede7.tic day N o . 11,09108 the period, 33,133moons. I1 33,135 nioons there (Satcrdzy, April 9), they m ~ d e end of tke 1 till are I48 eclipse cycles of 223 moons each, aild clecnsing \T70rk. Referring to moon KO. 73609 (eo~lnterpart, 131 over. Back 131 nlooils frolll l;o.73740 in IS24 A.D., of meon No, 46606 in I-Hezekiah's (do7~r-n this end) m2s the correspondin~g at moon to KO. 73C09. NOTV, 33,135 lnoolls minus 131 are day), the time interrenir~g the next lunation mas 29 d a j ~ niiizntes (29 d8.y~1 honrs 39 699 1 33,004, the :~nnilserof moons it is desired to go . bae& -from p~~~73699, to locate tkle l n n p ~ i c n 1x~"~xle": it therelore occnrred 3: 29 D.,L i j e nearest to the spring equinas in the year of day, Edeisic clcly N o . 1199120 ( 9 : 29 a.m., TknrsBezeliiah above ni3iltioned, $loon N ~ 73603 day, *%pril21). Aaother gl.lnee a t tl:e Ln:lation . S rose, astronomicsly, Jerusalerll time, at 11:02 Experience Table, moon KQ. 73610, S ~ -O T T Tthat the time inlzrvening to the ~ e x snccecarng Iunab ~ ~ ~ angust 20, 1,424 B.D. -~J 33.064 , i ~ ~ d ~ ~ ~ 11 o o n s are 33004 s 2551442.864976 seco~ds, tion mas 29 2ays 641 minutes, half of which is 1 lv;ljell are $4,2Q7,$26,3~%,667904 seconds. bid- 14 days 17 hours 20% lili~inte;, Therefore, the f l ing in the usual Tcs.ay, rirst by 604800 ( s e c o ~ ~ d s ~ l of the moon in the seccn? rn:ol~th 71-as 8: 43 N.,Mc~).tsday, i f e 12, Ede?zic clmy N o . 1193135 L il? a week), then by 86400 (aeeonds ill a day), (usherino in 7~:eel; KO. 171305), B.R.77'Y (2 : 43 then by 3603 (seconds in an hour), m d findly .? by 60 (seconcls a nlir,Ete), this length of tiEe a.m., Frlaay, l h y 6,145 Bee.). Depeliding npo3 iE eqnals 130232 weeks 3 days 13 honrs 42 minaies. v;sh~sility,it 7~roaldhave heen possib!e to hold 'khese 3 clays 13 llours 12 bac!< from tkis passover on z. T1~1rsdaynight, mid it m a 7 ratl~crsny1 : 02 a.m., Salnrcla~r, 1 Angust 30, take ol:e to a have been so held, I~iitthe e c c o u ~ t gests that it 7vas held s o m ~ t i afte: sux-.do7-;;-n, ~e Tuesday at 9: 50 p.m. i8'01~7it is desired to ga i d baclc 139,252 :T7eelis (mkiich are 974,624 days) next thereafter, cli the sa'35ath ~ I - i c l h ~ then fiolll 9: 5s ~ ~ ~ug.st ~ 26,1924~B-D, heg~m. Tlie se-ren deya' ~ e a S r;f, ~;rl!ec:ve~cd ~ 2 ~ f P~~~ 745 ~ . cto 1924 A,D. there are 2,668 b r e d began, accordicg to the im;, 6.1 i: 15th , ! e pears. ~h~~~ c,,ntnin 2668 365 days of 'i:'a~onili~ Li;ll:ir7~~;;., T.7, E~ielzlc L;i,'e 6ay No. (973.830), 26 x 2d lea^ days in the 26 u~brolren IZS:23W (Snncl.~y, >Izy 81,r.nd ikcy rccesz~rilg centuries ( 2 . ,6 lea;] days in tiIe present tea- ended on a sezond salibnth; arid all rectl-i~cl 64) tLlry, 1 ill the e;ir,hth celltury B,S,, a12d 6 qUELd- S C C ~ hl.11ssing froin Jehovnh God thct they 1 a r e n ' - ~ ; ~ eover for yet .notl;er ITCC!;. ri :neir TicelZtesirfi~ day?: total days ill 2669 lcn9 vcntio", Ihe~efore,like that a t thr s!?dicetic;n 974,1(j7. T!;~ JC5irrd day is 974224- 974367, xr:lich is -J 57,Idajrs b A cfrom ~ ~ + ~ ~ ~ of the , temple,~ seems to hn4-e lasted over i l ~ r c c ~ t 2 5 sabbaths; it ended cli G o d s d ~ : lLife 28,Ede:.:ic , li'he sllsm-er is that in the first yt,r of kiall's reign new nlaon ~ 0 s . 2 50 N., ,+- d " go+ ~ 1299150 (Seturdas~, Jiiay 21) day, Edeqt2.u~cky N o I 119u0091q G o d ' s na??zt,%X o . -2OGO5, E.B. 727 (9 : 59 p.i~i.,Tuesday, March 22, X7hst G a l e a d ~ rDccs God Zrse? - B.C.). I n the year 1925 A.D., March 22 Tliis iienl about IFezcBiah is set oat h s o ~ e 145 cor:sidernhle detail, to+ether with the cnka1.comes 011 a Fri,-JZy. Referencc to the sis-ifiouFand-J7ear c21e11dar 368 of N ~4 ,~ 4 sho~7s tions, bcczuoe f k provldcs yet one more sur) -that in the year l y B.R.('745 B.C.) the d2te prising pro01 of the masllcr in whish Jehovah ~ llamed have failen oll a '8iaesday; iT-hicll God ccnzcd His 'faithful 7+-itl?essill 'the heavens' to bear record 01 the reliability of I-Iis shows that tlie aasx7er is correct. -Word. I1 the Devil, or any of his tlieo!ogians, veryTITell. ~h~ first mollt;l was ill 44 ~ o L l r s ~ ! np tile~ had had anything to do wit11~the movcmel~tof ~ ~ i ~ ~ temple, therefore, begen on tlle mornillR of the moon throilgh the heavms, 110 such record M a lz s d n y, Bedenzptiolz 1, Er!e+tic d n y NO. 7v0n1d 'Om be 1199093, B.R. 17'7 (Friday, March 25, 74%B.C.). The prime fuctors are 2 x 2 x 3 x 5 x 5 s 7 x 551.
7
-7

nasseh, until they had destroyed them all."2 Ch1.onic1t.s 50 : 20-27 ; 31 : 1,A.R.B.

"For the invisible things of him froni the creation of the world are clea-fly seen, being understood hy the things that are made." So says one faithful ~mitnessof Jehovah. (Ttomal~s 1:20) "The heavens declare the glory of God ; alid the firmanlent sheweth his Siai~dy~~~ork. Da>nnto clay uttereth speech, aild night unto night shemeth B~io-cvledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard. Their line is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. I n then1 hath he set a tabernacle for tlie sun." (Psalm 19: 1-4) TVho can doubt the precision, the exactitude, the \visdom, of the great Creator? The daytime, the nighttime ; summer and winter ; seedtime and harvest; year in, year out, follow one another mith unfailing regularity. I s it not reasonal~leto believe that the great Jehovah v~ouldgive to His human creatures some reliable measuring "line" so their relationship to tiine could be reliably recorded"2esus told His disciples the day and the hour of His s e c o ~ d coming ~~<r;ss l<no~\-li only to His Father. (Matthew 24: 36) If the Father kept record with snch exactness, TI--hat calendar clid H e nse? TJTonldHe be party to the caprice of the worshipers of heathen gods and recognize the days and months named after these gods, or ~vouldHe have the heavens show forth His handiwork? T;ITonld their line (measuring cord) go out throughout the earth3 I s it not reasonable to believe that, with the time having conze for the knowledge of Jehovah to cover the earth, His method of recording the times and seasons to would be made l i n o ~ m His people!

illen's bones upon them; and he returned to Jerusalem. And the liing commanded all the people, saying, Keep the passover nnto Jehovah your God [Exodus 12 : 22,231, as it is written in this book 01 the covenant. Surely there was not lcept such a pasmver from the days of tlie judges that judged Israel, nor in all tlie days of the kings of Israel, nor of the kings of Judah; but in the eighteentli pear of king Josiah was this passover liept to Jehovah And like anto him was there in Jernselem. no king before him, that turned to Jehovah with all his heart, and with all his soul, and mith all his might, according to all the lam of Moses; lleither after him arose there any like him." -2 Rings 23 : 20-23,25, A.R.V. I t -c~-ill now he of great interest to see 011 just what day this passover occurred. The new noon at that season rose at 1 2 : 1 9 N . , L i f e d a y , E d e ~ z i cd a y No. 1 2 3 0 6 7 (6: 19 p.m., TiTednesday, March 13, 641 B.C.). The month began 48 hours thereafter (Friday evening, March 15, 641 E.C.), and its fourteenth day was ICla~zsday,

...

R e d e ~ . r z p t i o n 4 , E d e n i c d a y N o . 1237082, B.R. 1 673, beginning a t sundo11711 Thursday, Xarch 25,

641 B.C. Surely there conld be no hour lnore appropriate to cornmenlorate the passover than the same hour and the same day of the week in nhich the Lord himself last 01,served it? a i d a t which time I-Ie instituted the new thing, the memorial of His death in vindication of JehovaKs name. How does i t happen that in every one of these instances it turns out that the moon v a s snch a true and faithful witness? I t does not happen. It was arranged. There is an appropriateness about all these designaJosiah9s Great Passover tions of particular days that cannot fail to inlThe next day definitely marked in the Scrip- press every person who loves God. Jehovah be tures is the great passover of Iiiag Josiah, at God ];new centuries in advance 11-hat ~17ould vhich time Josiah dest~oyedidolatry out of the day of the ~veek,as well as the day of the Jndah. The reader should read the 22d and 23d month, when His first and best loved son ~ ~ o n l d chapters of 2 Kings and note the vely consid- die a ransom for inany. erable attention given to this subject in IToly Writ. On account of its connection with the The Times of the Gentiles (Luke 24: 24) feast of Jeroboam it would seem that this is The seven (Gentile) tiines ended mith the about to have its fulfillme:lt, in antitype, in placing of earth's rightful kiilg upon His throne, "Christendom". After describing in detail the approximately L i f e d a y , Icing 1 0 , Edeqbic d a y thorongh cleansing worli carried on under Jo- N o , ,2170097, Y.R. 1 8 8 2 (Thursday, October 1, siah's direction (similar to that which Jehovah 1914). If they had begun esactly 2,520 years God is no117 carrying on in the earth) the ac- previously they would have begun October 1, count terminates : 607 B.C. But the T/TTorld War did not begin "And he slew all the priests of the high places exactly on time. "The nations were angry" that were there, upon the altars, and burned (Revelation 11:18), so angry that they conld

not wait nl~tilthe DeviPs lease h2d expired; the house of [Jehovah], and the king's house, tl~erefore war begall some liine weeks ahead a n d all the houses of Jerusaleni, and every the of time. An approximate date is the bzst that great mail's lionse btlrnt he with fire. But it can be exj?eeted on this item." The date 588 G.C. came to pws, in the seve~iih month, thzt Ishiri Oxford Bibles is riineteell years out of the mad, the son of Nethaciah, the son of Elisllanna, way; the proper Gate for the followillg passage of the seed royal, came, ten men with him, is 687 KC., hitherto generally spoken of as alid smote Gedaliali, that he died, and the Jews being tlie beginning or" tile year 696 E.C. ( 1 3 0 ~ -2 n d thc C'haldee's that \\-ere ~ ~ i l l i at SBizpah. llirn ever, the assumptioll that the trne begi~ming A n d all the people, both sli~a!l and great, ancl of the year is ill the fall is erroneous. The the captains of the armies, arose, slid came to items are properly placed in 607 B.C., and Egypt: for they were afra-id of the Chaldees." i?ice!y sho~v the znger of the nations ahead 0-f (2 ICmgs 25 :2,3,8,9,25,26) There the seventy time, 2,520 years subsequently, as the tiil?les of years desolation of Judsh and Jcrusalern began. the Gentiles were drawing to a close.) Ill the year 607 B.C. the lie117 moon nearest "And the city irks besieged unto thc clevenl!i the spring equinox rose 9: 23 hr.,Lifeday, Edclzyear of lcizing Zedekiah. And 011 the ninth day ic day No. 1249499, God's ?~aoazt?z ATo. 42112, of the fourth month the Pa~rlineprevailed in ze~?zal eyzti~zon; ATo. 3421 ( 3 : 23 a.m., Thursday, th the city. And in the lifkh month, on the Nafch 27). The day r~~hen e famine is noted seventh day of tile 111011th came Nebuzar- as having been severe, 2srlccilzsdc!y, F ~ e e d o m9, adaii, captain of the guard, a sarvxnt of the E d e ~ z i cd n g No. 1249596$ (Friday, July 41, is king of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: and he burnt interesting, as it was about this time (in 1914,

...

...

* "But, as above observed, the procf shows that I t was a t this climax of the experiences of the church the tlirce and one-lialf times of Daniel began at thc 'when he [Satan the enemy, by and through his agen'time of the end7, to wit, October 1, 191k At that cies] accomplished [that is to say, completed and time there mere on tlic earth a number of persons Blished] tile ~ r o r kof sccrtte~ingthe power of God's v ccnsecrated to God aild nr:lclly devoted to his cause. .holy people7. This w o ~ k a s the micked expression Tlicy had entirely separated themselves from and of Satan, who had been expelled from heaven and broken off all alliaiice with x~orldly organizations. \rl?o mas wroth with God's holy people.-Revelation They were putting forth their best endeavors to 1 2 : 13-17. preach the truth of God's liingdom. The Scriptur?~ "As mzny of the numerals in 'Revelation appear and the facts then, aud those which follow, show to be literal, even so the same appears to be true in that this class exactly fits the prophct's descriptioa the prophecy of Daniel. According to Eiblical inethod of 'the holy people'. of calculation of time, a year of 360 days is 'a time'. 6 " ~ ~ s exactly [-f] tliree and one-half literal years, Therefore, 'a time, times: alld an half,' or three and t or 1260 days, by Eiblical method of caiculation, aftm one-half times, is equivalent to 1260 days, or three the time of the end, there begail, to wit, 1918, a great and one-half literal years. The beginning of this persecution of these holy people of God. Early in period, which must be a t 'the time of the end7, to February, 1918; ~r,aiiyof 'the holy pcol?le7, or God's wit, October 1, 1914, would necessarily eiid in the anointed, in Canada were arrested and thro-m into spring of 1918. [?I The Scriptnral statement and the prison. In the same month the hooks of account and physical facts as they are \veil lmown to exist are private papers of the Society's office at Brooklyn therefore exectly in harmony and show that 1260 headquarters were seized. A few days later the of- days are literal iil time and began October 1, 1914, ficers of the Society at Brooklyn were arrested. They and ended practically the first of L4pril, 1918. "-The were indicted at the instance of Satan's represent- TVatchtower, 1329, page 372. atives and mere tried, convicted, and sentenced to :Beginning e r a c t 7 l ~October 1, 1014, and ending e r a c t l ; ~ long terms of imprisonment, and were, on the 20th 1,260 literal clays thereafter, the day of June, 1918, confined in prison. At the same day lien the Cnited Statesbrings to &larch 14, 1915, the gorernrueut joined with time many others of like precious faith and devoiion government of Canada in bannillg publito God, and ill different parts of the earth, weye ar- catiol~s or the ~ \ ~ , t ~Tower Society. The storm raged l, rested and irn~risoned. The main office of the So- around Christian literature (now no longer in print), exeiety was completely dismantled, all comnlunication tending, in some instances, evcn to Bibles and h y m n books, between the main office and branch offices T V ~ Ecut and was the end, for that time, of religious freedom in off, and the work of giving the witness to the truth 2 The prime factors are 2 x 7 x 7 s 41 x 311. throughout the earth virtually and effectually stopped.

2,520 years later) t1la.t this war to give the liberty-loving peoples of the T e s t a larger and be tier share of the "new freedom" Tras first seen as inevitable. The war turned out to be a lamine for freedom, not a feast. Canada's kldependence Day is a day ezrlier than that of the Uuited States. Botll countries v e r e conspicuous in their advocacy of and particip2.tion in the war to make the world scckfe for democracies. The day when Jerusalelll as clestroyed, iaeluding the temple, was the seventh day of the 7 fifth month, L tf edo y, T7i.i~r/:icatioaz, Edeqzic day No. 1249625," B.B. 639 (Thursday, July 31, 607 B.C.), generally regarded as about the day, in 191-1, vhen the World TJTar broke out. The day in the seventh month when the flight of the Israelites (under Johanan) into Egypt tool; place is not named. I n the year 1914 the seventh month began wit11 moon No. 73486, rising, Jerusalem time, 6 : 02 N., Liglliday (12 : 02 a.m., Sunday, September 20). .hllo~ving for visibility and proclanlatio~z the month began Monday evening, Xepteillljer 21, and at sando~~rn its tenth day (ten is s g d o l i c of conlpleteness with respect to things earthly) was, as ~vould be expected, exactly October 1, when tlze world mas provided with its new ruler, Christ Jesus, who mill des'iroy every vestige of Satan's empire. (See page 432, 7 2-4.) I t is really astounding, the way in which all those dates, back there, 2520 years before 1964, n-ere timed with such accuracy and such approprintelless to their fnifillments. Only the hand of God could have so arranged. These things particularly, that is, the "times and seasons", He put entirely in His own power, not taliing anybody into His confidence, but leaving the record in the moons so that all may r,ow read it clearly.

comni:~uded unto theni, continually before [Zeh o ~ a h." ] When Soloillon had determined to build the telnple, he m o t e to Huram, king of Tyre, saying, in part: "Behold, 1 arn about to lsuild a house for the name of Jehovah my God, to dedicate it to hini, 2nd to hurn before hill1 inccnse of sweet ~picee,and for the continual siio~~bread, for the burnt-offerings mornand ing and evening, on the sabbaths, and on the flew moons, and on the set feasts of Jehovah our God. This is an ordinance for ever to 1-srae1."-2 Chroiiicles 2 : 4, A.R.B.

Exd sf Seventy Yeare of Desclati~n I t E:~rdly seems necessary to say i!iat the seve~lty years of desolation eizcld se-,,s?ityyears 9 lroln the time they began. As they begall ill the year 607 B.C., they ended in the autumn of 537 B.C., at the time which xTas fornlzriy (incorrectly) called the beginning of the year 536 B.C. Only one event in 537 B.C. c l ~ i ~ n s attcntion, i.e., that "from the first day of the seventli ~iiontll"burnt offel-iags were iriade to Jehovah a t Jerusalem by tlze restored re~lznant. (Ezra 3 : 6) I1 the year 537 the nem- moon nearest the 1 spring equinox (hTo.43178) rose, astronomically, a t 3: G9 p.m., Saturday, April 3. The seveiltli moon of that year, No. 43184, rose a t 7 : 33 p.m., IlIonday, September 27. The first day of the seiwntll 1:iontli (Lifedny, Xiqzg 1, 569 B.E.) began a t sundown Wednesday, 47 hours thereafter, and erded at sundown T'hursdaj-, Xepteiziher 20. This may be taken as a h i i ~ t from J~hovah God that the legal end of the desolatilt:; rule of Satan was the last day oil his month of Xeptenzber, 1914. The movenlents of Ezra can bc traced "in the seventh year of .hrraxerxes the king9' (Ezra '7: 71, non- k n o ~ ~ ~ have bee2 the year 500 B.E. to i l 'The New Moons , by Number9' (458 B.C.). "For upon the first day of tile first Readers have noticed that T h e Golden A g e month began he to go up from Bab~-1011,alld has numbered the moons from creation f orward : on the first d,zy of the fifth month came he to this makes an excellent method of identifica- Jerusalem, acccrding to tile good hand of his tion, good for the purposes of history. There God up011 him." (Ezra 7: 9) The new moon seems to be a possible hint that this course nearest bhe spring equinox ihai year rose a t would be proper in God's sight, in 1 Chronicles 11:21 N., Sta.1-dcry, E d e n i c day No. 1300262, God's mo?zth No. 44031 (5 : 21 a.m., TJTednesday, 23: 31, which reads as follo~vs: March 22). The nex7 year, and the first nionth "Offer all burnt sacrifices unto [Jehovah], in the sabbaths, in the new moons, and on the s f the new year, began about 37 hours subseset feasts, by number, according to the order quently, and i t call be said with confideilce that Ezra began his trip to the contact point a t c the river Ahava on Mansday, E d e ~ ~ id a y , * The grime factors are 5 x 5 x 5 s 13 x 769.

..

No. 1300264" (Friday, March 24), ushering in


week No. 185752. "Then we departed from the river of Ahava, on the twelfth day of the first month, to go unto Jerusalem." (Ezra 8: 31) The journey proper tvas begun Earthday, Redemption 12, Edenic day No. 1300275, B.R. 500 (Tuesday, April 4, 468 B.C.). Ezra arrived a t his destination 107 days after leaving Ahava, i.e., reached Jerusalem on Lifeday, J7i1zdicatio9z 1, Edenic dliy No. 1300352 (probably about the beginning of that day, sundown Wed., July 19).-Ezra 7 : 9. "And we canie to Jerusalem, and abode there three days" (the day of arrival and tv7o snbsequent days, including the sabbath). "Now on the fourth day [Lightday, Vindicatiovz 4,Edevzic day No. 1300385 (beginning at sundown Saturday, July 22)] was the silver, and the gold, and the vessels, weighed in the house of our God by the hand of Meremoth the son of Uriah the priest; and with hiin was Eleazar the son of Fhinehas; and with them was Jozabad the sola of Jeshua, and Noadiah the son of Binnni, Levites; by nulnber and by weight of every one: at and all the weight was ~ ~ r i t t e n that time. Also the children of those that had been carried away, 11-hich were come out of the captivity, offered burnt offerings unto the Cod of Israel, twelve bullocks for all Israel, ninety and six rams, seveaty and seven lambs, twelve he goats for a sin offering: all this was a burnt offering unto [Jehovah j ." (Ezra 8 : 31-35) 31though the account does not stipulate that this great burnt offering of the people mas made "upon the first day of the week" ( 1 Corinthians 16: 2), yet the record of God's '(faithful witness in heaven" discloses that it toas made 011 that day, and that accounts for the delay on the part of Ezra and his companions for three days so that the offerings could be made at the appropriate time.
Ezra's Further Activities One of Ezra's tasks mas the breaking up of the mixed marriages with the heathen women of the land, entered into by certaiii Israelites. "It was the ninth month, on the twentieth day of the month; and all the people sat in the street of the house of God, trembling because of this matter, and for the great rain." (Ezra 10: 9) This conference u7as c a 11 e d for Earthday,

Order 20, Edenic day No. 1300520," B.R. 500 (Tuesday, December 5, 468 B.C.),
"And Ezra the prieet, with certain chief of the fathers, after the house of their fathers, and all of them by their names, mere separated, and sat down in the first day of the tenth month to examine the niatter [ten days after the date last named]. And they made an end ~vitliall the men that had taken strange wives by the first day of the first month." (The session lasted three months, beginning Mansday,

Logos 2, Ede~ovic dug No. 1300530,t week No. 185790 [Friday, December 151, and ending E a r t h d a y, Bedenzptiojz 1, Edenic day No. 1300618, B.R. 499 [Tuesday, Xarcli 13, 467
B.C.] .) (Ezra 10 : 16,17) The chronicle of Ezra, written with references here and there to the days of God's months, now beconies a diary which can be read with accuracy and therefore with added zest and enjoyment.
A Glimpse at Nehemiah's Diary The last date, prior to the time of Christ, that is "thrust forth by the moons" through the Scriptures is '(the twentieth year of Artaxerxes the king"'. (Nehemiah 2 : 1) This year, hitherto mentioned as 454 B.C. (by which was meant the beginning of the year 454, on the supposition that the true beginning of the year is in the autumn), is now positively known to be the year 45.5 B.C. In this article the time of Christ's death will be exactly shown. That event was midway of a week (of years) before the full end of seventy such weeks (490 years) which ended October 1, A.D. 36. (Daniel 9 : 2427) From the beginning of the year 455 B.C. to the fall of A.D. 36 is 490y2 years, the 1/2 year being ignored as ia the case of Jesus, who, when 12% years of age, is referred to as 12. Nehemiah was a great organizer and a great worker. At the time of his first visit to Jerusalem he had but a brief leave of absence from the court a t Shushan, 'Persia, bat managed to get the wall of the city repaired by '"the twenty and fifth day of the month Elul, in fifty and two days". (Nehemiah 6: 15) The name "Elnl" is of heathen origin; it refers to the sixth month of the year. The date is located as folloms: The new moon nearest the spring ecluinox rose
9 : 33

D,, Lifeday, Edenic day No. 1306016, B.R.


factors are 2 s 2 x 2 x 5 x 13 x 2501.

* The

.* Prime

factors are 2 x 2 x 2 x 7 x 7 x 31 x 107.

$ The factors are 2 x 3 x 5 x 7 x II x 563.

467 ( 3 : 33 p.m., Thursday, March 2g8, 455 B.C.).

The date desired is 174 days later, Xtarday, Hope 25, Edenic day No. 1305190 (IVednesday, September 18). Nehemiah's trip one way, in those days, required four months. Now airplanes make it in a few hours, and l m d e r ~ e a t h the way that he traveled runs, almost the 1~11019 distance, the largest pipe line in the world. "And all the people gathered themselves together as one mall into the street that lT,7asbefore the v a t e r gate: and they spake unto Ezra the scribe to bring the book of the law of Xoses, ~ i ~ h [Jehovah] had colnmandecl to Israel. And i~h Ezra tlie priest brought the lam before the congregation bolh of men and women, and nl! that cczld hear v i t h nnders:anding, upon the first day of the seventh month." (Nehemiah 8: 1 , 2 ) This \iT.iason Eartlzday, ICi?zg 1, Edexic clay No. 1305196 (Tuesday, September 24). As Ezra, oil tlie second day of the conventi~n, read to the people, "they found m i t t e n in the la^" (Nehemiah 8 : 13,14) the arrangement for eight holy days (Leviticus 23 : 39) to be obeerved, hegiimiag ~ ~ - i the fifteellth of t h t tli month, E ~ ~ t h c i c i y , ICz'z?zg 15, Ede:xic day Ho. 13052ZG (Tuesclay, October 8 . The people a t ) once expressed their desire and intent to vholly obey Jehovah God. The last day of this holy convocatlan I J - ~ S Earthdcy, Xi.l;zg 22 (Tuesday, October 15). I n the next verse (Nehcmiali 9: 1) there is ail eccou:zt of what took place on the tventy-fourth day of tl-ic iiiontii, t ~ days later. ~ o All ille days defiliiteiar menticned in the Scriptvres, down to the time of Christ, that can be id2ntifiecl by rcfcrences :o the montl~(God's monihs) have liom be211 lccated and discnssed, aad a trne 2nd p e ~ f e c tc71ro3ology has 7sezn fouizd ~ i ' c h ~vhich,in dse t i r ~ ~all his!o:y e, vill be fonnd 'LO be ill accord. Kot an item has been fonnd, or could. be fo:niidl that is o ~ of hart mony with GoTs 'i'aithhi'nl x-itness i:i the heavthlust fort11 by ihe ens'. The 'preciocs t h i ~ g s moms' have been f o m d precions indeed; but ~ ~ o precious oP all are the 'chiags t!i2-t are s t coming next. '(Praise ye Jehovah. Praise ye Jehovah from preise him in the heights. Praise the heavei~s: ye him, all his angels: praise ye him, all his 11ust. Praise ye him, sun and moon: praise liim, a:! ye stars of light. Praise him, ye heavens of heavens, and ye waters that are above the heavens. Let then1 praise the name of Jehovah." -Isalni 148: 1-5, A.R.V.

Pn the Month Logos I n the naming of the months in the calendar of Jehovah God, the command of Jehovah seems to properly apply: "Declare his doings among the people, make mention that his name is exalted." (Isaiah 12: 4) Ainong all the doings of Jehovah God for humanity, \&at call compare 11-ith His sending of the Eogos to be man's Redeemer? Appropriately, therefore, this rnoiith in which the Logos was seut is namsd to comniemorate that act, and in grateful appreciation, also, of the Logos himself. Quickly calcv.lating 29 days 12 hours 44 liiinutes for cach lanation froni the one nearest ilie spring equinox, rneiltioned in the Lunation Table, it appears that the new moon 171hieh was to usher ill the 1 1 1 ! Logos rose 3: 56 D., Gods1 o 1h day, Edenic da31 Fo. 14?03"58, God's nzorztlz it'o. 43791, B.R. 35 ( 9 : 56 a.m., Saturday, Decema ber 5, 3 B.C.). The new month b ~ g a n t sundo~i~li hours later. The nineteenth day of 32 that lnonth Logos, Mansday, Ede~zicdr,y No. 147e7378 (Deceiliber 25), has arrived-day of trem+r~dons inlportance in heaven and in eartli. The scene shifts to h'azareth. E l ~ s ~ b e t l i , wife o f cd~,.,ns.i.ias, c ~ a s i i i Nary, still in the hill fqn7 of conntz;- of Jadea, 1iTssthen in her sixth nionih, carrying with her her blessing, her gift from 3eho~:ah God. The Logos and Gabriel have re. . ceived th2; grzal; collmlssnon: n o t l l i ~ glile it IIF~.; clsnie beiore, or ~vill ever keen ever be done TTT 2!.g:::n. ,; hex Slat eomrxissio:~, accepted gladly, . . j~si2::tly acd v.~q~estionmgiy, been given, had thz Z8tL.r 'i:?en aild there '%sent the Soil to be ti;? 8;2\rioi;r 01 the ST TOT^^)). He did iiot come cf h;:meli': IIe Tras srnt; but He ~~::-@s lo glad c c z x ; gl2d to do ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ that i V iOg U ~reflect tl~ r ~ l ~ ~ x ? c r n 1 5 s !~e~ven!yFather's name. np Zle caine, the Logcs, z.ccompanied by Gabriel, f ~ o l l zthe conrts of heave;^ to the l o ~ ~ seelies ~ly of earth. Tngct5er they located the hnail3le ab,de of a trne %;id feithful voman, the axe to 1~i-:?o:11 they hcd 1:~eli sc-nt, It was on tlic 19th day of God's month No.49791; the heathen c d l i t December 25; oiher heathen call it Chiisl's mass. The Logos remained invisible; Gabriel alone mziteriaiized in human form. Gabriel came in and said to RIary, "Hail, illox that a r t higlily favoared, tlie Lord is with then: blessed a r t thou alzlong ~~~oiilen''; what follo~vedis a matier of history, recorded i n the ilrst chapter of Luke. The evidence now in hartd provides proof that i t mas on that

425

he

SOLDEN AGE

BROOKLYN, . N. Y

day, aiid probably within a second froni the time Mary said, "Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it unto me according to tliy word," that the Logos "made himself of no reputation, aiid took upon him the form of a servant, and 11~as made in the likeness of men". "Though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, that ye through his poverty might Ise rich." -2 Corinthians 8 : 9. Then and there the Logos dilicsted himself, laid aside the royal livery of heaven and entered iiito the tiny cell which Jehovah God had prepared for PIim. The Father closed the door sof'c1.r and the Logos slept ; and in ihat cunnilig ehanlber in which all humanity were fashioned the One that hzd nlade all thirlgs, and 'without ~i.homnot allything was made that nras made', experiezlced great changes in His organism ; and they \vent on in AIarp's too, until the early morning, 280 days later, when she held in her arms her owii hope of life eternal, a l ~ d hope the of a11 the rest of humankind, "hope of earth a,nd joy of heaven," the Lord Jesns.

exact number of days that the Lord lived. He was cut ofl in the midst of the last week (of years) of the seventy 11-eeks determined upon Jerusalern. ISe therefore lived to be exactly 33% years old, froni the moment of His birth to the moment of ISis death. I f it be true that not one sparrow falls to the ground without your heavenly Father's lnlowledge, how much more tlie clitical care with ~vliilchall the details of the great Vindieaiion on Calvary ~17ere loolied after! The lionest-hearted will get a blessing from their coiifidelice in the Lord that so small a niatter as this was not overlooked by Jehovah God. Ele macln, the sun, and its years, and noti-ling is too small to escape the notice of the One who niarks the sparro r~.sfall. "Aiid when the sixth hour was come, there mas darkness over the whole land until the ninth hoar. And a t the 1zi.;"2th hotir J~SLIS cried with a loud voice, saying, Eloi, Eloi, lania sabachthanihvhich is, being in'ierpre-led, My God, my God, ~ v h y hast thou forsaken me? And somp, of them ihat stood by, when they heard it, said, Behold, lie calleth Elias. And one ran and filled The evidence herein seems to clearly prove a sponge full of vinegar, and put it on a reed, that the day of Christ's birth v a s Xing 3, Eden- and gave him to drink, saying, L e t a l o n e ; let i c d a y No. 1470658, completing week No. 210094, us see whether Elias ~villconie to take him God's ?,zonthNo. 49801, B.R. 34 (Oct, 1,B.C. 2). down. And Jesus cried with a loud voice, arid I-le TI-asborn on a Mnqzsday (Friday), and died [expired]. And the vail of the temple 11-as rent as on the same day of the weelc, ~vhich, will here- in twain, from the top -lo the botbom."-Afarls inafter be shown, was B e d e ~ z p t i o n14, E d e ~ ? L c 13 : 33-38. d a y No. 1482894,' eompleiing week No. 211842, The accounts of jVIa'ithewaiid Luke also menGod's ' ~ I Z O I G ~ NO. 5 0 1 5 , Pear of Rccnsom I tion the ninth hour ( 9 : 00 D., : 00 p.m.). ~L 3 (Friday, April 1, A.D. 33). The time of EPis ( a ) If the years of Jesus' lile are connied as death was 9: 00 D. ("the ninth hour" of the day, ordinary calendar years, then E e lived 3335 3 : 00 p.m.). (Mark 15 : 34-37) This mas mid- x 263 days (12227.5 days), p h s the 9 leap days ivay from the beginning of His ministry, about of B.G. 1 and A.D. 4,8,12,16,%0,24,28and 32; OcC. 1, A.D. 29, to the conversion of Cornelius, total days, 62;236, and 12 hours. I n the 12,236 about October 1, A.D. 36. Jesus' ministry be- days there are just 1,748 weeks; aiid by this gan on His thirtieth birthday, viheii P-Ie "began" reckoning Jesus was born on a i7fansday (Frito be thirty years of age, or, as the Diccglott puts day) a t 3 : 00 a.m. ; in other words, in the early it (Luke 3: 23), ('And he, Jesus, mas about morning of October 1, Be@.2. This seems the thirty years old when he began [his ~vorli]." most lilccly view. Jesus was born into Satan's Jesus beiilg 3334 years old when He died, it is world (2 Corinthiaiis 4: 4; John 14: 301, and manifest that the season in ~;hich mas born lived on earth while the vagaries ol tlie Roman He was a half year removed from that of the time calendar were in use. of EPis death. Jesus was born at 3 : 00 a.m., (b) If the years of Jesus' life are couiited as October 1.-Daniel 9 : 26,27. years of God, i.e., each 365.2422 days in length, There is a nice point in determining the then the days of I-Pis life were 12225.6137, or alniost a day less than in the paragraph above. * This number is made up of 7 s 2 s 3 x 3 x 3 s 3923, and By the latter calculation Ele was born at 12: 16 n7ill probably be found sometime to have deep significance. a.n~. day later, i.e., Godsday (Saturday), Oetoa The sum of the digits of 3923 i s 10 -4-7.

!-

her 2, B.C. Both views are presented, so {hat ers of this magazille are the first in the world 2. the reader may take his choice, But there are to bnoiv this most precious of all the ancient reasons dov:i?i in A D . 1914 to believe that tile things ~-hich Jehovah God has thrust forth view preseizted in (a) agrees best vit'n the logic through the moons. Beeourse is had to the eclipse cyc!es, to be as exact as possible. cf later events. m ahe r,est point of special interest is vhen Jesus' last clays were spent uiider moon No. a-ad's boy had come to the age of 12;b years. 5021Zj removed by 105 eclipse cycles of 223 lllooiis each froni So. 735.30, its counterpart, Meantime "the child went; on groring? and \:.oxing s t r o ~ g bc-coming filled \~i!;h\+-isdomj aiid whicli please see in the Lniintion Experience , the favour of Gocl was rip011 it. Ancl hie parents Tabla a~:dthe rcha~t.This moon, No. 50215, rose used to jorrriiep yearly :into Jernsalem, at- the at I :22 D.,L i fcday, Edei~zic day A70. 14829'79 feast of the passover. And when he bec'alne 47: 22 a.m., Thursday, ?:!arc11 17, A D . 33). it s t\\-elve years, a116 they went up, according $0 'ieference to tile table s h o ~ ~ ~TT;as 29 days the cnstoln sf the feast, and conlpleted the ;XPC 693 lninutes to the nest in succession, No. days, and then were returning, the I:oy Jesus :sUT'lG, one-half of ~vhichamount of tinie is 14 ren~aiiiecl behind in Jerusalem, and his p2rent.s c!a~s 17 hours and 47 minutes. The Incon unJesus TvT-as cruciiied, therefore, was der \~-;-!~ich noticed it not."-Luke 2 : 40-43, Rotlierha.nz. a.t its full at 7 : 05 AT., Pdal~sday, Redenzptiogz 14, Using the eclipse cycles, to locate the temple ilicidelli as closely as possible, moon No. 49955 Xdelzic dny N O , 1482894 (1: 05 a.m., Friday, was the eoniiterpa.rt of No. 73593 in the L~ana- April 1, A.D. 33). Fourteen hours later that tion Experience Taljlc, \:-hi& please see. Bild d a r Jesus v-as dead; the battle -was fought and 106 eclipse cycles of 223 mooils each take one mum. The T'indicator had done ~vhatHe came baelr to 5 : 43 AT., Godsday, E d e s ~ i c day Ayo. to earth tc do, aiid \\-hat He did v a s in itself 1475201, B.R. 21 (11 : 43 p.m., Friday, Earch 9, a great viadicatioli of Jehovah's v-ord and name. A.D. 12), a t whicl~time the nev moon rose under whicli Jesus and His parents went to Jern- Calendar of the Lore&'sLast Dags salem to the passover and sulssequei~tfeast. Thc Jev-ish feast of the passover, held on The new month and new year began 36 hours the fourteenth of the first month, xTas therelater, On the 14th day the passover was cele- al'tcr follox-ed by seveii days of unleavened brated in the early hours of Lightclay, Rede~szp- bread. These seven days of unleavened bread, ti092 14 (Saturday evening, Jda.rch 24). The iii the mind of iiiost J e ~ s seen1 to have been ? fcast of nnleavelied bread began the nest eve- ;he important thing. The? occurred on the 15th ning, and lasted seven days, e ~ d i n g t sundovn to the 21st of the molith, inelusis-e. The 14th, a (Smiday evening, April 1). the day of Christ's death, was referred to as l The three days in t~liichJesus as !eft be- c t t ILa , dajr of the preparation". (Matthew 27 : 62 ; Tinire 23: 54) See footnote, Erlzplzatic Diaglott, hind mere &-ea.ies.zday, EEnl-272day aild !Stct~dny, .Recle?~?,pt.io./~. B.B. 21 (RIoaday, Tuesday conlment cn Lnlie 2 :43 : "Eight days, cf nhich 22-2&, 2nd IT7ednesdaj, April 2-4, A.D. 12). Ko doubt the fezst of the Passover was one, and the rest some of the very doctors of the law ~vitli whom vere the seven days of unleavened bread." Jesus tallied. on H e m e n d n y , Redemptio~z 2.2 TJ71aen, therefore, one reads, "Then Jesns, six (Monday, April 2); were rejoicing 21. solar years davs before the passover, came to Bethany," and Flater? to the very day, that Jesus mas then si- ( Clhere they made him a supper", the proper is lent hl t.he tomb. At the end of the &fillenniuni m~derstax~ding that He came in the daytime, they mill get a chance to see v.-hat they missed. not of Godsday, lout of Licjhtdn?~, Rede?nption 9, E d e gz i c day N o . 1482889, Y.R. 1 (Sunday, The Time of Jesus' Death March 27, A.D. 33), and thst the supper a t Of great interest to readers of T h e Golden which Mary lsroke upon Him the alabaster 93ox A g e is it to know the time when Jesus could of ointment, and wiped His feet with her hair, looli up to the One who had sent Him and cry was in the closing hours of Lightday, Bcdempout, in the place of the sinner R e came to re- tiow 9 (Sunday, March 27). John 12 : 1-11 may deem, "Xy God, my God, ~vhyhast thou for- ilolT be read with added zest. The story continues (John 12: 12) that "on His saken me?" and shortly thereafter b o ~ v dear head and meekly say, "It is finished." The read- the next day", Heccve+zday, occurred the tri-

he

GOLDEN AGE
12: 37-30) ; on this day 11-as the great propl~ecy spolieii regarding the end of the n-orld (Matthew 24 and 25 ; 26 : 1 , 2 ; Mark 13 ; Luke 21 : 538)) ; and on this day Judas made his bargain with the chief priests. (Jlatt!le~v 22 : 1-5, 14-16; X a r k 14: 1,2,10,11; LuBe 22 : 1-6) One can hardly imagine the amount of nervous ener-gy used up in sue11 a strenuous day. 13, On Lifeday, Rede?~zptlo;z Edegzic day No. 148289.3 (Thursday, March 31), the disciples prepared for the passover, and that night, after sundown, there was the last supper (Matthew 26 : 17-30 ; 3Iarli 14: 12-26 ; Luke 22 : 7-30 ; John 13: 1-30), and Jesus gave His intimate follo117ers His farewell discourses (Matthew 26 : 31-35 ; Mark 14: 27-31; Luke 22 : 31-38 ; John 13 to 16 inclusive) and the last prayer.-John 17. On that same day, i.e., &lalfzsday, Zede?nptiolz 14, Edenic day No. 1482634, Y.R. I (Friday, April 1,A.D. 33); there was the agony in Gethsemane (J?Tatthe\v 26 : 30-46 ; Mark 14 : 26-42 ; LuBe 22 : 39-46 ; John 18 : I), the betrayal and arrest (Matthew 26 : 47-56; Mark 14 : 43-52 ; Lulie 22 : 47-53; John 18 : 1-12)?the trial before the Jewish authorities (Matthew 26: 57 to 27: 10 ; Mark 14 : 53-72 ; Luke 22 : 54-71 ; John 18 : 12-27), the trial before Pilate (Matthew 27 : 1131 ; Mark 15 : 1-20 ; TJulre 23 : 1-25 ; John 18 : 28 to 19: 16), and, of course: the crucifixion and burial. 01 Godsday, Redenzptio~z 1 15, Edenic day No. 1482895 (Saturday, April 2), the priests and the Pharisees had their watch posted a t the Savior's tomb.-Matthew 27 : 62-66. On Lightday, Rede~zptiogz Edeqzic day No. 16, 1482696 (Sunday, April 3), Jesus mas raised from the dead (Matthew 28 : 1-10 ; Mark 16 : 1-11; Eulce 23 :56 to 24 : 12 ; John 20 : 1-18), and the watch reported their unsuccessful efforts to keep Him in the tomb (Matthew 28 : 11-15) ; Jesus tooli the walk to Emiliaus with tv70 of His disciples (Mark 16 : 12,13; Lulie 24: 13-35), and that night appeared to the disciples, Thomas being absent.--Marli 16 : 14 ; Lulie 24 : 36-43 ; John 20: 19-25.
Life and Visitment A~valienedfronl the sleep of death on the day last above named, Jesus "shewed himself alive after his passion, by many infallible proofs, being seen of them forty days". (Acts 1:3) Therefore His ascension into heaven

u~illdlalentry, which is therefore identified a s liavii~gtaken place in the daylight hours of liTeace?zday, Redcynptio~z 10, Edeliic day No, 2482890 (Konday, March 28). There God's paschal Lamb mas selected for sacrifice. (See John 12 : 12-15 ; Matthew 21 : 1-11; Marl; 1 : 11 10; Luke 19: 29-44.) This is the day on which Jesus wept over Jerusalem and declared i t shoald be leveled to the ground. (Luke 19: 4144) "And Jesus entered into Jerusalem, and into the telllple: and when he had looked round about upon all things, and now the eventide was come, he went out unto Bethany with the 1 :1 . 1 1 twelve."--Mark "And on the morrow, nhen they n7ere come fro111 Bethany, he was hungry." (Marli 1 : 12) 1 I t takes considerable food to supply the needs of twelve active men, and apparently rations were short or n~issingfor Jesus and His followers on the morning of EartT~day,Recle9izpti013 11, Ecleqzic day No. 1482591 (Tuesday, March 29). Some of Jehovah's people today are familiar with the sensation of hunger which led to Jesus' prophetic act. (Verse 13) It was on this day that the second cleansing of the temple occurred. "And when even ~ 7 a scome, he went out of the city."--Marli- 11: 19. (See Luke 19 : 45-48 ; Ilatthe~v21 1: 12-16 ; Marli 1 : 1 14-18.) "And in the morning rStnrdny, Redemption 12, Erleliic day h70,1282892 (TVednesday. Ifarch 30)], as they passed by, they saw the fig tree dried up from the roots." (Matthew 21 : 20-22 ; Mark 1 : 20-25) On this day Christ's 1 authority was challenged by the chief priests and elders (Matthew 21 : 23-27 ; Marli 1 : 27-33 ; 1 Lulre 20: 1-8) ; I3e spoke the parable of the certain man who planted the vineyard (Mark 12 : 1-12; Lulie 20: 9-19) ; a~lsmered the question about the tribute to Caesar (Matthew 22: 1540) ; spoke about the wornan who had seven 'husbands, and which is the greatest coilimandmerit (1,Iarli 12 : 13-34; Luke 20: 20-40) ; asked whose son is Christ (Matthew 22 : 41-46; Mark 12 :35-37 ; Lnlie 20 :41-44) ; gave His condemna,tion of the clergy (Matthev 23 ; Mark 12 :38-40 ; Eulie 20 : 45-4fj; contrasted the ostelltatious rich with the noor humble widow v h o gave her all. (Mark 12 -41-44; Luke 21 : 1-4) On7his day Jesus said His hour was come, and on it the Father spoke to Hiin audibly from heaven. ( J o h n 12: 20-36) On this day the Jews turned ,away from Him, refusing to accept Him (John

took place on Lifeday, Life 24, Ede~zicday No. 1482935 (Thursday, May 12). B a d Jesus not ascended into heaven and there presented the evidence of His perfect work on man's behalf, God's gift of life to fallen man \;~ouldhave bnen held in akeyance. All hope of life for inan rests i n the fact that Jesus h i s h e d i11 every respect ihe ~vorl;the Father gave EIim to do, ad this : included IIis ascension on high as x:ell as ITis death. A dead Sc2vior ~ ~ o u be a great tesiild ~nonialof love, but a risen and esaltecl Savior means life to a dead and dyiag world. Tell days later, a t Pentecost, Lig7&7nj9Visitaneq~t 6, Edenic day h70. 1482945 (Xn1ida;r-, May 22), the holy spirit was poured out upon the !i~ticcompany waiiing for it a t Jerusalex. The name V i c i l ~ z e n tis applied to this nionth because of this great event. See in tha concordance the maax, many times in x-hich God promised to v k i t Ris professed ~ e o p l e ,efiher for good or for ill. This word may be uecd in respect to either Bind of r i s i i ; in this case, how gracious and kind! T h n , of the tliirtee:~ n:onths that m . 7 go God, to make np o m of the years cf J e L o i - d ~ f o ~ ~Eedenipt imz, Llic., Visii?:ze$z alld Logos r, t are ~laniedafter the cloings of God 2t the time of the first advent of :he Lord Jesus Christ. The other montl;s are ~a:iied aLrl;e~His doi:??~ in the last t h r e c s ~ c r ep a r s . Hn ti13 interim little of real co::seqcc~:e ocznrred.

issue of The Watclitower appeared. Not only are the contents of T h e Waichtotuer different, and o ; ~a f a r higher plane than of any other journal i11 the worlcl, but the Lord's poor have always been able to get it without money and without price, iilerely by asking for it once a year. Studies in the Divine JTord, appearing from issue to issue in T h e TF'utc7~to:oe1;often find their way, later, into important books on Bible subjects. The readers of T h e JVatc3z:'ower get the truths first, and later on the s a x e truths get to the general public. r d e r llloon No. 73630, E a ~ i h d a y , Visitn ? w t 12, Edelaic (lay No, 2174351, Y.E. 2833 (Tuesday, May 25, A.D. 1926), a t London, Englal:d., there the 1335 days e~ided and there b,, opal1 the great era of blessedness spoken of by Danicl the prophet. This blessedness was marked IJV a testimony to the rulers that Jehovah God has placed His chosen One upon His tlirone.
Orde-s---I CosinkChF'ans IS: 40 ""Order is heaven's first l a d ' ; and'so that the Lord's ~ v c r k might be prosecuted in an orderly niazlner in "the earth, the Watch Tonrer Bible &- T l ~ ~ e k Society was incorpord~ed, Godsday, on 01-dei- 21, Edenic day No. 22552zd, Y.B. 1952 (S~z'inrda;y,Gecelxl~er13, 1884). Back ill the days of Judges, the Bible says of the simple pastoral people that then eonstrtl~tedJehova!l's pco::le, ev6ry man did that, ~~;\.!!ich right in v,-as !;_is OT-meyes." But those thnt then lived in Cal1an11 v e r e not entrnsted vi-kh a world-\vide ~ ~ ; t n e sTT-ork. Scch a course ~ o v ; monld i:e x mr~stef~~l, disorderly a i d ineiriieieilt in the highest degree. God's .vork, to be clone properl;y, . requires organ:zr.iron, order, system. (Dsaicroliomy 12: 8) The Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society, Gocl's organlization in the eartil? is today the most efi5cient organization. beneath the snn. The arrangement is of God. The Society ~7~2s incorporated by men, true, and men carry C ~ I God's ~vor!~, the ~vitliess feature; bnt tlie ~v.itnessingis of God.
I(

The ~ { ~ f ~ & f o ~ ~ , n ~ - ~ / i s i g ~ ~ ; e ~ t FV ~ i oight of dal.l;ncss that settled do~.;.11npon ~ e \x;orJd ~ { i i lthe death of the ,~pc~e!;les .~ hegall to be lifted on _i;c.rthday, Visit:~;ej~t Ecte?lic 12, day N O . 21:77222, Y.B. 2847 (Tuesday, J c l y 1, A.D. 18,791 by the p ~ ~ l ~ l i c n t l o n first ni-imof the her oftthe magazine that Se!:.ovah God has used as Xis ixoathpieee f ~ o i n that time to this. Tivice eirery ixonth it has gone to His people in e:-ery part of the TI-orld,filled t o the brim TI-ith the truth as it has become dne in these last days. T?"nat The iVatcIi~i.iotc.er and what i t cloes, is, can be readily learned by any iliquirer who mill address The TVatch T o ~ ~ cBrooklyn, N. P., The Dag sf Jehoaal~ r, Tile "Day of Zehovah", "That Day," the and request a sample copy. The jonrnal is de: voted entirely to t11e vii~dicationof God's name. "Great Day of God Almighty", began with Hs A11 its studies in the Scriptures are to that placing Efis Son upon Bis throile, and colizend. It should be in the home of every reader riiissloning Kirn to rule in the midst of His of T72e GoLde72 Age, and, indeed, of every child enemies. While the Bible is fnll of pictnres of God. The month V*isii,nzeqtiis also appro- representing that epoch, which reaches from priately nanieil in that in this month the first the establishment of the kingdom sf God in
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___,

the earth d o t ~ ~ n and including Armageddon, to yet none seem to represent i t better than Moses' erl+andto Egypt, so forcefully preseilted in the book Je7~ovn7z. AIoses, in Egypt, delivering the Israelites, humbling Pharaoh and bearing witness to the approaching vindication of God's name, represents the Lord Jesus, through IIis organization visible and inr~isible, doing the same thing, on a colossal scale. The serving of notice 011 Pharaoh, and the subsequent pouring out of the plagues, engaged Moses and Aaron for 21 days." Christ Jesv.s has beell reigning in the inidsi of 1 3 s enemies 20% years. The antitypical plagues, however, did not begin until after the corning of the Lorcl to His temple, izl ihe spring of 1918. Everything indicates that Armageddon is very near. I t vill be a pleasure, now, for Jehovah's people to hastily sketch some of the principal items that have gone to make up the Day ol: Jehovah and to ol~servehow appropriately the names selected for the relnainiilg n~onihsof the year agree with the things that Jehovah God, through His Field ldarshal, and His organiz~tion,has been doing within that period.
Iiip2g

: .1

Throughout the Elijah period of the activities of Jehovah's o r g a i ~ i z ~ t i oin the esr'cl~,there n was repeated insistence of expectation of a great change to take place October 1,1914. Ho-\iwell that expectation ~ v a s based upon the Scriptnres is clearly a p ~ a r e n tfrom comments 011 pages 423-425 of this issue on "The Times of the Gentiles". I t is now coted that the ICixg came on Ma~qsday, Riwg 3, E d e ~ z i ed a y No. 247OG.58, 23.22. 34 (Friday, October 1, E.C. 2). That was the day that H e n7as bol-a. "Pilate thererore said unio him, A r t thou a king then1 Jesus ansvered, Thou sayest that I a n a liinq. To this end ~ v a s 12101.12, and for this cause came I into the 11-orld."

"Others have fancied the ~ l n g u e s estendod over long inter~als, months or even up to Z!1 years, but the view, i.e., that Jehovah God was there to delioer IIis people and to absolutely crush all oppositioil by continued a ~ i d ever-increashg pressure. seems alucl? more reasonable, especiallg in rieiv of tile fact that the expression "tomorrow" occurs so repeatedly in tlin account. Exodus 5 : 7 : "And Moses was fourscore years old nhen [he] spalre unto Phnr,toh," conpleci with the f ~ c t that he died just forty years (lacking 16 days) afterwards, proves tllat tile plagues all occurred in less than two montlls up t o the passorer in the spring of 1516 B.C.

.. .

(John 18 : 37) Christ became earth's righteous ruler 1915 years fro111 the day He was born. I n other words, the long anticipated Hope of the World began Ilis reign on Lij'eday, E d e n i c doy No. 2270097 (Thursday, October 1, A.D, 1914). It is from that date that the 1260 days of Dal~iel :7 begin to count. 12 Because i t is the reign of Christ Jesus that coas'iitu'ies the Second Presence or Pal-ozisia, i t -nvould seen1 to be not improper to say that the Secoiid Advent occurred on L i f e d a y , Rivzg 20, Edenic d a y N o . 2170097, Y.B. 1662 (Thursday, @ctober 1, A.D. 1914), under moon No. 72486. IZe c a n e to bring life to man; B e came as man's Kiqzg; H e came to perfectly fulfill His ogice a s t ! : e appointed Ruler of the earth, as the synlbclisin of 10 indicates. Ezekiel 21: 27 shows that when Jesus comes God gives Him the ICingdoin. Before that coming God did 11ot disclose the day or the hour. Under moon No, 73548, S t a r d a y , K i ~ z y 6 , Edegzie d a y N o . 2lYl923, Y,R. 1887 (Wednesdey, October 1, A.D. 1919), the first issue of Tibe Goldezz A g e was published. I t has always beell true to the King, e~rtlz'sbright and morning Siar. Some -\vj11notice the "6" and remark that T h e Goidea A g e is not quite perfect yet; yes, but the Lest possible nnder the eircumsta~lces.I t s col~amns,also, are full o l hope for distressed 1inmani:y. Under ixoorz No. 735'72, Godsdr;.,;~,Riazg 28, Edezzie d n y No. 2172654, Y.3. 185'9 (Saturday, October 1, A.D. 1921)) T h e E a r p of God was published. I t is a l?ook 01 Bod, a bock of the I<lng, now in iis 6,000,000 ediiioil, in 22 languages. What hope and comfort it has brought 1 to millions can liardly be estimated. I1 instances, even clergymen have said of this aorli that it is the inost 11-onrlerful book thcy have read. uncler moot1 No. 7364'7, G o d d a y , Xi:zg 4, Edezz-lc d a y N O . 2174845, Y.R. 1895 (SrCurday, October 1, 1927), Creatioqz mas published, one of the most valuable of aids to a comprehension of Cod's purposes ; a ~ e rect hamlonizaf tioil of science and the Bible. I n i n s t c ~ ~ c e s this ~17ork has been used as a tc::tlsooli ill lligh schools, in i11e coal regions, zs the lllost scicntifie and reasonable rccord iu print as to Iiotv the coal measures were laid do~vn. Under moon KO. 73684, Godsday, IrTiag 3, Edenic d a y N O . 217.5937, P.R. 1896 (Saturday, September 27, A.D. 1930), Light, Books One (Co?zti?zz~ed page 443) ow
T i

-1

The Second Hand in the Timepiece of God


(Continued f TO??% page 438) acd Two, were released, making the hitherto mysterious Revelation of John as clear as the s noonday sun. These 5 - ~ r l i present the physical faets of the fulfillment of The Revelation, aad show the things that 11l~st h o r t l y ~ come t~ pass. Under moon No. 73696, Henveazday, Icing 2, EdelzZc duy NO.2126289, P.R. 1899 (?,Ionday, Septemlaer 14, A.D. 1931), tlie bool;let T h e 1Ci11gdom, t h e M o p e of the JT70rEd xent to the rulers of earth. can see the appropriateness of this going out 011 g<il?g 2. I t contains the grave l~lessage all who gorern that they must conle for squarely over on the Lord's side or perish in Arniageddon.
Teaaapke and Sawcfuarg

Lord Jesus came to His tenll?le in the spring 1918. the sleeping saints ITTere aq-al;elled, There the pnriAceatjon of the truth began. "Dehold, 1will seid my msssenger, and Ee shall prepare the IT^:; before m.: 2.~1~1 the Lord, ~~-!lonl ~eelc,sl;all scddenly come to ye his temple, even the nlcssel?gcr of the co;~e:laat, vhom ye delight in : l;eEold, lie shall con1q snit21 [Jehovah] of hosts. Znt n-ho may abide tlie day of his c o m i ~ g ? n11d TT-lio shall stand wlien he apuearetlif for he is like a re5ner7s fire, allcl. like Idlers' soay: and 112 shall sit as a refiner and purifier of silver; gad be ~ 1 1 ~pu11 ri:y the sojis of Levi, and purge them as gold

and silver, that they may offer unto [Jeliova2l] an offering in righteousness."-3Ia.lachi 3 : 1-3. It is of great interest a t this julletnre to have a little table of Jellovah's calendar f o r this period. Tile hours, except for the top line, are assumed, to fill out the table. one dare llot say that tlle anl1ircrsnry, in 1918, of Jesus' resnrue~tionrr,al-lied tile exact date of the resurrection of the rnen1bers of Hi:; body, but it mould hare beell a niost appropriate it TT~ollld day. According to tjle Devil's he four days in the year thall elle of Jesus' resurrectioll (because Redentptzogt 1 i n A.D. 6918 as 4 days eadizr than in 3 3 ) , aiicl i t mzis one day ea.riier in the ~~~eeli-, the but correspo~~dency v e ~ y is closa, and there seems 110 harm in holciilig to the thotlght that on Godsday, R e d e n ~ 2 ~ t Z o n , Y.2. 1886 (Sat., March 30, 16 A.D. i9i8), the sleeping saints mere awakened. EIistorically, it is true that about that time judgx~el~t began a t the house of God (Ilalachi 3: 5), and it therefore seznled that the last 12:~~i:ltitlie year should be called Tenz;lu" of ! (TT-hen there are hut tr-elve mosths in the year). When there are thirteen monihs in the year, T e ~ j z p l eis the twelfth lnonti?, and S C L : L C I L I C L ~ ~ the thirteenth. The last meath of the pear ir,eluded April 1 in the Years o j Zc:!so:n 1863, 1986, 2689, 1891, 1894, acd 1900 ( A D . 1916, 1949, 1922, 1824, 1827, and 1933).

Vern.
Fqui.

Noon
KO.

Fin:~r

Dap of TJ7eel;

Edenic
Cng lio.

Xonth

Day P.E.

Konr

Grego-oria:~ Date

Yenr A,@.

Item

5934 7352s 9: 03

D. %i:ghfdfiy ; ? l ~ l ~ ~ O * T e n : p ! 8 11 1836 3 : 0 Q ~ p m SUD. Feb. 24 1318 "1~1il"illio;:sT<O\V (Los Allgclcs Liviuig "Time)
illi:ia: a&&ress

5954 73528 4.: 17

N. X t w d a y

,"i1i1356 T e m p l e

28 1386 10: 17pm '

Tne. BLar. 12 1915 Astronomi:a1

ris'g ef moor? N3. 93529. 5944 '735% 5: 00 D. Lifeday 2172357 Temple 29 l88O 11:00 am Thu. ;".Tar.14 1918 157. T. 1itzi.a(before snndo-;xn) ture b~nned, 594.4 73529 1: 00 AT. l l a n s d a y 2171358 Redenzptio?t 1 1886 7 : 00 pm Thu. Mar. 14 1918 Elid o 1260 f (after snndolvil) da.ys of
5945 78529 2: 00

N. L i f e d a y

P1713'71 'Redentptiow, 1)) 1886

694.5 '73599 10: 00 N. Godsday 2171373 Redesi~ption 16 1886

* The

priine factors are 2 x 2 x 3 x 3 x 3 i5 s 4021.


448

Dalliel. S : 00 pm %Ted. Mar. 27 1918 b1elnoria.l of Jesus' death. 4 : 00 am Sat. i\Iar. 30 1918 Anniversary of Jesus ' resumection.

Freedom Freedom is on the way, and nvill be here in God's due tii~ie. It is not God's will that men sliould he slaves to Big Business, Big Politicians, Big Clergy, or any other lrind of "big guns". -411 tliese hasre been hard taskmasters. Under moon Ko. 72607, M n ~ : s d a y Preedonz 22, E d e n i c , da?j .!To. 21736S2, P.R. 1892 (Friday, July 25, A.D. 1924), at Colunibus, Ohio, was sounded tl:e third trumpet, "Civilization Doomed," exactly ten years, to the day, after the opening of llie TTTorld TTTar. Under lnoon No. 73631, Eal-thday, F r e e d o m 3, E d e n i c d a y No. 2174.372, Y.R. 1894 (Tuesday, June 15,-A.D. 1926), the TVatchtower magazine firsl anaouneed Deli~eraqzce. This book is perhaps the first ever published to be dedicated to Almighty Cod. I t s chapter on Tlie Deliverer (96 pages) is the finest liIe of Christ ever w i t ten. This work has emouraged niillions to anticipate freedonz in Cod's appointed way. Under moo11 No. 73644, Lightclay, Preedo sz 24, Edevzic d a y X o . 2174776, Y.B. 1895 (Sunday, t7~1ly24, A.D. 1927), a t Toronto, Ontario, Canada, there n-ent out to all the world the message "'Freedom for the People" on vllat ~vns,until t!:en, the greatest radio broadcast in history, nntl w.\.:iid~ hroadc?.st was free. This message, t'nic sixth vial of God's wrath, was a message of freedom for all ~vhodesire tnlth aizd rightcl?usness, and they are to be found in all walks of Ffe. The Lord is impartial. Ko one is necessarily conclemned by Rirn because of having sonie of the goocl tlii~lgsof life, or necessarily npprored because he lias little, or vice versa. said, "Sure, I 17-ill F o r esaliiple : A business n~aii contribnte $1 for your books, ksnt ~vhaf; really I want is that lecture, 'Freedom for tlie People'; I heard it, and consider it well worth $1 of ally man's money." A11 evidently wealthy wornall said, "Of course I want v h a t you have sllosvn me: I heard that lecture; that nian took his life in his hands to give the people the truth." Thougli it was their masters that sought and accomplished Jesus' death, yet it was the servants that "plucked off tlie hair" and spat in His face. I t was this lecture that caused the fourill nionti? to kse called Preeclont.

der moon No. 73657, L i g h t d a y , Vir~dicatiofi 18, Edenic d a y N o . 2175154, Y.R. 1896 (Sunday, Angnst 5 , A.D. 1928), a t Detroit, Michigan, there was delivered to all tlie world the message that Jehovah God is the peoples' Friend, and His uame will be vindicated by the establishment of a righteous government in the earth. At that time two of the most important books in tlie world were released to the people, a o c er?z:nelat, ~ ~ ~ hhas hbeen placed in the hands of ic every important public oficial, besides several iilillions in other hands; and Reco:~"cZiaZio.iz, which latter is a plain statement of the gracious provision Jeliovali has made to bring all men into full harmony with Hinzself, that the obedient ones may have everlasting life on earth in contentment and complete happiness. Arnong intelligent, thinliing people, no other such constructive work on governnient' has ever appeared as the ~vorlcfirst narned. It presents indisputable evidence showing that the peoples of earth shall have a righteous governaieiit, and explaining the manner of its esta?alishment. Many of Jehovah's wi-tnesses make the Qoz.es.11nzent book their leader, as it goes to the heart of all the dificillties of earth. One of the niost fascinating pidures of the vindication of Jehovah's word and 1ian:e is tliat provided hy the book of Job, first explained i11 L i f e . This I:ool:, also, was tlie first book to have a chapter heading "Vindicatioli". The nrorlc was issued under moon KO. 73669, H e n v e ~ t d a y , Vindicntio~z ,E d e n i c dag No. 2176498, P.R. 1897 7 (Monday, July 15, 1 . 3 1929). I n this book it 13. now plainly appears that tlie terrible esperieiices of the prophet Jo?) represeilt the a~vfv.1 esperiences illat have befallen the l i ~ ~ m a n fanlily under the reign of Satan, but as Job finally was granted a, great deliverance, so rr,an!rii~d is coming grslndly into the golden age of glory and peace 2nd joy and clivii~eblessing everywl~erc pronlisecl in the Holy Word. One of the hardest things rnankind has had to bear nnder the reign of the Devil has loeen the brand of "comfort" ( 2 ) provided by the purveyors of hell-fire or purgatory a t so much per. Under lin_oozi No. 73694, L i f e d a y , Viadicatiofi 13, Edeqzic: day No. 2176243,t P.R. 1899
4 I t is the governinent of God that vindicntes His name, and therefore the doctrine of government i s the most ilnportant doctrine in the Scriptures.-Luke 8 : 1; Acts 30 : 25. t Vour days earlier, Lightday, V i n d i c c ~ t i o n9, Edc~ticd o l ~ No. ,0176239 (Sunday, July 26), Jehovah's witnesses accepted that name as their "new na.men, with all that it implies.

..

?'indication Now, in the Day of Jehovah, it fully appears that the key to an understanding of the Scriptures is in the vindication of God's name. Un-

he

GOLDEN AGE

(Thnrsday, July 30, B.D. 1931), a t Colunihus, Ede~ticd a y Xo. 2173347, Y.R. 1891 (Saturday, Ohio, Viq:dicatic~f,Book Oiie, n-as released. Angcst 25, A.D. 1923), a t Los Angeles, CaliforUr,der moon No. 73706, Heavt:q!duy, V2l,dic:.- nia, "Che Second Angel" soulided TEE WARNING t i o z 6, Edewic day 3 7 0 . 2:?6:7.90, Y.R. 1900 (a resclution), Man has bope, yes; but hope (?donday, July 1 , AD. P932), 'i7i~zdiccrtZo~zbrings responsibilities which cannot be set aside. 1 Bool; Two wa,s released. A \.;eel< l a t x , Beat;enUnCcr nmoon KO.73621, Godsday, B o p s 8, ~ ~ J dn31, Vi~zdica-i'ion13, Edewic day No. 2lr63.w R c l e ~ ~ i cC I IJo. 237d082, Y.R. 1 8 9 3 (Saiixday, (Monday, July 18), Vi;idiccr,tio?z,Boo!; Three hragusl29, A.D. 1925), at Indianapolis, Indiana, was released. Jehovah's hciy nazile r i l l be vin- ~ ~ edontcd the resolution called "Message of 2 s dicated by .the elimination of all v.nrigh':eous- Hcpe", from vI?ich this llloneh takes its namc. . ness from the universe. The testilnony of Eze- Order ~skdPeace-af Last kiel's prophecy, sealed until the publication of Uz~der niieolz No. 73661, Lifeday, Order 2, these fool;^, annoUiices the judgments of God E d e ~ . ~day No. 217525G, Y.R. 1896' (Thursday, ic .against. all, ill l~eavenOY i n earth, that have Xoveii15er 15, A.D. 1928), there xTas published participa,ted iil the clefalnation of the 112n7c of in The '&.T7~ichtower trrrill abont the Great the the Most 5Iigh. Siizce these stndies were eomPyrtlrnid; and the szme subject mas continned, pleted, God's object in writing t'he Scriptnres, cnder the same moon, Godsdccy, Ovcler 16, Edelzand the mancer in v,~hichthey are to he underic doy ATO. 2175,272, Y.X. 1896 (Saturday, Destood, are clearly revealed. In the last of these relzzher 1, A D . 1928). The renloval of this enthree T\-ondcrful Books tlie Jonada1:s (people taiigie~~elent from the paths of Jehovah's people of good ~vil! foreehndo~vxlby Jonadab) are h2s bcen a great b!essing and has resulted in Scripturally ide;ltiScd as the "'miliions nov7 llicorder ailrl pc-ace n-here before there was dising that svill G S V C ~ die". The destruction of the order and confusion. Devil and all his forces is immilzent. Uil~lermoon No. 73673, Lifeday, Order 25, Hope Edefzic day No. 2175634, Y.R, 2697 (Thursday, Hope for fallen mall is a gift from God, and November 28, A.D. 1929), the work Pt-ophery is so stated in 1 3 s Word. Undcr moor1 KO.73347, was released. Never hefore has there been a Xa~zsdoy,Hope 10, Edcgzic cluy No. 2171827, book published that ~xakesclear so much of P.R. 1887 (Friday, September 5, A.D. 1919), the prophecies ol the Bible a s this boolr. Eeat tlie internationxl coilvention of Jehovah's cause i t is now Cod's due time to malce clear vitnesses at Cedar Pokzt, Ohio, the house-to- IIis prophecies, any unbiased student can now thereof. An underh o n ~ enitliess y;ork 11-2s covenanted by JeCo- sae much of the f~~lfillliielit vah's people, and has since that time resulted standing of prophecy establishes faith and coain placing about two hmldred million pieces of fidevce in God ancl lifts many burdelis from literature, many nlillioris of ~ ~ h i e h bound man!:ilzC?. PropJ~ecy has brought order and were boolcs (and the rest booklets), in the hands of peace to the minds of lovers of God's TTo~dh the people, for their comfort? their uplift aild in every land. (See chzpters entitled "Cod's tkeir hope in the dark honrs of this dark day Organixa!Pon" and "Peace".) Under moon No. 73710, Stardny, O+*dcra, before the damn sf the glory just ahead. It was under nioon KO. 73554, n/Iu~zsday, Edelzic day No. 2176704, P.R. 2900 (J'iTednesHope 15, Edegztc dny No. 217.2996, Y.R. 1890 day, Xovember 2, A.D. 1932), the x~ork Preser(Friday, Sepienlber 8, 1922), at the seeond in- vntio!z r a s released. T ~ 7 o the most beautiful of of e ternational co~ixrentioi~ Jehovalz's ~ ~ i t n e s sats books of Clie Bible, Esther and Rnth, are now Cedar Point, Ohio, that the spirit was po~:.rcd doe to be undersioocl. I n these dsannas are set out npon all flesh. (Joel 2: 28) There all of forth facts ~vhichare of greatest inaportalice Jeliovall's p e ~ p l e became publishers of the truth. for all who love God and who are anxious to There ended the 1290 days of Daniel 12: 11; see the complete triumph of righteousiiess in there began the 1335 days leading up to the the earth. The final conflict between the wicked peculiar blessedness upon the people of God. and the rigl~teous just a t hand. I n this great is (Daniel 12 : 12) The world may as well lrnom crisis no nian could prcscrve liimself. But the of these facts: their value will be apparent to book shows who will be preserved, and how it a11 in due timc. will be brought about. Under moon No. 73596? Godsday, Hope 12, Uilder mocn Ko. '73'709, Godsday, Peace 24,
~

The

GOLDEN AGE
vah-judged), Joab (Jehovah-fathered), Joah (Jehovah-brothered),Joel (Jehovah is his God), Jozachar (Jehovah-remembered), Joha (Jehovah-revived) , Jochebed (Jehovah-gloried) , Abijah (Jehovali is his father), Adonijah (Jehovah is my Lord), Urijali (flame of Jehovah), Azaniah (heard by Jehovah), Ahaziah (Jehovah has seized), Ahiah (Jehovah is his friend), Elijah (God of Jehovah), Amaziah (strength of Jehovah), Amariah (Jehovah has said), Besodeiah (in the counsel of Jehovah), Baaseiah (in the work of Jehovah), Beraiah (Jehovah has created), Bithiah (daughter of Jehovali), Gedaliah (Jehovah has become great), Gemariah (Jehovah has perfected), Dodavali (love of Jehovah), Delaiali (Jehovah has delivered), Nodaviah (majesty of Jehovah), Zerahiah (Jehovah has risen), Haggiah (festival of Jehovah), Hazaiah (Jehovah has seen), I'Iezekiah (strengthened of Jehovah), Hacha'Liah (darkness of Jehovah), Nasadiah (Jehovah has favored), Harhaiah (fearing Jehovah), Tebaliali (Jehovah has dipped), Tobiah (goodness of Jehovah), Jaazaniah (heard of Jehovah), Josiah (founded of Jehovah), Ibiiijah (building of Jehovah), Jebereehiah (blessed of Jehovah), Igdaliah (magnified of Jehovah), Jedidiah (beloved of Jehovah), Jedaiah (praised of Jehovah), Jehu (Jehovali is He), Jehoahaz (Jehovah-seized) , Jehoash (Jehovah-fired), Josiphiah (Jehovah is adding), Joezer (Jehovah is his help), Joash (Jehovah-hastened) , Josibiah (Jecause to d~vell), Joshaviah (Jehovali hovah ~vill set), Jeziah (sprinkled of Jehovah), Jezrabiah (Jehovah will shine), Jehdeizh (unity of Jehovah), Jahaziah (Jehov-ah .will behold), Jehiah (Jehovah will live), Jecoliah (Jehovah 117ill enal~le)Jeconiah (Jehovah will establish), Han, aniah (Jehovah has favored), Ismachiah (Jehovah will sustain), Jaaziah (emboldened of Jehovah), Iphedeiah (Jehovah mill liberate), Jekamiah (Jehovah mill rise), Iri jah (fearful ol Jehovah), Jeriah (Jehovah d l throw), Jeremiah (Jehovah will rise), Jeshohaiah (Jehovah will empty), Jesiah (Jehovah will 'Lend), Ishmaiah (Jehovah will hear), Isaiah (Jehovali has saved), Cononiah (Jehovah has sustained), Chenaniah (Jehovah has planted), Moadlah (assembly of Jehovah), Micah (Who is like Jehovah "2, Melatiah (whom Jehovah. has delivered), Malchiah (king of Jehovah), Maadiah (ornament of Jehovah), Maaziah (rescue of Jehovah, Maaseiah (work of Jehovah), 3Ieso-

E d e n i c day No. 217'6686, Y.R. 1900 (Saturday, October 15, A.D, 1932), there was published in T h e TVatchtower a resolution, publication of whicli was official notification that theii and there ended the 2300 days of Daniel's prophecy. (Daniel 8 : 14) It pleased God to therealter have a cleansed sanctuary. Since theii God's people have had peace in God's temple. This ~ 7 a s occasion for the naniiiig of this month. the "And all thy children shall be taught of Jehovah; and gres~tshall be the peace of thy children."-Isaiah 54 : 13, A.R.V.
T h e Best at the Last Finally, last of all aiid best of all, under moon No. 73'737, Godsday, J e h o v a h 27, E d e n i c d a y No. 2277526, Y.R. 1902 (Saturday, Februaly 2, A.D. 1935), the booli J e l ~ o v a lwas released to ~ tlie public. This book, it is to be hoped, will give Jehovah His rightful place in the hearts of millions. The month which is named for Jehovah God takes the place of what, under the Devil's calendar, was the first month of the year. I1 His o~vnexpression of His will on 1 the subject, God has made it clear that the first montli of the year ( R e d e m p t i o n ) is appropriately named as has been done in this series of articles. "Verily, thou art a God that hidest thyself."-Isaiah 45 :15. Some niay wonder whether by calling a month "Jehovah" the name ~vill brought into combe mon use. I t slzoz~ldbe brought into common use. Men need to think about God, the Source of all their hopes aiid joys, as xx7ell as of their present and future life itself. Hallelujah (Praise Y e Jehouah) The Israelites caught sonie~vhatthe spirit of the Scriptures when they niade use of such names as Jehovah-jireh (Jehovah will see to it), Jehovah-nissi (Jehovah is my banner), Jehovah-tsidkenu (Jehovah is our righteousness), Jehovah-shalonl (Jehovah is peace), Jehovahshainmali (the name and reiloTvii of Jehovah), Jehozabad (Jehovah-endom-ed) , Jehohanaii (Jehovtlh-favored), J e h o i a d a (Jehovah-known), Jehoiachili (Jehovah 1~7il! establish), Jehoiakim (J~hovah xvill raise), Jehoiarib (Jehovah will contend), Jehonadab (Jehovah-largess), Joiiathan (Jehovah-given), J e h o a d a h (Jehovahaclorne;l), Jehoaddan (Jehovah-pleased), Jellozadali (Jehovah-righted), Jehoram (Jehovahraised), Jehosheba (Jehovah-s~vor~z) , Jehoshna or Joshua (Jehovah-saved),Jehoshaphat (Jeho-

haiic (found of Jehovah), 3Iattatl:ah (gift of Jehovah), Neariah (servant of Jelzovah j, Xerial1 (light of Jehovah), Wethaaiah (given of Jehomh), Semz.chia4 (snpporiced of Jeho\-ah), Ob~Giah(serving Jel:ovah), Adaiall (Jshovah h r s adorned), Azaziah (Jel~ovali has strengthened), TJzsiah (str.el:gt?il o l Jehovah), Azariah (Jehovuh has helped), Amaslah (Jchovah hcs loaded), hllaniah (Jchova!~ has covered), h a lotllijall (answers of Jehovah), Athaliah (Jehovah has constrained), Pclalish (Jehovsli has deliverccl) ,Pclaiah (Jehomh has distinguisliec: ) ? Pelaliah (Jehovah has judged), Pethalciah ( J e hoi.alz has oqlened), Zedekiali (r3ght of J c h o a a l ~ ) , Zephaniah (Jehovah has secreted), Rehabiah (Jehovah has enlarged), Ramiah (Je1lova.h has raised ), Eel~~aliah (3el:ovah has bedeciced), R~elaiah (!earfi?l of Jehovdi) , l%aamiali(Jehovah has shalnen),Rephaiah (Jehovah has cured), Shebaniah (Jt.hovali has prospered), Xhemaiah (Jehovah lias heard), Xliert?biah (Jehovali has l~rought heat), Serainh (Jehovah has prev::i!ecl). Jall (-iali) is a colatraction for a:ld ::leans J~l1o-s-ah. Ender the eircnmsta~cesit does not appear that sliy ralid objec'iiol~ctil; I,:! ralsecl " the i of this name to take tlis niace of tl:at cF "ihe present first month of the Devil's calendar. hi;d., alzylvay, people who hare been vritiiig , n,.-,q'/LT7)~ , all iheir lives? in holler cf the twofaced god of y n r , shocld be qnitn ~~i!liilg nom L ,to @!2J -rill -\3 1 1 ; ~ narrle of tks tr1.s~znd living ).L<.the Go& Tile dl;2 i i r l i ~has come: Jehovah c + d mill xot be ~ E S ~ ? into~ a corner am:? more. The L U Sheo!a~gizns of tlie Devil tail say nothing; 'il::c-y ne;:e;,. have a laifid jl:ord to py for $-Tehoyah; : some @f t,JlelLl llzre freely rdmitiecl $lley c7io n o t ~ E O I T ar,l;pt!?ing abont Him. ~ i\ot couii';li~gt ~ ? _ a coal!jinuti~z;~a,bcve mentiol~ed, l : ~ t ilz.r::c Sehsvah q p e a r s in the S c r i p tn:.es 6,557 ti;3es; ;vet, in t!ii? I<ing James, cjr Ld?LfT:,c.yi3ec- 7 ~ i . s i 5 1 ; .it is ira:;sla';ed by that 7 :??.lm ;n fcur iiiiigs: E:.:odus 6 : 3 ; Psalm 83: i: 18; Isaiah 1 2 : 2 ; Isaiah 26 : 4. 111 a sii~gle chapter iil the original Fiebre;~~ (Deuteronomy 23) : ~111snanie occurs forty times. "Allzinia; Szlvation, a 1 1 glory, 2nd honour, and Fo\?-er, unto 16 the Lord our Gocl. Aizil :gain they said, bllelnia. . . and b or shipped God th8t s a h n the throne, i saying, Amen ; Alleluia. . . . rFlie voice of mighty thuiiderings, saying, Alleluia ; for the Lord God omnipo~~:eiit reigi1eth."-Res~elatio1i 19 : 1,3,4, G.
(6
.?.

As Essential as the Food YOUEat


% OT! wouldii't try to get along vithont eating.
KO sane person wou1d. Well, ther&s sometili : g more inlportant in our lives than the three ~izc;c,lswe eat per day. What is i t ? Jesus ansxered that questio~i,~vheliH e said, "This is life eternal, that they might 1:now thee the only true God." Therefore, every person of gooil ~rj!l, every person wlio desires life in iis fullilass, should seek to l~110\17more abcut Jehovah z2d Iiis purposes. It is for this very pnrpose that, t~vice month, a The TVatchtozt.er mazazine is pi~blished, that is, to enable the people to icno~vJellova11 God and Eis purposes as expressed in tlie Bible. Every rcadcr of The Golden Age shonld be a subscriber for The PVatchto;uer also. I t is a 16-page journal dcvoied eiltirely to the publishicg of Cibk insii*uction specifically desigced to aid JebovallJs witnesses as 117ell a s all 0 t h people ~ ~ oi' good will ~vliodesire righteousness. I t adheres strictly to the Bible a.s authority for its nttcranccs ar,d is entirely free and separate from ail partics, sects or other worldly org2nizztions. It is ~vhollyand withoct reservation for the k i n ~ d o n ~ Jehovah God under Christ of k ~ beloved 1Ci;lg. ~ s If yon zrg nct alrearly a reeder of T h e Watchto... All out the coupon belo~vand send it ii? ;illlLAcdictelg,ancl start feeding upon the food 1711 wl-:lichthe Lord has provided.
-7.

,I

--,

7. 3

,7

J 1

Pleas? enter my s~~bscriptioil fcr the Ti7aichtozr-CY ~ r , s p z i c efor 1 year. Enclosed find a conMbu.tion of $1.00 (Canada and other countries, $1.50) t o aid j ~,r,,;i?g cn the PGngdom work. z

Street

............................................
~

"...... .*.............
~~

City and State ...................................... .......................................................

TEIE END

1935 Yearbook p. 168

CALENDAR' Jehovah'r Year ot Ransom 1905

Redemptfon 1 2 3 Flrat 4 6 6 7 8 9 1 0 Month 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 (Ex 12.2) 18 19 20 21 22 33 24

. .
* * .

. m m m m

Seventh Month

Klng

1 2 9 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25
$0

6 I2 19 26

9 7 0 13 14 16 20 21 22

27

0bz6nmze

a 29

Llte

Second Mvn t h

1 0 3 4 6 6 7 8 O 10 I 1 12 19 14 I 6 18 17 18 19 20 n 22 2 3 24 a 2'6 27 281 29 90 1 2 9 4 6 8 7 8 a 10 11 12 13 14 16 16 17 18 19 20 21

Peace
Eighth Month

1 2 3 1 6 8 7 8 O 10 11 12 18 14 IS 16 17 18 19 PC) 21222324m~n a 29 30
1 9 3 4 b 6 7 6 91011 12 13 14 16 18 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2 6

Vlmltrnant Third

Month

Month

Order Nln th

2 2 a a = 2 6 n z e

aD
Freedom

26Z7Pr20
4 6 6
11 12 13 18 19 B 25 26 Z7

Fourth Month

1 2 3 7 8 9 10 14 15 16 17 21 22 23 24 28 29 30

Logor

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A serles of atticlw i explanation will appear b n


Watch for them.

Tha Golden Age.

WATCHTOWER
March 1, 1935 Watchtower

selves in keeping with his kingdom of righteousness using and will continue to use every pmible means under Christ. Let no one be so unwise as to think that to cause Jehovah's witnesses to deflect and turn away he can pursue any kind of loose course merely because from the proper course. It is therefore needful for he knows that he cannot bring himself to perfection each one to be watchful and to hold himself or herself in the flesh. The fact that he is imperfect does not strietly.within the rules laid down by the Scriptures. mean that he should not war at all times against tlte We are in a real fight, and now we must maintain our imperfections. "He that saith he abideth in him, integrity toward Jehovah by faithfully representing ougbt himself also so to walk, even as .he walked." him, perfecting holiness in the fear of God. Let all
(1John 2: 6) "See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, redeeming the time, because tlie days are evil. Wherefore be ye not unwise, but understanding what the will of the Lord is. And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the spirit. "-Eph. 5 :14-18. We are in the evil day. Satan and his agents are who undertake to serve Jehovah God strictly observe the rules that are laid doton in his Word, and follow them explicitly. None of these rules have been relaxed or set aside because the kingdom is here. A strict o b servance of the Lord's commands and rule of his kingdom now is necessary for those who will have his approval.

CALENDAR

limited; and when man attempts to do anything of importance and, in doing so, ignores Jehovah's \Yard, he is certain to get into difficulty. Since the time of the rebellion in Eden that old Serpent, also collcd Satan, Dragon and Devil, has employed all manner of subtle and deceptive metllods to divert the attention of man from Almighty God. This is particularly noted with reference to tlic calendars for the division of time. Naturally men have desired to divide time in such manner that they could keep an accuratc rccord of events. Iq doing this had men adhered strictly to the Word of Jehovah God and diligently souglit to be guided by the Most High, they would have fased far better. The ancient Greeks and Romans made calendars, but in doing so they disregarded the Word of God entirely and employed the wisdom of men, which is foolishness in the sight of God. Satan saw to it that they were turned away from Jehovah. Elany persons of the present day have the idea that the calendar generally in use is of divine origin; but in this they are entirely wrong. Tile calendar now used was prepared and came into use in this manner: An Italian physician called Aloysius Lilius projected a plan for amending the Julian calendar, whiclt was used for some time; and after his plan aaq made thcnn it was presented to Pope Gregory XIII. Gregory called in the wise men of the Catholic hierarcl~yfor a consultation about this calendar; and this occurrcd

BE English word "calendar" means a system about the year 1577. In the year 1582 Gregory issued of reckoning time by dividing time into days, a brief abolishing the Julian calendar, and introduced months and years. The ability of man is very in its stead the calendar that is now generally in use
and which is known as the Gregorian calendar. According to the Word of God the Brcgorian calendar i s entirely wrong, and this alone is proof thnt the making of that calendar and its introduction were not by God's direction but mere clone under the infiuence of Satan, the enemy of Jehovah. Now, since the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ and his enthronement and his gathering t o g g e r of his faithful followers, the time seems at hand to more clearly understand God's purposes as expressed in his Word, and this includes the manner of measuring time. It seems proper and fitting that we should try to ascertain tho correct way of measuring time and give publication thereto. In its Year Boolc for 1935 this Society has published a sample calendar, and a detailed explanation of this calendar shall also be published. The space in The IVcctcktower is hardly sufficient for such publicition, because that space is needed for other truths. The Gulden Age magazine is one of the publications of tile WATCH TOIVER BIBLE& TRACT SOCIETY, The and Golden Age will publish the explanation of the division of time, or the calendar, -and the IVadcktowcr readers are requested to give careful consideration to tlie same. A series of articles covering this matter wl il appear witliin a short time in the Golden Age m a p zine.

ON SIDE O F JEHOVAH AND HIS KING


~ R ~E T I ~ M R D : J I have just finished reading your lecture e'mho Shall Rule the \VorldtH I will at thia time say Aye! with joy in my henrt of a dealre t o be on the aide of Jehovah God and his riglrteous Srng.

DEABJ

God bless you for hqtring the courage to bring the truth of the \vod of God to thoee lolying for the n g h t e o ~ rule of

his King.

Sinarel;y,
~ E B E T .

Twcscri, I o w a

May 1, 1935 Watchtower

m WATCHTOWER e

selves with better sacrifices than these. For Christ is the time then present, in which were offered both gifts not entered into the holy places made with hands, rrnd sacrifices, that could not make him that did the which are the figures [pictorial] of the true; but into service perfect, as pertaining to the conscience ;which heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God [service] stood only in meats and drinks, and diwrs for us. Nor yet that he should offer himself often, washings, and carnal ordinances, imposed on them as the [Jewish] high priest cntcreth into the holy until the time of reformation. But Christ W i g come place every year with blood of others; for then must an high priest of good things to come, by a greater he [Jesus] often have suffered since the foundation and more perfect tabernacle, not made with bands, of the world: but now once in tlie end of the world that is to say, not of this building," did bring about hath he appeared, to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. " U e b . 9 :22-26. redemption for the human family. Then the apostle says that the blood of the animals The foregoing Scriptural argument proves beyond offered on the atonement day foreshadolwd the offer- any question of doubt that the blood of Jesus is the ing of the blood of Christ as redemption for man. great redemptive price for mankind, and that tlte He says: ''Neither by the blood of goats and calves presentation of that blood in heaven constitutes the [or bull~ck~], by his o m blood, he entered in once sin-offering on behalf of the human family, but into the holy place, having obtained eternal ~ d e m p - BIany will then n a t m l l y ask, m y , in the face of ti~p for For the and of goah, and this tremendous argument showing the value of the shed the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sancti- blood of christ Jesus, are there so men claiming fieth to the purifying of the flesh; how much more to be preachers of the gospel I Y ~ Odeny that the blood shall the blood of Christ, Who through the eternal of the Lord Jesus has any pnrehasing wltatspirit offered hh3el.f without spot to God, p u r e your 8oever? The amwer to that question the Lord foreconscience from dead works to serve the living God ?" told and his inspired dtness to write do,m, -Heb. 9: 12-14. saying, "But there were false prophets also among The of the at Sinai the [Jewish] people, even as there shall be false teachowed the ransom and sin-offering, and was the basis among who privily =hall bring in damnable for the codmation of the law=Ovenant of with heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and the Israelites. The blood of Christ Jesus provided the bring upon swift destruction.,, (2 Pet, M m ~ t i v price and an offering for sin on behalf of 2: 1) "For there are e men crept in unawares, and is the basis for the making and inauw- who were before of old ordained to this condemnation ; ration of the new covenant which the Lord God prom- mgodly men, turning the of our ~~d illto ised in tlie prophecies. (Heb. 9: 15-21) Then the lBSCiviousness, and denying the ~~~d C Q ~ and , apostle makes it clear and positive that the blood of our Lord Christ.,,4ude 4. Christ Jesus is essential to salvation, saying : Will the people continue to be hoodwinked by these almad all thhgs are by the lawpurged conceits and blood [of animals] ; and wjthout of blood false prophets, who are wise in their who Pose as preachers of the gospel, or will they be is no remission. It was therefore necessary that the patterns of things in the heavens should be purified guided by the plain Word of God, which is now due to with these [sacrifices]; but the heavenly things them- be understood8 Let each hearer answer for himself.

was yet standing: which was a [prophetic] figure for

,,

T H E CALENDAR

0 HAVE a correct system of reckoning time is companied the study of chronology, and the pitfalls desirable. I t is well known that the calendars into which these things led many. Do not fall into heretofore used have been incorrect and un- a similar trap. I t is of far more importance to undersatisfactory. For this reason Tke Golden Age pub- stand our commission and to perform it than to lished facts concerning a system of reckoning time, ob- understand at just what time Adam was created. Be taining the important data from the Scriptures, and reasonable and moderate. Avoid wild speculation as some from astronomy. Seeing there is a_ danger of to a t what time and in what manner things future will giving importance to this and to the exclusion of come to pass. Be sure that you always are guided by weightier matters, this note of warning is here the counsel of the Lord's Word. The statements in sounded. God's people should keep in mind the The Golden Age are not dogmatic, but are worthy of "pyramid" delqsion and the speculations that ac- due and careful consideration.
Immediately with this notifi~xttion all publishera, whether of let God's snointd remnant or of tho people of good will, make due preparation for the forthcaoming activities. Those following the Qreater Gideon will not fail to arrange to be a t their post in their territory, and rith full equipment of torchlight und trumpet, and obed~entto servico signals.

(Continued from page 1JO) hovah and for Gideon, to wlt, June 1-9 inclusive. A most appropn'ate booklet for that period will be released then, Unrteraal T a r Near, and thie, together with nnotlrer new booklet, Favored Peopk, and the book Jehovah, will be offered In cornbination by a l publishers in English-apenking eon~rnun~ties. l