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ACADEMIC REGULATIONS & SYLLABUS

Faculty of Applied Sciences Master of Science Programme


(Biotechnology)

CHARUSAT 2010

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CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


Education Campus Changa, (ECC), hitherto a conglomerate of institutes of professional education in Engineering, Pharmacy, Computer Applications, Management, Applied Sciences, Physiotherapy and Nursing, is one of the choicest destinations by students. It has been transformed into Charotar University of Science and Technology (CHARUSAT) through an Act by Government of Gujarat. CHARUSAT is permitted to grant degrees under Section-22 of UGC- Govt. of India.

The journey of CHARUSAT started in the year 2000, with only 240 Students, 4 Programmes, one Institute and an investment of about Rs. 3 Crores (INR 30 million). At present there are seven different institutes falling under ambit of six different faculties. The programmes offered by these faculties range from undergraduate (UG) to Ph.D degrees including M.Phil. These faculties, in all offer 23 different programmes. A quick glimpse in as under: Faculty Faculty of Technology & Engineering Institute Charotar Institute of Technology Programmes Offered B.Tech M.Tech Ph.D B.Pharm M.Pharm Ph.D M.B.A PGDBM * Ph.D M.C.A Ph.D M.Sc M.Phil Ph.D B.PT B.Sc (Nursing)

Faculty of Pharmacy Ramanbhai Patel College of Pharmacy Faculty of Management Studies Indukaka Ipcowala Institute of Management Faculty of Computer Charotar Institute of Computer Applications Applications Faculty of Applied Sciences P.D.Patel Institute of Applied Sciences Faculty of Medical Sciences Charotar Institute of Physiotherapy Charotar Institute of Nursing * To be started from this academic year CHARUSAT 2010

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The development and growth of the institutes have already led to an investment of over Rs.63 crores (INR 630 Million). The future outlay is planned with an estimate of Rs. 250 Crores (INR 2500 Million).

The University is characterized by state-of-the-art infrastructural facilities, innovative teaching methods and highly learned faculty members. The University Campus sprawls over 100 acres of land and is Wi-Fi enabled. It is also recognized as the Greenest Campus of Gujarat.

CHARUSAT is privileged to have 300 core faculty members, educated and trained in Stanford, IITs, IIMs and leading Indian Universities, and with long exposure to industry. It is also proud of its past students who are employed in prestigious national and multinational corporations.

From one college to the level of a forward-looking University, CHARUSAT has the vision of entering the club of premier Universities initially in the country and then globally. High Moral Values like Honesty, Integrity and Transparency which have been the foundation of ECC continue to anchor the functioning of CHARUSAT. Banking on the world class infrastructure and highly qualified and competent faculty, the University is expected to be catapulted into top 20 Universities in the coming five years. In order to align with the global requirements, the University has collaborated with internationally reputed organizations like Pennsylvania State University USA, University at Alabama at Birmingham USA, Northwick Park Institute UK, ISRO, BARC, etc.

CHARUSAT has designed curricula for all its programmes in line with the current international practices and emerging requirements. Industrial Visits, Study Tours, Expert Lectures and Interactive IT enabled Teaching Practice form an integral part of the unique CHARUSAT pedagogy.

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The programmes are credit-based and have continuous evaluation as an important feature. The pedagogy is student-centred, augurs well for self-learning and motivation for enquiry and research, and contains innumerable unique features like: Participatory and interactive discussion-based classes. Sessions by visiting faculty members drawn from leading academic institutions and industry. Regular weekly seminars. Distinguished lecture series. Practical, field-based projects and assignments. Summer training in leading organizations under faculty supervision in relevant programmes. Industrial tours and visits. Extensive use of technology for learning. Final Placement through campus interviews.

Exploration in the field of knowledge through research and development and comprehensive industrial linkages will be a hallmark of the University, which will mould the students for global assignments through technology-based knowledge and critical skills.

The evaluation of the student is based on grading system. A student has to pursue his/her programme with diligence for scoring a good Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) and for succeeding in the chosen profession and life.

CHARUSAT welcomes you for a Bright Future

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CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Faculty of Applied Sciences

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
M. Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme

Charotar University of Science and Technology (CHARUSAT) CHARUSAT Campus, At Post: Changa 388421, Taluka: Petlad, District: Anand Phone: 02697-247500, Fax: 02697-247100, Email: info@charusat.ac.in www.charusat.ac.in

Year 2010

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CHARUSAT
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCES
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS M. Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme
To ensure uniform system of education, duration of post graduate programmes, eligibility criteria for and mode of admission, credit load requirement and its distribution between course and system of examination and other related aspects, following are the academic rules and regulations.

1. System of Education The Semester system of education shall be followed across The Charotar University of Science and Technology (CHARUSAT) at Masters levels. Each semester will be at least 90 working day duration. Every enrolled student will be required to do a specified course work in the chosen subject of specialization and also complete a project/dissertation if any. Medium of instruction will be English

2. Duration of Programme Postgraduate programme (M.Sc.) Minimum 4 semesters (2 academic years) Maximum 6 semesters (3 academic years) The maximum limit can be extended by 1 or 2 semester subject to the approval of university on case to case basis.

3. Eligibility for admissions For the admission to M.Sc., programs in the subject of Biological/Physical/Mathematical/Chemical Sciences a candidate must have obtained a Degree of Bachelor of Science from any recognized University or a Degree recognized as equivalent thereto, with minimum Second Class.

4. Mode of admissions Admission to M.Sc. programme will purely on combined merit of admission test and performance at graduation.

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5. Programme structure and Credits A student admitted to a program should study the course and earn credits specified in the course structure. (Please refer Annexure-A)

6. Attendance 6.1 All activities prescribed under these regulations and listed by the course faculty members in their respective course outlines are compulsory for all students pursuing the courses. No exemption will be given to any student from attendance except on account of serious personal illness or accident or family calamity that may genuinely prevent a student from attending a particular session or a few sessions. However, such unexpected absence from classes and other activities will be required to be condoned by the Dean/Principal. 6.2 Student attendance in a course should be 80%.

7. Course Evaluation 7.1 The performance of every student in each course will be evaluated as follows: 7.1.1 Internal evaluation by the course faculty member(s) based on continuous assessment, for 30% of the marks for the course; and 7.1.2 Final examination will be conducted by the University t for 70% of the marks for the course. 7.2 Internal Evaluation 7.2.1 Internal evaluation will be based on internal tests and several other tools of assessment like, quiz, viva, seminar etc., as prescribed by concerned teacher and decided by the faculty. 7.3 Internal Institutional evaluation for practicals 7.3.1 One internal practical test/viva will be conducted per semester totaling to 30 % internal marks for practicals 7.3.2 In Continuous evaluation Students shall be evaluated in a continuous manner for their involvement in the practical, aptitude for learning, completion of practical related assignments, regularity in the practicals and record keeping 7.4 University Examination 7.4.1 The final examination by the University for 70% of the evaluation for the course will be through written paper or practical test or oral test or presentation by the student or a combination of any two or more of these. 7.4.2 In order to earn the credit in a course a student has to obtain grade other than FF. Performance at Internal & University Examination Page 7 of 66

7.5

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7.5.1

Minimum performance with respect to internal marks as well as university examination will be an important consideration for passing a course. Details of minimum percentage of marks to be obtained in the examinations are as follows Minimum marks in University Minimum marks Exam per subject Overall per subject 40% 50%

7.5.1. If a candidate obtains minimum required marks per subject but fails to obtain minimum required overall marks, he/she has to repeat the university examination till the minimum required overall marks are obtained.(As per the clause 8.2(iv)

8 Grading 8.1 The internal evaluation marks and final University examination marks in each course will be converted to a letter grade on a ten-point scale as per the following scheme: Grading Scheme: Range of Marks (%) Letter Grade Grade Point 8.2 80 AA 10 75 <80 AB 9 70 <75 BB 8 65 <70 BC 7 60 <65 CC 6 55 <60 CD 5 50 <55 DD 4 <50 FF 0

The students performance in any semester will be assessed by the Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA). Similarly, his performance at the end of two or more consecutive semesters will be denoted by the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA). The SGPA and CGPA are calculated as follows: SGPA = Ci Gi / Ci where Ci is the number of credits of course i Gi is the Grade Point for the course i and i = 1 to n, n = number of courses in the Ci Gi / Ci where Ci is the number of credits of course i Gi is the Grade Point for the course i and i = 1 to n, n = number of courses of all semesters up to which CGPA is computed.

(i)

semester (ii) CGPA =

(iii)

No student will be allowed to move further if CGPA is less than 3 at the end of every academic year.

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9. Awards of Degree 9.1 Every student of the programme who fulfils the following criteria will be eligible for the award of the degree: 9.1.1 He should have earned at least minimum required credits as prescribed in course structure; and 9.1.2 He should have cleared all internal and external evaluation components in every course; and 9.1.3 He should have secured a minimum CGPA of 5.0 at the end of the programme; 9.1.4 In addition to above, the student has to complete the required formalities as per the regulatory bodies. The student who fails to satisfy minimum requirement of CGPA will be allowed to improve the grades so as to secure a minimum CGPA for award of degree. Only latest grade will be considered.

9.2

10 Award of Class: The class awarded to a student in the programme is decided by the final CGPA as per the following scheme: Distinction: First class: Second Class: CGPA 7.5 CGPA 6.0 CGPA 5.0

11 Transcript: The transcript issued to the student at the time of leaving the University will contain a consolidated record of all the courses taken, credits earned, grades obtained, SGPA,CGPA, class obtained, etc.

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ANTEXURE-A

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


Sem Subject Subjects Code L
BT701 BT702 BT703 General microbiology Cell biology Bioinstrumentation and biostatistics Molecular biology Communication Skills Seminar/Assignment/Miniprojects/library

M.Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme Teaching scheme Theory Evaluation P 3 3 3 3 2 Contact hrs. 6 6 6 6 4 8 Total Credits 5 5 5 5 3 4

Practical Evaluation

Total I +II

Institute University Total-I Institute University Total-II 30 30 30 30 15 70 70 70 70 35 100 100 100 100 50 15 15 15 15 30 35 35 35 35 70 50 50 50 50 100 150 150 150 150 150

3 3 3 3 2

BT704 CS703 AP701

Sem Subject Subjects Code L


BT705 BT706 BT707 BT708 BT709 BT710 AP702 Immunology Genetics and biochemistry Bioprocess technology Industrial biotechnology Biotechnology Laboratory I Computational Skills Seminar/Assignment/Miniprojects/library

Teaching scheme P 12 2 Contact Total hrs. Credits 3 3 3 3 3 12 4 8 3 3 3 8 3 4

Theory Evaluation

Practical Evaluation

Total I +II

Institute University Total-I Institute University Total-II 30 30 30 30 15 70 70 70 70 35 100 100 100 100 50 60 30 140 70 100 100 100 100 100 200 150

3 3 3 3 2

II

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Sem Subject Subjects Code L


BT801 Advanced genetics and Genetic Engineering Plant and Animal biotechnology Environment Biotechnology and bioinformatics Electives group 1. Advanced Bioprocess Technology and Biopharmaceuticals 2. Molecular Medicine Biotechnology Laboratory II Skills for Biological Sciences I Seminar/Assignment/Miniprojects/library

M.Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme Teaching scheme Theory Evaluation P Contact Total Institute University hrs. Credits 3 3 30 70 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 30 30 70 70 70 Total-I 100 100 100 100

Practical Evaluation Institute University Total-II --

Total I+II

3 3 3 3

100 100 100 100

III

BT802 BT803

BT804

BT805 BT806 AP801

12 12 3 3 9

8 2 5

60 45

140 105

200 150

200 150

Sem Subject Subjects Code L


BT807 BT808 Dissertation Skills for Biological Sciences II

Teaching scheme Contact Total Credits hrs. 08 25 32 24 01 02 04 03 P

Theory Evaluation

Practical Evaluation

Total I+II TotalII 350 600 100 150

IV

Institute University Total- Institute University I 100 150 250 150 200 15 35 50 30 70

In every programme additional credits can be earned by candidates by undertaking summer training projects: 1 Credits/project (Minimum 15 working days) Minimum credits to earn a degree is 25x4 = 100 CHARUSAT 2010 Page 11 of 66

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M. Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme

SYLLABI
(Semester 1)

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

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BT 701: GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY


Credit: 27 A. Objective of the course. Understanding the diverse groups of microorganisms will help student to appreciate the nature and play a positive role in solving global environmental problems. Recognize and describe the structure and function of prokaryotic cells including differences between Gram positive and negative bacterial cell structure and to defend this information in class discussions and on exams. Demonstrate proper use and care of microscope and other delicate lab instruments as assessed during routine laboratory exercise. Explain and demonstrate the importance of aseptic techniques as evaluated during routine laboratory exercises and applying universal precautions in hospital and home setting. To evaluate and describe various physical and chemical methods and how they can be used to control microbial growth. To explain and defend in exams the mechanism of microbial growth, microbial metabolism and genetics. Distinguish between various disease causing microbes, recognize how to effectively treat them and apply this information in laboratory discussion and in exams. B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units BT 701 - GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY 1 2 3 4 5 Introduction to microorganisms and methods of their study Molecular evolution and microbial systematics Diversity of microorganisms- I Diversity of microorganisms- II Microbial nutrition and growth 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Minimum number of hours Semester - 1

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C. Detailed syllabus. Sr. No Minimum number of hours BT 701 - GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY Introduction to microorganisms and methods of their study Introduction to microbiology and brief history, the nature of the microbial world, diverse groups of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, microscopy, stains and staining techniques, sterilization, control of microorganisms, isolation, cultivation and preservation of microorganisms, safety in the microbiological laboratory Molecular evolution and microbial systematics Early earth, origin of biological molecules, the evolutionary time scale- eras, periods and epoch, major events in the evolutionary time scale, the first cell, evolution of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, spontaneity of mutations, evolutionary change in nucleotide sequences, molecular divergence, molecular clocks, origin of new genes and proteins, evolution by gene duplication, domain shuffling, transposition and horizontal gene transfer, concept of microbial species, theories and methods of microbial systematics, nomenclature, methods of determining evolutionary relationships, phylogenetic relationships of microorganisms, Bergeys Manual of Systematic Bacteriology Diversity of microorganisms- I Principles of microbial diversity- distribution, abundance and ecological niche, microbial diversification, morphological, cultural, molecular and genomic methods for study of microbial diversity, salient features of major groups of Domain Prokaryotes and Archea, exploitation of microbial diversity, viral diversity 9h Title of the units Weightage

Unit 1

20%

Unit 2

9h

20%

Unit 3

9h

20%

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Unit 4

Diversity of microorganisms- II General characteristics, diversity, classification and economic importance of cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, salient features of Chytridiomycota, Mastigomycota, Zygomycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Deuteromycota, identification and general cultivation methods for economically important cyanobacteria, fungi and algae Microbial nutrition and growth Principles of microbial nutrition, nutritional categories of microorganisms, culture media for cultivation of microorganisms, batch, fed-batch and continuous growth, synchronous growth, mathematical nature and expression of microbial growth, measurement of microbial growth, microbial growth curve, attached growth and biofilms

9h

20%

Unit 5

9h

20%

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

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E.

Student learning outcome/objective

By the end of this course, students will be able to: Describe various theoretical models of the creative process. Apply a variety of creativity enhancing modes in a team setting. Understanding their own personal style of learning and how this relates to leadership. Identify and interact with creative pockets in the community to continue to reenergize their skills. F. Recommended Study Material: Reference books: 1. Analytical Microbiology Edt by Frederick Kavanagh Volume I & II. Academic Press New York 2. Applied Microbial Physiology by Rhodes. 3. Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology : 9th Edition 4. Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals by Bailey and Ollis, Tata McGraw Hill, N.Y 5. Brock the biology of microorganisms. Tata McGraw Hill, N.Y 6. Experimental Microbial Ecology by Aronson, Academic Press 7. Extreme Environment. Mechanism of Microbial Adaptation. Edited by Milton R. Heinrich. Academic Press 8. Extremophiles by Johri B.N. 2000. Springer Verlag. , New York 9. Introductory Practical Microbiology, by Mu dili, J (2007) Narosa Publ. House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi (ISBN: 978-81-7319-744-4) 10. Microbial Ecology. 2nd Edition. by R. Campbell. Blackwell Scientific Publication. 11. MIcrobial Life in Extreme Environments. Edited by D. J. Kushner. Academic Press 12. Microbial Physiology and Metabolism by Caldwell D.R. 1995, Brown Publishers. 13. Microbial Physiology by Benjamin 14. Microbial Physiology by Moat A.G. and Foster J. W. 1999.. Wiley.

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15. Microbiology 5 th edition by Pelczar M.J.Jr. Chan E.C.S., Kreig (2006) Tata McGraw Hill. 16. Microbiology and Biotechnology: A Laboratory Manual, by Kalaichelvan, PT (2006) MJP Publ., Chennai (ISBN:81-8094-008-X) 17. Microbiology of Extreme Environments and its potential for Biotechnology. Edited by M.S. Da Costa, J.C. Duarate, R.A. D. Williams. Elsiever Applied Science, London. 18. Microbiology of Soil by Alexander and Martin 19. Microbiology Principles and Explorations by Black, J.G. (2005) 6th edition John Wiley and Sons Inc. 20. Microbiology: Dynamics and Diversity by Perry. 21. Microbiology-A Laboratory Manual, by Cappucino, J and Sherman, N.C. ( ) The Benjamin-Cummings Publ. Co., Inc 22. Principles of Microbiology by R.MAtlas 23. Microbiology by Willey,Sherwood,WoolvertonTata McGraw Hill. 24. Source Book for Experiments for the Teaching of Microbiology, by Primrose, SB and Wardlow, AC (1982) Academic Press, London (ISBN: 0-12-565680-7). Microbial diversity by Colwd. D

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BT702 - CELL BIOLOGY Credit: 27 A. Objective of the course. Describe the structure and functions of biological molecules Differentiate between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and their cellular components Clarify cell organelles, surface structures and their functions Explain mitosis and meiosis Awareness against cancer and cancer causing agents. Semester - 1

B. Outline of the Course

Sr.No 1 2 3 4 5

Title of the units Introduction to the Cell, Cellular Organization and Function Structural Organization and Function of Intracellular Organelles Cell Signaling Cellular Communication Cell Division and Cell Cycle

Minimum no of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr. No.

Title of the units

Min of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

INTRODUCTION TO THE CELL, CELLULAR ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTION Evolution and history of the cell, structure and organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, shape and size of cells, molecular organization and functions of biomembranes, cell permeability, transport across membranes, passive diffusion, facilitated diffusion, osmosis, ion channels, ion pumps, active transport and receptor mediated endocytosis, exocytosis, mechanism of sorting and regulation of intracellular transport, membrane excitability, electrical properties of membranes, techniques and methods used to cells STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTION OF INTRACELLULAR ORGANELLES Structure and functions of cell wall, nucleus, mitochondria, golgy bodies, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, plastids, vacuoles, chloroplast, cytoskeleton and its role in motility, special cellular structures in prokaryotes, cell movement, vesicular transport and membrane transport. CELL SINGNALING Hormones and their receptors, cell surface receptor, characteristics of receptors, signaling through Gprotein coupled receptors, signal transduction pathways, secondary messengers, regulation of signaling pathways, bacterial and plant two component signaling systems, bacterial chemotaxis and quorum sensing CELLULAR COMMUNICATION Regulation of hematopoeisis, general principles of cell communication, cell adhesion and roles of different adhesion molecules, gap junctions, extracellular matrix, integrins, neurotransmission and its regulation CELL DIVISION AND CELL CYCLE Mitosis and meiosis, regulation of mitosis and meiosis, cell cycle and its control, cell death, introduction to cancer

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

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D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance. E. Student learning outcome/objective By the end of this course, students will be able to: Describe various theoretical models of the creative process. Apply a variety of creativity enhancing modes in a team setting. Understanding in their own style of learning and how this relates to leadership. Identify and interact with creative pockets in the community to continue to reenergize their skills. F. Recommended Study Material: 1. Essentials of Cell and Molecular Biology: by de Robertis E. D. P. and E. M. F. , Holt Saunder's International Edition (new edition) 2. Essentials of Molecular Biology, 4th edn., by Malacinski GM (2003) Jones & Batiett, London. (ISBN: 0-7637- 2133-6) 3. Instant Notes : Immunology, by Ladyard, Whelan and Fanger (new edition), Viva books 4. Molecular Biotechnology Glick 5. The Physiology and Biochemistry of Prokaryotes, by White, D (2000) Oxford University Press, Oxford 6. The Biochemistry of Cell Signalling- Ernst J. M. Helmreich ( Indian Edition)-2005 Oxford University Press 7. Molecular biology of the Cell by Bruce Alberts. 8. Molecular biology of the Cell by Lodish . 9. Immunology by kuby.willey and sons. 10. Immunobiology by Janeway. 11. The Microbial Cell Cycle. Gloover & Hopwood

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BT703 - BIOINSTRUMENTATION AND BIOSTATISTICS Credit: 27 A. Objective of the course. This course is designed to cover the tools and techniques of modern statistics with specific applications to biomedical and clinical research. Both parametric and nonparametric analysis will be presented. Descriptive statistics will be discussed although emphasis is on inferential statistics and experimental design. The objective of the course is to equip students with research skills necessary for a successful career in biomedical engineering. With this in mind, the course has been structured to provide students experience at: i) applying engineering tools and concepts learned in class and in other courses to realistic biological problems, ii) working in different teams to complete research projects, and iii) collecting and presenting data in a meaningful and professional manner Semester - 1

B. Outline of the Course Sr.No Title of the units 1 2 3 4 5 Microscopic, Histochemical, Immunotechniques And Imaging Techniques Biophysical Methods- I Biophysical Methods- Ii Molecular Biology Methods Biostatistics Minimum no of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h

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C. Detailed syllabus. Sr.No Title of the units Min hours 9h of

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

MICROSCOPIC, HISTOCHEMICAL, IMMUNOTECHNIQUES AND IMAGING TECHNIQUES Principle and applications of light, phase contrast, fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), confocal microscopy, cytophotometry and flow cytometry, ELISA, RIA, western blot, immunoprecipitation, in situ localization in cells by FISH and GISH, imaging techniques- plasma emission tomography (PET), MRI, FMRI, CAT BIOPHYSICAL METHODS- I UV/Vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), NMR, ESR, X-ray diffraction, light scattering, mass spectrometry, centrifugation, atomic absorption spectroscopy, surface plasma emission spectroscopy, IR and Raman spectroscopy, single neutron recording, patch clamp recording, ECG BIOPHYSICAL METHODS- II Chromatography, electrophoresis, measurement of viscosity, osmosis and pH, electrochemical techniques, radioisotope techniques, safety guidelines for use of radioisotopes, tracer techniques in biological research MOLECULAR BIOLOGY METHODS Isolation, purification and analysis of RNA, DNA (genomic and plasmid), proteins, isoelectric focusing (IEF), PCR, detection of post translational modification of proteins, DNA sequencing methods, methods for analysis of gene expression at RNA and protein level, isolation, separation and analysis of lipid molecules, microarrays, SAGE, RFLP, RAPD and AFLP techniques, protein sequencing

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

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Unit 5

BIOSTATISTICS 9h Populations, samples and inference, variables, data representation, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability distributions (binomial, poisson and normal), sampling distribution, hypothesis testing, confidence interval, analysis of variance (ANOVA), regression and correlation, ttest, F-test, 2 test, introduction to experimental designs .

20%

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance. E. Student learning outcome/objective By the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe various theoretical models of the creative process. 2. Apply a variety of creativity enhancing modes in a team setting. 3. Understanding in their own style of learning and how this relates to leadership. 4. Identify and interact with creative pockets in the community to continue to reenergize their skills. F. Recommended Study Material:
1. 2. 3.

An Introduction to Genetic Engineering By Desmond S. T. Nicholl Biochemical Calculations by Segel. I. R. - 1995 - John Wiley and Sons. From Genes to Genomes: Concepts and Applications of DNA Technology by Jeremy W. Dale (2007). Gene and Genome Technology: Principles and Applications of Recombinant DNA and Genomics by Sandy Primrose Methods in Biotechnology, by Schmauder, H.P, Schweizer, M and Schewizer, L.M (2003), Taylor and Francis Ltd., London (ISBN: 0-7484-0430-9)

4.

5.

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6.

Microbial Genomes - D. A. Realman and E. Strauss - 2000 - American Academy Of Microbiology (http:// WWW. ASMUSA.ORG / ACASRC / ACA1 .HTM Molecular Biotechnology Glick Spectrometric Identification of Organic compounds by R M Silverstein and F X Webster, (2002) Spectroscopy: D.R.Browning Validation Standard Operating Procedures, 2nd edn., by Haider, SI (2006) CRC Press Taylor and Francis Group, NY (ISBN: 0-8493-9529 Elements of biostatistics by S. Prasad. C. Edwards Genetics as a tool in Microbiology Biostatistics by Lewis A.E. Statistics and experimental design by G. M. Clarke Gene cloning and manipulation Christopher Howe Basic Biotechnology by Colin Ratledge and Bjor Methods in Biotechnology by Hans-peter-schmauder Recombinant DNA Principles and Methodology by James J Greene & Venigalla B. Rao Molecular Bio methods Handbook by Rapley & Walker Analytical biochemistry by Wilson and walker. Biochemical Methods by Pingoud A. etl.

7. 8.

9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

19. 20. 21.

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BT704 - MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Credit: 27 A. Objective of the course To gain a thorough understanding of the basic principles of molecular biology. To understand the tools of DNA technology. To be able to read and interpret scientific papers. To design approaches to addressing questions in molecular biology and to interpret experimental data in molecular biology. To become proficient with a number of advanced and basic tools in molecular biology. To interpret and design experiments. To keep a laboratory notebook, to gain the confidence and skills necessary to be able to attempt new laboratory procedures and troubleshoot their implementation. To be competitive for employment in an introductory laboratory research position. B. Outline of the Course Sr.No Title of the units 1 2 3 4 5 Nucleic Acid Structure and Genome Organization DNA Replication, Recomibination and Repair RNA Synthesis and Processing Protein Synthesis and Processing Control of Gene Expression Minimum no of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 1

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr.No Title of the units

Min hours 9h

of

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

NUCLEIC ACID STRUCTURE AND GENOME ORGANIZATION DNA as a genetic material, DNA structure, DNA topology, supercoiling, topoisomerases I and II, Cvalue paradox, structure of mRNA, rRNA and tRNA; packaging in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, structure of chromatin and chromosomes, DNAprotein interactions, interrupted genes, gene families, unique and repetitive DNA, transposons DNA REPLICATION, RECOMIBINATION AND REPAIR DNA replication in DNA viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes; enzymes involved and mechanism of replication, replication models, regulation of replication, role of telomerases, DNA synthesis in retroviruses, mechanism of recombination and repair, inhibitors of replication, extrachromosomal replicons RNA SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING Organization of transcriptional units, transcription in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, transcription factors, transcription activators and repressors, RNA polymerases, formation of initiation complex and its regulation, RNA processing, RNA editing, splicing, post transcriptional modifications, RNA transport, catalytic RNA PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING Ribosomes, genetic code, initiation, initiation factors and their regulation, elongation and elongation factors, translational proof reading, post translational modification of proteins, translational inhibitors, role of tRNA, aminoacylation of tRNA, aminoacyl tRNA synthetase

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

Unit 5

CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION 9h Regulation of phages (T4, T7 and ), plant and animal viruses; operon concept, regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, chromatin remodeling, regulation of lac, ara, his and trp operons, gene silencing, regulatory circuits, role of chromatin in gene expression

20%

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D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance. E. Student learning outcome/objective By the end of this course, students will be able to: Describe various theoretical models of the creative process. Apply a variety of creativity enhancing modes in a team setting. Understanding their own personal style of learning and how this relates to leadership. Identify and interact with creative pockets in the community to continue to reenergize their skills. F. Recommended Study Material: Reference books: 1. An introduction to human molecular genetics: mechanisms of inherited diseases 2. Jack j. Pasternak 2000. 3. Computational biology and genome informatics jason t. L. Wang , cathy 2003 world scientific 4. Genome transcriptome and proteome analysis by alain bernot, james2004 john wiley and sons 5. Methods in biotechnology and bioengineeringby s. P. Vyas, d.2002cbs publishers . 6. Molecular genetics of bacteria jeremy dale, simon f 2004 john wiley and sons. 7. Practical handbook of biochem and mol.bio geralal .jasmen. 8. Molecular biology by David Freifelder 9. A genetic switch by Mark Pthasne. 10. Microbial genetics by David Freifelder 11. Essential of molecular biology by David Freifelder 12. Principles of Genome analysis S.B.Primose

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13. Bacteriophages by John Douglas 14. Biotechnology an Introdoction by Susan R. Barnum. 15. Biotechnology Volumes by H.J. Rehm & Reed 16. Genes IX by lewin 17. Molecular biology of the gene by J.D.Watson. 18. Gene cloning and DNA analysis by T.A.Brown. 19. From genes to Clone 20. Molecular Biology Lab fax I & II : T. A. Brown 21. Molecular Biotechnology Glick 22. Molecular Genetics of Bacteria 4th Edition by Dale, J.W., Park, S.F. (2005) Wiley and Sons Inc 23. Intellectual Property Rights on Biotechnology, by Sigh, KC BCIL, New Delhi 24. Introduction to Modern Virology 4th Edition by Dimmock N J, Primrose S. B. 1994. Blackwell Scientific Publications. Oxford. 25. DNA Science by David .A.Micholas.

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CS703 - Communication Skills 1


Credit Hours: TEACHING SCHEME Hours/week Marks A. Objectives: 1) To enhance basic Communication Skills i.e. Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing of the students, 2) On an advanced stage, to improve their Speaking and Listening Skills necessary for everyday living and for classroom, academic and cultural situations, and eventually 3) To sharpen their expressional skills and help them succeed in Interview Process. B. Outline of the Course: Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Title of the Unit Minimum Number Hours Elements of Communication and Principles of effective 06 communication Key Communication Skills and Barriers to effective 06 communication Common Communication Styles and How to Work with 08 them Comprehensional Skills 15 Expressional Skills 15 Grammar and Vocabulary 10 Total Hours (Theory): 30 Total Hours (Lab): 30 Total: 60 of THEORY 1 50 PRACTICAL 1 100

TOTAL 2 150

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C. Detailed Syllabus: Unit 1: Elements of Communication and Principles of effective communication Hours: 06 Weightage: 10% Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 Topic Definition, Concept and Process of Communication Types and Levels of Communication Principles of Effective Communication Verbal Vs Nonverbal Communication Minimum Number Hours 1 1 2 1 of

Unit 2: Key Communication Skills and Barriers to effective communication: Hours: 06 Weightage: 10% Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 Topic Minimum Number Hours LSRW in Communication 1 Comprehensional and Expressional Skills 2 Barriers to effective Communication and techniques to 2 overcome them Alternative Modes of Communication 1 of

Unit 3: Common Communication Styles and How to Work with them: Hours: 08 Weightage: 13% Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Topic Introduction to Communication Styles Assertive Communication Aggressive Communication Passive Communication Passive Aggressive Communication Working with different Styles Minimum Number Hours 1 1 1 1 1 3 of

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Unit 4: Comprehensional Skills: Hours: 15 Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 Topic

Weightage: 25%

Min.No.of Hours Basic Comprehensional Skills: Reading and Listening 1 Types and Techniques - Skimming and Scanning of 5 Reading Types of Listening 2 Tips for effective listening 2 Academic Listening Lectures and Presentations 5

Unit 5: Expressional Skills: Hours: 15 Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Topic

Weightage: 25% of

Minimum Number Hours Basic Expressional Skills: Writing and Speaking Note Taking, Note Making, and Paragraph Development 1 Coherence, Topic Sentence, Supporting Sentence, Authentication, Examples Letter Writing and Resume Making 2 Technical Report Writing 3 Email Drafting and Etiquettes 1 Delivering Effective Speeches 2 Participating in Group Discussions 2 Winning at Personal Interviews 2

Unit 6: Grammar and Vocabulary: Hours: 10 Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Topic

Weightage: 17% of

Minimum Number Hours Tenses and the concept of time 3 Active and Passive Constructions 1 Direct Indirect Speech 2 Prepositions 1 Conditionals 1 Idioms, Confusables, One-word Substitutes, Synonyms, 2 Antonyms

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Recommended Study Material:


Text Books: 1. Contemporary Business Communication by Scott Over 2. Basic Business Communication, 10th Edition by Lesikar and Flatley 3. Developing Communication Skills by Krishna Mohan & Meera Banerji Reference Books: 1. Written Communication in English by Freeman Sardh 2. ABC of Common Grammatical Errors by Nigel B.Turton 3. English for Technical Communication Volume 2&2 Combined by Laxminarayan R K

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AP701 Seminar / Assignment / Miniprojects / Library

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M. Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme

SYLLABI
(Semester 2)

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

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BT705 - IMMUNOLOGY Total credits: 27 A.Objective of the course. To introduce the architecture of the immune system and various aspects of immunity and immune responses. To understand the role of various cells and molecules in innate and adaptive immunity To introduce to the concepts of antigens and antibodies, their types and structures and how diversity is generated among antibody molecules. To elaborate the role of B and T cells in humoral and cell mediated immunity To understand the mechanisms of pathogeneses and elicitation of immune response during various bacterial, parasitic and viral infections. To know in detail the implications of inflammation, hypersensitivity and immune deficiencies on health of the host. Understanding various reactions of antigens and antibodies and their applications To apply the knowledge of behaviour of immune system and molecules involved therein towards development of diagnostic methods and vaccines. B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 2

1 2 3 4 5

Immune system and immunity Mechanisms of host defense-I Mechanisms of host defense-II The immune system in health and disease Immunotechnology

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 20%

Unit 1

Immune system and immunity 9h Innate and adaptive immunity, organs of the immune system, cells and molecules involved in innate and adaptive immunity, antigens and antibodies, structure and functions of antibody molecules, generation of antibody diversity Mechanisms of host defense-I Humoral and cell mediated immune responses, B and T cell epitopes, primary and secondary immune modulation, antigen processing and presentation, MHC molecules Mechanisms of host defense-II Activation and differentiation of B and T cells the complement system, immune effectors mechanisms, mechanisms of pathogeneses, immune responses during bacterial, parasitic and viral infections The immune system in health and disease Inflammation, hypersensitivity and autoimmunity, immune deficiencies, transplantation immunology Immunotechnology Antigen and antibody reactions, principles of immunodiagnostics, hybridoma technology, monoclonal antibodies, antibody engineering, vaccines 9h

Unit 2

20%

Unit 3

9h

20%

Unit 4 Unit 5

9h 9h

20% 20%

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:

The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of

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continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

Student learning outcome

After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: Understand the immune system, various aspects of immunity and immune responses and the role of various cells and molecules in the innate and adaptive immunity. Imbibe the concepts of antigens and antibodies, their types and structures and how diversity is generated in antibody molecules. Elaborate the role of B and T cells in humoral and cell mediated immunity. Delineate the mechanisms of pathogeneses and immune response during various bacterial, parasitic and viral infections Know the implications of inflammation, hypersensitivity and immune deficiencies on health of the host. Understand the various reactions of antigens and antibodies. To apply the principles of immunological processes in the development of diagnostic methods and vaccines. F Recommended Study Material: 1. Kuby Immunology by Thomos J. Kindt, Richard A. Goldsby, Barbara A. Osborne, Sixth Edition W. H. Freeman and Company, New York (2007) 2. Immunobiology by Charles A. Janeway, Jr., Paul Travers, Mark Walport, Mark J. Shlomchik; Sixth Edition, Garland Science (2005) 3. Prescotts, Microbiology by Joanne M. Willey, Linda M. Sherwood, Christopher J. Woolverton, Seventh edition. McGraw Hill (2008).

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BT706 - GENETICS AND BIOCHEMISTRY Total credits: 27 A. Objectives of the course To introduce subject of genetics by giving a brief historical overview and by discussing the principles of Mendelian inheritance and its extensions. To learn the use of mutations and complementation test in genetic analysis. To know various genetic disorders and their genetic basis. To understand the various mechanisms of gene transfer in microorganism and extra chromosomal inheritance in detail. To discuss in detail the structures and functions of various biomolecules with particular emphasis on proteins. To understand the pathways involved in metabolism of various biomolecules. To elaborate structure, functions and characteristics of enzymes and enzyme kinetics. B. Outline of the Course Sr.No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 2

1 2 3 4 5

Basics of genetics Genetics of microorganisms Structure and functions of biomolecules Metabolism of biomolecules Principles of enzyme catalysis

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr.No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 20%

Unit 1

Unit 2

Basics of genetics 9h Brief history, Mendelian principles and its extensions, mutations and their use in genetic analysis, complementation test, linkage, inheritance in mitochondria and chloroplast genes, pedigree analysis, genetic disorders Genetics of microorganisms 9h Methods of gene transfer in microorganisms, extrachromosomal genetic elements and their mainteance, tetrad analysis Structure and functions of biomolecules 9h Composition, structure and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, conformations of proteins, protein folding Metabolism of biomolecules 9h Concepts of metabolism, major metabolic pathways for carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleotides and vitamins, regulation of metabolism Principles of enzyme catalysis 9h Structure and characteristics of enzymes, enzyme catalysed reactions, kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, enzyme activation and inhibition, purification of enzymes

20%

Unit 3

20%

Unit 4

20%

Unit 5

20%

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy

The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of

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continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

Student learning outcome

After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: Understand the basic principles of Mendelian inheritance and its extensions. Know the use of mutations and complementation test in genetic analysis. Understand genetic disorders and their genetic basis. Develop insights into various mechanisms of gene transfer in microorganism and extra chromosomal inheritance. Get knowledge about the structures and functions of various biomolecules with particular emphasis on proteins. Understand the pathways involved in metabolism of various biomolecules and appreciate the complexities involved therein. Understand in detail the structure, functions and characteristics of enzymes and enzyme kinetics. F Recommended Study Material 1. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry by David Nelson and Michael Cox , Fifth Edition Freeman Company. (2005) 2. Biochemistry by Jeremy Berg, John Tymoczko and Lubert Stryer, Fifth Edition, Freeman Company; 3. Enzymes: Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Clinical Chemistry by Trevor Palmer. EastWest Press Edition (2004) 4. Principles of Genetics by R. snusted, Wiley publication 5. Principles of Genetic analysis by F.Griffith, W.H.Freeman 6. Principles of Genetics by Tamarin, Mcgraw-Hill 7. Principles of Genetics by R. snusted, Wiley publication 8. Principles of Genetics by Tamarin, Mcgraw-Hill 9. Molecular Genetics by Uldis Streips, Wiley Liss 10. Molecular Genetics of Bacteria by Robert Glass, Academic Press

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BT707 - BIOPROCESS TECHNOLOGY Total credits: 27 A. Objective of the course. To introduce and appreciate the scope and future of bioprocess technology To learn how microorganisms can be screened for production of metabolites and activities. To understand how process fluids, air and other utilities can be sterilized and asceptic conditions maintained. To understand on what basis cultivation methods are decided for a particular bioprocess. To know the types of bioreactor configurations available and the principles of their design To understand the role of mass and heat transfer, aeration and mixing in bioprocesses. To introduce to various methods of cultivation of microbial, plant and animal cells. To know how bioprocesses can be controlled. To elaborate the various methods available for recovery and purification of biotechnological products B. Outline of the Course Sr.No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 2

1 2 3 4 5

Basic concepts of bioprocess technology Principles of reactor design and operation Fundamentals of process design Cultivation methods and process control Recovery and purification of products

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr.No Title of the units Min hours of

Unit 1

Basic concepts of bioprocess technology 9h Scope and future of bioprocess technology, process organisms, screening for microorganisms/ activities, cultivation media and its optimization, sterilization of process fluids, air and utilities, control of contamination, improvement of productivity, use of recombinant organisms in bioprocessing Principles of reactor design and operation 9h

20%

Unit 2

20%

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Choosing the cultivation method, mechanically and nonmechanically agitated reactors, mass and heat transfer, aeration, mixing Fundamentals of process design 9h Stoichiometry and energetics of microbial growth and product formation, bioprocess kinetics, rheology of process fluids, process scale-up and its difficulties Cultivation methods and process control 9h Batch, fed batch and continuous cultivation, immobilized cell systems, solid substrate cultivation, mixed cultures, control of bioprocesses Recovery and purification of products 9h Strategies to recover and purify products, separation of insoluble products, cell disruption, separation of soluble products, concentration of biological products with special emphasis on proteins, product formulation- microbial cells and soluble products

20%

20%

20%

D Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:

The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members

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on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

Student learning outcome

After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: Know and appreciate the scope and future of bioprocess technology. Understand how microorganisms can be screened for production of metabolites and activities. Understand how process fluids, air and other utilities can be sterilized and asceptic conditions maintained. Delineate on what basis cultivation methods are decided for a particular bioprocess. Know the types of bioreactor configurations available and the principles of their design Appreciate the role of mass and heat transfer, aeration and mixing in bioprocesses. Know various methods of cultivation of microbial, plant and animal cells and how bioprocesses can be controlled. To elaborate the various methods available for recovery and purification of biotechnological products F Recommended Study Material: 1. Biochemical engineering by Aiba, Humphrey and Millis . University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo 2. Biochemical Engineering fundamentals by Bailey and Ollis. McGraw Hill Book Co. New York 3. Principles of Fermentation technology by Stanbury, Whitaker and Hall, Pegamon Press, Oxford

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BT708 - INDUSTRIAL BIOTECHNOLGY Total credits: 27 A. Objective of the course. To elaborate on the scope of biotechnology based products as compared to chemically derived products. To introduce to the role of regulatory, IPR and biosafety issues concerning the development of biotechnological industry To give an overview of bioentrepreneurship and biotechnology industry in India. To understand the production of various primary and secondary metabolites, bioinoculants, recombinant proteins, probiotics and neutraceuticals. To provide insights into regulations in biotechnology. B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 2

BT/MI 708: INDUSTRIAL BIOTECHNOLGY 1 2 3 4 5 Introduction to business of biotechnology Biotechnological products-I Biotechnological products-II Biopharmaceuticals and neutraceuticals Introduction to regulations in biotechnology

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C Detailed syllabus Sr. No. Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4 Unit 5

Introduction to business of biotechnology Scope of biotechnology based products, competition with chemical synthesis based products, economic regulatory and IPR issues, patenting of processes and products, biotechnology companies- care and nurturing, bioentrepreneurship, an overview of the biotechnology industry in India Biotechnological products-I Production and applications of amino acids (lysine and glutamic acid), citric acid, ethanol, vitamin B12, xanthan gum Biotechnological products-II Production and applications of amylase, rifampicin, lovastatin, bioinoculants Biopharmaceuticals and neutraceuticals Production of recombinant proteins, biotransformations, probiotics and neutraceuticals Introduction to regulations in biotechnology Manufacturing facility for biotechnology based products-block flow diagram and conceptual layout, Good manufacturing practices- cGMP guidelines, principles of quality assurance and quality control, validation of facility, equipment and materials, bio waste treatment and disposal,

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h 9h

20% 20%

D Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:

The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of

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continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

Student learning outcome

After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: Elaborate on the scope of biotechnology based products as compared to chemically derived products. Understand the role of regulatory, IPR and biosafety issues concerning the development of biotechnological industry. Get an overview of bioentrepreneurship and biotechnology industry in India. Understand the production of various primary and secondary metabolites, bioinoculants, recombinant proteins, probiotics and neutraceuticals. Obtain insights into regulations in biotechnology F Recommended Study Material: 1. Comprehensive Biotechnology by Murray Moo-Young, H.W. Blanch, S. Drew, D.I.C (Eds). Wang Pergamon Press Ltd. 2. Biotechnology by H J Rehm and G Reed (Eds) Wiley-VCH (1985) 3. Industrial Microbiology by Prescott and Dunn 4. Industrial Microbiology by A H Patel 5. Handbook of Enology Vol 1, 2nd Edition, Pascal Ribereau-Gayon, Denis Dubourdieu, Bernard Don`eche, Aline Lonvaud (Eds), John Wiley & Sons Ltd. (2000) 6. Industrial Microbiology, L E Casida (2007), New Age International Ltd. 7. Basic Biotechnology, 3rd edition, Colin Ratledge (Ed) Cambridge University Press (2006) 8. Handbook of Microbiological quality control- Pharmaceutical and Medical devices. Baird, Hodges and Denyer (Eds), Taylor and Francis, London (2000) 9. Quality in the manufacture of medicine and other health care products by John Sharp (2000)

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BT710 - COMPUTATIONAL SKILLS


Total credits: 27 A. Objective of the course. To understand the basic concepts of mathematics relevant to biotechnology. To introduce to the concepts of modern computing with respect to the computer architecture, input output devices, storage devices and various operating systems To introduce to the database systems, creation of databases and various types of databases To provide an basic insights into computer programming with particular reference to biocomputing languages To discuss various applications of computers in biological sciences such as use of computers and softwares in data plotting and analysis, use of web based programs for solving biological problems Semester - 2

B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 3h 3h 3h 3h 3h

1 2 3 4 5

BASIC MATHEMATICS BASIC CONCEPTS OF COMPUTING INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE SYSTEMS COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTERS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

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C. Detailed syllabus. Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

BASIC MATHEMATICS Functions and graphs, 2D coordinate geometry, 3D geometry, basic trigonometric functions, matrix algebra BASIC CONCEPTS OF COMPUTING Overview and concepts of a computer system, input and output devices, storage devices, main circuit board of a PC, memory, types of processing, types of modern computing, an overview of computer viruses, introduction to operating systems INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE SYSTEMS Concepts of various types of databases, data abstraction, data models, instances and schemes, E-R model, Network data model, Hierachial data model, database software, text databases, multimedia databases COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS Algorithms, computer languages, fundamentals of programming, introduction to biocomputing languages- C and Perl APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTERS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY Use of computers in solving biological problems, softwares for biological sciences: data plotting and analysis, bioinformatics and biostatistics, the internet and its resources

Unit 2

9h

20%

Unit 3

9h

20%

Unit 4

9h

20%

Unit 5

9h

20%

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:

The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary

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and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

E.

Student learning outcome

After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: To understand the basic concepts of mathematics relevant to biotechnology. Understand the concepts of modern computing with respect to the computer architecture, input output devices, storage devices and various operating systems Know the concepts of database systems, creation of databases and various types of databases Will get basic insights into computer programming with particular reference to biocomputing languages Able to know the applications of computers in biological sciences such as use of computers and softwares in data plotting and analysis, use of web based programs for solving biological problems

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AP702 Seminar / Assignment / Miniprojects / Library

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M. Sc. (Biotechnology) Programme

SYLLABI
(Semester 3)

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

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BT 801 - ADVANCED GENETICS AND GENETIC ENGINEERING Total credits: 27 A. Objective of the course To learn the basic principles and techniques of genome mapping and analysis. To understand the principles of population genetics and its applications in conservation and medicine To provide insights into basic concepts and applications of genetic engineering. To understand various aspects of genomics and proteomics B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 3

1 2 3 4 5

Mapping and analysis of genomes Population genetics and its applications Concepts of genetic engineering I Concepts of genetic engineering II Genomics and proteomics

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Mapping and analysis of genomes Chromosome mapping in eukaryotes, phenotypic v/s molecular markers, different kinds of DNA markers for genome analysis, mapping with molecular markers, mapping by using somatic cell hybrids, development of mapping population in plants, mapping genes by interrupted mating, studying gene location and structure, genome sequencing, human genome project, salient features of human genome Quantitative genetics and population genetics Inheritance of complex traits, analysis of quantitative traits, heritability and its measurements, QTL mapping, the theory of allele frequencies, natural selection, random genetic drift, populations in genetic equilibrium, genetic constitution of a population, basic principles of conservation genetics, role of genomics in conservation, applications of population genetics Concepts of genetic engineering I Enzymes for genetic engineering, vectors and hosts for cloning and expression, cloning strategies, cloning in expression vectors, gene silencing Concepts of genetic engineering II Construction of gene libraries, screening of libraries, promoter isolation and deletion studies, site directed mutagenesis, in vitro mutagenesis and deletion techniques, gene knock out in bacterial and eukaryotic systems, applications of genetic engineering, gene therapy Genomics and proteomics The genome, transcriptome and proteome, introduction to genomics, comparative genomics, functional genomics, methods for gene expression analysis, metagenomics, introduction to proteomics, the need for proteomics; separation, identification, quantitation and analysis of proteins for proteomic studies, interaction proteomics, applications of genomics and proteomics

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

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D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

E. Student learning outcomes After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: 1. Understand the basic principles and techniques of genome mapping and analysis. 2. Know the principles of population genetics, its applications in conservation and medicine 3. Get insights into basic concepts of genetic engineering and its applications 4. Understand various aspects of genomics and proteomics and their applications. F. Recommended Study Material 1. Principles of genetics by D.P. Snustad and M. J. Simmons, Fifth edition, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 2010 2. Gene cloning and manipulation by C. Howe, Cambride, 2007. 3. Genetic Engineering by S. Mitra, MacMillan, 2005 4. Genomics fundamentals and applications by S. Choudhuri and D. B. Carlson, Informa, 2009 5. Microbial functional genomics. Zhou et al., John Wiley and Sons, 2004 6. Introduction to genomics by A. Lesk, Oxford University Press, 2007. 7. Principles of Gene Manipulation and Genomics, Third Edition (2006) S.B. Primrose, S.B. and R.M. Twyman, Blackwell Publishing Company, Oxford, UK. 2. 8. Gene Cloning and DNA Analysis: An Introduction. Fifth Edition (2006) T.A. Brown, Wiley-Blackwell, UK. 9. Molecular Cloning. A Laboratory Manual. Volume 1-3. Third Edition (2001) A. Sambrook and D.W. Russell, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, New York, USA. 10. Principles of proteomics by R. M. Twyman, Taylor and Francis, 2008.

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BT802 - PLANT AND ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Total credits: 27 A. Objectives of the course To understand the basic concepts of plant and animal development. To understand the applications of genetically engineered plant and animals. To train students on theoretical and practical aspects of plant tissue culture by providing case studies. B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 3

1 2 3 4 5

Basic concepts of development Plant development Animal development Genetic engineering of plant and animals Plant tissue culture and its applications

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr.No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Basic concepts of development Potency, commitment, specification, induction, competence, determination and differentiation, morphogenetic gradients, cell fate and cell lineages, stem cells, genomic equivalence and the cytoplasmic determinants, imprinting, mutants and transgenics in analysis of development Principles of plant development Embryo sac development and double fertilization in plants, embryogenesis, establishment of symmetry in plants, seed formation and germination, shoot and root development, leaf development, transition to flowering, floral development in Arabidopsis, senescence Principles of animal development Production of gametes, cell surface molecules in sperm egg recognition in animals, zygote formation, cleavage, blastula formation, embryonic fields, gastrulation and formation of germ layers in animals, axes and pattern formation in Drosophila, amphibian and chick, organogenesis, differentiation of neurons, environmental regulation of normal development Transgenic plants and animals Introduction to transgene technology, transgenic plants and animals; gene transfer strategies for plant and animals, molecular farming and breeding, marker assisted breeding in plants and animals, improvement of plant and animals for specific traits using transgene technology- case studies, regulations for use of transgenic plant and animals Plant tissue culture and its applications Plant tissue culture, culture media and growth hormones, micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, anther culture, somatic hybridization, somaclonal variation, applications of plant tissue culture with case studies.

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

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D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

E. Student learning outcome After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: Understand the basic concepts of plant and animal development. Understand the use of genetic engineering of plant and animals and their limitations. Get insights into the regulations for the use of genetically modified organisms. Get trained on theoretical and practical aspects of plant tissue culture by providing case studies. F. Recommended Study Material: 1. Introduction to Plant Tissue Culture by MK Razdan 2. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture by John H Dodds, Lorin W Roberts 3. Plant Tissue Culture by S. S. Bhojwani & M. K. Razdan 4. Plant Anatomy by Esau 5. Plant Physiology by Lincoln Taiz, Eduardo Zeiger 6. Patterns in plant development by Taylor A. Steeves, Ian M. Sussex 7. Mechanisms in plant development by Ottoline Leyser and Stephen Day 8. Molecular genetics of plant development by Stephen H. Howell and Stephen Herbert Howel 9. Plant biotechnology-The genetic manipulation of plants by Adrian Slater et al., Oxford University Press, 2003.

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BT803 - ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS Total credits: 27 A. Objective of the course To provide knowledge regarding various forms of pollution, its monitoring and methods for its control. To understand the biodegradation of various recalcitrant compounds by microorganisms. To learn various strategies for bioremediation of polluted sites and wastes. To provide basic insights into various bioinformatics tools and techniques. To understand the use of bioinformatics tools and techniques in research and industry. B. Outline of the Course Sr.No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 3

1 2 3 4 5

Pollution, its monitoring and control Biodegradation of pollutants Bioremediation Essentials of bioinformatics I Essentials of bioinformatics II

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr.No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

Pollution, its monitoring and control Scope of environmental biotechnology, pollution and its types, effects of pollution on health and environment, environmental monitoring, overview of environmental laws in India, pollution control strategies Biodegradation of pollutants and recalcitrant compounds Recalcitrant molecules, basis for recalcitrance, xenobiotic compounds, growth linked biodegradation and cometabolism, effect of chemical structure on biodegradation, biodegradation of hydrocarbons, dyes, pesticides, lignin, biodegradable plastics Bioremediation Bioavailability, approaches to bioremediation, waste characterization methods, methods of liquid and solid waste treatment and disposal Essentials of Bioinformatics I Introduction to bioinformatics-goals, scope, applications and limitations, introduction to biological databases, bioinformatics tools available, extraction of knowledge from resources, scoring matrices Essentials of Bioinformatics II sequence based bioinformatics tools, phylogenetic tree construction methods and programs Structure analysis and validation, 3 D structure visualization of protein, classification and comparison of protein 3D structures

Unit 2

9h

20%

Unit 3

9h

20%

Unit 4

9h

20%

Unit 5

9h

20%

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D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

E.

Student learning outcome

After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: Knowledge regarding various categories of pollution, its monitoring and methods for control will be obtained. Understanding of mechanisms of biodegradation of various recalcitrant compounds will be gained. Various strategies involved in bioremediation will be known. Basic insights into bioinformatics tools and techniques and their application in research and industry will be gained F. Recommended Study Material 1. Environmental Biotechnology by Alan Scragg, Oxford University Press, 2005. 2. Environmental Biotechnology by B. Bhattacharya, Oxford University Press, 2007. 3. Biodegradation and Bioremediation by Martin Alexander, Academic Press, 1999. 4. Essential Bioinformatics by Jin Xiong, Cambridge University Press, 2006. 5. Environmental Biotechnology by G. M. Evans and J. C. Furlong, Wiley, 2003. 6. Bioinformatics-An introduction, J.J.Ramsden, Springer, 2009. 7. Introduction to bioinformatics by A. Lesk, Oxford University Press, 2008.

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BT804 - ADVANCED BIOPROCESS TECHNOLOGY AND BIOPHARMACEUTICALS Total credits: 27 A. Objective of the course To understand concepts of metabolic engineering and systems biology. To provide insights regarding the various process related considerations in the cultivation and exploitation of plant and animal cells. To provide basic knowledge of drug discovery and development approaches. To provide in depth knowledge of various biopharmaceuticals and their purification and formulation techniques. B. Outline of the Course Sr. No Title of the units Minimum number of hours 9h 9h 9h 9h 9h Semester - 3

1 2 3 4 5

Metabolic engineering and systems biology Bioprocess considerations in using animal and plant cell cultures Drug design and development Biopharmaceuticals Downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals

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C. Detailed syllabus Sr.No

Title of the units

Minimu m number of hours 9h 20%

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Metabolic engineering and systems biology Improvement of microbial strains and bioprocesses, overproduction of microbial products, genetically engineered organisms in bioprocesses, scaling up of genetically engineered cell culture fermentation, concepts of systems biology, introduction to flux control analysis, metabolic control analysis, fermentation modeling Bioprocess considerations in using animal and plant cell cultures Approaches for cultivation of algal, plant and animal cells, comparison with cultivation of microbial cells, bioreactor considerations, stem cell cultivation, methods for microalgal cultivation, products of animal cell cultures, medical applications of bioprocess engineering, biofuels, fermentation economics Drug discovery and development Introduction to drug discovery and development, sources of drugs, approaches to new drug discovery, role of molecular recognition in drug design, enzymes and receptors as drug targets, prodrug design and applications, computer aided drug design, preclinical and clinical trials Biopharmaceuticals Concepts of pharmaceuticals, biologics and biopharmaceuticals, sources of biopharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals in production and research- cytokines, hemopoetic growth factors, hormones, blood products, therapeutic enzymes, nucleic acid therapeatutics, case studies Downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals Principles of protein separation, intracellular and extracellular proteins, protein stability and solubility, various protein purification techniques at industrial scale, case studies for purification of biopharmaceuticals, formulation of biopharmaceutical products, protein engineering

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

9h

20%

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D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy: The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board teaching to power-point presentations. Practical sessions will be conducted in a highly equipped laboratory. Experiments will be carried out by students individually. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be also conducted by respective faculty members on weekly bases. Course materials will be provided to the students from various primary and secondary sources of information. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their performance.

E. Student learning outcome After the successful completion of the course a student will be able to: To know the concepts of metabolic engineering and systems biology. Insights regarding the various process related considerations in the cultivation and exploitation of plant and animal cells will be gained. To understand the drug discovery strategies and development approaches. To provide in depth knowledge of various biopharmaceuticals and their purification and development techniques. F Recommended Study Material: 1. An introduction to drug design by S. N. Pandya, New Age International publishers 2. Fermentation microbiology and biotechnology by E.M.T. El Mansi and C.F.A. Bryce. Taylor and Francis, 1999. 3. Text book of Drug design and discovery by Larsen, Taylor and Francis, 2002. 4. Biopharmaceuticals by Gary Walsh 5. Biopharmaceutical drug design and development by Pong and Rojanasakul, Humana Press, 2008.

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AP801 Seminar / Assignment / Miniprojects / Library

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