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Deborah Parrent may never feel
the need to tuck her Beretta into
her purse when she goes out, but
she recently obtained a concealed
weapon permit just in case.
“It’s a right I have, and I don’t
want to lose that,” said the Duryea
woman. “I want to
be able to protect
my family if I have
to, though I pray
that I don’t have
to.”
She is among an
estimated 20,500
Luzerne County
residents with
concealed-weapon permits. That’s
more than 8 percent of the county’s
adult population, and the number is
growing.
The Luzerne County Sheriff’s
Department issued 5,216 gun per-
mits last year – a 2,326 increase
from 2010. The county exceeded 50
percent of last year’s permit issuanc-
es by the end of May, with 2,912,
according to statistics supplied by
Interim Sheriff John Robshaw.
Permits cost $20 and are valid for
five years. Permit holders may keep
CONCEALED WEAPONS: “I want to be able to protect my family if I
have to, though I pray that I don’t have to.”
Area packing heat
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Safety fears,
gun rights
prompt action
By SHEENA DELAZIO
and JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
sdelazio@timesleader.com
jandes@timesleader.com
Concerns about
‘stand your
ground.’ Page 14A
Carrying in plain
sight not illegal.
Page 14A
MORE
I NSI DE
See GUNS, Page 14A
INSIDE
A NEWS
Obituaries 2A, 7A
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
B PEOPLE
Birthdays 8B
C SPORTS
Weather 14C
D BUSINESS
Stocks 3D
E VIEWS
Editorials 3E
F ETC.
Puzzles 2F
Books 5F
G CLASSIFIED
Game 2
Devils, Kings
battle for title.
Story, 1C
HAZLETON – Backers of
a new video about im-
migrants’ roles in Hazle-
ton’s past and current revi-
talization say it is a step
forward in efforts to better
integrate Latinos into the
community.
The video, “Hazleton:
Land of Dreams of the
Immigrant,” was show-
cased at what Greater Ha-
zleton Chamber of Com-
merce President Donna
Palermo said was one of
the organization’s best-
attended networking mix-
ers ever, with 159 members
and guests registered for
the event held Wednesday
at Capriotti’s Palazzo in
McAdoo, just south of
Hazleton in Schuylkill
County.
The 19-minute video
focuses on the roles Eu-
Hazleton immigrants past, present spotlighted
Local video compares role
of Latino residents with
groups from the past.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
SUBMITTED IMAGE
The title screen for the video ‘Hazleton: Land of Dreams
of the Immigrant.’
EDITOR’S
NOTE: First
of a two-part
series on
recognizing
diversity in
two parts of
Luzerne
County.
COMING
MONDAY: A
look at
diversity in
the Moun-
tain Top
area and
how the
region is
celebrating
it.
See DREAMS, Page 8A
BELLEFONTE — Before his
arrest on child molestation
charges seven months ago, Jerry
Sandusky was widely considered
a living Penn State sports legend
and the founder of an exemplary
organization that worked with at-
risk children.
Then came
allegations,
spelled out in a
pair of grand ju-
ry reports, that
a monster was
concealed be-
neath a veneer
of respectabili-
ty and charitable leadership, a
man who would target and
groom boys systematically to
feed predatory sexual desires.
Despite Sandusky’s repeated
Jerry Sandusky trial could
go on for several weeks
About 250 reporters have
registered to attend and 29
TV trucks are expected.
By MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
See TRIAL, Page 8A
Sandusky
The consequences of austerity
cleave through the preliminary
budgets of Luzerne County’s 11
school districts: About 45 posi-
tions cut by furlough or attrition,
programs curbed–particularly at
the elementary level – class sizes
growing, emergency fund bal-
ances shrinking and taxes poised
to rise for most
county resi-
dents.
And adminis-
trators warn
that, despite
two years of
belt-tightening,
the proverbial
corner has not
been turned. In
fact, no corner
is even in sight.
“I think we’re
in a crisis,” Ha-
zleton Area
Acting Superin-
tendent Francis
Antonelli said,
“and the crisis could turn into a
disaster.”
By state law, all school boards
had to pass preliminary budgets
by May 31. Board members and
administrators stress things are
still very fluid and those blue-
prints can be substantially al-
tered before final adoption –
votes that must occur by June 30
– but here are some highlights:
• Property tax increases for
Luzerne County residents are on
the agenda in eight districts,
ranging froma1.9 percent hike in
Dallas to a 4.7 percent jump in
Lake-Lehman. Even where taxes
weren’t raised, trade-offs were
made. Crestwood opted to cur-
tail elementary music, art and
language offerings, sparking pub-
lic outcry. The Wilkes-Barre Area
School board rejected a prelimi-
Districts
face hard
financial
courses
Hard-pressed area schools
turn to cuts, tax hikes, raiding
reserves or all of the above.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See SCHOOLS, Page 14A
“I think
we’re in a
crisis, and
the crisis
could turn
into a di-
saster.”
Francis
Antonelli
Hazleton Area
acting
superintendent
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Alesso, Sara
Dzanis, Keith
Goch, Stephen
Hildebrand, Robert
Jacobs, Marcella
McDonough, John
Michelle, Sanai
O’Dell, Pamela
Sakowski, Therese
Snyder, Gerald
Sorber, Margaret
Swan, George
Winnicki, Elizabeth
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 7A
PRASHANT SHITUT
President & CEO
(570) 970-7158
pshitut@timesleader.com
JOE BUTKIEWICZ
VP/Executive Editor
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DENISE SELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Officer
(570) 970-7203
dsellers@timesleader.com
ALLISON UHRIN
VP/Chief Financial Officer
(570) 970-7154
auhrin@timesleader.com
LISA DARIS
VP/HR and Administration
(570) 829-7113
ldaris@timesleader.com
MICHAEL PRAZMA
VP/Circulation
(570) 970-7202
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R
obert D. Hildebrand, 82, sur-
rounded by his family, died
peacefully Thursday, May 31, 2012,
at his home in Charlton, N.Y.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on May 27,
1930, he was the eldest son of the
lateRobert W. andCarolineElterich
Hildebrand.
Bob was a graduate of city
schools and the Perkiomen Prep
School of Pennsburg, Pa., and Penn-
sylvania State College.
He served in the reserves in the
Pennsylvania National Guard and
field artillery.
Mr. Hildebrand was employed by
GE in the Test Engineering Pro-
gram, with assignments in various
departments throughout the com-
pany and later transferred to the
Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in
Niskayuna, N.Y., where he retired in
1992.
Bob was a former club secretary
and board member of the Guan-Ho-
Ha Fish and Game Club on Rector
Road in Glenville, N.Y. He was an
Endowment Life Member of the Na-
tional Rifle Association, American
Trap Association and the New York
State Trap Association.
Bob had a special interest in fam-
ilygenealogy. He tracedhis earlyan-
cestors back to 1635, immigrating
fromEngland, Prussia andDresden,
Saxony (Germany), where they
traveled by the ship Planter settling
inConnecticut, NewYorkandPenn-
sylvania.
Bob was a member of the Wyom-
ing Valley Genealogy Society and
Luzerne County Historical Society
of Pennsylvania.
He was predeceased by his broth-
er, John L. Hildebrand, in 1993.
Survivors include his wife of 55
years, Beverly F. (Falkinburg) Hil-
debrand; children, Carolyn Hilde-
brand, Greenwich, N.Y.; Eric Hilde-
brand and his wife, Barbara, Rotter-
dam, N.Y.; RebeccaEmerichandher
husband, Kevin, and Gregory Hilde-
brandandhis fiancée, Staci Cassidy,
all of Charlton, N.Y. He also leaves
behindhis cherishedgrandchildren,
Caia Ross, Elias Hildebrand-Willig,
Rayna and Austin Hildebrand, Alys-
sa and Alex Hildebrand, Nicholas
and Jessica Emerich and Alexis and
Jocelyn Cassidy; one great-grand-
daughter, Clover Ross. Bob also
leaves behind several nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
Funeral services will be held
11 a.m. Thursday, June 7, at
the Lutheran Church of the Good
Shepherd, 547 Saratoga Road, Glen-
ville, N.Y., with Deron Milleville of-
ficiating. Relatives and friends are
cordially invited and may call at the
Glenville Funeral Home Wednes-
day, June 6, from 5 to 8 p.m. Inter-
ment will be held at Sweetman
Cemetery, Charlton, N.Y.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made in Bob’s name to the
Lutheran Church of the Good Shep-
herd.
Online condolences may be sent
to www.glenvillefuneralhome.com.
Robert Hildebrand
May 31, 2012
K
eithAllanDzanis, 41, of Pittston
Township, passed away Thurs-
day, May 31, 2012.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on January
6, 1971, he was a son of Margaret
Gregori Dzanis and the late Joseph
Dzanis.
Keith loved the outdoors, fishing
and gardening. He was self-employ-
ed as a landscaper.
He was preceded in death by his
father, Joseph Dzanis.
Surviving are his mother, Marga-
ret Dzanis; grandmother, Lena Gre-
gori; brothers, Joseph and his wife,
Kathy, Ashley; Mark and his wife,
Debbie, Stroudsburg; David and his
wife, Marie, Chicago, Ill.; sisters,
Cynthia Scott and husband Marty,
Tulsa Okla.; Lisa Ahmadifar and
husband Christopher, Dallas; and
girlfriend, Emma Netta of Pittston
Township.
Funeral services will be held
Monday at 10 a.m. from the Antho-
ny Recupero Funeral Home, 406
Susquehanna Ave., West Pittston.
Interment will be in West Pittston
Cemetery. Friends maycall Monday
from 9 to 10 a.m. at the funeral
home.
Keith Dzanis
May 31, 2012
S
ara (Arfanella) Alesso, of Pitt-
ston, passed away Saturday,
June 2, 2012 at Geisinger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Born in Pittston on October 11,
1922, shewas a daughter of thelate
Salvatore and Santa Bellanca Arfa-
nella.
In addition to her parents, she
was precededindeathby brothers,
Angelo and Louis Arfanella; sis-
ters, Josephine Bellanco, Grace
Bonfanti, Rose Pisano and Mary
Colondo.
She is survived by husband Sam
Alesso, as well as numerous nieces
and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held for Sara on Tuesday at
9:30 a.m. from St. Joseph Marello
Parish, (St. Rocco’s R.C. Church)
Pittston. Interment services will
follow at St. Rocco’s R.C. Cemete-
ry, Pittston Township. There will
be no calling hours.
Funeral services are entrusted
to Graziano Funeral Home Inc.,
Pittston Township. Online condo-
lences may be made at graziano-
funeralhome.com.
Sara Alesso
June 2, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 7A
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 3-1-8
Monday: 4-7-4
Tuesday: 5-1-3
Wednesday: 5-9-0
Thursday: 1-5-4
Friday: 8-4-9
Saturday: 8-3-9
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 9-2-3-9
Monday: 1-7-4-5
Tuesday: 9-6-3-4
Wednesday: 1-9-6-7
Thursday: 5-7-9-6
Friday: 4-0-0-3
Saturday: 3-4-0-1
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 6-1-8-2-9
Monday: 7-9-5-2-6
Tuesday: 2-3-8-9-3
Wednesday: 0-3-8-0-8
Thursday: 9-9-9-4-6
Friday: 3-4-5-8-6
Saturday: 4-5-1-6-9
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 02-14-15-23-24
Monday: 08-13-21-23-29
Tuesday: 09-11-22-26-30
Wednesday: 02-14-17-29-30
Thursday: 08-09-25-27-29
Friday: 02-08-09-10-14
Saturday: 05-12-14-16-19
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 7-9-6
Monday: 1-9-8
Tuesday: 7-5-0 (1-9-4, double
draw)
Wednesday: 5-4-4
Thursday: 5-5-1
Friday: 5-3-8
Saturday: 5-5-5
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 8-2-1-8
Monday: 5-3-7-8
Tuesday: 3-1-8-9
Wednesday: 9-6-6-2
Thursday: 7-6-2-3
Friday: 4-8-5-3
Saturday: 2-1-3-5
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 1-5-6-5-5
Monday: 3-9-7-7-5
Tuesday: 1-4-1-7-7
Wednesday: 7-4-0-8-3
Thursday: 9-4-2-2-6
Friday: 3-3-3-0-2
Saturday: 2-6-2-9-7
Cash 5
Sunday: 02-03-24-28-34
Monday: 03-05-08-32-41
Tuesday: 19-20-25-39-42
Wednesday: 06-07-16-29-40
Thursday: 01-07-11-12-24
Friday: 03-04-30-34-39
Saturday: 03-21-25-35-39
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 05-25-30-37-48-49
Thursday: 18-27-31-34-40-42
Powerball
Wednesday: 09-10-24-52-56
powerball: 14
Saturday: 09-10-17-29-45
powerball: 33
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 02-14-29-53-55
Megaball: 31
Megaplier: 03
Friday: 02-27-38-46-52
Megaball: 45
Megaplier: 03
WEEKLY LOTTERY
SUMMARY
what my real name was, and I
told him. He then changed it to
Tony Bennett, so Bob Hope
gave me my name.”
Bennett then sang a wonder-
ful rendition of “Cold, Cold
Heart” followed by equally di-
vine versions of “Steppin’ Out”
and “The Way You Look To-
night.”
With the simple words, “I’d
he said as he reminisced about
the early days of his career. “It’s
true; we were discovered on an
amateur hour. Pearl Bailey saw
it and booked us. And Bob Hope
saw that and took me on the
road.
“He asked me what my name
was and I told him Joe Barrie,”
Bennett said. “He told me that
was no good, and asked me
WILKES-BARRE – The F.M.
Kirby Center for the Performing
Arts capped its silver-anniver-
sary season Saturday with a
sold-out performance by the
golden-voiced Tony Bennett.
The legendary crooner, born
85 years ago as Anthony Domin-
ick Benedetto in Astoria,
Queens, has been delighting
audiences with his standards,
show tunes and jazz since the
early 1950s. After a career lull in
the 1970s and an amazing come-
back in the late 1980s and early
1990s, Bennett is still on quite a
roll, earning two more Grammy
awards earlier this year (he now
has 16 plus a Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award) with his most
recent album “Duets II.”
Bennett strolled onto the
stage at about 8:23, following a
six-song set by his daughter
Antonia, to the first of many
standing ovations from the
enthusiastic crowd.
In the middle of his first num-
ber, “Watch What Happens,”
Bennett stopped and thanked
the crowd for coming out. His
second tune, “They All
Laughed,” showed the singer is
still in command of his powerful
voice.
“Rosemary Clooney and I
were the first American Idols,”
like to sing some of my records
for you,” Bennett then rattled off
a series of classics, each one
worthy of consideration as one
of his signature songs.
He started with “Just In
Time” and followed with “Bou-
levard of Broken Dreams,”
which he told the crowd was his
first recording and his first hit
that enabled him to come to
Wilkes-Barre for the first time
many years ago.
Then he sang a splendid trio
of songs: “The Good Life,” “The
Shadow of Your Smile” and
“One For My Baby (and One
More for the Road).” Just when
you thought it couldn’t get any
better, he brought the house
down with “I Wanna Be
Around,” earning a rather spirit-
ed standing ovation at the sassy
song’s conclusion.
He garnered another standing
ovation after his next number,
“For Once In My Life,” and yet
another following “The Best Is
Yet To Come.”
He then reached the apex of
the evening with an absolutely
knock out version of “I Left My
Heart In San Francisco.”
After a few more tunes that
gave his stellar band a couple
more showcases, he ended his
1-hour, 10-minute performance
with “Smile” and “When You’re
Smiling.”
After several minutes of ap-
plause, Bennett came back to
the stage twice to acknowledge
the crowd, finally waving and a
blowing a big kiss to his adoring
fans as they cheered wildly and
pleaded for more.
Special guest for Saturday’s
show was Bennett’s daughter,
Antonia, who began the concert
with six standards of her own,
including nice renditions of
“Too Marvelous For Words” and
“S’Wonderful.” Later in the
evening, she joined her father
for a wonderful duet on a Sond-
heim tune that included a funny,
touching dance routine.
Bennett brings down house at Kirby
Classic crooner proves he still
has the singing chops to make
audience swoon at age 85.
R E V I E W
By BRAD PATTON
Times Leader Correspondent
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Tony Bennett is greeted Saturday night with a warm welcome at the F.M. Kirby Center after his
daughter sang five or six tunes.
WEST WYOMING – Keeping
your pooch legal and protected
was the focus of the inaugural
“Cause for Paws” event Saturday
in Dailey Park.
More than 100 pet owners
showed up to purchase licenses,
get their dogs vaccinated and
learn about other ways to protect
their pets.
Only 15 percent of all dogs in
Pennsylvania are properly licens-
edandvaccinated, saidstate Rep.
Phyllis Mundy, who participated
in the event along with area pet-
conscious organizations.
Statelawrequires all dogs tobe
licensed, Mundy said. The re-
quirement protects the pet and
the owner and provides much-
needed funds for kennel inspec-
tions, animal shelters and animal
control efforts across the state.
Mundy, D-Kingston, said she
could not estimate how many
dogs across the state are not li-
censed but said the amount of
lost revenue for Harrisburg could
be substantial.
Dog licenses only cost from
$6.45 to $8.45 and are readily
available at the Luzerne County
Courthouse, she said. About 40
licenses were purchased at Satur-
day’s event.
Laura Beers, who works for the
county, said that about 28,000
dog licenses were purchased last
year. If Luzerne County is like the
rest of Pennsylvania, there could
more than 150,000 unlicensed
dogs in the county, she said.
The county collects $1.45 of
the fee with the state getting the
rest, Beers pointedout. The state
pays the salaries of “dog war-
dens” across the state who can is-
sue citations up to $300 for unli-
censed or non-vaccinated dogs.
Beers said she can tell when
the wardens are busy in a certain
community because of the influx
of license requests.
She said owners who use per-
manent identifications such as
microchips placed under the
dog’s skin can purchase lifetime
licenses for a one-time fee of
$31.45for a spayed/neutereddog
and$51.45for adognot spayedor
neutered.
Mundy said she believes most
people don’t purchase licenses
because they think it is “inconve-
nient” or because they lack
awareness of the legal require-
ments.
“It is the law,” she stressed.
Dr. Mark Stair, a veterinarian
from Trucksville, assisted volun-
teers from the Luzerne County
Society for the Preventionof Cru-
elty to Animals in providing dis-
counted vaccinations and micro-
chips. He administered about 60
rabies vaccines and 25 micro-
chips to dogs brought in by their
owners.
He admitted he has to advise a
large percentage of his clients
about proper licensing and vacci-
nations.
“They just don’t realize the im-
plications if they don’t,” he said.
Stair pointed to the continuing
need for owners to spay and neu-
ter their pets to fight overpopula-
tion.
Mundy saidthe turnout onSat-
urday was “excellent” and she
plans toconduct a follow-upinJa-
nuary in her office to continue to
promote licensing.
A ‘paws-itive’ approach for dogs
Event in West Wyoming
focused on keeping canines
legal and protected.
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Peggy Nork of the SPCA, and Jaime Colarusso hold Mimi as Mi-
mi’s owner 4-year-old Sofia Colarusso keeps an eye on Dr. Mark
Stair (not in picture) preparing a microchip.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
BLACK CREEK TWP.
Weston man in fatal crash
S
tate police said John Lupcho, 28,
of Weston, died from injuries
suffered when the pickup truck he
was driving crashed early Saturday
morning.
Lupcho was traveling east in a 1997
Dodge Ram on the Nuremberg By-
pass around 1:45 a.m., state police
said. The pickup truck left the road-
way, struck a large oak tree, contin-
ued traveling before it struck another
oak tree, rolled down an embank-
ment and ended up on its roof, state
police said.
HANOVER TWP.
Drug raid nabs three
Officers from the Pennsylvania
Attorney General’s Office and the
Luzerne County Drug Task Force
arrested three peo-
ple on drug traffick-
ing charges during a
raid at 7:23 a.m.
Saturday at the
Hanover Village
Apartments.
Police said they
recovered marijua-
na, scales and cash
from the apartment
in the 400 block of
the apartment com-
plex.
Edward Charles
Earl Jr., 27, of Ha-
nover Village, was
charged with pos-
session with intent
to deliver marijua-
na, possession of
marijuana and crim-
inal conspiracy to
deliver marijuana;
Jeffrey Stephen
Albuquerque, 36, of
Hanover Village and
Kingston, was
charged with possession with intent
to deliver marijuana, possession of
marijuana and criminal conspiracy to
deliver marijuana, and Michelle Cin-
tron, 28, of Hanover Village was
charged with criminal conspiracy to
deliver marijuana.
All three were arraigned Saturday
before District Judge Joseph Halesey
and remanded to Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack of
$25,000 straight bail.
PLAINS TWP.
DEP offers workshop
The state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection invites resi-
dential code enforcement officials,
builders, contractors and designers to
a June 12 training workshop in Plains
Township on the 2009 International
Energy Conservation Code.
The workshop will be from 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Woodlands Inn
and Resort on Route 315. Regis-
tration begins at 8 a.m., and breakfast
and lunch will be provided as part of
the $40 registration fee.
The workshop will focus on best-
management practices in sustainable
residential construction. Participants
will learn about sizing residential
HVAC units according to the Manual
J methodology, a protocol used to
determine how much heating and
cooling a home requires. The in-
structor is Mike Turns, associate
director of the Pennsylvania Housing
Research Center.
Attendees will receive six UCC
continuing education hours for com-
pleting the training.
For more information or to regis-
ter, visit www.dep.state.pa.us or
www.paconstructioncodesacade-
my.org, or call 717-763-0930.
KINGSTON
Free helmets for kids
For the fifth year in a row, the
Hourigan, Kluger & Quinn Fund for
Children’s Advocacy, also known as
HKQ Kids, will give away free bicycle
helmets to hundreds of area children
during the July 4th fireworks cele-
bration at Kirby Park. The HKQ Kids
booth in Kirby Park will be open
from11 a.m. to 7 p.m. with a total of
1,500 free bike helmets on hand for
eligible children. Children must be 12
or under and must be accompanied
by an adult to receive a helmet.
All free bike helmets distributed by
HKQ Kids meet U.S. Consumer Prod-
uct Safety Commission standards,
and each helmet comes equipped
with a user’s manual and CPSC label
of certification.
N E W S I N B R I E F
Albuquerque
Cintron
Earl
Loyal Don Imus listeners, you’ve got the right
station, but the man coming through your speakers
doesn’t wear a cowboy hat and isn’t an ordained
minister.
And the man behind the voice broadcast over the
94.3 FM airwaves Monday through Friday mornings
does know where Shickshinny is and twice ran –
and lost – political races.
Dave Madeira was a Back Mountain chiropractor
before becoming a political candidate, political
consultant and a branding and marketing specialist.
In his new position as morning radio talk show
host from 6 to 9 a.m., he said his first three weeks
on the air have been a lot of things. But fun is right
at the top of the list.
“I walk out of the studio at 9 o’clock totally
jazzed. It doesn’t feel at all like work,” Madeira, 45,
said. He then heads from the radio station on West
Mountain three miles away to his house in West
Scranton and begins a shift at his other job as a
branding and marketing specialist for Infinity Con-
cepts.
He jokes that he needs to work both jobs to sup-
port his family, which includes wife Melanie and
their six children, ages 3 to 18. And while Imus and
other talk show hosts bring their personal lives and
families into the mix, Madeira tries to stay on the
issues of the day. His affinity for politics rises to the
Area man’s show more than just talk
Dave Madeira takes Imus’ spot on 94.3FM
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Dave Madeira of 94.3 The Talker has begun a local
radio talk show weekdays from6 to 9 a.m. See TALK, Page 12A
YATESVILLE – Three people
applied for the Pittston Area
School Board seat made available
when Ross Latona resigned last
month. The boardhas scheduleda
special meetingTuesday, 6p.m. for
the purpose of appointing a re-
placement.
The board sought applicants to
fill the seat and finish Latona’s
term. The deadline for applica-
tions passed last week, and The
Times Leader requested names of
applicants. The three seeking the
post are John Lombardo, Ro-
seanne Ricotta and Kent Bratlee.
Of those, Bratlee is the only one
with board experience, according
toTimesLeader archives. Helost a
bid for re-election in the 2009 pri-
mary, a year of highturmoil for the
board, thanks totheongoingfeder-
al corruptionprobe. Then-Superin-
tendent RossScarantinoandboard
member Joseph Oliveri both re-
signed and pleaded guilty to cor-
ruption charges. Only one incum-
bent, Bob Linskey Jr., won in the
2009 primary, which also ushered
in newcomer Latona.
Latona was boardvice president
when he submitted his letter of re-
signation. In it, he said, “Personal
commitments have become too
great for me to be able to fulfill the
requirementsof mypositiononthe
board.”
Bratlee also applied in Novem-
ber 2010 to fill a position opened
when Michael McAndrew re-
signed. That vacancydrew11appli-
cants, withthe boardoptingfor Ri-
chard Gorzkowski
The board voted to accept Lato-
na’sresignationMay19, andbylaw
has 30 days from that date to ap-
point a replacement. If the board
deadlocks on voting for a replace-
ment, or otherwise fails to meet
the 30-day deadline, a Luzerne
County Court judge would step in
and make the decision for them.
3 seeking
seat on
PA board
John Lombardo, Roseanne
Ricotta and Kent Bratlee want
to replace Ross Latona.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
WHITE HAVEN– Anonprof-
it will blaze a new trail through
Luzerne County this summer.
The Delaware & Lehigh Na-
tional Heritage Corridor is ex-
panding its D&L hiking and
biking trail by 8.5 miles in Lu-
zerne County, and offered a pre-
view tour of the project Satur-
day.
From a trailhead off Main
Street in White Haven, the trail
snakes its way
north to a new
trailhead south
of Glen Summit
in Fairview
Township.
Along the way,
the trail crosses a
“recycled bridge”
– a repurposed
section of pedes-
trian causeway that once
spanned Interstate 81 near Avo-
ca – and passes by Moosehead
Lake, a pristine 10-acre body of
water previously cut off from
public access.
“It’s been isolated forever,”
said Silas Chamberlin, director
of Stewardship and Interpreta-
tion for the nonprofit. “Now
this will be the first public ac-
cess.”
Like the rest of the Heritage
Corridor, most of the trail itself
is not new; it’s part of a165-mile
network of waterways, canals,
railroad beds and access roads
that once supplied the industri-
al furnaces and home hearths of
Greater Philadelphia with an-
thracite coal excavated from lo-
cal mines.
“It’s important to tell Ameri-
ca’s story of the discovery and
production of anthracite in
Northeastern Pennsylvania…
and the industrial heritage that
Corridor to expand hiking and biking trail
The Delaware & Lehigh
National Heritage Corridor
path to grow by 8.5 miles.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Library board member Marla Doddo, left, Dale Freudenberger of
D&L National Heritage Corridor, trailgoer Bill Runner of Sha-
vertown, and patrol volunteer Rick Burman look over a map.
See TRAIL, Page 12A
To see
additional
photos, visit
www.times
leader.com
WILKES-BARRE–Barnes&NobleBook-
store in downtown Wilkes-Barre partnered
withtheRiverfront ParksCommitteetogive
area children the opportunity Saturday to
begin creating a colorful and informational
mural for the upcoming 2012 Wyoming Val-
ley Riverfest.
The mural painting, which depicts the
trout that inhabit the nearby Susquehanna
River, was organized by local artist Jan Lok-
uta, a member of the Riverfest planning
committeeandanadvocatefor better under-
standing of the river and its environment.
"We are coming upon the 40th anniver-
saryof HurricaneAgnes andit has beenonly
nine months since flooding has challenged
our area," saidLokuta. "But, weneedtocon-
tinue to viewthe river as an asset."
This is Lokuta’s fourth year crafting mu-
rals that reflect various aspects of the river.
This year’s Riverfest will allow him to over-
see children with two murals: one depicting
the river at Wyoming and one at the bend of
the river at Forty-Fort.
Lokuta emphasizes the colors chosen for
thepaintingsreflect different characteristics
of theriver. For example, helooks forwardto
using more grays in an upcoming mural to
reflect morning fog enveloping the water.
Crystal Gigliotti-Hughes and her daugh-
ter, Alana, tookpart inSaturday’spaintingof
themural, andbothwereverypleasedtopar-
ticipate in something that has reinforced re-
spect for the river and provided fun family
time.
"We plan to come to Riverfest and I amso
glad that the event fo-
cuses on both adults
and children," said
Gigliotti-Hughes, as a
smilingAlana careful-
ly applied yellow paint to one of the
trout in the mural.
John Maday, executive director of
the Riverfront Parks Committee, was
also present at the event, and was all
smiles as he looked at the mural in pro-
gress, as well as murals frompast years.
"This is the essence of Riverfest and,
in a sense, its first event," said Maday.
Maday credited Lokuta for his hard
work in preparing for the event and his
ability to share information regarding
the watershed in an understandable
way. Another mural-painting session is
scheduled for this Saturday, also at
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Crystal Gigliotti-Hughes and Alana Hughes, 5, of Sugar Notch, work on a mural at Barnes & Noble in Wilkes-Barre for the
Riverfest.
A stream of colors
Children’s mural kicks off Riverfest
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
INSIDE: For
Click photos
from the event,
see Page 13A
See MURAL, Page 12A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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HAZLE TWP. – The grounds of
the Hazleton Area High School
were awash in a sea of red and
white, with 756 eager graduates
looking forward to the future.
The school’s 20th annual com-
mencement provided opportunity
for family and friends to acknowl-
edge the accomplishments of the
graduates.
Principal Rocco Petrone, in his
remarks to the audience, remind-
ed the graduates to always believe
in themselves and never lose faith.
He reminded students they would
face adversity, but they could use
challenges to grow stronger.
Petrone thanked the teachers
for their hard work in preparing
students for graduation and the
families for supporting students
with unconditional love and sup-
port. Hesaidthat without support-
ive families, graduation would not
be possible.
“This is not an ending,” said Pe-
trone, “but the beginning of the
rest of your lives.”
Petrone quoted graduate Josie
Bachman, a student athlete, who
always said, “We are ready!” before
running.
“You are ready!” Petrone told
thegraduates, torousingapplause.
Superintendent Francis Anto-
nelli, Ed.D., called the commence-
ment a wonderful occasion for fac-
ulty, graduatesandfamiliestocele-
brate a great milestone in the lives
of the graduates.
“Each class is unique and con-
tributes tothe legacy andtradition
of this great school,” said Antonel-
li.
DonBayzick, assistant tothe su-
perintendent, saidhewas especial-
ly grateful the weather had al-
lowed for an outdoor ceremony.
Originally, the ceremonywas tobe
heldonFriday night, but was post-
poned because of rain.
Graduates Sara Wisniewski and
Zachary Bradley, who will both be
attending Luzerne County Com-
munity College in the fall, said
they looked forward to continuing
their education and eventually en-
tering the workforce.
“It took a lot of work, but we are
finally here,” said Bradley, a mem-
ber of the National Honor Society.
George Joseph, whose daughter
graduated with honors, said that
the graduation was his “very
proudest moment,” and that he
was looking forward to his daugh-
ter continuing her education at
Penn State University in the fall.
“The district has done a good
jobpreparingour graduates for the
future,” said Joseph, commending
district teachers for a job well
done.
Graduate Virginia Pereyra,
when asked what graduation
meant to her, quoted Gandhi and
said, “Be the change you wish to
be.”
Pereyra said she intends to do
just that.
HAZLETON AREA COMMENCEMENT
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Members of the 2012 graduating class at Hazleton Area High School had many different responses to commencement ceremonies
Saturday evening.
Grads ready for future
Principal Rocco Petrone tells
members of the class of 2002
to never lose faith.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
For a complete list of graduates
and more photos, see our gradua-
tion section on July 7.
S P E C I A L S E C T I O N
LOS ANGELES — Years of
ferocious storms have threat-
ened to gnaw away the western
tip of a popular beachfront park
two hours drive north of Los
Angeles. Instead of building a
500-foot-long wooden defense
next to the pier to tame the
tide, the latest thinking is to
flee.
Work is under way to gauge
the toll of ripping up parking
lots on the highly eroded west
end of Goleta Beach County
Park and moving a scenic bike
path and buried utility lines in-
land away from lapping waves.
Up and down the California
coast, some communities are
deciding it’s not worth trying to
wall off the encroaching ocean.
Until recently, the thought of
bowing to nature was almost
unheard of.
But after futile attempts to
curb coastal erosion — a prob-
lem expected to grow worse
with rising seas fueled by glob-
al warming — there is growing
acknowledgment that the sea is
relentless and any line drawn in
the sand is likely to eventually
wash over.
“I like to think of it as getting
out of the way gracefully,” said
David Revell, a senior coastal
scientist at ESA PWA, a San
Francisco-based environmental
consulting firm involved in Go-
leta and other planned retreat
projects.
The issue of whether to stay
or flee is being confronted
around the globe. Places exper-
imenting with retreat have
adopted various strategies.
In the U.S., the starkest ex-
ample can be found in Alaska,
where entire villages have been
forced to move to higher
ground or are thinking about it
in the face of melting sea ice.
Several states along the Atlan-
tic coast have adopted policies
meant to keep a distance from
the ocean. They include no-
build zones, setbacks or rolling
easements that allow develop-
ment but with a caveat. As the
sea advances, homeowners
promise not to build seawalls
and must either shift inland or
let go.
Over the past half-century,
the weapon of choice against a
shrinking shoreline has been
building a seawall or other de-
fense. Roughly 10 percent of
California’s 1,100-mile coast is
armored. In Southern Califor-
nia, where development is
sometimes built steps from the
ocean, a third of the shore is
dottedwithman-made barriers.
While such buffers may pro-
tect the base of cliffs, and the
land and property behind them,
they often exacerbate the prob-
lem by scouring beaches, mak-
ing them narrower or even
causing them to disappear.
This is one reason state
coastal regulators in 2009 turn-
ed down a proposal by Santa
Barbara County to fortify an
eroding section of Goleta
Beach park lashed by periodic
storms. Arock wall was built as
a temporary stopgap, but a
long-termsolution was needed.
After the state rejected the con-
struction of another hard struc-
ture, park officials, working
with environmentalists, came
up with a Plan B: Move gas, wa-
ter and sewer lines out of the
risk zone. Relocate a bike path
to higher ground. Demolish150
parking spaces and allow the
acre of asphalt to be reclaimed
by the beach.
Calif. towns eye
retreat from sea
Until recently, the thought of
bowing to nature was almost
unheard of.
By ALICIA CHANG
and JASON DEAREN
Associated Press
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5A
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
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FURNITURE KING
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DALLAS CENTRE HARDWARE
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN
Raid frees hostages
B
ritish and other NATO forces
stormed a cave tucked in the moun-
tains before dawn Saturday and res-
cued two foreign female aid workers
and their two Afghan colleagues being
held hostage by Taliban-linked mil-
itants.
Helicopters, flying under the cover of
darkness, ferried the rescue team to
extreme northeastern Afghanistan
where they suspected the hostages
were being held. After confirming the
workers were there, they raided the
site, killed several militants and freed
the hostages, ending their nearly two-
week ordeal.
The four who were rescued work for
Medair, a humanitarian non-govern-
mental organization based near Lau-
sanne, Switzerland.
MISHAWAKA, IND.
Kids hear couple’s shooting
An Indiana man has been charged
with murder in the deaths of his broth-
er and sister-in-law, who authorities say
were fatally shot in their home while
their children listened.
The St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s
Office filed two murder charges and a
weapons charge Saturday against 41-
year-old Steven Clippenger of South
Bend. He’s being held without bond.
Prosecutors also charged a woman
they say was Clippenger’s accomplice.
Forty-year-old Jenifer Leveque is
charged with assisting a criminal and
giving a handgun to a felon. She’s being
held on $60,000 bond.
Police say Matthew and Lisa Clip-
penger were fatally shot at their Mis-
hawaka home early Saturday as their
children listened. They say Steven
Clippenger was paroled in 2010 after
serving 20 years in prison for murder.
BEIRUT
Russian help is sought
Washington reached out to Syria’s
most important ally and protector
Saturday, urging Russia to join a coor-
dinated effort to resolve the deadly
conflict as the violence spilled across
the border into Lebanon, a senior State
Department official said.
The international community has
been frustrated by the failure of a U.N.-
brokered peace plan to stop the blood-
shed. Fears also have risen the violence
could spread and provoke a regional
conflagration.
Already clashes have broken out
between pro- and anti-Syrian groups in
northern Lebanon, with at least eight
people killed late Friday and early
Saturday, Lebanese security officials
said.
TROMSO, NORWAY
Clinton visits Arctic Circle
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton trekked north of the Arctic
Circle on Saturday, a region that could
become a new international battle-
ground for resources.
Clinton’s trip to northern Norway is
her second to the area in a year. She is
bringing a message of cooperation to
one of the world’s last frontiers of un-
explored oil, gas and mineral deposits.
She’s also underscoring the region’s
rising significance as melting icecaps
accelerate the opening of new shipping
routes, fishing stocks and drilling op-
portunities.
To safely exploit the riches, the U.S.
and other countries near the North
Pole are trying to work together to
address issues.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Tropical storm near Philippines
A man wades in a submerged pier
Saturday as tropical storm Mawar hit
the area in suburban Navotas City,
Philippines, Saturday. Mawar has de-
veloped just northeast of Manila. This
system is expected to move north-
eastward today and strengthen into a
category 1 typhoon with winds be-
tween 74 and 95 mph.
CAIRO — Hosni Mubarak was sen-
tenced to life in prison Saturday for fail-
ingtostopthe killingof protesters during
the uprising that ousted him, offering his
opponents a measure of justice. But he
and his two sons were acquitted of cor-
ruption in a verdict that did not satisfy
public demands for accountability after
what the chief judge called 30 years of
“darkness” under the old regime.
The mixed ruling set off street protests
and by nightfall, a large crowd of up to
10,000 was back in Cairo’s Tahrir Square,
the birthplace of the uprising, to vent an-
ger over the acquittals. Similar protesters
were held in other cities, including the
Mediterranean port city of Alexandria
and Suez on the Red Sea.
“Justice was not served,” said Rama-
dan Ahmed, whose son was killed on Jan.
28, the bloodiest day of last year’s upris-
ing. “This is a sham,” he said outside the
courthouse.
Protesters chanted: “A farce a farce,
this trial is a farce” and “The people want
execution of the murderer.”
Mubarak, 84, and his ex-security chief
Habib el-Adly were both convicted of
complicityinthe killings of some900pro-
testers and received life sentences. Six
top police commanders were acquitted of
the same charge with chief Judge Ahmed
Rifaat saying there was a lack of concrete
evidence.
That absolved the only other represen-
tatives of Mubarak’s hatedsecurity forces
aside from el-Adly. It was a stark remind-
er that though the head has been re-
moved, the body of the reviled security
apparatus is largely untouched by genu-
ine reform or purges since Mubarak was
ousted 15 months ago.
Many of the senior security officials in
charge during the uprising and the Mub-
arak regime continue to go to work every
day at their old jobs.
Life sentence for leader
Mixed ruling for Mubarak for failing
to stop killing of protesters in Egypt.
By HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Egypt’s ex-President Hosni Mubarak
lies on a gurney inside a barred cage in
the police academy courthouse in Cai-
ro, Egypt, Saturday.
LONDON—It was a royal
day at the races, as Queen
Elizabeth II watched a horse
with the courtly name of Cam-
elot win the EpsomDerby on
Saturday —the kickoff to a
four-day celebration of the
British monarch’s 60 years on
the throne.
Later in the weekend the
queen will make a trip down
the River Thames, and then
take in a concert —all accom-
panied by tens of thousands of
her subjects, coming out to
fete a monarch whose long-
evity has given her the status
of the nation’s favorite grand-
mother.
An armada of vessels —
fromhistoric sailboats and
barges to kayaks, lifeboats and
military launches —was mus-
tering along the Thames ahead
of Sunday’s river pageant. The
queen aboard the royal barge
will lead the flotilla of 1,000
boats —described by orga-
nizers as the biggest gathering
on the river for 350 years.
Diamond Jubilee festivities
officially began Saturday with
a 41-gun salute fired by the
King’s Troop, Royal Horse
Artillery at Horse Guards
Parade in central London.
The 86-year-old monarch
and her husband, Prince Phi-
lip, visited Epsomracecourse
south of the capital for the
Derby, one of the year’s biggest
horse-racing meetings. The
queen waved to the130,000-
strong crowd as she was driven
down the racecourse in a Ben-
tley bearing the Royal Stan-
dard —the car’s sun roof kept
shut under gray skies —before
settling down to watch the
races fromthe royal box.
Dressed in a royal blue coat
and matching hat over a blue-
and-white floral dress, the
queen was accompanied by
members of the royal family
including her sons Prince
Andrewand Prince Edward
and Andrew’s daughters Prin-
cess Beatrice and Princess
Eugenie.
The royals were treated to
an aerial display by members
of the British Army’s Red
Devils parachute teambefore
the main event —the racing.
British monarch spends day at races to kick off jubilee events
A day fit for a queen
By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, center, reacts as she looks out from the balcony at the end of
the Epsom Derby horse race at Epsom racecourse in England.
LOS ANGELES — Yes, it’s true. You
can damage your eyes by staring at the
sun. People need to remember that as
they turn to the skies to watch the sil-
houette of Venus march across the face
of the sun on Tuesday fromthe Western
Hemisphere (Wednesday fromthe East-
ern Hemisphere). Known as a transit of
Venus, this won’t happen again until
2117.
There are a few ways to protect your-
self:
• Wear special viewing glasses such
as solar eclipse glasses. You can buy
them online or at your local museum.
Alternatively, you can go to a hardware
store and get a pair of welder’s glasses,
but make sure it’s number 14 or darker.
Or make a pinhole projector with card-
board. Do not watch the transit with
regular sunglasses.
• Peer through telescopes outfitted
with special filters at viewing parties
hosted by museums, observatories and
astronomy clubs.
• Tune in online. NASA, Slooh.com
and the Exploratoriumin San Francisco
areamongthosethat planlivewebcasts.
The drama unfolds Tuesday after-
noon from the Western Hemisphere
(Wednesday morning from the Eastern
Hemisphere.)
Venus will appear as a small black dot
glidingacross the diskof the sun. As ina
solar eclipse, do not stare directly at the
sun; wear special protective glasses.
The entire transit, lasting 6 hours and
40 minutes, will be visible from the
western Pacific, eastern Asia and east-
ern Australia.
Skywatchers in the United States,
Canada, Mexico, Central America, and
the northern part of South America will
see the beginningof the showbefore the
sun sets.
Tips on how to safely watch Venus without damaging your eyes
AP FILE PHOTO
Transit of Venus, when the planet
Venus passes between the Earth and
the Sun, is seen in June 2004.
The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH — Like a run-
ner who’s gotten a big head start
in a race, Pennsylvania may be
set to dominate natural gas pro-
duction in the Marcellus Shale
region for many years, experts
say.
With billions of dollars already
invested in leases, wells and re-
lated infrastructure, the state is a
cost-effective place to do busi-
ness. And a plunge in wholesale
prices has made being thrifty a
must for some companies, deal-
ing a potential blow to would-be
upstart New York.
Fadel Gheit, an oil and gas ana-
lyst with Oppenheimer & Co. in
New York City, says he expects
Pennsylvania to be the center of
activity for the next few years, if
not longer.
“The industry will always stay
with what they’ve got,” said
Gheit, adding that for many com-
panies, there’s less risk sticking
with a state — and with regula-
tions —they know. NewYork, he
added, is generally seen as a
more liberal state than Pennsyl-
vania, andthus more prone toim-
posing stricter rules on drilling.
An existing base of suppliers
also helps, Gheit said, as well as a
growing network of pipelines
linking the Pennsylvania wells to
regional and national hubs.
Shell Oil Co. has also chosen
western Pennsylvania as the site
for a huge new petrochemical
plant because that region has
more of a type of gas that can be
turned into industrial and con-
sumer products, such as plastics.
The industry has beensoexcit-
ed about prospects in Pennsylva-
nia that there’s a large backlog of
partly finished wells that will
keep companies busy for years.
In Pennsylvania thousands of
wells have been put into produc-
tion over the past four years, but
about 2,000 more have been
drilled but not completed, leav-
ing plugged holes in the ground.
The backlog means it is far
cheaper for a company to bring
those wells into production than
to start others from scratch in
neighboring states.
A new report from Bentek En-
ergy, which examines national
industry trends, estimates that
even if companies stopped drill-
ing new wells in northeast Penn-
sylvania, production could grow
by 31 percent over the next 16
months as the partlydrilledwells
get hooked up.
Pa.’s gas
leadership
is seen
as secure
State known as cost-effective
place to do business despite
drop in natural gas prices.
By KEVIN BEGOS
Associated Press
C M Y K

PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 7A
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The family of the late
MICHAEL
(MICKEY)
YAKALAVICH
would like to thank friends, family
and neighbors who sent monetary
gifts, flowers, food and Mass cards
during our recent time of sorrow.
BARBER – Cora, funeral Monday at
11a.m. at the Bowman’s Creek Free
Methodist Church, corner of
routes 29 and 309. Friends may
call 9 to 11 a.m. before the service.
BURNS – Justin, Mass of Christian
Burial Tuesday at 10 a.m. at
Queen of the Apostles Church,
715 Hawthorne St., Avoca. Family
and friends are asked to go
directly to church for Mass.
Friends may call Monday 4 until 8
p.m. at Queen of the Apostles
Church, Hawthorne Street, Avoca.
CARLIN – John, funeral 10 a.m.
Tuesday from McLaughlin’s, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Traditional Latin Requiem Mass
(Tridentine Rite) at 11 a.m. in St.
Michael the Archangel Church,
1703 Jackson St., W. Scranton.
Friends may call Monday 5 to 8
p.m.
COONS – Marjorie, memorial ser-
vice 11 a.m. Monday in the Shel-
don-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc.,
73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.
CROOP – Jessica, funeral 7 p.m.
today from Williams-Hagen
Funeral Home Inc., 114 W. Main St.,
Plymouth. Friends may call today
4 p.m. until the time of service.
DONNORA – Julia, funeral Monday
at 9 a.m. from the Gubbiotti
Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming
Ave., Exeter. Mass of Christian
burial at 9:30 a.m. at St. John the
Evangelist Church, William St.,
Pittston. Visitation today 6 until 8
p.m. at the funeral home.
ELLARD – Edward Jr., blessing
service today at 8 p.m. in the
Victor M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522
Fallon St., Old Forge. Friends may
call today 6 to 8 p.m.
GROSEK – Anthony Jr., Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday in
St. Therese’s Church, Pioneer
Ave. and Davis St., Shavertown.
Friends may call today 2 to 5 p.m.
in the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral
Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Sha-
vertown.
GUDMAN – Genevieve, celebration
of life Mass 11 a.m. Saturday in St.
Frances X. Cabrini Church, 585
Mt. Olivet Road,(Kingston Town-
ship) Carverton.
LEMMOND – Charles, funeral 11 a.m.
Wednesday at the Dallas United
Methodist Church, 4 Parsonage
St., Dallas. Friends may call Tues-
day 4 to 7 p.m. at the Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140
N. Main St., Shavertown.
LEVANDOWSKI – Adam, funeral
9:30 a.m. Monday from Kiesinger
Funeral Services Inc., 255 McAl-
pine St., Duryea. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10 a.m. at Queen of
the Apostles Church, Hawthorne
Street, Avoca. Friends may call
today 5 to 7 p.m.
MLECZYNSKI – Christina, viewing
2 to 5 p.m. today at the Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14 W.
Green St., Nanticoke.
MOSS – Sharon, Mass of Divine
Liturgy at 9 a.m. Monday at the
Holy Transfiguration Ukrainian
Church, Center St., Nanticoke.
Friends may call today 4 to 7 p.m.
at the George A. Strish Inc. Fu-
neral Home, 105 N. Main St.,
Ashley.
PRINCIC – Suzanne, blessing ser-
vice 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Victor
M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522 Fallon
St., Old Forge. Visitation Tuesday
from 3 to 7 p.m. in the funeral
home.
SHULTZ – Robert, military funeral
service 11 a.m. Tuesday from the
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home
Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown.
Friends may call Monday 4 until 7
p.m. at the funeral home.
VANFLEET – Carl, memorial service
June 20 at 6:30 p.m. in the
Eatonville United Methodist
Church.
WICKKISER – James, funeral 10
a.m. Monday from the Charles V.
Sherbin Funeral Home, Main
Road, Hanover Green, Hanover
Township. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today at the funeral home.
ZATCOFF – Florence, graveside
service 10 a.m. today in the B’nai
Jacob Cemetery, 91 Darling St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
FUNERALS
JOHN T. “JACK” MCDO-
NOUGH, of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away onWednesday, May 30, 2012,
at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Med-
ical Center, Plains Township. He
was born March 12, 1939, a son of
the late John and Mary McDer-
mott McDonough. A graduate of
St. Mary’s High School and a Navy
veteran, he was formerly employ-
ed at General Electric in Allen-
town. Surviving is his sister, Mary
Ann Frank, Ashburn, Va.
Privatefuneral services will
be held. Condolences can be
sent to the family at www.eblake-
collins.com.
THERESE SAKOWSKI, 60, of
Nanticoke, was taken to heaven on
Friday, May 25, 2012. Born in
Brooklyn, N.Y., on April 23, 1952,
she was a daughter of the late John
and Mary Sakowski. Therese and
her husband, Michael, were resi-
dents of Nanticoke for the past 17
years. She was his beloved wife for
almost 40 years and the most
amazing mother. Everyone that
knew her will always remember
her kind-hearted nature and un-
ending care for others. Currently
retired, she spent many years dedi-
cated to caring for others as a nurs-
ing assistant. Although no longer
physically here, her spirit will live
on forever! Surviving are her hus-
band, Michael; daughter, Marie,
N.Y.
Memorial service will be held
at a later date. Arrangements are
by Yeosock Funeral Home, Plains
Township.
PAMELA M. O’DELL, 49, of
Madison Street, Wilkes-Barre,
died Wednesday, May 23, 2012.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 S. Main Street, Plains
Township.
M
arcella Jacobs, of Wilmington,
Del., passed away on Thurs-
day, May 31, 2012, at age 89.
Marcella was a longtime resi-
dent of Wilmington, Del. She re-
tired as Coordinator of Hazardous
Materials at the DuPont Company
after more than 30 years of service
there.
Born the eldest of two children
to Mary Healy and John Irving in
Wilkes-Barre, Marcella began
studying dance at age 7.
After years of entertaining
throughout Northeastern Pennsyl-
vaniaandNewJerseyas atapdanc-
er, she eventually started her own
dance school. Marcella was a grad-
uate of Hanover High School in
Lee Park, Pa., and attended Col-
lege Misericordia in Dallas.
In1951, Marcella married Maur-
ice “Jake” Jacobs, and they moved
to Wilmington, where their two
sons were born.
She has been a member of St.
Helena’s Catholic Church ever
since. She was alsoa dedicatedvol-
unteer for the Tobin Foundation
for the Visually Impaired.
She was predeceased by her
brother, James Irving, San Francis-
co, Calif.
Marcella is survived by her hus-
band, Jake, Wilmington, Del.; her
son Kevin, Wilmington, Del.; son
Lawrence; and daughter-in-law,
Katherine, New York City, N.Y.;
grandsons, Nicholas and Samuel
“Lock” Jacobs, Wilmington, Del.;
sisters-in-law, Thelma and Esther
Jacobs; and cousin, Sally Ann Hea-
ly, Wilkes-Barre.
There will be a memorial Mass
held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, June 5, at
St. Helena’s Church, 602 Philadel-
phia Pike, Wilmington, DE 19801.
Friends and family may call from
10 to 11 a.m. at the church. Burial
will be private.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made toSt. Jude Children’s
Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
www.mealeyfuneralhomes.com.
Marcella Jacobs
May 31, 2012
G
erald F. Snyder, 65, of River
Street, Honey Pot section of
Nanticoke, passed away Saturday,
June 2, 2012, at Bonham’s Nursing
Home, Huntington Township.
Born in Nanticoke on October
30, 1946, he was a son of the late
Edward and Helen Shipkowski
Snyder.
Geraldwas employedinthecon-
struction field and worked for vari-
ous local construction companies.
Preceding himin death were his
wife, the former Charlotte Wolfin-
ger, anda brother, EdwardC. Snyd-
er.
Surviving are his daughter,
Christine Krieger, Nanticoke;
sons, Edward Wolfinger and his
wife, Linda, Nanticoke; Gerald,
Hunlock Creek, and Stephen,
Shickshinny; brothers, Michael
and David; sisters, Linda Snyder,
Barbara Tranell andhusband, Don-
nie; DianeSnyder, all of Nanticoke;
12 grandchildren; many nieces, ne-
phews, aunts and uncles.
Services will be held Monday
at 7:30 p.m. from the Earl W. Loh-
man Funeral Home Inc., 14 W.
Green St., Nanticoke. Friends may
call Monday from6 p.m. until time
of service.
Gerald Snyder
June 2, 2012
G
eorge Andrew Swan (Swannie),
62, of Hanover Township,
passed away Friday, June 1, 2012, at
the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Recently diagnosed, he was fighting
a brave battle with cancer.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre on
January 24, 1950, a son of the late
Henry and Dorothy Kuhl Swan, and
a grandson of the late Anna and An-
drew Kuhl.
Swannie’s greatest joys and
proudest accomplishments in life
were his familyandhis service tohis
country.
Swannie loved the life he created
with his family.
He is survived by his high school
sweetheart and wife of 42 years, Je-
nys Casterline Swan; daughters,
Amy (Russell) Wren, Shavertown;
Allison (Mike) Dagen, Pittsburgh,
andHillary(Mike) Gasper, Hanover
Township.
Throughout his life, Swannie’s
wife and daughters always knew he
could be counted on to do anything
for his family.
Swannie was a devoted and lov-
ing “Pop” to his six grandchildren,
Michael and Mackenzie Gasper, Ri-
ley Wren, and Bode, Cali and Kai
Dagen. Much to his delight, most of
his days were spent creating memo-
ries with his grandchildren. This
not only brought great joy to his life,
but theirs as well. He was his fam-
ily’s hero.
Swannie attended GAR High
School, leaving at age 17 to volun-
tarily enlist for military service. He
proudly served his country from
1967 to 1969 in the Marine Corps,
1st Division Infantry. He was a ma-
chine gunner stationed in Da Nang,
Vietnam. While he was in Vietnam,
he was awarded both a Presidential
Citationanda Purple Heart. He was
his country’s hero.
Swanniereceivedanassociatede-
gree fromLuzerne County Commu-
nity College and attended King’s
College. He was employed by the
Cityof Wilkes-Barrefor 23years and
the U.S. Postal Service before his re-
tirement.
He is also survived by his sisters,
Nancy (Alan) Davis, Mary (Tom)
Kerpovich and Judy Marasky; sis-
ters-in-law, Nancy Gittens, Sharon
(Frank) Yanulevius, Holly (Luke)
Colleran, Cindy (Angelo) DeSanto;
aunts, Eleanor Loftus and Ruthie
Gavin; and several cousins, nieces
and nephews.
His family would like to extend
their sincere appreciation to every-
one who aided in his care, and espe-
cially to Dr. Patrick Kilduff, whom
Swannie considered not only as a
physician, but also as a caring
friend.
A private family memorial
anddeserving military service
will be held at the Lehman Family
Funeral Service Inc., Wilkes-Barre,
on Tuesday, June 5.
Memorial contributions may be
made to Vietnam Veterans Memo-
rial Fund, http://www.vvmf.org.
One of his favorite Elvis songs
was “Walk a Mile in My Shoes.” It
began, “You never stood in that
man’s shoes, or saw things through
his eyes, or stood and watched with
helpless hands while the heart in-
side you dies. So help your brother
along the way no matter where he
starts, for the same God that made
you, made him too, these men with
broken hearts.”
Semper Fi, George “Swannie”
Swan. You will be sadly missed and
live forever inour hearts andmemo-
ries.
George Swan
June 1, 2012
S
anai Michelle, precious angel of
Samiyah Carden, died early
Wednesday morning, May 30, 2012,
at home.
Born in Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains Town-
ship, on February 25, 2012, Sanai
brought a smile to everyone’s face
who looked at her.
She was what is beautiful in life.
Sanai is survived, in addition to
her mother, Samiyah, by her grand-
mother, Kiesha; brothers, Samir, Sa-
mad; aunts, Aaliyyan and Nia; un-
cle, Allen; and cousins.
Godblessedus withthis sweet lit-
tle bundle of love for just a short
time, but she will be missed forever.
Funeral service for Sanai was
held yesterday for the family, at the
Lehman Family Funeral Service
Inc., 689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
To send condolences to the fam-
ily or to view Sanai’s video tribute,
visit the funeral home website at
www.lehmanfuneralhome.com.
Sanai Michelle
May 30, 2012
M
argaret “Peg” Sorber, 82, resi-
dent of Swamp Road, Hunlock
Creek, passed away Tuesday, May
29, 2012 in Hospice Community
Care, Wilkes-Barre.
“Peg” died Tuesday, having
bravely dealt with brain cancer. The
memory of her kindness, compas-
sion and love of life cannot be
dimmed by any disease.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre to
the late WilliamandRuthSponauer.
Her family lived in Hunlock Creek,
where Peg graduated from Harter
High School. Something that most
of you do not know is that she was
the Valedictorian.
She has been a devout Catholic
since birth, and lived her faith daily.
She was a member of the St. Frances
Church, Nanticoke, and St. Mi-
chael’s Church, in S.C.
She was predeceased by her hus-
band, Andrew; parents; and sisters,
Helen and Catherine.
She is survived by her son, An-
drew, Hunlock Creek; daughters,
Becky Kowalek, Nanticoke, andLin-
da Sue, at home; grandchildren, the
loves of her life, Andy Jr., Jeffrey,
Kayla and Mike; siblings, Ruth Ma-
cEwen, Woodbridge, Va.; Patricia
Pegarella, Hunlock Creek; and Bill,
Palmyra, Pa.; and a faithful cousin,
Margaret Welch.
Following her husband’s early
death, Peg pursued her dreamof be-
coming a Special Education teach-
er, enrolling at Bloomsburg Univer-
sity. Graduating Cum Laude at age
56, Peg beganher teaching career at
the Garrison Elementary. She
taught for 12 years before retiring.
Pegmissedher students, soshecon-
tinued to substitute until 2011,
working three or four days a week.
Her love of Myrtle Beach, music,
shows, travel and eating out with
family and friends remained strong
through her life – and don’t forget
thecasino! Sheandher faithful com-
panion Linda traveled abroad to 48
of the 50 states.
Being a dedicated community
person, Peg has served on the
boards of the ARC and URS, volun-
teered at the White Haven Center,
Special Olympics and the Catherine
McAuley House.
There are not enough words to
describe this beautiful person. She
made those she met feel special
with her smile and sense of humor.
She could always take your pain
away, but carry her own pain in a
special way, always listening and
nurturing others, especially on the
phone. She would not want any of
her family or friends to feel sad or
pain, but to share her happiness of
eternal life, perhaps with a glass of
wine. Life is so tender, so fragile, so
precious!
A Celebration of Life Mass will
be heldonSaturday, June16, 2012at
12 p.m. at the St. Faustina Parish
(Holy Trinity), 520 S. Hanover St.,
Nanticoke. Visitation with the fam-
ily will be at 10:30 a.m. until the
time of the Mass.
Thefamilywouldliketoinviteev-
eryone to Peg’s famous backyard af-
terwards to celebrate her life. Kind-
ly RSVP to 417-4401, 735-2365 or
542-7439.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the Catherine McAuley
House, 121 Church St., Plymouth,
PA18651.
Arrangements are by the Clark
Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset
Lake Road, Hunlock Creek.
Margaret Sorber
May 29, 2012
E
lizabeth Radovich “Betty” Win-
nicki, 91, formerly of Miller
Street, Luzerne, has gone gallivant-
ing. Betty will be on the lookout for
the best of bargains for all her family
and friends.
Born March 11, 1921 in Luzerne,
she was a daughter of the late Dush-
an and Verinica Smida Radovich.
Twin sister Genevie Kinger; sis-
ters, Vera Kuzma and Ann Alaimo;
brothers, Steve, Nickolaus, George
and Joseph Radovich preceded her
in death.
Betty was Louis Paul Winnicki’s
better half and co-proprietor of
Louie’s Bar, Hunlock Creek, where
noonewent homethirsty, hungryor
broke. The only rule was good
laughs and good times were here
again.
Betty was also a nurse’s aide in
the baby ward at the Nesbitt Memo-
rial Hospital during the war. She al-
ways worked at jobs where she
served her fellow man, whether it
was waitressingat the BostonStore,
making pastries at the Percy Brown
bakery or as a CNA for the Leader
Nursing Home in Kingston before
Agnes, and afterward for the Home
HealthCare Wilkes-Barre, before re-
tiring in 1980.
She was a loving and guiding
mother of Frank, Rita, Zigmondand
Joseph Winnicki; supportive moth-
er-in-law to Wanda and Nancy Win-
nicki; a beaming grandmother of
Ray and Robert Hunter, Debra Shu-
ga, Lisa Neuendorf, Matthew, Jen-
nifer and Katrina Winnicki.
Amazed that she would be
blessed with 13 great-grandchil-
dren, flabbergasted that she would
ever live long enough to become a
great-great-grandmother.
The lady in the hat and wheel
chair says thanks for the unlimited
desserts and coffee at the Old Coun-
try Buffet, and to Boscov’s for door
buster sales every day. “Wheel of
Fortune” has lost an ardent fan and
the PA lottery has lost a devoted in-
stant bingo player.
My brother and I have lost our fa-
vorite foods on our birthdays, un-
limited hugs and kisses and new
socks every Christmas. Her smile
will always be in our heart. She
watches over us with her love as she
walks with the Lord.
Betty made sure her children al-
ways wore socks and shoes because
they were not to be country bump-
kins. She made sure that her sons
got a college education so that they
would not have to dig ditches or
work in the coal mines for a living.
She made sure her sons stood tall
and straight and walked like men
who would be kings.
Betty Winnicki loved to laugh
with abandon, dance as if no one
was looking, cook as if she was feed-
ing an army, and love, yes, always
love unconditionally.
The family will have a Memorial
Service for their matriarch at a fu-
ture date. Condolences may be sent
to Rita Winnicki, P.O. BOX 145,
Hunlock Creek, PA18621, or Joseph
Winnicki, 6 Hunter Lane, Barring-
ton, NH 03825.
Arrangements made by
McLaughlin’s - The Family Funeral
Service. Permanent messages and
memories can be shared with Be-
tty’s family at www.celebrateherlife-
.com.
Elizabeth Winnicki
June 1, 2012
S
tephen E. Goch, 40, of Charles
St., Ashley, passed away Friday
evening, June 1, 2012, at Celtic
Health Care, Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
He was a son of the former Elea-
nor (Lyons), of Ashley, and the late
James J. Goch Sr.
Stephenwas agraduateof Hanov-
er Area High School, class of 1989.
He had been employed as a machi-
nist for Penn Cigar Machines in
Nanticoke for approximately 20
years.
Stephenhada passionfor the out-
doors. He was an avid hunter and
fisherman and enjoyed working on
cars. He lovedhis family andfriends
and his dog, Shadow.
Surviving along with his mother,
Eleanor Goch, is a brother, James J.
Goch Jr., Ashley; aunt, Gloria Kieff-
er and her husband, Donald, Clarks
Summit; uncles, Marlin Lyons and
his wife, Sue, Orangeville, Pa., John
C. GochandJosephL. Goch, bothof
Ashley; numerous loving relatives
and friends, and his dog, Shadow.
Funeral services for Stephen
will be held on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
from the George A. Strish Inc. Fu-
neral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ash-
ley, with a Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. in St. Leo’s/ Holy Ros-
ary Church, Manhattan Street, Ash-
ley. Interment will be heldinSt. Ma-
ry’s Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Familyandfriends maycall onTues-
day from 5 to 8 p.m.
Inlieuof flowers, donations inhis
memory may be made to Celtic
Health Care, 601 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston, PA18704.
Stephen Goch
June 1, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 2A
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Raymond James Financial Services
Opens New Office In Kingston
KINGSTON,
PENNSYL-
VANIA (May
31, 2012)
Raymond
James Fi-
nancial Ser-
vices, Inc.
a leading
national financial services firm,
announces the opening of a
new office at 250 Pierce Street,
Suite 100, Kingston, and the
appointment of David L. Capin
as branch manager.
Raymond James Financial,
Inc. (NYSE-RJF) was recently
named the best full-service
broker in the 2011 Smart
Money Annual Broker Survey.
Raymond James is the parent
company of Raymond James
Financial Services, Inc. with
which Capin is associated.
Marking the third time in four
years that Raymond James
earned the top honors, the firm
ranked above Edward Jones,
Wells Fargo, UBS, Merrill
Lynch and Morgan Stanley
Smith Barney.
Richard Averitt, Chairman and
CEO of Raymond James Finan-
cial Services said, “We are very
excited about opening this new
office headed by David Capin to
serve Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia. Capin brings over 26 years
of outstanding experience and
an established track record for
working with individuals and
small business.”
Capin and his staff offer a
comprehensive range of finan-
cial and investment services
including financial planning
and asset management, mutual
funds, insured CDs, stocks,
bonds and more. Capin special-
izes in fixed income investment
solutions as well as retire-
ment planning. “Many people
don’t realize until it’s too late
that Social Security and their
company pension are often
inadequate income sources for
the kind of retirement they
desire,” said Capin. “Because
people want to have the same
standard of living in retirement
as they had when they were
working, it’s important to plan
accordingly. Rather than trying
to beat the market in the short
run, we develop financial strat-
egies for our clients which we
believe will carry them through
the ups and downs of volatile
markets. Helping my clients
achieve their financial goals
is the most rewarding thing I
could do. Our goal is to always
exceed client expectations.
Capin, his wife Joyce and
daughters Abigail and Claire
reside in Kingston.
About Raymond James Financial, Inc.
Raymond James Financial (NYSE-RJF) is a Florida-based diversified holding company providing financial
services to individuals, corporations and municipalities through its subsidiary companies. Its three principal
wholly owned broker/dealers Raymond James & Associates, Raymond James Financial Services and
Raymond James Ltd. have more than 5,300 financial advisors serving 1.9 million accounts in 2,300 locations
throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. In addition, total client assets are approximately $275
billion, of which approximately $36 billion are managed by the firm’s asset management subsidiaries.
For more information contact David Capin at
(570) 714-4100 david.capin@raymondjames.com
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ropean immigrants had in the
city’s growth in the days of coal
mining, the city’s economic wane
after coal’s decline and the uptick
in population and new business-
es in the past decade that accom-
panied a major influx of Latinos
into the city.
“It talks about the immigrants
that first came here in the past
and howthey had to adjust to the
lifestyle in the area, and now
we’re seeing that with our new
immigrants. I think it portrays
the community very well. It
shows what a great quality of life
we have here and, more specifi-
cally, that this is what our Latino
friends want for their families,”
Palermo said.
More important, Palermo said,
the video addresses communica-
tion and other obstacles that still
exist.
“We’re making progress, but
we still have barriers up. People
… are afraid to associate because
they’re of a different nationality
or ethnicity, so this is a good op-
portunity for people in an infor-
mal setting to talk to each other
and get to know each other for
the betterment of the communi-
ty,” Palermo said.
Push on for center
The mixer was sponsored by
the Hazleton Integration Project
– an organization with the major
goal of openingthe HazletonOne
Community Center.
The center would be “a place
primarily, but not solely, for kids
so that we can begin the process
of bringing our communities to-
gether –theHispanic community
and the existing Caucasian com-
munity,” said HIP board presi-
dent Bob Curry.
The video is a step in that di-
rection, Curry said.
The HIP and community cen-
ter project came about through
the efforts of Hazleton native Joe
Maddon, manager of the Tampa
Bay Rays Major League Baseball
teamand American League Man-
ager of the Year in 2007 and 2011.
The HIP launched an aware-
ness campaign in December with
a fundraiser attended by Maddon
andother bignames suchas base-
ball legends Yogi Berra and Don
Zimmer and professional wres-
tling stars Sgt. Slaughter and
“Nasty.I.Am” Brian Knobbs.
“Now, we are taking those next
steps,” Curry said. “We joinedthe
chamber, we wanted to increase
awareness by having this mixer,
and we also have an absolutely
beautiful, powerful film, which
was written directed, produced
and edited by the Latino Media
Group.”
Seeking acceptance, unity
Maximo Toribio, photogra-
pher with Latino Media Group,
said through Melissa Galan, a
translator with the group, that
the members of the company
“wantedtobeapart of something
that would support the commu-
nity, integrate us, bring us closer
together. All they needed was
one simple idea. From there, the
video was launched.”
“The video shows the way in
which the Hispanics who moved
to Hazleton have become part of
the community – the way we
worktogether, pretty muchlike it
was acenturyagowhenit was the
Polish, the Italians were in Hazle-
ton and the way it’s changed now
and how the Hispanics now have
had just as much of an impact as
(immigrants) did back then,” To-
ribio said.
In introducing the video to the
chamber group, editor/producer
Jose Galan said Hazleton can
continue economic and cultural
growth if all of its citizens are
willing to work together.
“Only united will we grow, on-
ly united will we progress, and
only united will we be able to
make of our community a better
place to live and to work. We can
do it,” he said.
George Garcia, producer, said
the Hazleton-basedLatinoMedia
group was formed in June 2011
and started working on the video
soonafter. It was completedearly
this year. Awebsite – www.hazle-
film.com – is under construction
and the video soon will be posted
on the site.
Sense of tension detected
After a showing of the video,
Curry recalled life in Hazleton
decades ago, when college stu-
dents oversaw children’s activ-
ities at the parks andplaygrounds
every weekday in the summers
and youth sports programs flour-
ished.
He recalled he hired Maddon
to coach one of those programs
when he worked for the city of
Hazleton, and the two became
friends.
He called Maddon “a cheer-
leader for the city” when he
spoke of growing up in the Hazle-
ton area “and how wonderful it
was and how for him this place
just signified something really
special.”
“Andfor the first time, about 18
months ago, when Joe was here,
he didn’t get that same sense. He
didn’t get that sense of communi-
ty. He was feeling some tension
and he was feeling some lack of
communication,” Curry said.
And with that, Curry showed a
five-minute video Maddon re-
corded at Tropicana Field espe-
cially for the group, withthe Rays
practicing in the background.
“When I was back home, I was
really a little bit upset by what I
was seeing regarding the city in
general …seeingfear andtrepida-
tion between the Hispanic com-
munity and our own,” Maddon
said. “I thought it was really im-
portant to try to do something at
that point, to do something to
bring everybody together.”
“I believe that if you don’t em-
brace our Hispanic brothers and
sisters … our city is really going
to go away. These people want to
be here, they want to be part of
our community” and work for a
better life, Maddon said, not un-
like his own grandparents many
years ago.
“I believe that embracing our
Latin brothers and sisters in Ha-
zleton and working together as
one city, we really, truly have a
chance to get back on our feet
and make it into something spec-
tacular again,” he said.
DREAMS
Continued from Page 1A
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Left to right in the back row, Latino’s Media group members Edilio Ulerio, Maximo A. Toribio, Jorge
Garcia and Jose Galan created the video ‘Hazleton: Land of Dreams of the Immigrant’ for the Hazle-
ton Integration Project. In the front row, Donna Palmero, president of the Greater Hazleton Chamber
of Commerce; Amilcar Arroyo, HIP vice president; Bob Curry, HIP president; and Melissa Galan,
translator for the media group, participated in a recent screening of the video.
According to the U.S. Census
Bureau:
• In 1990, 249 Hispanics com-
prised 1 percent of Hazleton’s total
population of 24,730.
• In 2000, 1,132 Hispanics made up
about 5 percent of Hazleton’s total
population of 23,329.
• In 2010, 9,454 Hispanics com-
prised 37 percent of Hazleton’s
total population of 25,340.
Hispanic community leaders have
said that historically, Hispanics
have been undercounted.
B Y T H E N U M B E R S
delay requests, it now appears
the case will get under way
Tuesday with the selection of
jurors from among his neigh-
bors in the central Pennsylva-
nia county that is home to
Penn State, an area that before
November could be called
Happy Valley without a hint of
irony or bitterness.
The scandal toppledfootball
coach Joe Paterno, forced ma-
jor changes at the highest lev-
els of Pennsylvania’s largest
and most prominent universi-
ty, and raised still-unanswered
questions about the response
by various people to the warn-
ing signs that had periodically
arisen over more than a dec-
ade.
After months of planning,
court officials say they are pre-
paredfor what couldbe several
weeks of trial, building on ex-
periences in other states with
high-profile proceedings.
About 250 reporters have reg-
istered to attend, and 29 televi-
siontrucks are expectedintiny
Bellefonte.
“I think we’re ready to go. A
few loose ends between now
and Monday night, maybe
even Tuesday morning, but
we’re pretty confident we’re
ready,” said JimKoval, spokes-
man for the Administrative Of-
fice of Pennsylvania Courts.
The Nittany Lions’ former
defensive coordinator has con-
sistently maintained his inno-
cence, so jurors will have to
sort out which of the two dra-
matically opposed versions of
Jerry Sandusky is the truth:
the avuncular ex-coach devot-
ing his life to help needy chil-
dren, or the predator who used
his access to boys to commit
vile and criminal sexual at-
tacks?
He was arrested twice, the
first time in early November,
whenprosecutors chargedhim
with abusing eight boys, in-
cluding two whose identities
had not — and still have not —
been determined by investiga-
tors, boys witnesses said were
subjected to sexual acts by Sand-
usky inside football team show-
ers.
The second arrest came about
a month later, when state prose-
cutors added charges related to
two more boys. Sandusky’s law-
yers are still seekingtohave all or
some of the 52 counts against
him dismissed on various
grounds, more than enough
counts tosendthe 68-year-oldde-
fendant to prison for the rest of
his life.
The case has followed a twist-
ed path to trial, starting with the
decision by all the judges in Cen-
tre County to recuse themselves,
so the state Supreme Court
brought Judge John Cleland, a
veteran jurist fromnorthwestern
Pennsylvania, to preside.
More recently, his lawyers
sought several times to delay the
trial, but a state appeals court
turned them down after Cleland
ruled against them and kept the
case on track to begin this week.
Defense attorneys have appealed
to the Pennsylvania Supreme
Court, which could rule some-
time Monday.
On Friday, a group of news or-
ganizations that includes The As-
sociated Press sought clarity on
what types of electronic trans-
missions will be permitted from
the courtroom during trial.
Sandusky’s wife, Dottie, has
stoodbyhim, postinghis bail and
issuing a statement in early De-
cember that said the accusers
had concocted lies that left her
“shocked and dismayed.” Sand-
usky appeared on NBC to deny
he was a pedophile and ramble
on when asked if he was sexually
attracted to boys.
He later revisited the topic,
telling The New York Times the
question took him aback.
“I was sitting there saying,
‘What in the world is this ques-
tion?’ You know, if I say, no, I’m
not attracted to boys, that’s not
the truth, because I’m attracted
toyoungpeople, boys, girls ...” he
said.
Sandusky hasn’t given any
more interviews, andClelandlat-
er issued a gag order that has ef-
fectively stopped his lawyers and
prosecutors from talking about
the case. But their prior state-
ments and court filings suggest
the trial will hinge on testimony
by the accusers, and Sandusky’s
lawyers are determined to attack
their credibility.
Recently, a defense filing re-
ferred to Victims 11 through 17,
suggesting investigators might
have identified seven additional
accusers for whomSandusky has
not beencharged. Whether those
people exist, andif theywill testi-
fy — or if Sandusky will take the
stand — are among the ques-
tions the trial should answer.
Lawyers for five of the young
men have asked Cleland to take
steps to protect their anonymity,
but the judge has yet to rule. The
AP doesn’t identify people who
say they have been sexually as-
saulted without their consent.
Their testimony will be all the
more critical to prosecutors, be-
cause unlike sexual abuse cases,
the Sandusky investigation likely
did not produce forensic evi-
dence. But the scope and nature
of the prosecution’s evidence,
and its witness list, haven’t been
disclosed.
One closely watched witness
will be Mike McQueary, an as-
sistant coachwho was a graduate
assistant in 2001when he said he
saw Sandusky naked in the team
showers with a boy of about 10
described in the grand jury re-
port as Victim 2.
TRIAL
Continued from Page 1A
HARRISBURG — Amid the
crush of wrangling and debate
that annually precede passage of
Pennsylvania’s state budget, ad-
vocates of getting the state out of
the business of selling liquor and
wine are hoping to advance their
cause before lawmakers break for
the summer.
House Majority Leader Mike
Turzai, the Legislature’s leading
privatization champion, is trying
to line up votes for his latest plan.
Among other things, it would
give the state’s 1,200 beer distrib-
utors the first shot at buying li-
censes tosell beverages currently
available only at state-owned
stores.
On Friday, Turzai announced
plans for a House GOP caucus
meeting on privatization next
week in preparation for a still-to-
be-scheduled vote on his plan.
Lawmakers are slated to recon-
vene Monday for a busy June
schedule whose main task is to
pass a budget for the fiscal year
that starts July 1.
Turzai’s plan has evolved sub-
stantially since he unveiled his
original bill nearly a year ago —
through public hearings, a study
by an outside consultant and a
watershed committee vote —
andhe warnedthat the latest pro-
posal is likely toundergomore re-
visions before it hits the House
floor.
“It’s merely a draft, that’s all it
is,” the Allegheny County Repub-
lican said this week. “The final
product has to be geared toward
the citizens of Pennsylvania ... to
provide consumers with the best
service, prices, convenience that
they demand and that they see in
other states.”
Under the latest proposal, ac-
cordingtopeople familiar withit,
thestatewouldissue1,600licens-
es for the retail sale of liquor and
wine. Beer distributors would be
given the right of first refusal and
licenses that are not sold to them
would be auctioned off to other
private companies.
Also, the 600-plus state stores
would be closed over five years,
and supermarket chains current-
ly licensed to sell takeout beer
could not be licensed to sell li-
quor and wine for 10 years.
Turzai, whose efforts are
backedbyGov. TomCorbett, said
many Pennsylvanians want priv-
atization.
“They travel to other states.
They don’t understand why New
York, New Jersey, Maryland, De-
laware, Ohio and West Virginia
can seemto do it in a responsible
manner and Pennsylvania is so
antiquated,” he said.
But the plan has drawn a tepid
response from trade groups in-
volved in the sale of alcoholic
beverages and relentless opposi-
tion from the union that repre-
sents about 2,500 state-store em-
ployees.
Jay Wiederhold, president of
the Pennsylvania Beer Alliance,
which represents beer wholesal-
ers that supply retail distributors
and restaurants, said many retail
distributors would be squeezed
bythepriceof thelicenses. Prices
would be set by county, ranging
from $60,000 in rural Juniata
County to more than $800,000 in
the Philadelphia suburb of Mont-
gomery County, he said.
“Here’s the best advice I have:
‘Slow down,”’ Wiederhold said.
“This is a huge change. We’ve
been doing this since coming out
of Prohibition in 1933.”
Deal to privatize
liquor sales elusive
House majority leader is
trying to line up votes for his
latest plan.
By PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 9A

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CHICAGO — The suddenly
dismal news on American jobs is
a blow to President Barack Oba-
ma’s re-electionargument that he
has been a steward of recovery.
It’s heightened White House anx-
iety over global threats to U.S. ec-
onomic growth — and the presi-
dent’s political prospects, too.
The economy, Obama conced-
ed Friday, “is not growing as fast
as we want it to.”
Taking a harsher tone, presum-
ed Republican rival Mitt Romney
declared that the country ap-
peared to be “moving backward.”
He sought to drive home a politi-
cal point fromthe nation’s first in-
crease in joblessness in almost a
year.
After a winter when the job
trends were in his favor, Obama
has been forced onto the defen-
sive by three months of lacklus-
ter to dismal growth. Confronted
by Friday’s report of a feeble
69,000 new jobs and an uptick in
unemployment to 8.2 percent in
May, Obama vigorously renewed
his demand that Congress step
upandenact some of his jobs pro-
posals.
CallingtheEurozone’s debt cri-
sis a “shadow” hanging over the
U.S. economy, Obama made his
most urgent plea yet for mea-
sures that he saidwould“serve as
a buffer in case the situation in
Europe gets any worse.”
Later Friday, speaking to do-
nors at a fundraiser, Obama said:
“Europe is having a significant
crisis inpart becausetheyhaven’t
taken as many of the decisive
steps as were needed to deal with
the challenge, and that’s weak-
ened Asia and that means it’s har-
der for our exports. All this stuff
makes a difference in the global
economy.”
The jobs numbers, issued early
every month, have become the
year’s dominant economic ba-
rometer, a baseline fromwhichto
gauge Obama’s and Romney’s po-
litical fortunes in an election that
rides on the pace of a post-reces-
sion recovery.
Romney, responding to the
first report since he effectively
clinched the GOP presidential
nomination, called the figures
“devastating news.”
In an interview Friday with
CNBC, Romney said that Oba-
ma’s policies and his handling of
the economy had “been dealt a
harsh indictment.”
Obama was in Minnesota to
push his proposal to expand job
opportunities for veterans and to
raise money for his campaign. He
also raisedmoney Friday evening
in Chicago, where he was to
spend a rare night in his family
home.
He said private business has
created more than 4 million jobs
over the past 27 months, but, he
added, “as we learned in today’s
jobs report, we’re still not creat-
ing them as fast as we want.”
Still, he said, “we will come
back stronger; we do have better
days ahead.”
The economy, struggling to re-
cover from the worst recession
since the Great Depression, has
had to fend off a number of exter-
nal pressures, from high oil pric-
es to natural disasters and, now,
economic troubles in Europe and
a weakening economy in China.
The unemployment numbers,
while imprecise and typically a
lagging indicator of economic
performance, are nevertheless an
undeniable marker of the human
cost of a weak economy.
May’s 69,000 new jobs and
downward adjustments for
March and April mean the econo-
my has averaged just 73,000 jobs
a month over the past two
months. That’s half of what’s
needed simply to keep up with
population growth and is a dra-
matic drop fromthe 226,000 jobs
created per month in the Janu-
ary-March quarter.
May’s 8.2 percent jobless rate,
the first increase in11months, re-
flected more people coming back
into the job force, but that was a
thin silver-lining to an otherwise
discouraging report.
No president since the Great
Depression has sought re-elec-
tion with unemployment as high
as that, and past incumbents
have lost when the rate was on
the rise.
The economy is central to each
candidate’s argument — Obama
wants it to be a choice between
his and Romney’s economic vi-
sions; Romney wants it to be ref-
erendum on Obama’s economic
policies.
Obama is counting on an un-
employment trajectory that has
fallen froma high of 10 percent in
October 2009. The president
likes to point to the 3.8 million
jobs created since he became
president, though 12.5 million
people remain unemployed. He
highlights the resurgence of the
auto industry following govern-
ment bailouts of Chrysler and
General Motors.
Friday’s report seriously damp-
ens Obama’s message, though
the May numbers may end up do-
ing more damage to Obama’s
short-term political standing
than to the economy long-term.
The United States has experi-
enced periods of jobs slowdown
for the past three years, only to
bounce back. Last year, fromMay
to August, job growth averaged
80,000 a month and from June
through September of 2010, the
average was 76,000.
Hiring, housing, consumer
spending and manufacturing all
appear to be improving, yet they
remain less than healthy. Econo-
mists surveyed by The Associat-
edPress expect growthtopickup
this year, though not enough to
lower unemployment much.
Eager to draw attention to his
challenger, Obama has mounted
a step-by-step assault on Rom-
ney’s economic record, from his
days as a venture capitalist to his
tenure as Massachusetts gover-
nor from 2003-2007.
Jobs report weakens Obama’s re-election campaign
President forced onto the
defensive by three months of
lackluster to dismal growth.
By JIMKUHNHENN
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 11A

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Congratulate Your
Favorite Graduate
in The Times Leader Graduate keepsake
edition Saturday, July 7, 2012.
These schools will be featured:
Coughlin
Crestwood
Dallas
GAR
Greater Nanticoke Area
Hanover Area
Hazleton Area
Holy Redeemer
Lake-Lehman
LIU 18
Meyers
MMI Preparatory School
Northwest Area
Pittston Area
Scranton Prep School
Scranton School for
Deaf and Hard of
Hearing Chilrden
Tunkhannock Area
West Side Career and
Technology Center
Wilkes-Barre Area
Vo-Tech School
Wyoming Area
Wyoming Seminary
Wyoming Valley West
2” x 2.75”
$
15
4” x 1.75”
$
20
4” x 2.75”
$
25
Marie Springs
Wyoming Area
Congratulations Marie
I’m so proud of you
Uncle Walter
ake
kes-Barre Area
o-Tech School
oming Area
oming Seminary
oming Valley West
Thomas Benson
Meyers High School
Congratulations
We’re proud of you and
your accomplishments
Enjoy your college
experience,
Mom and Dad
Drop off or mail this form with a photo of your favorite
grad along with a personal message of congratulations.
Neatly print the grad’s name and school along with
the name and phone number of the person submitting
the ad on the back of your photo. Include a self-
addressed, stamped envelope to have your photo
returned or pick it up at our office after July 1, 2011.
Deadline: Wednesday, June 20 at 4:00 p.m.
Name ____________________________________________________
Address __________________________________________________
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AndrewChap
Coughlin High School
Congratulations &
Good luck at Penn State!
Love, Mom and Dad
timesleader.com
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ENTERPRISES
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• Complete Landscape Service
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Barnes &Noble.
"The river doesn’t start in New
Yorkstate,"saidLokuta, "theriver
starts in our own backyards."
Maday said the committee is
looking forward Riverfest 2012 as
an opportunity for environmental
awareness, food, friends and fun.
He especially looks forwardto the
"river paddles" whichwill provide
opportunityfor residentstospend
time on the water.
This year’s Riverfest will take
placeonJune22, 23, and24. Infor-
mation on Riverfest can be ac-
cessed atwww.rivercommons.org
or by telephoning Penn State Ex-
tension at 825-1701.
MURAL
Continued from Page 3A
was built along side of it,” said
Dale Freudenberger, anthracite
regional coordinator for the Her-
itage Corridor.
Much of the trail from Bristol,
Bucks County to White Haven
has been cut back, cleaned up
and repurposed as a hiking and
biking trail. Its closest complete
segment, the LehighGorge State
Park Trail, terminates at the op-
posite end of Main Street from
the trailhead where the new cor-
ridor picks up.
This summer workers from
the Heritage Corridor will level
its now passable but rough and
overgrown surface and lay down
a compressed stone compound
called “trail mix,” making it eas-
ier to ride a bike over the surface.
They will also build a new trail-
head off Woodlawn Avenue
south of Glen Summit. The pro-
ject is primarily funded with fed-
eral grants, Freudenberger said.
Eventually, Freudenberger
said the group would like to ex-
tend the trail through Mountain
Top, down past the Seven Tubs
Natural Area, through Ashley
and into Wilkes-Barre.
“The plan is, eventually, our
trail will link with all the other
trail systems in the region; the
Susquehanna Warrior Trail, the
Back Mountain Trail and the
Black Diamond Trail.
Susan Eckert, president of the
White Haven Chamber of Com-
merce, said during the tour Sat-
urday that the trail could im-
prove White Haven’s status as a
hub for outdoor recreation.
“I think it’s going to bring a lot
more people through our won-
derful town, and I really hope it’s
going to improve our local econ-
omy,” Eckert said.
TRAIL
Continued from Page 3A
surface most often.
“I’m a recovering politician,”
Madeira said, though he’s quick
to point out that while he ran in
those circles he never made it
to the inner ring.
“I’m just a regular guy who
has an insider’s knowledge of
the game,” said Madeira who
ran unsuccessfully as a Repub-
lican for a state Senate seat in
2006 and Congress in 2010.
He lost in the party’s primar-
ies to Lisa Baker and TomMari-
no, who would both go on to
win the respective seats in the
general election.
“I’m not guarding what I say
on the air like a politician does.
Most politicians have that filter
between their brain and their
mouth,” he said. Because he
has no plans to seek office
again, he is free to say what he
thinks without worrying about
future repercussions.
His “recovering politician”
line finds its way into the fabric
of most of his shows, which he
refers to as “therapy” on the air.
First lured to the 94.3 air-
waves in 2010 as a weekend
morning host of a live call-in
show, he found the show both
rewarding and fun and started
talking to station management
about expanding his role with
the station.
Brian Spinelli, the station’s
general manager, said Madeira
seemed like a good fit with the
station’s weekday lineup that
consists of fellow conservative
talkers Sean Hannity, Glenn
Beck, Laura Ingraham and
Mark Levine.
Madeira brings much to the
table as a host, including his in-
volvement in the political and
business worlds.
But something Spinelli said
is apparent is Madeira’s “ability
to articulate political issues,”
and his ability to stand behind
those feelings.
“He definitely takes a stand
and defends his position. I re-
spect that,” the general manag-
er said.
Imus had been the day’s first
show since 94.3 switched for-
mats fromsoft rock to all talk in
2009. Spinelli said the decision
to drop his show wasn’t a slight
against Imus, but they wanted a
local talk show to lead off the
lineup.
“Imus was a good show, but
he’s not talking to Scranton or
Wilkes-Barre. He’s not fromour
backyard,” Spinelli said.
While the feedback the sta-
tion’s received has included
both positive comments about
Madeira and negatives about
taking Imus off, Spinelli and
Madeira both said they’re
pleased with the decision and
look forward to building the
show into “must-hear radio.”
“I want to be the somewhere
people go in Northeast Pennsyl-
vania for the real truth,” Madei-
ra said. He said as a listener of
talk radio he sometimes tires of
hearing the same experts and
insiders pop in to say the same
things. So he lines up guests
who can give valuable insight
but might not be household
names.
One such guest, David Rubin,
was a client with Infinity Con-
cepts and lives in Israel. So
when a story related to Israel
makes headlines, Madeira has
Rubin come on to discuss the is-
sues “as our on-the-ground cor-
respondent.”
His goal is to have “major
league radio at the local level.”
But he doesn’t want to do a
run-of-the-mill talk show.
“People don’t want to tune in
and just have me lecture,” Ma-
deira said. “They want to be en-
tertained.”
TALK
Continued from Page 3A
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Dave Madeira of 94.3 The Talker goes over notes during a commercial break. He has begun a local
radio talk show weekdays from 6 to 9 a.m. At right, Tom Jenkins works the control board.
CAMBRIDGE SPRINGS — If
you’re missing a wallaby, the
Pennsylvania Game Commission
wants to talk to you.
Commissionofficials say a wal-
laby — an animal resembling a
small kangaroo — was captured
Wednesday in Crawford County
in northeastern Pennsylvania.
The 25-pound male was tran-
quilized near Cambridge Springs
and taken to the Pymatuning
Deer Park in Jamestown, where
it will remain until the owner is
found.
Officials saida former commis-
sion biologist aide reported that
her landlordhadseenthe animal.
Eugene Morton, senior scien-
tist emeritus at the Smithsonian
Institution, told the Erie Times-
News that he “broke up in laugh-
ter” whenheardthe student’s sto-
ry.
He and others who use the
Hemlock Hill Biological Re-
search Area in Rockdale Town-
ship are more accustomed to see-
ing birds than marsupials native
to Australia and surrounding is-
lands.
In Pennsylvania, wallaby own-
ers are required to have a license
to keep exotic animals, but offi-
cials said no one has reported
such an animal missing.
Wallaby caught in
Crawford County
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 13A
CLICK
➛ timesleader.com
INTERNATIONAL
FESTIVAL AT ST. JUDE’S
TYLER WINSTEAD FAMILY
BENEFIT
KIDS MURAL FOR
RIVERFEST
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Juliet, 6, Sophia, 3, Melissa and Tommy, 5, Biscotti
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Mollie Evans, Hughestown, Susan Mason, Wilkes-Barre, and Denise
Thomas, Wilkes-Barre
FED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Ethan Kozden and Michael Tkach
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Mike Caponigro and Dan Fraschella
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Danielle Kishbaugh of Kingston and Gail Kishbaugh of Wilkes-Barre
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Alana Hughes and Crystal Gigliotta-Hughes
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Linda Brown and Marilyn McCormick
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kim Royce, Wilkes-Barre, and Heather Lavelle, Wilkes-Barre
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Judy Tkach and Sydney Kozden
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Avery, 5, and Bobbi Cloutier
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kierra Brogdon, Judah Springer and Safeer Brogdon
FRED ADAMS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jan Lokuta and John Maday
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Ashlen Kuhar and Stephen Phillips
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jenny Chi of Wilkes-Barre and Edovkovaka Ezoun of Wilkes-Barre
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Pete Schmidt, Kallysta Jayne and Brooke Hartman
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
nary budget with a 2.4 percent in-
crease and opted to drain more
money from reserves.
• At least 45 positions will be
cut, either by attrition – not re-
placing positions opened by re-
tirements or other reasons – or
by furloughing employees, as
Crestwood had to do thanks to a
cadre of younger teachers, none
near retirement age. The biggest
cut – 24 positions – will take
place through a mix of attrition
and furlough at Hazleton Area.
• Even where positions have
not been officially eliminated in
the preliminary budget, cuts may
still come. Greater Nanticoke Ar-
ea Superintendent Tony Perrone
said no cuts are detailed in the
district’s proposed spending
plan, but up to eight support staff
– aids and hall monitors, for ex-
ample – could be pared from the
payroll. Wyoming Valley West
Business Manager Joe Rodriquez
said the district may opt to elim-
inate some support staff posi-
tions in order to reduce or elim-
inate a planned tax hike.
Good news can be found in the
detritus of the budget butcher-
ing, but it’s rare. Wilkes-Barre Ar-
ea’s preliminary plan calls for re-
instating seventh- and eighth-
grade sports programs, though
some of that money ends upcom-
ing from the new Family and
Community Enrichment Servic-
es, or F.A.C.E.S. program.
Launched with $25,000 this year,
the outreach effort would be lim-
ited to $10,000 in 2012-13.
Board members and adminis-
trators stress their budgets were
drawn up without firm numbers
on what the state is providing.
Gov. Tom Corbett has dramat-
ically shaken up the state budget
system, launching this age of aus-
terity last year when he trimmed
nearly $1 billion from the prior
year’s spending. Corbett insisted
the cuts resulted because federal
stimulus money used to plug
holes the last twoyears was gone,
but local educators note it is a dis-
tinction without a difference:
When they make their budgets,
they are still staring at less mon-
ey coming from Harrisburg.
Still, some administrators ex-
pect the state’s final budget will
be a bit less severe than Corbett’s
proposed plan, as legislators – in-
cluding those aligned with the
Republican governor – are talk-
ing about adding to the educa-
tion budget, thanks to better-
than-expected state revenue in
recent months. When Wilkes-
Barre Area debated the district’s
preliminary plan, Superintend-
ent Jeff Namey told the board
there was a very good chance of
“increased revenue” from the
state.
But that couldbe coldcomfort,
as there also are increased de-
mands from the state. Antonelli
pointedto proposals for handling
a big shortfall in the state-run
pension system. Districts must
contribute a percentage of teach-
er pay into the fund each year,
and that percentage is soaring.
“The state basically did not do
their fair share of contributing to
that system for approximately 10
years, and now it’s all bouncing
back on local districts,” Antonelli
said. “Those costs are just in-
creasing exponentially.”
The state sets the district’s
contribution rate, and under cur-
rent proposals “our annual pay-
ments could increase from $2.8
million to $17.5 million in a five-
year period,” Antonelli said.
Hanover Area Business Man-
ager TomCipriano saidsome dis-
tricts – including his – could take
a big hit instate subsidies incom-
ingyears thanks toCorbett’s deci-
siontobundle what hadbeenvar-
ious separate subsidies into one
blockgrant for districts. Inpartic-
ular, Corbett has lumped state
subsidies of Social Security taxes
in with basic education funding
and transportation subsidies.
All three had previously been
calculated separately based on
actual numbers from districts –
enrollment or bus miles traveled,
for example. Now, Cipriano
noted, it looks like districts will
receive one lump sum based on
what this year’s subsidies were.
The problem: Hanover Area had
implemented major staff reduc-
tions this school year, along with
a pay freeze, dramatically reduc-
ing payroll.
“This current year is probably
the lowest salary expense this
district will ever have,” Cipriano
said, “which means we’re getting
the lowest reimbursement for So-
cial Security.”
If future reimbursements are
based on this year’s cost, the dis-
trict will be penalized because
salaries will rise, increasing So-
cial Security tax payments, with
no comparable increase in state
subsidies.
“That’s something that’s just
kind of lost in this whole thing,”
Cipriano said.
SCHOOLS
Continued from Page 1A
$32.5 Crestwood
Greater
Nanticoke
Hanover
Area
Hazleton
Area
Lake-
Lehman
Northwest
Area
Pittston
Area
Wilkes-Barre
Area
Wyoming
Valley West
Wyoming
Area
Dallas $32
$117.1
$40.8
$97.6
$59.6
$33.2 $33.2
$24.3 (both years) $24.3 (both years)
$24.8 $24.8 $25.1 $25.1
$120 $120
$26.1 $26.1 $27.5 $27.5
$17.4 $17.4 $17.9 $17.9
$42 $42
$100.1 $100.1
$63.3 $63.3
$28.9 $28.9 $29 $29
$32.9 $32.9
$0 $40 $80 $120
(millions)
2011-12 budget total
2012-13 preliminary budget total
Source: District preliminary budgets
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
SCHOOL DISTRICT
PRELIMINARY BUDGETS
2011-12 property tax mills
2012-13 preliminary budget mills
Source: District preliminary budgets
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
PRELIMINARY BUDGET
PROPERTY TAX CHANGES
Crestwood
Greater
Nanticoke
Hanover
Area
Hazleton
Area
Lake-
Lehman
Northwest
Area
Pittston
Area
Wilkes-Barre
Area
Wyoming
Valley West
Wyoming
Area
Dallas
9.16
11.5824
9.9295
16.4783
8.8567*
8.8531
9.1986
13.123
15.3684
13.5
11.8052 11.8052
10.1807 10.1807
9.1027 9.1027
9.28 9.27
9.4193 9.4193
13.424 13.424
13.824 13.824
0.0%
1.9%
13.0799
13.55 13.55 3.6%
2.4%
2.3%
2.4%
4.7%
2.8%
2.5%
0.0%
0.0%
percent change
Proposed increases may change
before final budget approval later
this month.
*Hazleton Area 2011-12 rate adjusted
to reflect change in tax levy
earmarked for library
guns hidden inside clothing, in
bags and vehicle glove compart-
ments and trunks when they
leave home, though concealed
guns are prohibited in schools,
many government properties
and some other places.
Safety-driven concerns
For many, such as Nanticoke
resident Dave Evans, the moti-
vation to arm himself was per-
sonal safety. He said his job at
the time required him to deliver
pizza in areas that seemed un-
safe.
“It’s peace of mind. The gun is
a tool – one more thing I can use
if everything else fails,” Evans
said.
About a dozen county resi-
dents recently applying for per-
mits at the county courthouse
gave the same reason: safety.
Hazleton area resident Eric
Osborne, who obtaineda permit
last month, said he’s a new fa-
ther andsees anincrease inlocal
violence, gangs and drugs.
Osborne, who recently served
withthe U.S. Marine Corps, said
he hopes he never has a reason
to use the gun for protection.
Brian Geiswite obtained a
permit in February because he
perceived an increase in crime.
A stranger who appeared to be
under the influence of drugs
pushed him into a light pole
without provocation and threat-
enedto kill himinSouthWilkes-
Barre, he said.
“I got mine as a means to pro-
tect myself,” said Geiswite, who
lived in Plains Township until
recently moving to the Altoona
area for a new job.
Daniel Polerecki, Pittston, ob-
tained a permit decades ago to
help secure his business and re-
cently went to the county for a
renewal.
“I kept up with it for self pro-
tection. We have problems in
the area,” he said, noting a re-
cent theft of copper in a vacant
rental in his neighborhood.
Women arming themselves
The permit increase is notice-
able at Piestrak’s Gun Shop in
Nanticoke, where about 50 cus-
tomers have been shopping for
handguns weekly, said owner
Ken Piestrak.
“People feel threatened in
their own home,” Piestrak said.
“Men and women are fearful,
and they feel a need (to have a
gun).”
Piestrak said the rise in gun
purchases by women is the most
significant. He recommends a
trainer if they seem unsure
about shooting and loading and
unloading their new weapons.
Female customers typically
purchase smaller caliber guns,
suchas a .22or .38special, while
large calibers such as a 9mmare
popular among men, he said.
He recommends permits,
even if people plan to take their
guns outside the home only for
target shooting.
“For the few dollars it costs,
it’s worth it to be legal,” Piestrak
said.
Joe Lasecki, owner of the
Nimrod Haven Gun Shop in Ha-
nover Township, had been sell-
ing about five handguns per day,
sixdays a week, but that number
recently dropped off. He be-
lieves prospective customers
are spending their extra money
on vacations at this time but ex-
pects the volume to resume in
the fall.
High-profile crimes also im-
pact sales, he said.
“We haven’t hadtoo many vio-
lent crimes in the paper. Once
there’s two or three home inva-
sions, another influx of people
looking for guns will be here,”
Lasecki said, notingsales of pep-
per spray and Tasers also are up.
Dave Fleury, owner of Back
Mountain Gun Sports in Dallas,
also believes a search for securi-
ty is driving many sales.
“There’s a lot of people com-
ing in and stating they are buy-
ing their first handgun for home
protection,” Fleury said.
“There’s a big increase in that.”
Elderly gun buyers are a large
part of the increase, he said.
“They’ve never had a gun be-
fore, nowthey are arming them-
selves for defense,” he said.
Carrying responsibly
People carrying guns must
consider the safety of others –
not just themselves, Evans said.
“The weapon you carry is a re-
sponsibility and a liability as
well. You’re responsible for what
that tool does,” Evans said.
He knows how to handle and
maintain his gun and practices
target shooting. Evans said he
would attempt to get away or
physically stop a threat before
removing his gun from the hol-
ster.
Training shouldbe mandated,
he said.
Parrent saidshe wouldn’t con-
sider carrying her gun until she
extensively practices with her
husbandanda familyfriendwho
worked for the FBI.
Responsible gun handling is
the key, saidMaxNacheman, ex-
ecutive director of CeaseFirePA,
which promotes gun safety is-
sues.
“New gun owners have to un-
derstand they’ve introduced a
new, serious risk,” Nacheman
said.
Indoor/outdoor shooting and
archery ranges were added to a
master plan for county-owned
Moon Lake Park in Plymouth
Township because the sheriff’s
office identified gun training as
a local need, though the plans
may never materialize due to a
lack of funding.
Some permit holders practice
shooting through gun clubs or
at state gameland ranges.
Wilkes-Barre resident Wil-
liamHossage keeps his shooting
skills sharp by regularly target
shooting at a gamelandrange off
state Route 118 in Ross Town-
ship. He has had a permit for
decades and considers it a hob-
by, as opposed to protection.
“The fun of shooting is hitting
what you’re shooting at,” he re-
cently said before aiming at a ti-
ny target he placed at the range.
Hossage enjoys sharing his
shootingexperience withothers
on the range, though he avoids
the place on more crowded
weekends.
He’s a stickler for rules and
safety and shook his head at bul-
let holes in off-limit sections.
The state addeda $30annual fee
last year for range users who
don’t have hunting or fur-taker
licenses, which will generate
revenue for maintenance and
upkeep.
Plains Township resident Joe
Harowicz recently shot targets
at the state range with his son,
Joe Jr.
He taught his two daughters
and son to shoot so they would
be comfortable handling guns.
He’s fiercely protective of the
Constitutional right to bear
arms and plans to be an NRA
member for life.
Harowicz said he obtained his
permit a decade or so ago and
believes local crime is driving
the permit increase. His son
lives in Philadelphia, but the
men said crime seems as much
of a concern here.
Gun injuries and deaths often
are committed by people who
don’t register and permit their
weapons, they noted.
“If you can’t protect yourself,
your home and family, that’s
something to worry about,” the
younger Harowicz said between
rounds of target shooting.
GUNS
Continued from Page 1A
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Dave Fleury, owner of Back Mountain Gun Sports in Dallas,
shows a few of the handguns that he sells most often to people
who have a permit to carry a concealed weapon.
The recent Trayvon Martin
shooting in Florida and the ensu-
ing controversy over gun control
has raised concerns about the
newwave of “stand your ground”
laws across the country.
In Pennsylvania, as in most
states, a resident has had the
right to defend themselves in
their home under the Castle Doc-
trine.
The right was expanded last
year when the state House and
Senate approved a new gun-con-
trol lawthat outlines the rights of
peopletousedeadlyforceagainst
attackers in places outside their
homes. The new legislation also
eliminates a requirement that
people attempt to retreat before
using deadly force in those situa-
tions.
Gov. Tom Corbett signed the
controversial bill into law in Au-
gust 2011. Former Gov. Ed Ren-
dell had vetoed a similar bill in
2010 before leaving office.
Concerns raised
“Everyone keeps telling me,
‘Hey, Charlotte, I’m getting a
gun,’ ” Charlotte Raup, president
of the Wilkes-Barre Crime Watch
Coalition, said, recalling com-
ments she’s heard since “stand
your ground” became law.
“It’s actually frightening. With-
out the proper training for our ci-
tizens, many times the bad guys
end up with the gun in self-de-
fense situations,” she said.
Raup said it’s the official policy
of the national Crime WatchCoa-
lition that members are to be un-
armed at all times when volun-
teering in their neighborhoods
and are only to observe and re-
port suspicious activity.
“It’s common sense,” said
Raup, who supports Second
Amendment rights. “I mean, we
train and license people to drive
carsbut don’t requireanytraining
to carry a gun in public.”
But there are other voices on
the issue.
“I believe everyone should be
allowed to carry a gun and pro-
tect themselves,” said Hazleton
resident Lucy Mikula, who refer-
enced the recent uptick in home
invasions andpurse snatchings in
her area. “But theyshouldreceive
the proper training in the use of
firearms and self-defense.”
Richard Long, spokesman for
the Pennsylvania District Attor-
neys Association, which lobbied
heavily to alter the provisions of
the initial legislation, called the
bill “a solutioninsearchof a prob-
lem.” He saida concernis the law
could make it more difficult to
prosecute criminals.
“The old law adequately dealt
with the issue of self-defense, as
far as we were concerned,” Long
said. “But we
felt that as long
as they were
going to push
this bill
through, we
needed to have
substantial in-
put into the
legislation.”
Long said
his association,
along with oth-
er law enforce-
ment agencies,
lobbied for in-
clusion of sev-
eral vital com-
ponents in the
Pennsylvania
law that set it
apart from
those recently
enacted in oth-
er states.
Under the
current mea-
sure, a person
using deadly
force must
have a legal
right to pos-
sess the fire-
arm, deadly
force cannot be
used against a
law enforce-
ment officer in
the commis-
sion of his duty
and the use of deadly force is pro-
hibited if the person is engaging
inillegal activityat thetimeof the
self-defense incident.
“Our major concern is that the
law will be misused by criminals
and misapplied by defense attor-
neys,” Long said.
Supported by NRA
Proponents of the legislation,
led by the National Rifle Associ-
ation, say it enhances public safe-
ty by exempting gun owners act-
ing in self-defense from prosecu-
tion. However, the NRAdoes not
support the inclusion of govern-
ment-mandated gun training un-
der expanded self-defense laws.
Luzerne County District Attor-
neyStefanieSalavantis saidsheis
aware of the provisions of the cur-
rent law and plans to stay in con-
tact with the District Attorneys
Association to remain updated
on the Castle Doctrine issue and
will thoroughly investigate every
fatal shooting to “determine the
facts of the case and see if indeed
the new Castle Doctrine legisla-
tion applies.”
One problem Salavantis had
with the bill’s passage last year is
there was “no public outcry for a
change” in the law.
That theme was echoed by
state Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski.
He said the bill was pushed by
ALEC, the American Legislative
Exchange Council, a well-funded
Washington-based lobbying
group. Pashinski voted for the re-
vised version of the bill after the
District Attorneys Association
added some amendments.
Weighing in on
self-defense laws
Pa.’s Castle Doctrine and
other states’ ‘stand your
ground’ laws debated.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
“It’s ac-
tually
frighten-
ing. With-
out the
proper
training for
our citi-
zens, many
times the
bad guys
end up
with the
gun in self-
defense
situa-
tions.”
Charlotte Raup
President of the
Wilkes-Barre
Crime Watch
Coalition
Four years ago a Lebanon
County mother was on the side-
lines at her child’s soccer game
with a handgun holstered in
plain view.
Aghast parents and fans
thought Meleanie Hain was
breaking the law in the widely
publicized incident, but in real-
ity she was exercising her right
to openly carry a loaded firearm
in Pennsylvania.
The issue has emerged closer
to home. In 2008, Hazle Town-
ship came under verbal attack
from gun advocates when it
banned firearms from its Com-
munity Park. Right-to-bear-arms
advocates contended it was a
violation of the Uniform Fire-
arms Act.
The following year, Scranton
City Council discussed an ordi-
nance to ban firearms from
meetings after members noticed
some audience members were
armed. They backed off after
gun advocates told them a ban
would be illegal.
In Pennsylvania, people 18
and older who are not prohib-
ited by law from owning fire-
arms may openly carry a loaded
handgun in plain sight. They do
not need to have a license to
carry.
The exceptions to the law
include in vehicles and any-
where in Philadelphia, which
has a first-class state charter.
Those instances require a citi-
zen to have a license to carry a
concealed firearm.
Guns also may not be carried,
open or concealed, in places
such as court and federal facil-
ities, state parks, detention
facilities, airport terminals and
schools.
According to PAOpenCar-
ry.org and state law, cities,
towns and municipalities are
prohibited from enacting laws
prohibiting concealed or open
carry of firearms.
In Pennsylvania, a citizen
does not need to be a resident to
open carry.
PAOpenCarry.org says there
is no “brandishing” or “dis-
turbing the peace” law in Penn-
sylvania if one is carrying a gun
openly. If a person intimidates
or intends to intimidate another
person with a firearm, they are
subject to charges.
Long guns (rifles and shot-
guns) must be unloaded and in
separate containers if being
transported inside a vehicle.
Handguns may be loaded while
in a vehicle only if the person in
possession of the gun has a valid
license to carry.
Without a license to carry in
Pennsylvania, unloaded hand-
guns may only be transported to
and from specific activities and
locations. For example, a gun
owner can transport his or her
weapon from the store of pur-
chase to home or take the fire-
arm to a shooting range or hunt-
ing location.
Gun toters
can carry
openly
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012
G
enealogists trying to find records
fromclosed Roman Catholic
churches their ancestors attended
nowhave a tool to help themget started,
thanks to the diocese and Bishop Joseph
Bambera.
To track a parish that you cannot find
today, go to the diocese’s website, at
www.dioceseofscranton.com. Click on
“Find a Parish and Mass Times.” Then
click on “Consolidated Parish Reference
List.”
There you will find, under an alphabe-
tized list of towns, the names of the now-
closed churches. On the right is the
church it merged into when it was closed
during the consolidation project of the
early 2000s.
Accessibility of records could vary,
however. Please remember that houses of
worship —of nearly all faiths —rely on
volunteer and part-time help in operating
their offices and maintaining their re-
cords. My recommendation is to be un-
derstanding and charitable when asking
for help froma church.
The site also includes a list of all the
schools the diocese operates. They are far
fewer in number than in the days when
nearly every large or mid-sized Catholic
parish operated its own grade school, and
high schools were also numerous. As yet,
I do not see any comparable listing for
now-closed schools. To find out what
happened to an ancestor’s Catholic
school when you do not see it on the list,
my best suggestion is to inquire at the
present-day church, or its successor.
In any case, “Out on a Limb” thanks
Bishop Bambera and the diocese for this
very useful help for genealogists and
historians.
Irish Genealogy: While there’s no
shortage of aids to finding Irish ances-
tors, there’s a newone that bears looking
into.
The Genealogical Society of Pennsylva-
nia is offering “Tracing Your Irish and
Scots-Irish Ancestors,” featuring Frank
Mullan, executive director of the Ulster
Historical Foundation. You have your
choice of an online presentation ($20) or
a DVD($25) fromthe Genealogical
Society of Pennsylvania.
For details, go to the society’s website
at www.genpa.org.
News Notes: The Northeast Pennsylva-
nia Genealogical Society has increased
the hours for its research library. It will
nowbe open Mondays 5-8:30 p.m. for the
summer as well as Thursdays10 a.m.-4
p.m. and the second Saturday of every
month noon-4 p.m. The library is in the
caretaker building at the Hanover Green
Cemetery, Main Road, Hanover Town-
ship.
The society is still seeking volunteers
to help index the U.S. Census of 1940. To
join the effort, register with Family
Search at www.familysearch.org/volun-
teer/indexing. Be sure to designate the
Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical
Society as the group you want to volun-
teer with.
While you’re volunteering, consider
joining the society —if you’re not already
a member. One of the prime benefits
you’ll get is the quarterly newsletter, very
useful to area genealogists. The current
issue contains an article on finding Lu-
zerne County records of naturalization,
which after 1906 became a federal respon-
sibility.
I had a fantastic turnout for my “Writ-
TOM MOONEY
O U T O N A L I M B
Diocese site
gives info on
closed churches
See LIMB, Page 2B
T
om Hess is the president of two Servpro franchises he owns with his wife
Dorothy. Hess, 55, attended Benton Area High School and received an asso-
ciate’s degree in business at Luzerne County Community College. He and Do-
rothy have three children: Jennifer, Jessica and Jeremy. The couple lives in
Shickshinny.
Could you describe what your
company does? “We are a cleanup
and restoration service that deals
mostly with water and fire damage
to homes, businesses and other
areas. We try to handle situations
with empathy and an under-
standing of the loss a customer
or person is going through. We
also clean up after biohazard
spills or at crimescenes. It is re-
ally tough to clean up after
someone has lost a loved one
tocrimeor asuicide. Thefam-
ily or landlords are in despair
andwehavetohelpinanyway
we can, to put it delicately. It is
sad.”
You have probably seen many different
situations through the years. Does any
moment stand out when you were helping
someone? “There are so many moments.
They always revolve around customers who
havegoneout of their waytothank us for our
services. They are very appreciative and we
inturnappreciatetheir kindness bydoingthe
best we can for them. The flooding last Sep-
tember inundated us with more than 350
phone calls, and that was just the first few
days alone. Unfortunately, we could not help
everyone. We were shoveling mud and pres-
sure washing as we tried to help many places
that were in various stages of demolition or
we were trying to salvage or save homes.”
That must have required a lot of equip-
ment and manpower. How hard was it to
deal with the situation? “We had to rent
equipment on top of what we had. That in-
cluded 1 10 air movers (special fans) and 35
dehumidifiers to try and dry out as many of
the customer’s homes as we couldbefore the
mold set in. Some properties were so large
that we had to operate an immense amount
of drying equipment just for those areas.”
You seem to be very family-oriented.
Talk about what your family has meant to
you through the years in regards to your
life pursuits. “It starts with my wife who is
the co-owner of the business with me. She is
very kind and giving and she participates in
the Geisinger Miracle Tour with me every
year. It is a motorcycle ride for charity that
starts in Danville and ends up at Knoebels
amusement park. My three kids and their
grandchildren have been a source of pride
and have been part of the best moments in
my life. They are also a part of the Servpro
business in different capacities for us. I also
have tomentionmy brother, Robert. I used to
work at the Wise potato chip factory and he
CLARK VAN ORDEN
/THE TIMES LEADER
See MEET, Page 2B
MEET TOMHESS
A
fter months searching for work andfeeling increasingly discouraged, Na-
talie Cole caught a break — an offer of a part-time position at a Little
Caesars PizzashopinCompton, Calif. Themanager scheduledher orien-
tation and told her she had to pass a food safety test. • She took the test — and
failed. But rather than study and take it again, she shrugged it off. •“I guess I am
not working for a reason,” she said.
Cole isn’t a victim of the struggling econo-
my. She was poor before andis poor now. Hers
is a story of entrenched poverty — a whirl of
choices, challenges and chaos that keeps un-
dermining her spurts of personal progress.
Tracking Cole’s life over six months offers a
messy and at times disheartening insight into
vexing social policy questions: How do you
break the cycle of generational poverty? Can
or shouldsociety domore tochange the trajec-
tory of the young and poor?
Cole, 27, and her four children have moved
nearly a dozen times in the last year while liv-
ing on about $1,000 a month in public cash as-
sistance and food stamps. She wants to pro-
vide a better life for her childrenbut seems not
to know how.
“I just know what I know,” she said. “All I
candois raise them. ... They are goingtomake
their own path in life.”
But if Coledoesn’t findabetter way, chances
are her children won’t finish school, hold stea-
dy jobs or stay healthy.
“Poverty is bad for kids,” said Harvard Ken-
One woman’s story of challenge, chaos and progress
By ANNA GORMAN Los Angeles Times
MCT PHOTOS
ABOVE: In relief and joy, Cole embraces
her boyfriend Juan Sena after learning
that they had gotten the one-bedroom
apartment in Compton, Calif. TOP: Strug-
gling with diabetes, Natalie Cole receives a
checkup. INSET: Natalie Cole’s youngest
son, Jaylyn, 2, receives treatment for a
severe asthma attack.
See STRUGGLE, Page 2B
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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was my boss. He helped me growup
on that job. He was and is always
there when I need him.”
Favorite places visited? “Any
place with a beach. Bermuda and
going on cruises. We love England,
too.”
WereyoualwayswithServproor
the cleanup industry? “I worked a
great deal of my life as a computer
operator and in data processing. I
worked at a factory during my high
school years beforegoingtocollege.
After that I worked for the Wise
plant for four years. I transitionedin-
to working for Commonwealth Tele-
phone which became Alltel and
served as a data manager until
2001.”
What does NEPA need? “Better
tax structurefor small business ven-
tures. The roads need to see contin-
uing improvement as does the job
availability in the area.”
That brings us to your defining
moment in life. What transpired in
2001-2002? What was the sudden
career change motivation? “I simply
wanted self-employment as did my
wife. We started looking at compa-
nies and franchises and decided on
Servpro because they had a good
track record. We interviewed with a
trainer/distributor and found that
we were a good fit for themand vice
versa. We celebrated 10 years with
the Berwick location and we have
owned the Hazleton / Harveys Lake
locale for nearly six years. This job
also gives us the opportunity to
meet people on a personal level. We
are at their location for weeks at a
time and it is a nice feeling to give
them support and compassion and
to get to know them during their
time of need.”
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
ing Your Memoirs” presentation
at the Kingston Senior Citizens
Center recently. I also distrib-
uted a copy of my three-page
guide to memoir writing.
Shortly thereafter I received
an email from Jessie Larson of
the Family History Society of
Arizona asking permission to
reprint my column on memoir
writing in its newsletter. Evi-
dently a lot of people today are
looking into memoir writing,
and I wouldn’t be surprised to
see more genealogists investing
time and effort in memoirs for
the benefit of their families.
In any case, thanks to center
director Sandy Acornley and her
staff for putting the program
together.
LIMB
Continued from Page 1B
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader
genealogy columnist. Reach him at
tmooney2@ptd.net.
nedy School professor Kathryn
Edin, who studies poverty poli-
cy. “It just makes everything a
struggle.”
Children who are born into
poverty and spend years that
way are more likely to be teen-
age parents and remain poor as
adults, according to the Urban
Institute.
“Getting out of poverty takes
extraordinary perseverance,”
Edin said. “When disadvantage
builds over generations, it is go-
ing to take generations to un-
build it.”
Cole, whohas highbloodpres-
sure and diabetes, worries about
the future but focuses mostly on
the present as she moves from
crisis to crisis.
•••
Cole was raised by a single
mother in Compton who
worked off and on as a security
guard. In her early teens, Cole
started drinking and smoking
pot, dropped out of school and
got pregnant. At 17, she was rais-
ing two children: Peter, now 12,
and Destiny, 10.
Her relationships with their
fathers didn’t last. Whenshewas
21, she met Juan Sena. He was
kind and calm. The couple had
two sons: Gemini, now 4, and
Jaylyn, 2.
Last summer, Sena got laid off
fromhis construction job. He re-
ceives some unemployment and
earns a little money doing tat-
toos. Cole sometimes braids
hair to earn a few extra dollars.
But mostly, they rely on public
assistance. Cole has learned not
tobeembarrassed. “Youdowhat
you got to do,” she said. “Every-
thing we do is for our kids.”
Cole knows she’s made bad
decisions — she should have
graduated and waited to get
pregnant. But she says she can’t
undo that now. “I’m not gonna
worry about it if I can’t fix it,”
she said.
At a Factory-2-U store in
Compton one day, Cole found
some socks and underwear in a
box of discount clothes. At the
checkout counter, she held up
Superman pajama pants. “Are
these mark-down?” The clerk
shook her head.
“$3.99?” Cole said. “Oh, no. I
can’t afford that.”
When the money runs out,
Cole says, she sometimes has re-
sorted to shoplifting — usually
diapers or food. She prays not to
get caught.
Cole, who is heavyset and
laughs easily, has tattoos of her
children’s names and her own
nickname — “triste,” or sad in
Spanish. Shetells her childrento
study and stay away fromdrugs.
She warns Destiny that boys are
trouble.
But Peter, sullen and quiet,
has already been kicked out of
several schools for fighting and
was arrested for shooting a BB
gun at passing cars. And Desti-
ny, outgoing and affectionate,
has trouble keeping up with her
classmates.
“My mother struggled, my
grandma struggled and I am
struggling,” Cole said. “Hopeful-
ly they will see what we went
through as a family and it makes
themwant to be better and go to
school and graduate so they
don’t have to struggle.”
•••
Their struggles often involve
housing. Cole and her family
have briefly stayed in an old van,
in a motel and, for one night, on
skid row. “I try not to cry in front
of my kids,” she said. “I cried.”
Latelast year, Colewas paying
$400 to rent a roominSouthLos
Angeles, where the whole family
slept. But the roommate com-
plained about the noise and the
mess, and she eventually kicked
them out.
About the same time, Cole
started feeling sick. Her legs
swelled, her head throbbed and
she was tired. She was anxious
and depressed. Some days she
couldn’t get out of bed.
She finds life frustrating. She
and Sena insist they are good
people, but can’t get ahead.
They say they don’t do drugs or
drink anddote ontheir children,
often taking the youngest two to
STRUGGLE
Continued from Page 1B
See STRUGGLE, Page 3B
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3B

➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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KINGSTON TWP.: The 2012
Kingston Township Summer
Recreation Program will be held
June 18-Aug. 10. The program is
exclusively for resident children
of Kingston Township who have
completed kindergarten up to
12 years of age at the time of
registration. Proof of residency,
age and completion of kinder-
garten for children five years of
age are required at time of regis-
tration.
The summer program, spon-
sored by the Kingston Township
Board of Supervisors, will take
place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each
weekday. Participants will meet
at the Center Street Park each
morning. A bag lunch and drink
should be brought each day.
Children are responsible for
admission fees for field trips,
swimming and other activities.
Registration will be held from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday at
the Center Street Park Pavilion.
Registration will also be accept-
ed at the Administration Office
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. June
11-25. Last chance to register is
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on June
25.
For more information visit
www.kingstontownship.com or
call the municipal building at
696-3809.
LEHMAN: Penn State Wilkes-
Barre is accepting registrations
for its third Women in the Sci-
ences and Engineering (WISE)
program, underwritten by Proc-
ter and Gamble’s Live, Learn,
and Thrive grant. Twenty wom-
en will be accepted into the
program at no cost.
The three-day camp on Le-
go® Mindstorm® Robotics is
open to young women in grades
six through eight and will be
held on campus under the lead-
ership of Timothy Sichler, Penn
State lecturer in engineering.
Students should request a
teacher’s recommendation.
Students will gain an under-
standing of robotics and learn
how to write their own pro-
grams that allow robots to
move, sense and react to the
environment. On the final day
of the program, WISE participa-
nts will take a field trip to Proc-
ter & Gamble, Mehoopany, to
see industrial robots in the
workplace.
Gerri Wall, career counselor
at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, will
talk about getting a head start
on potential careers, share guid-
ance resources on the Internet,
help WISE participants get a
head start on building an effec-
tive résumé and exploring other
options in the fields of science,
technology, engineering and
mathematics.
For more information, or to
register, contact Teri Pace at
675-9219 or tmp13@psu.edu, or
visit www.wb.psu.edu/ce/
youth.
LEHMAN: The Lake-Lehman
High School Band Alumni will
hold an open house 1-5 p.m. on
June 16 at Lake-Lehman High
School to honor John Miliaus-
kas, Lake-Lehman’s former band
director. Miliauskas will be
honored for his outstanding 33
years in music education at the
school. He was recently in-
ducted into the Pennsylvania
Music Educators Association’s
Hall of Fame and was honored
as a recipient of the Lake-Leh-
man’s Knights of the Round
Table, a program honoring
former staff and students of the
district.
The open house will begin
with an hour of light refresh-
ments. There will be a short
presentation highlighted by
remarks from former students,
local dignitaries and Miliauskas,
along with music selections
played by present Lake-Lehman
Band members.
The alumni will also present
the Lake-Lehman High School
with refurbished plaques honor-
ing past and present outstand-
ing band students. The day will
continue with the dedication of
the road leading from the high
school to the Lehman Elemen-
tary School as “Miliauskas
Way,” and culminate in a time
of remembering and sharing
with participants. A silent auc-
tion will be held to award vari-
ous trophies won throughout
Miliauskas’s tenure, 1966-1989.
All present and former stu-
dents of Miliauskas are invited,
as well as the interested public,
with a donation requested to
cover the cost of food provided.
For more information, call 639-
2587 or contact gmide@ya-
hoo.com or tomko5@com-
cast.net or see The Lake-Leh-
man High School Band Alumni
Facebook site.
BRIEFS
parks and the Aquarium of the
Pacific in Long Beach.
And Cole has goals: to be-
comeasecurityguardandmove
into a house of her own. Sena
has hopes too —of living where
there are lots of parks. “I want to
see something else for them,”
he said.
As last Christmas ap-
proached, the family was split
among relatives and the chil-
dren were making lists. Cole
dreaded the holiday. “How do
you tell a 3-year-old you can’t
buy them anything?” she said.
On Christmas Eve, Jaylyn
turned pale and struggled to
catch his breath. It was an asth-
ma attack.
“Youcouldtell he was not get-
ting any air,” Cole said. “It
looked like he was dying.”
A friend drove them to St.
Francis Medical Center in Lyn-
wood, Calif., which sent them
by ambulance to Miller Chil-
dren’s Hospital in Long Beach.
Jaylyn was hooked to oxygen
and an IV.
A few days after Christmas,
Jaylyn lay listless on his mom’s
lap. He started whimpering and
coughing.
“What’s wrong, papi?” Cole
asked him. “What’s wrong?”
When the nurses arrived for a
breathing treatment, Cole walk-
ed down the hall to the hospi-
tal’s family resource center.
“Do you know anyone who
has a place for rent? A back
house? Anything?” Cole asked a
counselor. “My son is really, re-
ally sick. I don’t want him to be
moving around and around and
end up back here.”
The counselor promised to
try and help.
Cole’s eyes startedtearingup.
“I love my kids,” she said. “I just
been stressed sometimes.”
Cole hadn’t seen a doctor in
months. She felt weak. It was al-
ready 1 p.m. and she hadn’t eat-
en. She tried not to think about
it. “I just focus on my kids,” she
said.
Back in the hospital room,
Jaylyn started to nod off. Cole
turned off the lights and lay
down beside him.
•••
The new year started off bet-
ter. An old roommate told Cole
her family couldmove backinto
her apartment.
Corina Bullis, 33, had an in-
fant and a 4-year-old and was a
recoveringdrugaddict. She was
behind on her rent. Cole’s mon-
ey would help, and she didn’t
want tosee her oldfriendonthe
streets. “I felt more for the kids
than anybody,” Bullis said.
In Cole’s room, a mattress lay
on the floor next to a small bed.
Ashelf held a television, several
stuffed animals and a stack of
children’s movies. A prayer was
taped to the wall: God in heav-
en, hear my prayer. Keep me in
thy loving care.
Cole turned on music,
grabbed Gemini’s hand and
started dancing. She was so
happy to be in an apartment
where she felt comfortable.
“I just feel so relieved,” she
said. Nowshe just needed a job.
As she walked Gemini to a
nearbyHeadStart preschool, he
stopped at a patch of yellow
flowers. “Mommy, can I pick a
flower?” he asked. “Yes, you can
get your teacher a flower,” she
told him.
In the classroom, Cole asked
the teacher about a janitor’s job.
“Do you have a resume?” the
teacher asked. Cole shook her
head. The teacher urged her to
write one. Cole never did.
At the end of January, Cole
missed her period. Another ba-
by would be difficult, but she
said, “If I didget pregnant, I got-
ta deal with it.”
When she walked by a preg-
nant neighbor, Cole touched
her belly and said she was hav-
ing one too. “I’m hoping for a
girl,” she said.
Since she was a teenager,
Cole had been going to the
same federal Women, Infant
and Children programoffice for
food coupons and health and
nutrition counseling. This
morning, she used her coupons
tobuy tortillas, milk, juice, cere-
al and fruit.
Cole asked a nutrition educa-
tor if the office was hiring. “I
need some kind of income,” she
said. “And I may be having an-
other baby.”
The counselor, Martha Oroz-
co, asked if she had returned to
school yet for her GED. “Not
yet,” Cole responded. “I amjust
barely getting stable.”
Orozco told her to keep try-
ing. “Children are a blessing.
You are just gonna have to be
stable.”
“I’malmost there,” Cole said.
•••
Cole wasn’t pregnant after
all. But she was sick, waking up
many mornings with swollen
legs or a throbbing headache.
And she was out of blood pres-
sure medication. She had to go
to the clinic.
A nurse at the St. John’s Well
Child and Family Center in
Compton pricked Cole’s finger
to check her blood sugar. The
results popped up quickly: 357.
“Oooh. That’s high,” Cole
said.
“Did you take your medica-
tion?” asked Annie-Claude San-
chis, a nurse practitioner.
She hadn’t. Nowher diabetes
was out of control. “I think it’s
just the stress,” Cole told her.
“I’m concerned when you are
so stressed, you can’t come get
your medicine,” Sanchis said.
“Not good, Natalie. Not good.”
Sanchis worries about the
long-term damage to Cole’s
health and to her children’s
health. “If the mother is
stressed, the kids are stressed
too,” she said.
Sanchis scheduled Cole for a
full physical. Cole didn’t go, say-
ing she didn’t want more bad
news.
There was already bad news
about her living situation. She
and Bullis argued over money
and she had to move out. “We
don’t fit in that room no more
anyway,” shesaid. “I don’t care.”
Cole and Sena were ready to
look for something better. Cole
had gotten a license as a securi-
ty guard. Peter, her oldest son,
had qualified for Supplemental
Security Income based on a
learning disability, so their
monthly income increased
slightly.
Cole’s first job was as a guard
at the Coachella Valley Music
and Arts Festival —$11an hour
for two weekends of work.
To prepare, she started walk-
ing, eatingbetter andtakingher
medication. She didn’t want her
health getting in the way. The
first weekend went well, but
hours into the second, she start-
edthrowingupandcame home.
But with the promise of more
security guard work, Cole and
her familymovedintotheir own
apartment in early May. It was
across Compton from Gemini’s
preschool, so she stopped tak-
ing him.
The rent was double what
they’dbeenpayingbefore: $800.
Cole was determined not to fall
behind. She believed this was
their chance.
“If I have to sell dinners, col-
lect cans, I am going to make
my rent,” she said. “This is our
new beginning.”
STRUGGLE
Continued from Page 2B
Jaclyn Beth Caccese, Mountain Top,
recently graduated from The Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania in Philadel-
phia. She earned a Bachelor of
Science degree
in engineering
and bioengineer-
ing. She has
spent the last
four years con-
ducting drug
development
research in
spinal muscular
atrophy under
the direction of
Dr. Gideon Dreyfuss. Caccese
completed an internship with the
Virginia Tech-Wake Forest Uni-
versity Center for Injury Biome-
chanics, where she did research in
brain and skull morphometrics and
concussion detection. She is a
four-year member of the Penn
Running Club, where she served as
treasurer for two years and presi-
dent her senior year. She also is an
executive council director and
seasonal race coordinator for the
National Intercollegiate Running
Club Association. She has com-
pleted numerous full marathons.
She also worked as a senior high
indoor/outdoor track coach for St.
Hubert’s High School for Girls in
Philadelphia. Caccese has accept-
ed a fellowship from the University
of Delaware, where she will be
enrolled in a Ph.D. program in
biomechanics and movement
science. She will serve as an in-
structor of kinesiology and applied
physiology (functional anatomy).
Caccese graduated from Crest-
wood High School, Mountain Top,
in 2008, and is the daughter of
Ron and Karen Caccese and rand-
daughter of Carol Petruzzi, Co-
nyngham.
NAMES AND FACES
Caccese
K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O C C A S I O N S
J
ade Ann Devlin and Joseph Tim-
othy Cotter, together with their
parents, announce their engagement
and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Robert and Diane Devlin, Suscon.
She is the granddaughter of Theresa
Cebula and the late John Cebula Jr.,
Dupont, and the late Helen and Peter
Devlin Sr., Pittston.
Jade is a 2001 graduate of Pittston
Area High School. She graduated
from King’s College in 2005 with a
Bachelor of Arts degree in elemen-
tary and special education and from
the University of Scranton in 2009
with a master’s degree in elementary
school counseling. She is employed
as a special education teacher in
Pittston Area School District.
The prospective groom is the son
of Judy Cotter Greenwald, Pittston
Township, and the late Joe Cotter,
and the step-son of Phil Greenwald,
Pittston Township. He is the grand-
son of Rita Mecadon and the late
Alfred Mecadon, Pittston Township;
the late Gertrude and Dr. John Cot-
ter, West Pittston; and the step-grand-
son of Joy Greenwald, Scranton.
He is a 2002 graduate of Pittston
Area High School. He graduated from
Brown University in 2006 with a
Bachelor of Arts degree in business
economics and from Villanova Law
School in 2009 with a Juris Doctor.
He is currently employed by Deloitte
Tax LLP in Philadelphia as a tax
attorney.
The couple is planning a beach
wedding at Dewey Beach in Delaware
in June 2012.
Cotter, Devlin
M
eredith Ann Ohl and Peter Paul
Recek III, together with their
families, are excited to announce
their engagement and upcoming
wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Thomas and Denise Amantea Ohl.
She is the granddaughter of the late
Thomas and Marjorie Ohl and Ralph
Amantea and the late Lola Amantea.
She is a 2002 graduate of Wyoming
Area High School and a 2008 gradu-
ate of Misericordia University, where
she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree
in history. She is employed by the
Dallas School District.
The prospective groom is the son
of Deborah Recek and the late Peter
Recek Jr. He is the grandson of the
late Peter and Louise Recek and the
late Bill and Anita Rinehamer.
He is a 2002 graduate of Greater
Nanticoke Area High School and a
2006 graduate of King’s College,
where he earned a Bachelor of Arts
degree in environmental studies. He
is employed by FedEx Ground.
The couple will exchange vows in
the presence of family and friends in
September, 2012.
Ohl, Recek
A
my Lazarski, daughter of Kevin
and Susan Lazarski, Elysburg,
and Christopher Rhinard, son of
Debbie Rhinard, Tunkhannock, and
Ed Rhinard, Laceyville, celebrated
their wedding ceremony and recep-
tion on July 9, 2011, at Eagle Rock
Resort in Hazleton.
The outdoor wedding ceremony
was officiated by the Rev. Joanna
Bach and a reading was given by
Jennifer Lazarski, sister of the bride.
The bride, escorted by her father,
chose her sisters, Jennifer and Katie
Lazarski, as maids of honor. Brides-
maids were Allyce and Nicole
O’Brien, cousins of the bride, and
Cheryl Hoinowski and Amy Mudry,
friends of the bride.
The groom chose his cousin, Ryan
Tewksbury, and long-time friend,
Brendan Elick, as the best men. The
groomsmen were Bob Johnston,
Brian Stauffer, Keith Shields and
Steve Chou, friends of the groom.
A cocktail hour and reception were
held immediately following the cere-
mony at The Base Lodge of Eagle
Rock Resort. A rehearsal dinner was
hosted by the parents of the groom at
The Clubhouse of the Resort the
evening before the wedding. The
bride was honored at a bridal shower
hosted by her mother and attendants
at LaPrimavera in Lewisburg.
The couple honeymooned to Ja-
maica. They reside in Lewisburg.
Lazarski, Rhinard
M
elissa Rudaski and Stephen
Chase were united in marriage
Oct. 15, 2011, at St. Nicholas
Church, Wilkes-Barre. The ceremo-
ny was officiated by Monsignor
Joseph Rausher.
The bride is the daughter of Dale
and Kimberly Rudaski, Wilkes-
Barre. She is the granddaughter of
Lucille Bertram, Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Stanley
and Sharon Chase, Old Forge. He is
the grandson of Dolores Melvin,
Pittston.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle and given in marriage by her
father. She chose her cousin, Ange-
line Alessandri, as her maid of
honor. Bridesmaids were Shelby
Chase, sister of the groom; Ade-
laide Bertram, cousin of the bride;
and Colleen Reilly and Erin Jones,
friends of the bride.
The groom chose his friend, John
Jones, as his best man. Groomsmen
were Dale Rudaski, brother of the
bride; Kevin Nowakowski, cousin of
the groom; and Bill Coopey and
Paul Yaskanis, friends of the
groom.
Readings were given by Tara
Bertram-Marsh, cousin of the bride,
and Kara Corbett, cousin of the
groom.
Following the ceremony, an eve-
ning cocktail hour and reception
were held at The Waterfront Ban-
quet Facility, Plains Township. The
bride was honored with a bridal
shower given by the mother of the
bride and bridesmaids at Fox Hill
Country Club, Exeter. The rehears-
al dinner was hosted by the parents
of the groom at The Café, Wilkes-
Barre.
Melissa is a 2001 graduate of
Meyers High School and earned a
bachelor’s degree in elementary
education from King’s College. She
is employed by Wilkes-Barre Area
School District.
Stephen is a 1999 graduate of Old
Forge High School. He is employed
by Northeast Eagle, Pittston.
The couple honeymooned in
Aruba.
Rudaski, Chase
D
r. Heather Lynn Andrejko and
Arash Noaeen were joined in
matrimony by Judge Joseph Halesey
on June 10, 2011, in a garden ceremo-
ny at the Highlands in Newberry
Estates.
Heather is the daughter of Stephen
and Carol Andrejko, Plymouth. She is
the granddaughter of the late George
and Josephine O’Bara Andrejko,
Hanover Township.
Arash is the son of Sumie Goto and
Morrie Noaeen, Sydney, Australia. He
is the grandson of Hiroyoshi and
Mieko Goto, Japan.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her stepsister,
Jillian Zarnas, Alburtis, as matron of
honor. Bridesmaids were Jennifer
Matar and Jessica Kurpis, Bluffton,
S.C., cousins of the bride, and Nellie
Choi Noaeen, Sydney, sister-in-law of
the bride.
The groom chose his close friend,
James Dennis, Sydney, as best man.
Groomsmen were Danny and Dennis
Noaeen, Sydney, brothers of the
groom, and Trent Hale, Sydney,
friend of the groom.
Readings were given by Georgette
Siedlecki, aunt of the bride, and Ju-
lianne Dennis, Sydney, friend of the
bride and groom. Diane O’Malley,
harpist, provided music during the
ceremony.
Heather is a graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School. She graduated
from the University of Scranton with
a Bachelor of Science degree in biol-
ogy. She earned her degree in den-
tistry from Temple University. Prior
to her wedding, Heather had a dental
practice in Sarasota, Fla.
Arash is a graduate of Macquarie
University, where he received his
accounting degree. He is the financial
controller for Aurora Expeditions,
Sydney, Australia.
A cocktail hour and dinner recep-
tion were held immediately following
the ceremony at the Highlands in
Dallas. Guests danced to the music of
the band Groove Train. The bride
was honored with a bridal shower
given by her mother and bridesmaids
at Sugar’s Tearoom. A rehearsal din-
ner was hosted by the parents of the
bride at Leggio’s. A backyard picnic
was held the following afternoon by
the parents of the bride for out of
town guests. Family and friends trav-
eled from Australia, Canada, En-
gland, Florida, South Carolina, Texas
and Virginia to attend the wedding
ceremony.
Following the wedding the couple
toured Iceland and spent two weeks
on an Arctic expedition. The couple
resides in Cammeray, New South
Wales, Australia.
Andrejko, Noaeen
M
r. and Mrs. Ricky Federici cele-
brated their 10th wedding anni-
versary on June 1, 2012. They were
married in the Glendale Gospel
Chapel, West Pittston.
Their parents are John and Louise
Hartman, Scranton, and Mike and
Josie Federici, Plymouth.
They are the parents of Lila Chris-
tine and Nicole Federici; Anthony,
Anita, Laura and Alannah Schock;
and Evan and Amanda Federici. They
also have a grandson, Aiden.
The couple belongs to Green Street
Baptist Chapel, Edwardsville.
The Federicis
M
r. and Mrs. John Doris, Hunlock
Creek, will celebrate their 70th
wedding anniversary on June 6, 2012.
They were married on June 6, 1942,
at Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Church, Lake Silkworth.
The couple has two daughters,
Lucy, Glen Lyon, and Patricia, Dallas.
They have five granddaughters, Pau-
line, Donna, Patti, Chandra and Pam,
and four great-grandchildren, Zach,
Brianne, Taylor and Emily.
A family gathering and renewal of
vows are planned to celebrate the
occasion.
The Dorises
C
harles and Lindsey Ripa cele-
brated their 30th wedding
anniversary on May 29, 2012. The
couple was married by the late
Thomas F. Ferris at St. Clement
and St. Peter’s Episcopal Church,
Wilkes-Barre.
John J. Oliver, brother-in-law,
served as best man, and Mary
Elizabeth Jamieson, sister of Mrs.
Ripa, was maid of honor.
The Ripas are retired educators.
Mrs. Ripa is the daughter of the
late John and Ruth Cole Thomas,
Ashley. Mr. Ripa is the son of
Celia Ripa, Plymouth, and the
late Charles E. Ripa Jr.
They are the parents of two
daughters, Meredith Ann, employ-
ed by Taylor & Francis Group
LLC, Philadelphia; and Allison
Mary, a senior fashion merchan-
dising major at Philadelphia Uni-
versity.
A family celebration occurred.
The Ripas
J
oseph E. Berti
(Jibber), a life-
long resident of
Swoyersville, is
celebrating his 92nd
birthday today, June
3, 2012.
He is the son of
the late John and Eugenia Piere Berti
of Swoyersville.
He was married to the late Tillie
Gallagher Berti of Swoyersville. They
celebrated their 63rd anniversary
Aug. 4, 2008.
Joe is a veteran of WWII and the
European theater and served in the
U.S. Air Force as a supply sergeant.
He was a plasterman by trade and
was employed by local contractors
Stanley Susek and Frank Coslett. He
retired in 1988 from Tenavision Cor-
poration after 11 years of service.
Joe has four children: daughter,
Marie E. and son-in-law, Jim Kittle,
Dallas, Texas; daughter, Deborah and
son-in-law, Joe Walsh, West Pittston;
daughter, Corinne and son-in-law,
Michael Craig, Cedar Hill, Texas; and
son, Dale, Plano, Texas.
His grandchildren are Joseph
Walsh, West Pittston; Kyle Walsh,
New York City; Kelly Walsh Pacelli
and husband Frank, Wyoming; and
Matthew Berti, Plano, Texas. He has
one great-grandchild, Frank Joseph
Pacelli.
Joe is an active member of Holy
Trinity Parish, Swoyersville, and
STAR Fitness, Edwardsville.
A party is planned in his honor by
his children.
Joseph E. Berti
celebrating 92nd
birthday today
The Times Leader allows you to decide
how your wedding notice reads, with a
few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in Sun-
day’s People section, with color photos,
free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220 words,
and we reserve the right to edit announ-
cements that exceed that word count.
Announcements must be typed or sub-
mitted via www.timesleader.com. (Click
on the "people" tab, then “weddings” and
follow the instructions from there.) Sub-
missions must include a daytime contact
phone number and must be received
within 10 months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary an-
nouncements or announcements of wed-
dings that took place more than a year
ago. (Wedding photographers often can
supply you with a color proof in advance
of other album photographs.)
All other social announcements must be
typed and include a daytime contact
phone number.
Announcements of births at local hospi-
tals are submitted by hospitals and pub-
lished on Sundays. Out-of-town an-
nouncements with local connections also
are accepted. Photos are only accepted
with baptism, dedication or other reli-
gious-ceremony announcements but not
birth announcements.
Engagement announcements must be
submitted at least one month before the
wedding date to guarantee publication
and must include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement announce-
ments once the wedding has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are published
free of charge at the 10th wedding anni-
versary and subsequent five-year mile-
stones. Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without pho-
tographs.
Drop off articles at the Times Leader or
mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to Kathy
Sweetra at 829-7250 or e-mailed to
people@timesleader.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
D
ebbie and Edward Warkevicz,
Hunlock Creek, are celebrating
their 15th wedding anniversary today,
June 3.
They were married at Mary Gate of
Heaven Catholic Church, Negril,
West Indies, by the Rev. Joseph Gil-
more.
Debbie is the daughter of the late
Marian and Myron Lynn, Trucksville.
Edward is the son of the late Stella
and Louis Warkevicz, Plymouth.
The Warkeviczes
Nesbitt Women’s & Children’s Center
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
Kutch, Megan and Jason, Dallas, a daugh-
ter, May 15.
Adams, Melissa and Lamire, Kingston, a
daughter, May 15.
Sitar, Alysia and Christopher Davis, Ply-
mouth, a son, May 15.
Long, Brittany and David E. Williams Jr.,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 16.
Radginski, Lisa and Damon, Hunlock
Creek, a daughter, May 16.
Houston, Jennifer and Brian, Exeter, a
son, May 16.
Centi, Amy and David, Bear Creek Town-
ship, a son, May 16.
Sheikh, Amie and Kamal, Drums, a daugh-
ter, May 17.
Best, Kristen and John, Sweet Valley, a
daughter, May 17.
Ziomkowski, Heleena and Daryl Cromer,
Hanover Township, a son, May 17.
Buchinski, Stephanie and Gregory
Grzymski, Nanticoke, a son, May 17.
Hayes, Rachel and Jason, Forty Fort, a
son, May 18.
Farber, Rachelle E. and Joseph M. Hazel-
tine, Ashley, a son, May 18.
Johnson, Latia and Abdullah Sharif,
Edwardsville, a daughter, May 18.
Bluhm, Jess and Frank McHenry, Sugar
Notch, a daughter, May 18.
Laskaris, Casey and Nicholas, Kingston, a
son, May 19.
Alfonso, Ahleah and Eric Sipple, Ply-
mouth, a daughter, May 21.
Ratchford, Maria and Doug, Shavertown,
a daughter, May 21.
Comunale, Lynn and Anthony, East
Stroudsburg, a son, May 21.
Gavis, Michelle Christine, Nanticoke, a
son, May 21.
Karns, Chirstlynn, Kingston, twin sons,
May 21.
Brown, Heather, Kingston, a daughter,
May 22.
Shotwell, Melissa and Louis Emel, Ed-
wardsville, a son, May 22.
Reddick, Brianne and Jamal Mcelligott,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 24.
BIRTHS
Tuesday
WILKES-BARRE: Toastmasters Interna-
tional, 5:15 p.m., Sundance Vacations,
Presentation Room, 264 Highland Park
Blvd., across from the Mohegan Sun
Arena. Club meets the first and third
Tuesday of each month. All are wel-
come. For more information contact
Rick at 417-7036; visit toastmasters.org;
or email toastmasterswb@gmail.com.
MEETINGS
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
GENERATIONS GATHER FOR BAPTISM
F
our generations gathered on Mother’s Day to celebrate the baptism of Col-
ton Pisano at St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church in Dallastown, Pa. Colton
was born on March 13, 2012, and is the son of Bobby and Laura Pisano. Bobby is
a graduate of Crestwood High School and Kutztown University. He earned his
master’s degree from John Hopkins University. He is an elementary school
guidance counselor in Baltimore City. Laura is also a graduate of Kutztown
University and earned her Master in Social Work degree from Widner Universi-
ty on May 19. She is employed by York County Children and Youth. They reside
in Dallastown, Pa. A family cookout marked the occasion. From left, are Bobby
Pisano, father; Evelyn Raitter, Mountain Top, great-grandmother, holding Col-
ton; and Debbie Ozark, Thornhurst, grandmother.
Six Wyoming Seminary students recently competed in the Princeton University Spring Moot Court Tourna-
ment, one of the largest moot court tournaments in the country, featuring 122 teams from the eastern part of
the United States. The students competed in three teams of two players each. The team of senior Logan May,
Dallas, and junior Harold Roberts, New York, N.Y., placed third in the tournament, losing to the eventual cham-
pion in the semifinal round by a single ballot. May also was one of 10 student attorneys, out of 244 competitors,
to be recognized as a top attorney after the first four rounds of competition. Other students who competed in
the tournament are sophomore Salvadore Diaz, Avoca; sophomore Matthew Obeid, Pittston; junior Spencer
Norris, Mountain Top; and freshman Locchanan Sreeharikesan, Scranton. At the awards presentation, from left:
Diaz; Norris; Roberts; Peter Angelica, director, Princeton University Moot Court Tournament; May; Obeid; and
Sreeharikesan.
Seminary students excel at Moot Court tournament
Holy Redeemer High School science and math students competed in the state Pennsylvania Junior Academy of
Science (PJAS) competition at Penn State University in State College. All students won first- or second-place
awards. First-place winners are: Emily Becker, Shickshinny, mathematics; Maria Khoudary, Dallas, mathematics;
Bryce Partlow, Nanticoke, mathematics; Michael Gatusky, Harveys Lake, biology; Olivia Gregorio, Kingston, biol-
ogy; Theodosia Seasock, Kingston, botany; Stacey Warga, Mountain Top, botany and a Perseverance Award for six
years of PJAS participation on the state level. Second-place winners are: Jane Kane, Shavertown, chemistry;
David Tomaszewski, Trucksville, chemistry; Gaetano Buonsante, Exeter, mathematics; Amanda Halchak, West
Nanticoke, mathematics; Hailey Noss, Plains, mathematics; Sarah Williams, Mountain Top, mathematics; Arvind
Murali, Kingston, microbiology; and Caitlin Croke, Mountaintop, physics. Faculty sponsors were Joni Clarke, Mary
Humiston, Diane Jones, Linda Rakauskas, Joseph Suchocki and Keith Zielen. Participants, from left, first row, are
Buosante, Halchak, Noss, Tomaszewski, Partlow, Kane and Murali. Second row: Gregorio, Williams, Becker, Warga,
Seasock, Gatusky, Khoudary and Croke.
Redeemer science, math students excel at Junior Academy of Science competition
Thirty-five students in the Misericordia University Nursing Program were recently in-
ducted into the Theta Phi Chapter of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of
Nursing. In order to be nominated for membership in the honor society, undergraduate
nursing candidates must have completed at least one half of the nursing curriculum, main-
tained at least a 3.0 grade point average and be ranked in the top 35 percent of the grad-
uating class. Graduate nursing candidates must have completed one fourth of the nursing
curriculum and achieved a 3.5 grade point average. At the event, from left, first row, are
Krystal Burford and Lori Kolody. Second row: Cassandra Casselbury and Diane Baldi. Third
row: Meaghan Connolly-Ubaldini and Kristie Force. Fourth row: Lisa Homa, Karen Delay and
Holly Goncheroski. Fifth row: Louis Lalande, Danielle Nebzydoski and Lauren Lomando.
Sixth row: Amy Mikula, Ashley Marinock and Amanda Howatt. Seventh row: Jamie Novitski
and Maura Nerbecki. Eighth row: Rachael Schmitz, Rita Shock and Elizabeth Stuscavage.
Ninth row: Brian Stecker, Christine Shenefield and Erin Stellar.
Misericordia nursing students join honor society
Students in Michael Novrocki’s Holocaust classes at Lake-Lehman High School recently attended the 24th an-
nual Teen Symposium on the Holocaust at Marywood University. Students had the opportunity to meet in small
group settings with Holocaust survivors. They also talked with conference keynote speaker Sgt. Alan Moskin, staff
sergeant in the 66th Infantry in General Patton’s 3rd Army, and liberator of the Gunskirchen concentration camp.
Some of the participants, from left, are Chelsea Ruger, Kayla Denmon, Moskin, Bryar Raspen, Rachel Barbacci,
Kendra Stine, Tom Chipego, Sierra Pall, Nicole O’Connor and Katelyn Ashton. Also accompanying the students was
Novrocki and Ryan Lindbuchler, chair, Social Studies Department, Lake-Lehman.
Lake-Lehman students attend Holocaust symposium at Marywood
The Luzerne County Reading Council, an affiliate of the International Reading Association (IRA) and the Keys-
tone State Reading Association (KSRA), a professional association comprised of educators, recently celebrated
its 30th anniversary by holding a dinner meeting on May 16. Dr. Mary Garrity Slaby, a charter member of the
Council and a veteran teacher in the Lake-Lehman School District, was the main speaker. Slaby, using the pen
name Molly Roe, recently published ‘Call Me Kate: Meeting the Molly Maguires,’ the first of a trilogy of young
adult historical fiction. Council members have worked to help bring about improvement in reading instruction
and to help develop a love of reading at all levels for all learners. They have conducted a variety of professional
development opportunities for teachers in Luzerne County and numerous literacy events for students. The coun-
cil has been an IRA honor council for 19 of its 30 years, a distinction held by under 50 councils throughout the
nation. For more information on the Reading Council, go to www.ksra.org or email cusickb@ptd.net. At the dinner,
from left, first row: Jane Fritz, current president, Hanover Area School District, and Dr. Gail Y. Gayeski, past presi-
dent/charter member, retired, Carbon Lehigh IU 21. Second row: Mary Ann Stelma, past president/charter mem-
ber, retired, Wyoming Seminary; Dr. Susan M. Bechetti, past president, retired, Crestwood School District; Chris-
tine A. LaMonica, past president, Hazleton Area School District; and Catherine Rinaldi, past president, Hanover
Area School District.
Reading Council holds dinner meeting
Wyoming Seminary Lower School recently awarded Seminary Scholarships and Dean
Merit Scholarships to seven area students. The Seminary Scholarship recipients are Sophia
Adeghe, Danville; Madeline Arthur, Dallas; Jeremy Callahan, Hanover Township; Tanaya
Kollipara, Dallas; and Olivia Ostrowski, Dallas. The Dean Merit Scholarship recipients are
Elisha Blake, Factoryville, and John Kehl, Mountain Top. The recipients are chosen on the
basis of their performance on a competitive exam and interviews. At a reception for the
winners, from left, first row, are Adeghe and Arthur. Second row: Kehl and Ostrowski.
Seminary Lower School students receive scholarships
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Students at St. Jude School, Mountain Top, recently enjoyed an enrichment program sponsored by the Parent
Teachers Guild. Four members of the Mandigo tribe in Sengal, West Africa, presented a program of dancing, music,
acrobatics and comedy. They also told the students about the customs and languages in their native country;
explained about the sounds and materials used to make their instruments; and wore traditional tribal clothing.
Many students and faculty members were chosen to be a part of this interactive event. Some of the participants,
from left, first row, are Chloe Pugh, Edward Patrick, Dominic Alberti, Cameron Chalk and William Wolfgang. Second
row: Thomas Mayernik; Boujou Cissoko, who played the kora; Mohamed Soumah, who played the doun dou; Mat-
thew Dean; Baye Balla Diouf, who played the djimbe; Lauren Patrick; Oumar Niancho Sanneh; and Ella Urosevich.
West African Mandigo tribe performs for St. Jude students
Members of St. Nicholas-St. Mary’s third-grade class recently completed a biography
project. Students were asked to choose a person of interest, read a book about the person
and write a report. To conclude the project students gave a presentation about the person
and answered questions presented by classmates. Students included display boards, props
and dressed up as their topics. Participants, from left, first row: Gracie Parsons, Emma Kel-
leher, Ian Edler von Lerch and Lexy Curtin. Second row: Grace Wolseiffer, Katelyn Engel,
Rose Hayward, Alexis Roman and Michael Rodyushkin. Third row: Kelci Kuren, Mackenzie
Marx, Ryan Viteritti, Amanda Feher, Lauren Casey and Owen Martin.
St. Nicholas-St. Mary’s third-graders present biography projects
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 7B
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Dallas Middle School
Thomas J. Duffy, principal, Dallas
Middle School, recently an-
nounced the Honor Roll for the
third marking period.
Grade 6: Honors with Distinction:
Audrey Aristeo, Rebecca Balara,
Cassidy Buda, Alexander Char-
lton, Annalise Cheshire, Jessica
Chinikaylo, Kaitlyn Connolly,
Caroline Conrad, Christopher
Dautrich, Steven Finarelli, An-
drew Francis, Olivia Kimmerle,
Andrew Kovalick, Alicia Langan,
Claudia Leu, John Macey, Kim-
berly Manganella, Nathan Ma-
ransky, Matthew Metzloff, Ryan
Nelligan, Benjamin O’Connell,
Drew Patton, Rayna Roberts,
Rachel Rollman, Samantha
Sorokin, Kaitlyn Strumski, Logan
Tompkins, Bryce Van Deutsch,
Hannah Vitale, Jennifer Yencha,
Kyle Zern. First Honors: Scott
Alexander, Erin Amos, Madeline
Arthur, Kayla Bidding, Michael
Biesecker, James Bittner, Christi-
na Blankensop, Adam Borton,
Nora Brown, Makenna Bryant,
Jeffrey Buscher, Nicholas Carr,
Annalise Cheshire, Michael
Collins, Sarah Congdon, Megan
Dailey, George Davies, Cassidy
DeLeur, Jenny Dickerson, Mat-
thew Dillon, Morgan Edwards-
Lewis, Mason Gattuso, Andrew
Grabowski, Kimberly Gruver, Kyle
Gurzynski, Christopher Hadsall,
Emma Hastings, Joshua Hold-
redge, Hollie Holthaus, James
Hunter, Joshua Jarden, Morgan
Jenkins, Olivia Johnson, Olivia
King, Angel Klemunes, Nicholas
Kocher, Kaitlyn Kozick, Kade
Kravits, Samuel Kravitsky, Nicho-
las Krivak, Mikail Krochta, Gian-
na Leo, Matthew Magnotta,
Thomas Marsola, Matthew Math-
ers, Evan McLain, Autumn
McCrum, Madison McEvoy, Jor-
dyn Miller, Zachery Minarik,
Nicholas Mishu, Rylee Muldoon,
Emma Oley, Olivia Ostrowski,
Garrett Pall, Matthew Pehala,
Caitlyn Pike, Gabriela Ramirez,
Melinda Ratchford, Hunter Re-
savage, Mikayla Reynolds, Lar-
son Rice, Catherine Rinehart,
Mark Roginski, Peyton Ross,
Nicole Russell, Christopher
Sedeski, Dylan Shaver, Heather
Shively, Dalton Simpson, Ryan
Spears, John Stachnik, Brody
Strickland, Adam Sutton, Rayna
Swida, Rena Troy, Madison Willis,
Erika Wintersteen, Richard
Wooditch, Josh Wyandt, Patrick
Yurish, Abigail Zolner. Second
Honors: Bradley Adams, Lauren
Alves, Ian Backus, Emily Bara-
nowski, Adam Barberio, Shania
Bearce, Dasha Bidding, Lucas
Birdsall, John Bynon, Michael
Caravaggio, Cassidy Chas, David
Chopyak, Makiah Cintron, C.J.
Coolbaugh, Dylan Davenport,
Drake Dettore, Joseph Deyo,
Jacob Dragon, Max Dzugan,
Sayde Ellsworth, Mya Enright,
Margaret Evanoski, Joshua
Ferris, Joseph Fioti, Brandon
Fox, Sydney Fulton, Bridget
Goodrich, Jaclyn Hodle, Michael
Huntington, Hanna Johnson,
Joshua Kalna, Zachary Kalna,
Kara Kochanski, Jessica Kush,
Dylan Lisnow, Joshua Lydon,
Megan Lyons, Erica McGovern,
Christopher Murray, Julianna
Myers, Rachel Nelligan, Gerald
Ogurkis, Margaret Oldeack,
Maria Ostrum, Alex Perry, Mark
Regan, Olivia Rinaldi, Kyle Ripa,
Marissa Roberts, Katie Roma-
nowski, Kaitlyn Sarday, David
Schuster, Michael Sebolka, Josh-
ua Segear, Kelly Shimonis, Kaveri
Singh, Nathaniel Steele, Tyler
Stivers, Preston Towle, Francesca
Treslar, Jake Weiland, Katherine
Yablonsky, Kyle Yagloski, Jacob
Yakus, Edward Zochowski.
Grade 7: Honors with Distinction:
Liam Barrett, Maria Bednar,
Angela Bendick, Paige Boyle,
Brandon Clemow, Maxine De-
Rome, Courtney Devens, Blake
Dyke, Christopher Good, Sara
Lojewski, Justin Marshall, Jor-
dan McLaughlin, Ann Metzloff,
James Oschal, Connor Phillips,
Troy Reinert, Margaret Rinehart,
Allison Stallard, Sarah Strazdus,
Shayla Stuart, Jordan Wilson.
First Honors: Robert Ackerman,
Ashlie Alves, Chase Anderson,
Christopher Arvletta, Jacob
Besecker, Jarod Blockus, Daniel
Burkhart, Mikaila Chakon, Za-
chary Charlton, Nicholas Christ-
man, Ryan Cohen, Jason Culp,
Katelyn DeAnthony, Meghan
Donahue, Lee Eckert, Savannah
Gochoel, Max Gordon, Leah Gorr,
Mia Greenwood, Elizabeth Grose,
Rachel Habib, Kaitlyn Hill, Emily
Howell, Joshua Hunter, Chris-
topher Huntington, Madison
Hurst, Haley Karasinski, Ryan
Kelly, Elizabeth Kennelly, Greta
Ketchner, Talia Kosierowski,
Jessica Kus, Tori Landon, Kate
Lazzeri, Anna Lehane, Emma
Lehman, Kady Mamola, Stone
Manello, Carl Markowski, Erin
May, Connor McAndrew, Corey
McAndrew, Abigail McCabe,
Megan Meyer, Megan Miller,
Richard Morgan, Riley Oremus,
Emily Pellam, Carley Perloff,
Collin Pertl, Justin Phillips, Ryan
Phillips, Sara Reichold, Brianna
Rinehimer, Christian Roberts,
Madeleine Ross, Michael Santo-
ra, Justin Sarker, Sara Schwartz,
Jonathon Scintilla Joelle Sera-
fin, Madison Slacktish, Alexis
Spaciano, Arthur Spears, Jacob
Stritzinger, Jessica Stuart,
Meghan Stubeda, Ethan Szcze-
cinski, Joseph Thompson, Jo-
sephina Treslar, Skylar Vander-
hoff, James Vitale, Jaydin West,
Alexander Zaykowski, Andrew
Zeyher, Abigale Zondlo. Second
Honors: Moustafa Almeky, Jo-
nathan Andrews, Hannah Balo-
ga, Gregory Banks, John Barrett,
Kyle Besecker, Kaylynn Bruch,
Malynda Cook, Nico DeLuca,
Jacqueline Dottor, Michael Far-
rell, Charles Giacometti, Maggie
Gilbertson, Nickolas Guzzo,
Emily Heltzel, Ryan Hulbert,
Madalyn Kelley, Connor Kerkow-
ski, Gabrielle Kosierowski, Ra-
chael Kozick, Nina Leeds, Rachel
Maniskas, Michael Mesko, Kyle
Moskaluk, Abigail Noone, Antho-
ny Nyzio, David Orehotsky, Ro-
nald Ostrowski, Lexes Palissery,
Kaitlyn Pelchar, Kaeli Samuel,
Jeffrey Simon, Megan Sinoracki,
Owen Sprau, Robert Swida,
Christian Sypneiwski, Andrew
Thomas, Justin Thompson, Erica
VanEtten, Dillon VanTuyl, Victo-
ria Vespico, Paul Zablotney.
Grade 8: Honors with Distinction:
Rebecca Andrews, Christopher
Biesecker, Catherine Blankensop,
Andrew Chupka, Chase Feeney,
John Fessler, Tanner Gattuso,
Devon Gerstein, Tabitha Grabow-
ski, Kathryn Grose, Courney
Hoats, Lauren Hudak, Madison
Kaminski, Michael Kelly, Michael
Kovalick, Angelo Kwak, Michelle
Leonard, Rachel Luke, Ryan
Martin, Daniel Mingey, Justin
Novitski, Marlena Ostrowski,
Mira Patel, Julia Ramirez, Alex-
andra Rome, Kathryn Snedeker,
Krista Vivian, Alexis Wyandt,
Emilee Zawatski. First Honors:
Mohammad Abualburak, Saleem
Abualburak, Kyle Archer, Emily
Atiyeh, Brendan Balara, Julia
Baloh, Lia Barbacci, Joseph
Bevevino, Joseph Blaine, Jessica
Bowden, Brielle Brace, Anthony
Brominski, Jacob Buda, Julie
Butwin, Peter Capitano, Daneille
Caputo, Kaitlyn Chacke, Ivy
Chamberlain, Maura Chappell,
Arthur Coolbaugh, Allsion De-
Boer, Anthony DeLuca, Cathe-
rine Dillon, Alexa Dosiak, Lauren
Dottor, Timothy Elston, Madison
Evans, Lauren Finnegan, Joseph
Fiorello, Joshua Frankevich,
Anna Giacometti, Madison Good-
win, Tabbytha Greene, Makayla
Guzzo, Rachel Healey, Alexis
Hockenberry, Katie Kapral, Mor-
gan Kapral, Christian Kimmerle,
Kaitlyn Kochanski, Kyleigh Kra-
vits, Katherine Kravitsky, Jared
Krawetz, Caitlyn Landau, Ste-
phanie Lyons, Connor Macarty,
Robert Martin, Andrew Matcho,
Sukhmail Mathon, Ruby Mattson,
Connor Motley, Adam Niznik,
Michaela O’Connell, David Oley,
Derek Peters, Katherine Pugh,
Samantha Rinehimer, Jacob
Roberts, Jackson Shaver, Janelle
Sherman, Shawn Spencer, Ste-
phen Strumski, Justin Sweeney,
Kaitlyn Yakus, Tyler Yang, Anne
Yanik, Justin Yavorski, Julia
Zochowski, Tiffany Zukosky.
Second Honors: Abdhul Almeky,
Dominic Augustine, Jessica Blat,
Spencer Bowanko, Felicia Brit-
tain, Kathleen Brown, Andrew
Casey, Taryn Chopyak, Noah
Cote, Jared DelGatto, Devin
Dickson, Nathan Dix, Zachary
Dottor, Tayler Dove, Connor
Duffy, Mariana Dymond, James
Farrell, Joshua Grote, Matthew
Harrison, Joshua James, Annal-
isa Jolley, Rachel Kon, Brandon
Kozar, Alexandria Krebs, Sa-
manth Lanunziata, Joseph
Latzko, Paige Lewandowski,
John Lyback, Rachel Magnotta,
Megan Mancineli, Aidan Marti-
nez,Cory Metz, Alyxandrea Miko-
laichik, Linsey Miller, Jonathan
Miranda, Byron Oldeack, Josh
Orlandini, Grant Payne, Chad
Phillips, Bria Polachek, Arden
Rice, William Robbins, Cameron
Shaner, Chuck Sickler, Griffin
Stone, Bret Storrs, Jayson
Strausser, Alycia Thomas, Cam-
eron Tuck, Danielle Walsh, Kevin
Young, Aaron Yurko.
HONOR ROLL
Dallas Senior High School
Jeffrey D. Shaffer, principal, Dallas
Senior High School, recently
announced the Honor Roll for
the third marking period.
Grade 12: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Somiah Almeky, Sarah
Bilski, Alyssa Blamire, Alyssa
Charney, Kelsey Dissinger, Chris-
topher Ehret, Stephanie Force,
Aubrey Gryskiewicz, Angelina
Hoidra, Elizabeth Hoover, Rebec-
ca Kahn, Chelsea Martin, Chris-
tine McCarthy, Caitlyn Meehan,
Kassondra Michno, Alyssa Mo-
naghan, Kelly Monaghan, Deep
Patel, Sarah Pomfret, Emily
Prater, Andrew Santora, Kirby
Szalkowski, Jonathan Weaver,
Laura Zimmerman, Sabrina
Zurek. First Honors: Mariya
Ackerman, Jess Adams, Andrew
Arnoldi, Emily Collins, Jessica
Congdon, Casey Conway, Hilary
Crossley, Taylor Davies, Nicholas
Delmar, Morgan Dingle, William
Dixon, Nathan Dombek, Shane
Dunn, Chelsea English, Brooke
Evans, Matthew Fasulka, Bethany
Flanders, Rachael Gerstein,
Sarah Gillette, Taylor Gingell,
Megan Grabowski, Ashley Gross,
Kelly Healey, John Hodle, Dana
Jolley, Lindsey Kelly, Timothy
Kennedy, Amanda Kotch, Kalie
Lindbuchler, Erica Luzetski,
Caitlyn Metz, David Miller, Jessi-
ca Missal, Marilyn Mizenko,
Brianna Morgan, Danielle Ole-
nginski, Alexandra Owen, Amir
Paris, Madeline Payne, Amelia
Pietraccini, Jacob Piskorik,
Brandy Popple, Alexandra Rego,
Kaylin Russell, Adam Stofila,
Ryan Thomas, Michelle Thomp-
son, Thomas Tidey, Stephanie
Titus, Elaina Tomaselli, Melissa
Tucker, Aaron Weir, Sarah Zer-
foss, Alexander Zubko. Second
Honors: Aaron Aciukewicz,
Rachael Alles, Kara Augustine,
Kyle Banks, Caitlyn Barry, Donald
Behm, Benjamin Brace, Paul
Brace, Gavin Carolan, Joseph
Cembrock, Karli-Rose Cimino,
Chelsey Conahan, Francesco
Costantino, Kyle Dolman, John
Dougherty, Joshua Dymond,
Justin Ellis, Dalton Elston, Lind-
say Jayne, Luke Jolley, Alyx
Koehler, Samantha Lentz, Aaron
Lisses, Carly Manganello, Erica
McCabe, Colleen McDonald,
Jesse McLaughlin, Amanda
Mikolaitis, Tiffanie Miller, Paul
Narcum, Tamara Nijmeh, Eric
Novroski, James Roccograndi,
Keifer Rogers, Damien Rutkoski,
Joshua Shilanski, Austin Sickler,
Austin Smith, Allison Spencer,
Tyler Steve, Theadora Treslar,
Brett Wanek, Thomas Weeks,
Haley Zimmerman.
Grade 1 1: Honors with Distinction:
Amy Avillion, Bridget Boyle,
Maria Chielli, Rebecca Darling,
Blake Donovan, John Emil, Tan-
ner Englehart, Megan Fleming,
Amanda Foote, Emily Harchar,
Taylor Hodle, Lauren Jones,
Luisa Klemm, Merissa Konnick,
Christopher Lafratte, Loreal
Lyback, Joshua McEntee, Kathe-
rine Metcalf, Taylor Newhart,
Rachel Olszewski, Krysti Oschal,
Gates Palissery, Andrea Parme-
lee, Olivia Sod, Marcus Wagner,
Jamie Wise, Danna Yu. First
Honors: Cody Adanosky, Chloe
Alles, Stephanie Amann, Alyssa
Belskis, Miranda Besecker, Bryan
Biesecker, Caitlin Cameron, Colin
Casto, Christopher Colacito,
James Delpriore, Deidre Deluca,
Matthew Diaco, Christina Diltz,
James Duffy, Ashley Dunbar,
Kristian Dyrli, Maria Fessler,
Nicole Giampietro, Morgan Gil-
hooley, Brian Goyne, Allison
Grose, Clara Grube, Dylan Hertel,
Jessica Hiscox, Alyssa Horvath,
Ryan Kozloski, Elizabeth Kravitz,
Tess Macarty, Katharine Mar-
ianacci, Casey McAndrew, James
McGovern, Alyssa Menzel, Ste-
phen Mingey, Jenna Morgan,
Madeline Mulhern, John P. Mur-
ray, Meghan O’Brien, David
Payne, Jillian Payne, Sarah
Payne, Michael Podskoch, Megan
Redlich, Francois Ross, Chris-
topher Schmid, Rebecca Schna-
ble, Brandon Scott, Courtney
Sickel, Jason Simonovich, James
Smith, Brian Stepniak, Jonathan
Strausser, Eric Yurko, Ryan
Zapoticky, Eric Zawatski. Second
Honors: Leah Benedetti, Stepha-
nie Burba, Michael Carey, Julie
Casey, Alan Cheskiewicz, Ronald
Chupka, William Crompton,
Dante DeAngelo, Michael Gallis,
Megan Johnson, Nathan Kalo,
Michael Kapral, Nathan Kish,
Briana Konecke, Sabrina Kras-
niak, Richard Luksic, Jack Matu-
siak, Marlee Nelson, Ryan Pan-
zetta, Greg Petorak, Cara Prich-
er, Daniel Saba, Danielle Spencer,
Tyler Tuck, Nathan Vario, Skyler
Velazco, Jennifer Yannuzzi.
Grade 10: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Carmen Cabrera, Decklan
Cerza, Lauren Charney, Mag-
dalena Fannick, Amber Habib,
Drew Harding, Jonathan Higgins,
Sara Hudak, Kelly Jacobs, Leo-
nard Javick, Amanda Martin,
Erin Muldoon, Andrew Nardone,
Patrick Newhart, Samuel Rein-
ert, Regan Rome, Michelle
Thompson, Kayla Wanek, Ste-
phen Wempa, Haley Wilcox,
Krista Zimmerman. First Hon-
ors: Lily Amadio, Allison Amos,
Abigail, Berger, Olivia Birdsall,
Sarah Blamire, Emily Blessner,
Lauren Butruce, Dana Capitano,
Jennifer Cave, Drew Cohen,
Kathryn Comitz, Kristi Culp,
Stephanie Cybulski, Kelsie Davis,
Dominic Deluca, Bethany Dennis,
Bryanna Dissinger, Brenden
Ehret, Catherine Gawlas, Patrick
Gelso, Ryan Georgetti, Jared
Hoats, Frank Hullihen, Sarah
Kerdesky, Peter Kuritz, Emily
Lofing, Anna Lucas, Patrick
Madaya, Connor Martinez, David
Matcho, Gurmail Mathon, Jessi
Mendoza, Samantha Missal,
Jaime Moran, Bryan Morgan,
Emma Niznik, Megan Ostrum,
Kallysta Panagakos, Michael
Pierce, Peter Shaver, Jillian
Simon, Michael Stachnik, Joseph
Steve, Jacqueline Sutton, Sa-
mantha Tencza, Nora Tidey,
Cortlyn Van Deutsch, Brian
Vojtko, Joshua Weaver, Taryn
Weaver, Madison Ziemba, Sa-
mantha Zimniski. Second Hon-
ors: Nell Adams, Kellyann An-
derson, Britnee Atherholt, Ste-
phanie Baines, Casey Barrett,
Christopher Behm, John Blat,
Kyle Borland, Grace Carolan,
Anthony Chielli, Thomas Christ-
man, Marcus Claflin, Matthew
Corbett, Logan Darling, Brianna
Dewey, Elizabeth Dillon, Alyssah
Dombek, Sara Evans, Bethany
Fiorello, Alexandra Hood, John
Hutchins, Alexander Jones,
Ashley Kapral, Taylor Kelley,
Leah Kleynowski, Alexandra
Klinges, Amanda Kus, Taylore
Lewandowski, Alex Manganella,
Mary Martin, Bryce Mattson,
Travis Mattson, Lauren McDer-
mott, Erin Michael, Margaret
Michael, Michael Mihal, Chris-
topher Milligan, Rory Mullin,
Bethany Murray, Amanda O’Day,
Sophie Olson, Mason Palissery,
Kaitlyn Palmer, Vincenzo Par-
ente, Blake Pertl, David Pomfret,
Heaven Pratz, Amanda Rando,
Joshua Rukstalis, Matthew Saba,
Brandon Scharff, Samantha
Schooley, Nigel Stearns, Kaila
Thomas, Owen Thomas, Ryan
Totten, Annastina von Schmel-
ing, Ryan Webster, Khadayah
Whitaker, Sarah Wittle.
Grade 9: Honors with Distinction:
Jesteen Adams, Dorian An-
derson, Abigail Bendick, Jacob
Bozentka, Madalyn Bozinski,
Nicholas Conway, Isabella Delpri-
ore, Erik Dyrli, Caitlin Gill, Alek-
sey Gitelson, Cheyanne Gray,
Lindsey Jacobs, Kelsey Karasin-
ski, Connor Koscelansky, Ryan
Marshall, Catrina Notari, Madi-
son Perez, Lia Ruggerio, Grace
Schaub. First Honors: Jacob
Archer, Emily Banta, James
Baut, Peter Baut, Alysha Becker,
Samantha Bitto, Sarah Boyd,
Alexandra Bruch, Katie Conrad,
Gabriella Darbenzio, Brian
Drouse, Melissa Fleming, James
Flores, Lia Giampietro, Haley
Haddle, Heather Harvey, Antho-
ny Huntington, Caylee Irvin,
Omar Kazimi, Owen Kiluk, Peter
Konnick, Elizabeth Kutza, William
Luksic, Quinn Marsola, Luke
Matusiak, Aidan McLaughlin,
Kellie Meehan, Alexandra Milli-
gan, Alexis Murdoch, Olivia
Musto, Gregory Navestad, Milan
Novak, Lindsey Oremus, Kajal
Patel, Alexis Pelchar, Eric Pincof-
ski, Jacob Plank, James Rine-
hart, Marissa Rollman, Jonathan
Sabatini, Richard Sarker, Sarah
Scherer, David Schnable, Aman-
da Schwerdtman, Allyson Se-
bolka, Michael Shutlock, Ashley
Strazdus, Talia Szatkowski, Cait-
lyn Vailes, Christina Valenti,
Courtney Wagner, Joanna Wal-
lace, Kassandra Weeks, Brittany
Weinstein, David West, Mercedes
Whitaker, Jonathan Wilson, Tara
Zukosky. Second Honors: Mi-
chael Alves, Kaylin Augustine,
Brendan Baloh, Anastasia Baney,
Jacob Bienkowski, Adam Burton,
Brian Butler, Zachary Connolly,
Calvin Crane, Michael Davis,
Angela DiMaria, Abigail Downs,
Allen Fell, Jonathan Ferris, Kate-
lyn Force, Lauren Gallagher,
Jesse Goode, Kara Hockenberry,
Katelyn Hunter, Eric Kalo, Syd-
ney Kern, Thomas Ketchner,
Ross Kleinman, Jacob Kolojej-
chick, Michael Kusma, Kameryn
McGee, Devin Michalec, Kelsey
Monahan, Ryan Monk, Jason
Morgan, Julianna Murray, Helen
Nguyen, Omar Nijmeh, Jessica
O’Malley, Samantha Onda, An-
thony Pace, Leah Popple, Kyle
Radzewicz, Matthew Reynolds,
Allison Rismondo, Caroline
Sheehan, Kurtis Sod, Samantha
Starbuck, Kayla Stearn, Kennedy
Straitiff, Stephanie Vanderhoff,
Gabrielle Volpetti.
HONOR ROLL
7
3
9
4
5
5
7
5
8
4
0
3
THE BEST
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Clarinetist extraordinaire Bob
DeAngelis will transport you
back to the exciting time of
swing with his interpretational
tribute to one of the most in-
fluential figures in popular and
jazz music. Savor the dynamic
and memorable style of this era.
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Premium
Tkts: $44-$60 Adult
7
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C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your child’s birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-generated.
Include your name and your
relationship to the child (parent,
grandparent or legal guardians
only, please), your child’s name,
age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grand-
parents’ names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages. Don’t forget to in-
clude a daytime contact phone
number. Without one, we may be
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announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return of
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publicity photos. Please do not
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GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) are free
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Christopher Thomas Weghorst,
son of Eric and Angela Wegh-
orst, Wilkes-Barre, is celebrating
his eighth birthday today, June
3. Chris is a grandson of Dean
and Alice Weghorst, Wilkes-
Barre, and Jim Gormley and the
late Elizabeth Gormley, Lake-
wood, Wash.. He is a great-
grandson of Bill and Barbara
Woodworth and Lucille Wegh-
orst, all of Wilkes-Barre. Chris
has a sister, Brianna, 9, and a
brother, Devin, 4.
Christopher T. Weghorst
Brooke Joy Ryman, daughter of
Scott and Joy Ryman, Mountain
Top, is celebrating her second
birthday today, June 3. Brooke is
a granddaughter of the Rev.
Lawrence and Carolyn Reed,
Harvey’s Lake, and Mart and
Brenda Ryman, Slocum. She has
a brother, Austin, 12.
Brooke J. Ryman
James Cornelius Kush, son of
Raymond and Anne Brown Kush,
Murfreesboro, Tenn., is cele-
brating his 10th birthday today,
June.3. J.C. is a grandson of
James and Sue Brown, Franklin,
Tenn., and Regina Kush and the
late Cornelius Kush, Nanticoke.
James C. Kush
Damon Michael Williams, son of
Mary Beth Williams and Thomas
Williams, Wilkes-Barre, is cele-
brating his eighth birthday to-
day, June 3. Damon is a grand-
son of Karen and Michael Zak,
Ashley, and Tammy and Thomas
Williams, Wilkes-Barre. He has
three brothers, Landon, 9, Ay-
den, 3, and Ethan, 3 months.
Damon M. Williams
Maggie Paciga, daughter of John
and Laurie Paciga, Shavertown,
is celebrating her ninth birthday
today, June 3. Maggie is a grand-
daughter of Florence Paciga; the
late John Paciga; Larry Ferrone;
and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gazoo.
She has a sister, Emily, 12.
Maggie Paciga Brooke Felici, daughter of Pete
and Kelly Felici, Nanticoke, is
celebrating her sixth birthday
today, June 3. Brooke is a grand-
daughter of Helen Baluta and
Jim and Betsy Cheshinski, all of
Nanticoke; Kevin and Sandy
LeBlanc, Scarborough; and Pete
Felici, Glen Lyon. She has a
sister, Lexy, 8.
Brooke Felici
The West Side Career and Technology Center National Technical Honor Society recently held its 15th annual induction ceremony at Irem
Country Club in Dallas. To be a member, students must maintain a 3.1 grade point average and have excellent behavior. At the ceremony, from
left, first row, are Laura Baut; Audre Edwards; Shyann Church; Sam Edmonds; Laura Brown; Dawn Harding, adviser; Hannah Smith; Jackie
Joseph; and Ashley Williams. Second row: Kisem Freeman, Matt Church, Gage Buchanan, Brittany O’COnnell, Jestina Vasicak, Darren Lupole,
Sam MacMillan and Jess Ogrodnick. Third row: Stan Sopata, Paul Holena, Mitch Pointon, Jory Brezinski, Chris Cragle, Lloyd Crawford, Mark
Hughes and Mark Macosky.
WSCTC students become members of Technical Honor Society
Dr. Victor F. Greco of Drums was recently awarded the 2012 UNI-
CO National Marconi Science Award by UNICO National President
Glenn Pettinato at a gala award ceremony during UNICO’s board of
directors meeting on March 24 in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Dr. Greco, a
general and thoracic surgeon, helped develop the heart-lung ma-
chine, which allowed surgeons to break the last barrier that re-
mained to operate on the heart. Dr. Greco was also a member of the
team that performed the first successful open-heart surgery in
1953. He is the last surviving professional member of the first team.
UNICO’s Marconi Science Award is presented to a U.S. citizen of
Italian descent involved in the physical sciences, such as electron-
ics, physics, chemistry, etc. The award was established in 1995 to
annually recognize a living scientist who exemplifies Marconi’s vast
scientific and creative accomplishments through their own life
achievements. At the award presentation, from left, are Pettinato;
Greco; and Andre Dimino, award chairman and past national presi-
dent
UNICO Science Award given to Greco
Two students from Wyoming Valley West High School were select-
ed to participate in the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association’s
All State Festival held April 18-21 in Lancaster. The students pro-
gressed through district and regional level festivals in order to
qualify for All State. Jason Klus was selected to concert band and
Meg Markwith was selected to chorus. Participants, from left, first
row, are Klus and Markwith. Second row: Andy Kolojejchick, band
director, and Chris Wilski, choral director and chair, Music Depart-
ment.
WVW students attend All State Music Festival
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 9B
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New Hours:
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Fri.-Sat. 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sunday 12 p.m.-6 p.m.
King’s College
Dr. Nicholas A. Holodick, vice presi-
dent for academic affairs at
King’s College, recently an-
nounced the students who have
qualified for the spring 2012
dean’s list.
A: Janelle Adams, Susan Addoms,
Andrew Agustini, Adrian Alberti-
ni, Maxwell Allegro, Matthew
Alles, Megan Amey, Natanya
Anty, Kaitlyn Apolinaro, Eliza-
beth Appleby, Janeen Arancio,
William Ardoline, Nicholas Ar-
menti, Lindsay Atchison, Aman-
da Avery, Katheryn Avila, and
Michael Avvisato
B: Priyanka Bahl, Ashley Bahlatzis,
Preston Balavage, Tara Banville,
Tyler Baran, Haley Baran, Jessi-
ka Baranousky, William Baratta,
Laura Barna, Colleen Barr, Kevin
Barry, Jeannette Bartlow, Chris-
tina Bartolomei, Allison Baum-
gartner, Jonathan Beekman,
Melissa Benjamin, Matthew
Bennett, Anna Bergeman, Josh-
ua Berman, Kylanne Berry, Sarah
Beyer, Justin Binkowski, Julie
Blackmore, Michael Blessing,
Michael Bocan, Cynthia Bodden,
Eric Bohem, Jessica Bolton,
Sarah Bolton, Aimee Bono,
Ashley Booth, William Borysew-
icz, Heather Bowman, Ryan
Boyle, Alyssa Bozzett, Molly
Brado, Taylor Brainard, Michael
Brannon, Chelsea Breimann,
Rachele Brennan, Sean Brogan,
Eric Brown, Jesse Brown, Ma-
cawley Brown, Molly Brown,
Emily Buchman, Nicole Buck-
man, Stephanie Burke, Loretta
Bushick, and Joseph Byczek
C: Nicole Caccese, Joseph Caffrey,
Patrick Caffrey, Lily Calkins,
Tyler Calkins, Margaret Callan,
Kelly Caloway, Sarah Calvaresi,
Matthew Campbell, Gabrielle
Carbone, Amanda Cardone,
Amanda Carey, Courtney Carey,
Paige Carlin, Timothy Carroll,
Marguerite Carver, Amanda
Casey, David Castro, Julie Cau-
field, David Centak, Justyna
Cerefin, Rebecca Chateauneuf,
Kathleen Cheseldine, Natalia
Chinikaylo, Michael Chmielewski,
Julio Cicconi, Madeline Cielski,
John Clawson, Rebecca Cole-
man, Roman Collins, Elizabeth
Conn, Kevin Conroy, Courtney
Conway, Carissa Cook, James
Cook, Jennifer Cook, Kaleen
Cook, Gianna Cordasco, Ryan
Cordingly, Anthony Corigliano,
Margaret Corley, Morgan Coslett,
Blair Ann Costantino, Kasey
Critchlow, Micah Cross, Alex-
andra Crowell, Kayleen Cuddy,
Gordon Custer, and Jamie Cybul-
ski
D: Molly Dahl, Dominic Daley, Emily
D’Amato, Diana Darby, Sarah
Darte, Heather Dartnell, Nicole
Dauria, Steven Davi, Ashley
Davies, Robert Davis, Christina
Davis, Michael Deangelo, Julia
Dearden, Tara Decker, Michael
Deegan, Vittoria Degiosio, Mal-
colm Delara, Jamie Deleon,
Catherine D’Elia, Kayleigh De-
Mace, Elizabeth Demko, Stepha-
nie Deremer, Paige Desaulniers,
Angela Desiderio, Scott De-
vincenzo, Caitlin Dewey, Nicholas
Diaco, Richard Dicasoli, Anthony
Dietrick, Giancarlo Dilonardo,
Anthony Dimitrion, Michon
Dinwoodie, Anthony Disalvo,
Rachel Docktor, Zachary Dolei-
den, Alyssa Dolman, Alicia Dom-
broski, Joel Dorman, Stephen
Dotzel, Richard Douglas, Morgan
Douglas, Edward Dowse, Eric
Drevitch, Brittany Driscoll, Leann
Dudash, Lee Dudick, Lauren
Duguid, Danielle Dunham, Shan-
non Dunski, Adam Dunsmuir,
Thaddeus Dziedzic, and Jessica
Dzugan
E: Brenton Eades, Jenna Ebersole,
James Edelman, Slade Eigen-
mann, Justin Eilenberger, Justin
Eimers, Mary Elchert, William
Elliott, Alysha Emelett, Cassie
Erdmann, Frances Erndl, Lindsey
Evans, Amanda Evans, Ryan
Evans, William Everett, and Tyler
Ewell
F: Gerald Fahey, Kaitlin Falatovich,
Kenneth Faldetta, Tessa Farah,
John Farber, Andrew Federo,
Candace Fegley, Deidra Felici,
Brian Ferrari, Jonathan Filipe,
Samantha Fisher, Kelly Flannery,
Carmen Flores, Caitlin Foley,
David Foley, Joseph Foreman,
Samuel Forst, Jillian Foster,
Danielle Frallicciardi, Julia
Frampton, Olivia Francisco, Carl
Frank, Jackson Frauel, and
Amanda Frey
G: Sean Gaffney, David Gagliardi,
Allison Gardiner, Kyle Garon,
Brandi George, Allison Gibbons,
Adam Gilbert, Kellyn Gimbel,
Kathryn Gisonti, Kristy Gleco,
Michael Glenn, Kaitlyn Globosits,
Amanda Goetz, Catherine Golya,
Michaelene Gongliewski, Audra
Gould, William Grabinski, Robert
Greenhalgh, Kelsey Griesback,
Timothy Griffith, John Grimes,
Robert Groblewski, Megan Gro-
hol, Deric Grohowski, Colleen
Grosenick, Debra Gross, Derek
Grovatt, Christine Guarino, An-
nemarie Guest, Christina Gu-
gliotti, Kaitlyn Gustafson, and
Sarah Guzinski
H: Hillary Haaf, Kamila Hacia,
Matthew Hacker, Joseph Hack-
ett, Jordan Haddock, George
Hadeed, Brittany Haight, Jill Hall,
Chelsea Hamershock, Jessica
Hamilton, Kyle Hammonds,
Jennie Hampton, Amanda Ham-
stra, Jeffrey Hanadel, Karlee
Hantz, Hillary Hanwell, Richard
Hardy, Alexis Hargrave, Tyler
Hartranft, Ronald Harvey, Jesse
Harvey, Garrett Harvey, Allison
Hawk, Alicia Hayes, Brittany
Heaney, Alexandra Heavilon,
Emily Heimbecker, Stephen
Hemmig, Kristin Henchenski,
Kyley Henry, Mark Henry, Jason
Herman, Rachel Herron, Ashley
Hettel, Alyssa Hickey, Alicia
Higgs, Jessica Hildebrand, Alys-
sa Hill, Rebecca Hilmer, Steven
Hippeli, Matthew Hoernle, Mi-
chele Hoffman, Erin Holcomb,
Caitlin Holehan, James Holland,
Jared Holodick, Krystna Ho-
manko, Christine Horn, Amanda
Horto, Judi Howe, Michel
Hughes, Stephanie Hughes,
Exaud Hugho, Eric Hummel,
Jacob Humphreys, Chelsi Hunter,
and Jaclyn Hynes
I: Megan Inama, and Michael In-
genito
J: Lindsey Jachim, Ashlee Jacobs,
Brianna Jacobs, Nicholas Jallat,
Kelsey James, Christian Janus-
ziewicz, Jennifer Jean-Jacques,
Andrea Jimcosky, Jordan Jiunta,
Shane Johns, Natalie Johnson,
Kaitlen Jones, Kelsey Jones,
Shaliyah Jones, William Joyce,
Kevin Judge, and Kristen Justice
K: Paul Kankiewicz, Eric Karpinski,
Jeffrey Katra, Felicia Kaufmann,
Alison Kearns, Julie Kearns,
Robert Kehler, Gina Kellett,
Daniel Kempa, Christopher
Kempinski, Kaley Kennedy, Kyle
Kepfinger, Jessica Kerrigan,
Emily Kesselring, Amanda Ke-
tusky, Kyle Kidd, Jeffrey Killian,
Cathryn Kinsman, Olivia Kirk-
Jasulevicz, Colton Kishel, Kelly
Klaproth, Christopher Kleva,
Francesca Klinger, Briana Klug,
Peter Kmec, Amanda Knowles,
Kelci Koch, Kristen Kohut, Mat-
thew Kolbeck, Sarah Beth Kolod-
ziej, Matthew Koncz, Steven
Kondracki, Trudi Konopki, Corey
Koons, Kevin Kopco, Emily Ko-
pec, James Kopec, Ryan Kopy-
cienski, Tracy Korona, Zachary
Kosak, Eric Kotch, Jeffrey Kozel,
Melissa Kozerski, Konrad Kras-
zewski, Jessica Kresge, Carly
Krisavage, Matthew Kruczek,
Douglas Krysan, Jessica Krzyw-
icki, Jake Ksiazkiewicz, Bryn
Kubinski, Jessica Kuc, Matthew
Kujat, and Vanessa Kundrik
L: Mark Labbadia, Vincent Laconti,
Kerri Ladines, Andrew Lafratte,
Lisa Lamaire, Mary Kate Lam-
bert, Timothy Lambert, Elyse
Laneski, Megan Lange, Timothy
Lange, Giuliana Lapiana, Nicole
Lawler, Kevin Lawrence, Eric
Leedock, Devin Leffler, Alena
Leger, Jacob Lehnowsky, Kristi-
na Leiby, Leah Leikheim, Bren-
ton Lewandowski, Kelly Lewis,
Kevin Lewis, Emily Lichtenstein,
Kathryn Lisante, Justine Lisella,
Jenni Lisiewski, Tina Lispi, Laura
Lobrutto, Kellie Logrande, Mark
Loiacono, Jarryd Lokuta, Da-
nielle Long, Dawn Long, Bobbi-
lynn Loomis, Melissa Loomis,
Angela Lopez, Richard Lopez,
Ryan Lord, Mingtong Lu, Jillian
Luckasavage, Eric Ludwig, Kelcie
Lushefski, April Lynch, Sara
Lynn, and Katlyn Lytle
M: Stephen Macioch, Kyle Mahal-
ick, Matthew Malak, Ashlee
Mallery, Abigail Malloy, Thomas
Maloney, Talia Mamola, Chelsea
Manes, Kaitlin Mangan, Marissa
Manning, Patricia Manning, Holly
Mannucci, Gregory Maresca,
Samela Mariano, Alisa Marino,
John Mariotti, Amanda Marra,
Maryann Marselles, Ashley
Marsh, Janelle Marshallick,
Chelsy Marszalek, Mario Marti-
nelli, Alexander Martino, Christi-
na Marvin, Joseph Maskalis,
Bobbi Ann Maslowski, Julie
Mathew, Kyle Matis, Kristopher
Matthews, Patrick Matthews,
Lara Mattias, Karmen Matusek,
Brian Matylewicz, Abigail May-
ernik, Amber Mays, Alexandra
Mazaleski, Catherine McAfee,
Ryan McCarthy, Shannon McCar-
thy, Debra McCloskey, Mark
McCracken, Morin McDade,
Valerie McElrath, Scott McGoni-
gal, Sean McGowan, Shannon
McGowan, Thomas McGrath, Rob
McGuiness, Hayley McGuinn,
Charles McGuinness, Erin McLin,
Kevin McMahon, Andrew McMas-
ter, Edward McNichol, Brandon
McNulty, Michelle McNulty, Paige
McWilliams, Anthony Melf, Mary
Jo Mellas, Thomas Meluskey,
Manuel Mendes, Timothy Meyer,
Emmalee Meyers, Matthew
Michael, Katlin Michaels, Daniel
Migatulski, Timothy Mike, Brian
Mikus, Vincent Milazzo, Chris-
topher Milewski, Jillian Millard,
Jessica Miraglia, Brett Mirigliani,
Nicole Mitkus, Tara Mlodzienski,
Elyssa Molino, Nicole Molino,
Jennifer Momenzadeh, Lee Ann
Monaghan, Joseph Monaghan,
Jordan Moore, Patrick Moran,
Sean Moran, Brian Morris, Rob-
ert Moulton, Samantha Moyer,
Nicole Munley, Shelby Munson,
Brittany Murgallis, Connor Mur-
phy, Kaitlin Murphy, and Marissa
Mutzek
N: David Nat, Drake Nester, Minh
Nguyen, Matthew Nice, and
Kaitlyn Nonamaker
O: Ian Oakley, Paul Ofcharsky, Irene
Ogrodnick, Mara Olenick, Louis
Oley, Amy Oliveri, Lindsey Olson,
Samantha Olson, Jill O’Malley,
Kelby O’Neil, Christopher O’Neill,
Jennifer Orso, Laura Ortiz,
Victoria Ortolani, Ashleigh Osol-
nick, and Heather Ott
P: Lindsey Paduck, Elizabeth
Paese, Jessica Palermo, Brian
Palladino, Sophia Panaccione,
Erica Pandolfo, Ashley Panko,
Carisa Panzetta, Andrew Pan-
zitta, Laura Panzitta, Jessica
Pardo, Michael Parshall, Kesha
Patel, Kyle Paul, Scott Pavone,
Aaron Perez, Christis Perillo,
Katie Perlowski, Erin Perry, Alex
Peslak, Danielle Petchkis, Katie
Phelan, Joshua Phillips, Kathryn
Phillips, Scott Picketts, Michael
Pierce, Nicole Pierson, Stephanie
Pierson, Joelle Pilek, Rachael
Pompeii, Jessica Porter, Sara
Potteiger, Ryan Powers, Chris-
topher Prater, John Prater,
William Preston, Lisaanne Priest,
Connor Prince, Lauren Pristash,
and Kristen Pstrak
Q: Ryan Querci, and Jenera Qui-
nones
R: Celia Rader, Jessica Rafalko,
Sabih Rahman, Caitlin Ralston,
DEAN’S LIST
See KING’S, Page 10B
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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Family Run For Over 100 Years
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• 35 Varieties of Tomatoes
• Heirloom Tomato Plants
• 22 Varieties of Peppers
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PAT &DEB’S
Cerise Rapp, Nicole Rave, Aman-
da Reilly, Beau Reznak, Kellie
Rhiel, Jeremy Rich, Katelyn
Rivers, Nicole Rogers, Jacob
Rohring, Joel Rojas, Katlyn
Rossowski, Kyle Rowan, Thomas
Rowley, Cory Ruda, Kaitlyn
Runner, Michael Ruth, and Kayla
Rutkoski
S: Tamara Sager, Erika Samuels,
Carlos Sanchez, Karina Sanchez,
John Sanchez, Timothy Sand-
erson, Nicole Sandrowicz, Robert
Santopietro, Carissa Sarlo, David
Satterfield, Charles Savage,
Jessica Savino, Anthony Scaccia,
Ashley Scarpetta, Marc Schaffer,
Madeline Schiminger, Michelle
Schmid, Brianne Schmidt, Alicia
Schroeder, Sarah Scinto, Anna
Scutt, Christopher Sedon, Kelsie
Seese, Brandon Senese, Shawn
Senese, Luann Sensale, Emily
Sepela, Tyler Serbin, Nick Serig-
nese, Anne Shaffer, Robert
Sharp, Christopher Sharry,
Samantha Shelton, Daniel Sheri-
dan, Alexandra Shinert, Jacob
Shook, April Shumate, Jacque-
line Sikora, Isabel Silva, Suzana
Silva, Samantha Simcox, Daniel
Simpson, Michael Sipsky, Emily
Sisk, Patrick Skellington, Saman-
tha Skellington, Christopher
Skevofilax, Brittany Slattery,
Carissa Smith, Charles Smith,
Monica Smith, Emily Snyder,
Brittany Sohle, Kayla Solomon,
Molly Spanfelner, Amy Sperling,
Holly Spikol, James Sprague,
Ashtyn Stang, Karley Stasko,
Brittany Steele, Alyssa Stella,
Ashley Stephens, Meghan Ster-
nat, Ian Stewart, Kayla Strach,
Kirsten Strauss, Patricia Streeter,
Victoria Stuccio, Lauren Su-
checki, Kati Sudnick, Ashley
Sugalski, Christine Suraci, Ash-
lee Swanson, Maura Sweeney,
Patricia Swope, Lindsay Szalkow-
ski, and Ryan Szwast
T: Thomas Taraszewski, Daniel
Taroli, Rebecca Taylor, Kevin
Taylor, Renee Thomas, Ashley
Thomas, Gabrielle Thomas,
Christopher Thompson, Brenden
Thornton, Noemi Tlatenchi, Jane
Tomkinson, Abigail Torres,
Amanda Torres, Jackeline
Torres, Stephanie Torres, Mi-
chael Toth, Cathleen Traino, Lam
Tran, Jacqueline Treboschi,
Albert Trinisewski, Thomas
Troianiello, Margaret Troxell,
Andrew Tuminello, Cassandra
Turczyn, Briana Turnbaugh, and
Alexandria Turnbull
U: Christopher Uhl, and Amanda
Urban
V: Ashley Varga, Eric Vega, Nicho-
las Vera, Krystina Villarreal,
Michael Vizzoni, Renee Voith,
Courtney Vojtko, Chelsea Voor-
hees, and Robert Vornlocker
W: Vanessa Wagner, Christina
Waiculonis, Alisha Wainwright,
Amanda Waligun, Kara Washing-
ton, Teresa Wasiluk, Casey Was-
lasky, Kimberly Wasmanski,
Justin Weilert, Ryan Weiner,
Rebecca Weinschenk, Christian
Weiser, Matthew Weitz, Carissa
Welles, John Wells, Lauren Wen-
ner, Meghan Wernimont, Kirsten
Wetzel, Emily Wexler, Corey
White, Brooke Whiteko, Stepha-
nie Widdoes, Tiffany Wiencek,
Margaret Wilde, Gregory Wil-
liams, Lauren Williams, Monika
Williams, Samantha Williams,
Christopher Wilson, David Wil-
son, Emily Winters, Kayla Witm-
er, Devon Woolfolk, Kyle Wool-
folk, Brittny Woss, and Timothy
Wychock
Y: Amanda Yakobitis, Megan Ya-
koski, Roxanne Yaniello, Robert
Yanik, Stanley Yanik, Jordan
Yatsko, Sabrina Yelverton, Sarah
Yocius, Zachary Yodis, and Dou-
glas Young
Z: Julia Zafia, Stephen Zapoticky,
Michael Zema, Zachary Zerbe,
Amanda Zieba, Sean Ziller,
Angelo Zingaretti, Brian Zinga-
retti, Brian Zinn, Michael Zurek,
and Kimberly Zurinski
KING’S
Continued fromPage 9B
Albion College, Albion, Mich.
Paige Narins, Kingston.
Messiah College, Grantham
Meghann Miller, Berwick, and El-
izabeth Seigendall, Hazleton.
University of New Haven, West
Haven, Conn.
Nathan Albrecht, Shavertown;
Amanda Brooking, Wapwallopen;
Amal Salahedin, Forty Fort;
Dominique Stasulli, Shenandoah.
OUT-OF-TOWN
DEANS’ LISTS
Bucknell University, Lewisburg
Kate Bowen, Kingston, Bachelor of
Science degree in biology, cum
laude.
Edward Dal Santo, Kingston, Bach-
elor of Arts degree in psycholo-
gy, cum laude.
Robert Duffy, Kingston, Bachelor
of Arts degree in sociology and
English, summa cum laude.
Zachary Klush, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science degree in
neuroscience.
Matthew Lamore, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology.
Drew Orth, Sugarloaf, Bachelor of
Science degree in civil engineer-
ing.
Morgan Popple, Wilkes-Barre,
Bachelor of Science degree in
business administration in
management, cum laude.
Ian Schnaufer, Drums, Bachelor of
Science degree in interdisciplin-
ary studies, economics and
mathematics.
Kirby Thomas, Tunkhannock,
Bachelor of Arts degree in
political science and English,
magna cum laude.
Elizabeth Yale, Drums, Bachelor of
Arts degree in English with
departmental honors, cum
laude.
DeSales University, Center
Valley
Ann Marie O’Holla, Hazleton,
Bachelor of Science degree in
medical studies, magna cum
laude.
Ryan Canfield, Tamaqua, Bachelor
of Science degree in finance and
accounting, cum laude.
Allison Kurowski, Gouldsboro,
Bachelor of Science degree in
nursing.
Adriana Stigliano, Tannersville,
Bachelor of Arts degree in
theatre.
Sidney Snyder, West Pittston,
Bachelor of Science degree in
psychology, cum laude.
Kelsey George, Wilkes-Barre, Bach-
elor of Arts degree in dance.
Joshua Medvecky, Drums, Bache-
lor of Science degree in sport
and exercise science.
Douglas Harding, Swoyersville,
Bachelor of Science degree in
accounting and finance.
Drexel University, Philadelphia
Ted Kopec, Wilkes-Barre, Juris
Doctor degree.
Lycoming College, Williamsport
Allyson Blizman, Wilkes-Barre,
Bachelor of Arts degree in
mathematics, actuarial mathe-
matics and economics, magna
cum laude.
Joshua Miller, Drums, Bachelor of
Arts degree in economics and
business, magna cum laude.
Danielle Biacchi, Berwick, Bachelor
of Arts degree in communi-
cations and Spanish, magna
cum laude.
Daniel McHugh, Hunlock Creek,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology, cum laude.
Steven Wanner, Benton, Bachelor
of Science degree in biology.
Raymond Bierbach, Hunlock
Creek, Bachelor of Arts degree
in business.
Michael Tonart, Dallas, Bachelor of
Arts degree in communications.
Amanda Miller, Kingston, Bachelor
of Arts degree in English, sum-
ma cum laude.
Alyssa Jones, Wilkes-Barre, Bache-
lor of Arts degree in psychology.
Quinnipiac University, Hamden,
Conn.
Jeremy Stull, Dallas, Bachelor of
Arts degree in history.
Lauren Zimniski, Dallas, Bachelor
of Arts degree in mathematics.
Saint Vincent College, Latrobe
John J. Petrucci, Exeter, Bachelor
of Science degree in manage-
ment.
University of Pittsburgh,
Bradford
Nicole Povilitus, Wilkes-Barre, a
degree in sport and recreation
management.
University of Vermont,
Burlington, Vt.
Ryan Stredny, Dallas, Bachelor of
Science degree in secondary
education science.
Blair Gallacher, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science degree in
art education.
Nina Dinan, Mountain Top, Doctor
of Physical Therapy degree.
OUT-OF-TOWN
GRADUATES
The Dietrich Theater Fundraising Committee is planning two
events. A fundraiser will take place on June 27 at Perkins Restaurant
and a Founders Day basket raffle will be held. Committee members,
from left, are Linda Murray, Nancy Aiello and Patty Holdredge.
Dietrich Theater committee holding fundraisers
Each month GAR Memorial High School recognizes outstanding students for their personal successes and achievements by honoring
them with the Ray Sunday Student of the Month Award. Winners from the 2011-12 school year, from left, first row, are Brea Seabrook, Krista
Montigney, Mary Minnick, Bridget Buchan, Natalia Scarantino, Brittany Stevenson, Lien Do, Gabrielle Hynes and Laurel Roughsedge. Second
row: Colleen Robatin, high school principal; Eric Drako, secondary English teacher and Student of the Month coordinator and Student Coun-
cil adviser; Heather Grebeck, high school librarian and Student of the Month coordinator and Student Council adviser; Andrew Smith; Rash-
aun Mathis; Thomas Williams; Mohamad Toure; Brian Klapat; Jeff Chintalla; Alberto Carrington; Carol Kolodziej, TitleI Math teacher; Thomas
Thackara, German teacher; Raphael Cooper, secondary English teacher; and Anthony Khalife, assistant high school principal.
Students of the Month honored at GAR
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 11B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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James M. Coughlin High School
James M. Coughlin High School
recently announced the Honor
Roll for the third quarter.
Grade 12: Highest Honors: Cara
Answini, Taylor Balucha, Da-
nyelle Barrow, Rosa Bartoletti,
Brittany Bella, Sara Blazejewski,
Logan Carroll, Dena Casterline,
James Chmiola, Christopher
Cinti, Shahara Davis, Karen
DeGante, Michelle Diaz, Clint
Donovan, Marina Dunsavage,
Kayla Eaton, Rebecca Emmert,
Jeremy Evanko, Laura Evans,
Shelby Flaherty, Clifford Francis,
Kayla Franckiewicz, Kyle Gra-
ham, Andrea Grillini, Dannah
Hayward, Eric Heffers, Scott
Hoffman, Julie Hughes, Lindsey
Humanik, Eric Klemchak, Joseph
Kubicki, Trystin Lamereaux, Nhi
Le, Summer Lentini, Marissa
Lercara, Coreen Lingle, David
Long, Elizabeth Long, Hannah
Lukatchik, McKenzie McDo-
nough, Liana Meshko, Stephanie
Milewski, Marissa Miller, Matthew
Miraglia, Alyssa Monaghan,
Anthony Nestor, Bailey Novak,
Ivy Nulton, Linda Obando- Wil-
son, Tina Olson, Jeremy Ozark,
Anthony Panaway, Kara Paw-
loski, Heather Pilcavage, Sierra
Pinkney-Williams, Richard Pop-
lawski, Kaushal Savalia, Amanda
Sax, Paul Scull, Cayla Sebastian,
Kirby Silliboy, Marissa Smith,
Jordan Sod, Aldrin Soriano, Sally
Sosa, Gregory Stankiewicz,
Brooke Stepanski, Kaitlin Syp-
niewski, Ryan Sypniewski, Alex-
andra Szoke, Allison Townsend,
Phillip Trout, Edward Walsh,
Jessica Walsh, Madison Zamsky,
Stephanie Zedolik. High Honors:
Lynn Aguilar, Zuhey Aguilar,
Jordan Answini, Julie Barry,
Gerdwine Bourdeau, Katie Bris-
lin, Brittany Bullock, Ryne Clark,
Carla Clarke, Micheal Czernia-
kowski, Devon Davis, Thomas
Donato, Grace Fazzi, Heather
Gaydos, Devin Green, Dominick
Gulius, Emilie Gurdock, Jawanna
Harper, Eryn Harvey, Michael
Iorio, Robin Jackson, Jasvir
Jacobs-Singh, John Karazia,
Eligh Lasiewicki, Sarah Lasoski,
Jason Lepore, Cara Martin,
Brittany Maza, Zachery McNeill,
Ian Mercado, Kaitlyn Mondulick,
Russell Monroe, Eric Murray,
Kallista Myers, Victoria Pando,
Joseph Parsnik, Allison Peck,
Matthew Phillips, Ashley Ray,
Berenice Rodriguez, Whitney
Ruiz, John Skursky, Joshua
Stankinas, Nicole Tirpak, Troy
Vannucchi, Victoria Wilde, Eric
Yakabovicz, Kevin Zingaretti.
Honors: Brandon Adkins, Kevin
Andrzejewski, Michael Avery,
Jessica Bealla, Bryan Buckelew,
Ialik Etheridge, Justin Francis,
Tyheem Jenkins, Kevin Kandrac,
Sierra Kelley, Brandon Konze,
Jacob Kruika, Benjamin Lenkof-
sky, Amber Lynn Mahalick, Leo-
nard Montgomery, Erica Nanni,
Robert Paci-Greenwald, Saman-
tha Petrancosta, Jesse Ragugini,
Maximo Ramos, Caitlyn Rocker,
Brittany Ross, Jason Ross, Ash-
ley Simonson, Brian Thomas,
Natalie Torres, Alexander Zuppo.
Grade 1 1: Highest Honors: Samuel
Andrews, Cindy Anusiewicz,
Hunter Bednarczyk, Kaitlyn
Benczkowski, Andrey Boris,
Frank Brandolino, Spoorthy
Challa, Maria Cinti, Atyia Collins,
Julia DeMellier, Steven Dobbs,
Zachary Evans, Shamus Gartley,
Dominique Gurns, Shelby Hess,
David Hontz, Madysen Jones,
Mackenzie Keats, Michaela
Keats, Shelby Kresge, Summer
Kubicki, Michael Lewandowski,
Sara Long, Hailley Malenovitch,
Lorianne Masi, Samantha May-
wald, Kylee McGrane, Matthew
Moorhead, Julia Moskel, Emily
Motsko, Joshua Moules, Cassidy
Moyer, Theodore Mykulyn, Justin
Okun, Mykela Pacurariu, Michael
Post, Dylan Robbins, Jessica
Ross, Nathan Sauers, Danyelle
Schweit, Nicholas Scupski, Casey
Silvi, Jessica Sims, Felicia Solo-
vey, Alvin Soriano, Sergey Svin-
tozelskiy, Aaron Tohme, Cathe-
rine Yankowski. High Honors:
Danielle Adcock, Jennifer An-
drews, Marcia Archibold, Alexan-
der Beaver, Wendy Chew, Tayler
Cook, Shannon Daly, Davone
Davis, Christopher Domiano,
Rebecca Elmy, Bradley Emerick,
Brooke Evans, Jocelyn Hillman,
Ryan Javick, Rachael Javorka,
Joseph Kenzakoski, Skylar Ko-
peck, Michaelena Kowalczyk,
Joseph Lanning, Breanne Lloyd,
Justin Malinowski, Jacqueline
Marroquin, Aaliyah Massey,
Jordan Phillips, Austin Popish,
Joseph Ramos, Gerald Ryan,
Kimberly Salas, Nathan Sien-
kiewicz, Raizy Sosa, Aaron Strait,
Melanie Sweeney, Paige Tedik,
Joseph Tona, Sara Walkowiak,
Morgan Wanyo, Kaitlyn Waskiew-
icz, Haley Waslasky, Caitlin
Wood. Honors: Kayleen Collum,
Steven Cook, Nicholas Davi,
William Engle III, Connor Flaher-
ty, Kimberly Flores, Bohdan
Gines, Amanda Goy, Tyler Hardy,
Amanda Hart, Steven Himlin,
Alisha Loeffler, Shawn Maiers,
Jared Melton, Mark Miraglia,
Jaylee Montanez, Lauren Pop-
ple, Dejuana Pyatt, Septima
Simpkins, Luke Slenzak, Jennifer
Sosa, Rebecca Steuer, Caitlin
Vukovich, Collin Ward.
Grade 10: Highest Honors: Alex
HONOR ROLL
See COUGHLIN, Page 12B
C M Y K
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Anderson, Kyra Castano, Lau-
ren Castellana, Alexander
Cerep, Valerie Davi, Christopher
Dennis, Alizabeth Ellsworth,
Adam Giovanelli, Collin Gozick,
Samantha Hardy, Nandi Har-
rington, April Haupt, Corey
Hauser, Anthony Khalife, Som-
mer Kosko, William Kozub,
Daulton Lentini, Kyle Lupas,
Benjamin Manarski, Keighlyn
Oliver, Yamileth Orduna, David
Parsnik, Nima Patel, Thomas
Pistack, Evan Popple, William
Poray, Ilham Priyambodo, Jen-
nifer Reynoso, Jessica Reynoso,
Allison Rorick, Angeline Ru-
basky, Bridget Ryan, Barry
Schiel, Dana Schneider, Jada
Smith, Alexandria Soller, Kayla
Stachokus, Steven Tlatenchi,
Michael Wozniak, Stephen
Zedolik. High Honors: Eric
Adamczyk, Scott Alexis, Paula
Almendarez, Molly Andress,
Courtney Answini, Katlyn Bar-
ber, Nicolas Bishop, Yuriy Boris,
Ruben Bourdeau, Austin Brzo-
zowski, Alexandra Bukeavich,
Charles Capinas, Erin Chmiola,
Katelyn Colleran, Nicholas
Cotillo, Ingrid Da Costa, Ryan
Decinti, Elizabeth Dohman,
Brooke Dunlap, Emily Dupak,
Dhalia Espinoza, Marisa Gribble,
Lauren Gryskevicz, Abagail
Gutierrez, Courtney Hafner,
Farid Hernandez, Sarah Jarnot,
Erica Kline, Meghan Krumsky,
Khang Le, Kimberly Lozada,
Anthony Malacari, David Mar-
riggi, Kyle McGrady, Dalton
McHenry, Miranda McLaughlin,
Kelvin Mejia, Kimberly Nestor-
ick, Allison Novak, Michael
Osmanski, Bruce Panattieri,
Kathleen Pascual, Timothy
Pilch, Emily Richards, Tyler
Schweit, Anthony Serpico, Alia
Sod, Saray Sosa, Rebecca Svab,
Kelly Tlatenchi , Kaitlyn Tredin-
nick, Lucia Walkowiak, Caitlin
Walsh, Kenneth Werkheiser,
Tiffany Young. Honors: Aman-
da Benczkowski, Jessica Bencz-
kowski, Avery Bradford, Dalton
Buck, Noel Clark Kaitlyn Cos-
key, Kimberly Curet, Marc
Donato, Bradley Dunn, Bobby
Ent, Nicholas Fazio, Erin Flana-
gan, Elijah Foster, Joseph
Gayoski, Anait Guzman, Sharif
Hasan, Caroline Hayduk, Megan
Hughes, Daniel James, Caitlin
Jaworski, John Jones, Maggie
Jones, Katrina Kaeser, Richard
Kenzakoski, John Lacomy,
Stephanie Lauer, Jessica Luton,
Jade Matusick, Paul Meehan,
Tristan Mercado, Jessica Mio-
relli, Megan Mosley, Christina
Nash, Jesenia Nava, Brandon
Olshefski, Kaitlyn Pearage, Max
Rodriguez, Marissa Ross, Kim-
berly Sosa, Julie Suchocki,
Heather Tompkins, Anthony
Vaimaona, Abigail Viola, Desti-
ny Warnagiris, Rebecca Wilk,
Eric Williams, David Wodarczyk,
Justin Wright.
Grade 9: Highest Honors: Natha-
niela Bourdeau, Baily Branni-
gan, Matthew Bruns, Desiree
Buck, Rowan Connelly, Kelsey
Eovitch, Adam Ercolani, Kelsey
Gabriele, Carmen Garcia, Jen-
nifer Goodrich, Jeremy Griven-
sky, Emily Hall, Travis Keil,
Jacqueline Kline, Thomas
Kozerski, Kourtney Kukowski,
Katharine Lanning, Christine
Lapsansky, Holly Lloyd, Tiffany
Mayhue, Morgan McKenna,
Morgan Novakovich, Carly Ray,
Carlos Rodulfo, Adam Sadvary,
David Sadvary, Rebecca Scott,
Catherine Silveri, Nicholas
Stavinski, Rachael Supinski,
Cory VanChure, Victoria Walter,
Frank Wojtash, Michael Yan-
chuck. High Honors: Kathryn
Askew, Shawn Austin, Kristen
Bailey, Lauren Bailey, Teagan
Bigelow, Shelby Bizub, Daniel
Blazejewski, Mauri Bohan,
Baylee Bukeavich, Bianca Bull-
ock, Brandon Butry, Kassandra
Cebula, Nicole Ciprich, Dylan
Clewell, Amber Colleran, Kayla
Cunningham, Sarah DeBiasi,
Rhaelynn Froncek, Lee Gusti-
nucci, Jessica Harvey, Robert
Hawkins, Chloe Hutter, Zachary
Johns, Alexander Kane, Caitlyn
King, Rachel Kollar, Justin
Kuna, Volodymyr Kunderevych,
Madisen Leslie, Heather Lloyd,
Kayla Losito, Kaitlyn Lukashew-
ski, Michael Malacari, Lee
McCracken, Kelly McGraw,
Gabrielle McNeill, Daren Miller,
Joseph Miraglia, Zachary Myku-
lyn, Bethany Paulukonis, Amber
Reese, Norah Rosencrans, Kyle
Schneikart, Morgan Sidorowicz,
Edward Slavish, Kelly Smith,
Kyle Swingle, Brianna Wondo-
loski. Honors: Patrick Barrow,
Melissa Bartkus, Tyler Bonick,
Megan Bruns, Brandon Catone,
Brandon Duda, John Elick,
Timothy Elick, Rakeena Finn,
Jessika Finsterbusch, Bailey
Fox, Jeremy Francis, Cristian
Gamboa, Ryan Gorki, Sydney
Hendrick, Zackery Hinkle,
Christopher Huertero, Jesse
Jimenez, Iyana King, Alana
Lathrop, Megan Lercara, Car-
ianna Makowski, Caitlyn McA-
tee, Hassanah McLendon,
Dominique Miraglia, Thomas
Mitchell, Heather Reed, Kimber-
ly Rivera Melanie Santiago,
Anna Marie Shaffer, Steven
Shaffer, Zoey Spak, Robert
Sudnick, Tyler Uravage, Grace
Weed, Adam Wylie.
COUGHLIN
Continued from Page 11B
Six King’s College students will study or intern in foreign countries
for academic credit during the summer. Gregory Groblewski, a junior
majoring in accounting and marketing, will be studying at the Uni-
versity of Stirling in Scotland. Matthew Henry, a senior majoring in
accounting and finance, will be studying in Costa Rica with the
School for Field Studies. Pasquale Romano, a senior majoring in
business management, will be interning in Sydney, Australia, through
Arcadia University College of Global Studies. Kristen Van Auken, a
senior majoring in psychology, will be interning in Leiden, The Neth-
erlands, through Webster University’s Global Internship Experience.
Bennett Williams, a sophomore majoring in Spanish, and Monika
Williams, a junior majoring in chemistry and Spanish, will be studying
in Cordoba, Argentina, through the Center for Cross-Cultural Study.
Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Monika Williams,
Bennett Williams and Van Auken. Second row: Mollie Farmer, director
of the study abroad program; Groblewski; and Romano.
King’s students going abroad for summer studies
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012

timesleader.com
N
ot even an innovative move
from the baseball book of Joe
Maddon was enough to save
Hazleton Area’s softball season.
So Cougars coach Vince Trivelpiece
began pondering even further about
how he could have saved the day.
“I made two mistakes,” Trivelpiece
said after his team’s 1-0 loss to Wil-
liamsport in the District 2-4 Class 4A
softball championship game. “I should
have done a pickoff play at third
(base). And I should have taken an-
other kid and put her in the middle
there, right off the mound.”
Never mind that there was no guar-
antee either strategy would’ve worked.
The Cougars were beaten by a
bases-loaded suicide squeeze bunt in
the bottom of the seventh inning that
produced the lone run Thursday and
ended the game when Williamsport’s
Dominique Thomas was called safe on
a play that was really too close for
anyone to call at the plate.
But decisions such as those could
make a team look great if they work,
and keep a coach kicking himself
through a whole summer if they don’t.
Take the gamble Jamie Higgins, the
coach of two-time district champion
Scranton, made during Wednesday’s
District 2 Class 4A baseball champion-
ship showdown.
He had sound reasoning for putting
the go-ahead run on base with a run-
ner already standing at second by
intentionally walking Wyoming Valley
West’s No. 3 hitter Joe Pechulis. Hig-
gins explaining that Pechulis homered
against Scranton in an earlier meeting
between the teams, already had a hit
in the early innings Wednesday, and
he had to be thinking the next batter
up, cleanup man Tommy Alexander,
was 0-for-2 when he stepped to the
plate.
All that sound reasoning turned
illogical when Alexander slammed a
two-run double, then scored on the
ensuing single, and made it a three-
run decision that sent Valley West into
the state playoffs with a 4-1 win.
“I’m still second-guessing,” Higgins
said afterward, noting that Alexander
hit a mistake pitch. “I don’t know if I
should have walked Peculis or not.”
The center fielder came walking in
to play infield for Hazleton Area with
one out and the bases loaded in the
bottom of the seventh inning of a
scoreless District 2-4 championship
softball game.
Which shouldn’t have been a sur-
prise, considering Tampa Bay Rays
manager and former Hazleton High
standout Maddon has set up that type
of defense in similar situations during
his major league games in Florida.
But despite the extra effort, and
extra infielder, Williamsport beat the
idea with a bunt fielded by pitcher
Becky Demko but thrown to the plate
a split-second too late to keep Thomas
from being called safe.
Trivelpiece adamantly protested she
was out.
Then he nearly went out of his
mind trying to second-guess scenarios
that would have prevented the game
from ending right there.
He said if he’d called for a pitchout
on the squeeze bunt, the Cougars may
have caught Thomas wandering too
far off third base.
“She was running on the pitch,”
Trivelpiece said.
And he suggested a different posi-
tioning of one of the infielders, maybe
placed between the pitcher and first
baseman – “Somewhere in the middle
there, right off the mound” – may
have discouraged a bunt in the first
place.
It’s the place of coaches and manag-
ers to make the calls they believe give
their teams the best chance to win.
Even if sometimes, those decisions
couldn’t make them feel worse.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Great if they
work, terrible
if they don’t
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
WEST PITTSTON
– Frankie Redmond
and Deedra Porfirio
scored wire-to-wire
backyard victories in
the 35th annual West
Pittston Anthracite 4
Mile Run on Saturday.
Redmond, 23, of Harding, broke the
tape in 21 minutes and 48 seconds. He
outpaced second-place finisher, James
Connors, 18, of Pittston, by 1:39. Ed
Kraftchisin, 41, of Pittston Township,
finished third, six seconds behind Con-
nors.
“I went out a bit too
fast at the start,” said
Redmond, who was a
standout runner for
Wyoming Area High
School and Misericor-
dia University. “I
threw in a little surge
at about a mile and a half into the race.
That’s when I opened up a sizable lead.”
After that, Redmond, despite not hav-
ing a great run between miles 2 and 3,
was running in front all by himself. CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Participants start the annual West Pittston Anthracite 4 Mile Run on Exeter
Avenue.
R U N N I N G
Redmond, Porfirio top field at
W. Pittston Anthracite 4 Mile
By ROBERT MINER
For The Times Leader
See RUN, Page 6C
Porfirio Redmond
NEWARK, N.J. — Jeff Carter scored
at13:42inovertimeandtheLos Angeles
Kings moved within two wins of their
first NHLtitle witha 2-1victory over the
New Jersey Devils in Game 2 of the
Stanley Cup finals Saturday night.
Jonathan Quick made 32 saves and
Drew Doughty scored on a magnificent
end-to-end rush as the Kings won their
10thstraight roadgamethis postseason,
and their 12th in a rowover the last two
seasons. Both are NHL records.
The Kings are now 14-2 in the post-
season, and they once again have anoth-
er opponent wondering what’s going
on. New Jersey had won eight of 10
games inbeatingtheFlyers andRangers
in the last two rounds in the Eastern
Conference. Nowthe Devils headtoLos
Angeles for Game 3 at the Staples Cen-
ter on Monday night
S TA N L E Y C U P F I N A L S
Kings go up 2-0 with OT winner
By TOMCANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A shot by
the Los
Angeles
Kings’ Drew
Doughty
gets behind
New Jersey
Devils goalie
Martin Bro-
deur for the
game’s first
goal in the
first period
of Game 2 of
the Stanley
Cup final on
Saturday in
Newark, N.J.
2
KINGS
1
DEVILS
GAME 3
New Jersey Devils
at
Los Angeles Kings
8 p.m. Monday, NBC
HANOVER TWP. – To find a
new approach to conquering
match play on the golf course,
Art Brunn Jr. leaned on a for-
mer area star in another sport
for some words of wisdom.
It turned out Tom Wasilewski
had some good advice.
And Brunn Jr. used it to pol-
ish off an incredible run in the
Wyoming Valley Country Club
Classic.
Brunn Jr. birdied eight of the
final nine holes Saturday, carry-
ing his teammate Steve Skiro
along with him past tournament
favorites John Olszewski and
Eric Williams, 1-up, and into to-
day’s tournament semifinals at
the country club.
“It wasn’t something I put
any thought into,” Brunn Jr.
said.
But the game plan was.
While joining Wasilewski for
lunch, Brunn Jr. complained
that he wasn’t very good com-
peting in match play.
“He said, ‘You’ve got to be
more aggressive,’” said Brunn
Jr., the head golf coach at Holy
Redeemer High School.
“That’s right,” Wasilewski
said. “Stay aggressive, I told
him.”
That mindset served Wasilew-
ski well back when he was
pitching for Wyoming Valley
West, Vanderbilt University and
with minor league affiliates of
the Toronto Blue Jays and San
Francisco Giants in the 1980s.
And being forceful took
Brunn Jr. and his partner Skiro
into the WVCC semifinals Sat-
L O C A L G O L F
Birdie run
nets spot
in semis
Art Brunn Jr. and Steve Skiro
power their way into WVCC
Classic final four today.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
See BIRDIE, Page 6C
PARIS — If love means never having
to say you’re sorry, what about 6-love?
Depends which side of the French
Open scoreboard you’re on, apparently.
Maria Sharapova feels not a shred of
remorse about the way she’s been fin-
ishing off opponents quickly — a total
of five games lost through three match-
es at Roland Garros this year, including
a 6-0, 6-0 win in the first round.
The 27th-seeded Mikhail Youzhny of
Russia, meanwhile, was on the wrong
end of a shutout set Saturday and de-
cided he needed to apologize right
then and there to the ticket-buyers in
the seats at Court Suzanne Langlen. Fi-
nally having won one game after losing
the first eight against No. 6 David Fer-
rer of Spain, Youzhny used the toe of
his right sneaker to carve a mea culpa
in the red clay near the baseline.
He etched out “S-O-R-R-i!” — stamp-
ing the dot atop the lowercase last let-
ter for emphasis before heading to the
sideline for a changeover.
“People in the stands may not have
noticed, but I think I had to do this,”
Youzhny said after his 6-0, 6-2, 6-2 loss.
“There was a lot of people. That’s
why I write ‘sorry’ — because I can’t
show them a nice game,” he explained.
“The way we played in the beginning,
it was not really interesting for peo-
ple.”
Ferrer, who said he didn’t see Youzh-
ny’s lettering, was part of Spain’s 5-0
showing Saturday, led by Rafael Nadal,
who continued his bid for a record sev-
enth French Open title by overpower-
ing Eduardo Schwank of Argentina 6-1,
6-3, 6-4.
“Now the first week has gone by,”
said Nadal, who gets a day off Sunday,
his 26th birthday. “It’s always the most
complicated week to manage.”
The other Spaniards who moved on
TENNI S
She is pretty quick
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russia’s Maria Sharapova returns the ball to China’s Peng Shuai during their third round match in the French Open at Ro-
land Garros stadium in Paris on Saturday, June 2, 2012. Sharapova won 6-2, 6-1.
Sharapova mows down another opponent
“The last thing that’s on my
mind when I’m going out on
court is thinking about who
paid for a ticket and how long
they’re going to watch my
match for.”
Maria Sharapova
Women’s No. 2 seed
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer
See RULE, Page 6C
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories and
update them promptly. Sports
corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the sports department at
829-7143.
➛ S C O R E B O A R D
CAMPS/CLINICS
Dallas Field Hockey Booster Club
will be hosting a two day camp
June 18-19 instructed by Princeton
University head coach Kristen
Holmes-Winn. The camp will be
held at the Misericordia University
turf field at a cost of $170 and is
open to girls entering grades 9-12.
Applications available at www.dal-
lasfieldhockey.org or call 406-1127.
King’s College Field Hockey Camp
will be held July 16-20 from 9 a.m.
to noon. Camp includes t-shirt,
team photo and awards. For more
information contact Cheryl Ish at
208-5900, ext. 5756, or email
Cherylish@kings.edu
Lake-Lehman wrestling will be
hosting a series of clinics this
summer on Monday and Wednes-
day evenings from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
beginning June 4. Cost of the
clinics will be $180. Intensive
workouts, top notch technique
instruction, and exposure to the
top college and high school coach-
es in the country will be featured.
The clinics are being directed by
Jack Davis, former Clarion Uni-
versity coach. Registration in-
formation can be obtained by
calling Jack at 814-538-9034.
Nanticoke Basketball will hold its
summer basketball camp for both
boys and girls from June 11-15. The
camp will focus on the funda-
mentals of the game and there will
be daily skills competitions, three-
on-three and five-on-five games,
and other activities. There will be
separate sessions for boys and
girls in grades 2-9 (next school
year). The girls’ session will be held
in the morning from 9 a.m. to
noon, while the boys’ will follow in
the afternoon from1-4 p.m. Both
will be held at the Nanticoke gym.
Information and an application are
available online at www.gnasd.com
or call 740-6049.
Wilkes University will hold its wom-
en’s soccer residential soccer
academy from June 17-20. It will be
an overnight camp and will be
conducted at the Ralston Athletic
Complex.
Wilkes University will hold its men’s
soccer “Make-A-Save” goalkeeping
camp from June 25-29. Sessions
will run from 9 a.m. to noon, and
will be held at the Ralston Athletic
Complex.
Wilkes University will hold summer
wrestling clinics Thursday and
Sunday nights starting June 24
until Sept. 9. Sessions will be from
6-7:30 p.m. and will be held in the
Wilkes wrestling room at the Marts
Center.
Wilkes University will hold its wom-
en’s basketball overnight camp
from June 17-20. Sessions will be
held in the Marts Center gymnasi-
um.
Wilkes University will hold a mini
football camp for all those in-
terested between the ages of 6-13.
The camp will be from June 20-22
and will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Ralston Athletic Complex.
Wilkes University will hold Frank
Sheptock’s Linebacker School for
high school athletes on June 23,
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West field hockey
camp will be held from June 11-15.
Sessions will run from 9 a.m. to
noon at the Wyoming Valley West
stadium and is only for Wyoming
Valley West students in grades 1-8.
For more information, contact
Linda Fithian at 379-3713.
MEETINGS
Back Mountain Baseball and Soft-
ball will hold a board meeting
Monday at 7 p.m. at the Daddow-
Isaacs American Legion located on
the Route 415 in Dallas. General
meeting, open to the public, will be
held at 8 p.m. Please visit
www.bmtll.com<http://
www.bmtll.com> for more in-
formation.
Berwick Boys High School Basket-
ball Boosters will be holding its
monthly meeting on Tuesday in
the gymnasium lobby area at 7
p.m. This meeting will be about all
summer activities in which the
basketball team will be participa-
ting in. If you have any questions,
contact coach Jason Kingery at
570-394-7115 or jkingery@ber-
wicksd.org.
County Line Girls Softball League
will have a meeting today at 7 p.m.
at Dupont fieldhouse. All town reps
and 10u and 12u coaches are in-
vited to discuss upcoming 10u and
12u playoffs. 14u and 17u coaches
will meet at a later date. For more
info call Bob Cappelloni, 881-8744.
Jenkins Twp Little League will hold
its monthly meeting today at 6
p.m. Items to be discussed include
district and tournament team
requirements. Attendance from all
managers from all teams is man-
datory.
Meyers Soccer will hold a mandatory
meeting for varsity boys and junior
high coed soccer players and
parents today at 7 p.m. at the
Gordon Ave. Soccer Fields. Sum-
mer conditioning schedules as well
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD as the upcoming season will be
discussed. Anyone interested in
playing soccer at Meyers and not
yet signed up should also attend.
For more information, call coach
Nolan at 899-0198.
Plymouth Shawnee Indians will a
meeting at the Plymouth Borough
Building today at 7:30 pm. Coach-
es should attend. Parents are
welcome.
Wyoming Valley West Aquatics
Club will be having a very impor-
tant, informative meeting for all
parents on June 6 at 6:30 p.m. at
the Grotto in Edwardsville. All
returning parents and also current
8th grade parents of athletes that
are going to be joining swim, dive,
and/or water polo next year are
encouraged to attend.
Wyoming Valley West field hockey
booster club meeting will meet in
the Middle School Conference
Room on June 5 at 7 p.m. Much
information will be discussed. All
parents are urged to attend.
Wyoming Valley Baseball coaches
will be meeting on June 6 at 7:30
p.m. at Rodanos in Wilkes-Barre to
pick the coaches all-star team. The
senior all star game will be played
on June 14 at 4:30 p.m. at Wilkes.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Crestwood Comet Boys Basketball
Camp is currently accepting appli-
cations for this season. The camp
will be held the week of June 11-15.
The morning sessions will be for
boys entering grades 3-5. The
afternoon session is for boys
entering grades 6-9. Both sessions
will be held at the Crestwood
Middle School. For more informa-
tion, call coach Atherton at 825-
4116 or email him at mark.ather-
ton@csdcomets.org.
Hanover Mini Hawks will hold regis-
trations on the following days:
Today from12-2, June 5th from
6-8, June 7th from 6-8 and June
11th from 6-8.All registrations to be
held at the Warrior Run Storage
Facility, Front St Warrior Run. Any
questions contact Lori Fedor
824-5331.
Plains Township has released its
summer sports camp schedule.
The training programs are avail-
able to any student who is enter-
ing 2nd through 8th grade this fall
and are as follows: Basketball,
Wrestling and Field Hockey June
11-14, Football and Tennis June 18-21
and Soccer June 25-28. The cost is
$50 for the first child and $30 for
the additional family members. If
anyone is enrolled in two camps
the second camp will be $30. For
those who reside outside Plains
and Wilkes-Barre, the cost is $60
for the first child and $40 for the
second. Applications can be picked
up at the Plains Township Munici-
pal Building, 126 North Street,
Plains. For More information
contact Bill Monaghan at 825-
5574.
Pocono Region Baseball will hold
tryouts today at Tunkhannock
High School. Open registration will
start at 8 am. Visit www.keystone-
games.com for more information
regarding upcoming open tryout
dates. On-line registration is avail-
able and a required waiver form is
also available. Any questions can
be directed to Sean Foley, Pocono
Region Baseball Coordinator at
570-574-6541.
West Side United Soccer Club is
having a late sign-up session on
June 4th inside the Plymouth Boro
Bldg (2nd floor) 6:30 - 8:00pm.
Cost is $20 per player for all ages
3-17. Plus $50 to cover cost of 10
raffle tickets per family. Uniforms
are $20 for those who need.$25
late fee. New players required to
provide proof of age. For more info
& registration form, go to website
www.WSUSC.org or phone Mat-
thew Detwiler at 779-7785.
Wyoming Area Ice Hockey Associ-
ation will hold their season regis-
tration for incoming 7 through 12
grade students residing within the
Wyoming Area School District. JV
and Varsity Registration will be
held Tuesday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
at the West Wyoming Boro. Build-
ing. A $100 deposit will be required
at the time of registration. For
more information contact Dawn
Thomas at mejane134@aol.com.
UPCOMING EVENTS
The GAR Blue-Gray Fund of the
Luzerne Foundation will hold its
sixth annual golf tournament and
outing on July 28th at the Wilkes-
Barre Golf Club in Laurel Run.
Shotgun start is at 8 a.m. and will
be a captain and crew format. Cost
is $85 per golfer and includes golf,
prizes and lunch afterward at the
Wilkes-Barre Township Fire Hall at
150 Watson Street. For more in-
formation contact Jim at 855-
4543.
868-GOLF
260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop
www.blueridgetrail.com
Tuesday thru Friday
Play & Ride for Just
$
33.00
Weekday Special
Must Present Coupon.
One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in
tournaments or with any other promotion. ST
Monday Special $32
Senior Day Mon-Thurs $28
Ladies Day Thursday $28
Weekends After 1 p.m. $36
GPS CART INCLUDED
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Country Club
Route 309 Drums, PA
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570-788-5845
• Driving Range
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25
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Must Present Coupon
GOLF 9 ROUNDS
Get 10th Round FREE
Ask for coupon at Golf Shop
Pinnacle
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BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
TIGERS 8.0 Yankees
BLUE JAYS 10.0 Red Sox
RAYS 8.0 Orioles
ROYALS 8.5 A’s
WHITE SOX 7.5 Mariners
INDIANS 9.0 Twins
ANGELS 8.0 Rangers
National League
Marlins 8.5 PHILLIES
NATIONALS 6.5 Braves
Reds 8.5 ASTROS
BREWERS 7.5 Pirates
ROCKIES 10.5 Dodgers
GIANTS 7.5 Cubs
D’backs 6.5 PADRES
Cards 8.0 METS
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Eastern Conference Final
Heat 1 CELTICS
Home teams in capital letters.
AME RI C A’ S
L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welter-
weight title fight on June 9 in Las Ve-
gas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$450
vs. Timothy Bradley at +$350.
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
PREP LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 1 p.m. unless noted)
Abington Blue at Back Mountain
Abington White at Mountaintop
Dunmore at Nanticoke
Moscow at South Scranton
Swoyersville at Green Ridge
Valley View at Mountaintop, 4 p.m.
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Greater Pittston at Tunkhannock
Hazleton Area at Mtop-1
Mtop-2 at Plains
Nanticoke at Back Mountain
MONDAY, JUNE 4
(All games at 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
PREP LEGION BASEBALL
Back Mountain at Nanticoke
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
Swoyersville at Mtop-2
TUESDAY, JUNE 5
(All games at 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
Greater Pittston at Plains
YOUTH LEGION BASEBALL
Back Mountain at Swoyersville
Mountain Top at Old Forge
Nanticoke at Tunkhannock
Plains at Greater Pittston
West Scranton at Wilkes-Barre
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
PREP LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:30 p.m. unless noted)
Abington White at Abington Blue
Dunmore at South Scranton
Mountain Top at Back Mountain
Moscow at Green Ridge
Swoyersville at Nanticoke
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Mtop-1 at Plains
Nanticoke at Mtop-2
Tunkhannock at Wilkes-Barre
THURSDAY, JUNE 7
YOUTH LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Back Mountain at Tunkhannock
Old Forge at greater Pittston
Wilkes-Barre at Plains
FRIDAY, JUNE 8
PREP LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:30 p.m. unless noted)
Abington White at Valley View
Dunmore at Moscow
Mountain Top at Swoyersville
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Plains at Wilkes-Barre
Swoyersville at Hazleton Area
Tunkhannock at Back Mountain
YOUTH LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Swoyersville at Mountain Top
SATURDAY, JUNE 9
YOUTH LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 10:30 a.m. unless noted)
Greater Pittston at Old Forge
Mountain Top at Tunkhannock
Old Forge at Wilkes-Barre
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
Tunkhannock at Back Mountain
W H A T ’ S O N T V
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX—NASCAR, Sprint Cup, FedEx 400, at Dover,
Del.
3:30 p.m.
ABC — IRL, IndyCar Series, Belle Isle Grand Prix,
at Detroit
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Supernationals, at Englishtown,
N.J. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Noon
ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals,
game 5, at Gainesville, Fla.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN—World Series, game11, teams TBD, at Ok-
lahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ESPN—World Series, game12, teams TBD, at Ok-
lahoma City
CYCLING
9:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Criterium du Dauphine, prologue, at
Grenoble, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Wales Open, final
round, at City of Newport, Wales
Noon
TGC—PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, final
round, at Dublin, Ohio
2 p.m.
TGC—ShopRiteLPGAClassic, final round, at Gal-
loway, N.J.
2:30 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, final
round, at Dublin, Ohio
7 p.m.
TGC—Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic,
final round, at West Des Moines, Iowa (same-day
tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
TBS — N.Y. Yankees at Detroit
1:30 p.m.
WQMY -- Miami at Philadelphia
2 p.m.
ROOT -- Pittsburgh at Milwaukee
4 p.m.
WGN — Chicago Cubs at San Francisco
8 p.m.
ESPN2 — St. Louis at N.Y. Mets
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
SE2, WYLN -- Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Catalu-
nyan Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain
3:30 p.m.
SPEED—MotoGP Moto2, Catalunyan Grand Prix,
at Barcelona, Spain (same-day tape)
11 p.m.
SPEED — AMA Pro Racing, at Elkhart Lake, Wis.
(same-day tape)
NBA
8:30 p.m.
ESPN — Playoffs, conference finals, game 4, Mia-
mi at Boston
SOCCER
7 p.m.
NBCSN—Men’s national teams, exhibition, United
States vs. Canada, at Toronto
TENNIS
1 p.m.
NBC — French Open, fourth round, at Paris
5 a.m.
ESPN2 — French Open, fourth round, at Paris
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Designated INF-OF Bill
Hall for assignment.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Traded OF-1B Steve
Pearce to Baltimore for cash.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Claimed RHP Chris
Schwinden off waivers from the New York Mets.
Designated RHP Daniel Farquhar for assignment.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES — Recalled LHP Rex
Brothers from Colorado Springs (PCL). Optioned
RHP Carlos Torres to Colorado Springs.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Recalled OF Fernando
Martinez from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed OF
Travis Buck onthe15-day DL, retroactivetoMay 29.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Placed RHP Jose
Contreras on the15-day DL. Recalled RHPMichael
Schwimer from Lehigh Valley (IL).
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Released QB Eric
Ware, DB Jimmie Anderson and DL Steven Friday.
COLLEGE
PENNSYLVANIA — Named Robin Martin men’s
track and field coach.
B A S E B A L L
International League
At A Glance
All Times EDT
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) ............. 34 22 .607 —
Buffalo (Mets) ......................... 31 24 .564 2
1
⁄2
Lehigh Valley (Phillies).......... 31 24 .564 2
1
⁄2
Yankees.................................. 29 25 .537 4
Syracuse (Nationals) ............. 26 28 .481 7
Rochester (Twins).................. 23 32 .418 10
1
⁄2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 32 24 .571 —
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 32 25 .561
1
⁄2
Durham (Rays)......................... 25 32 .439 7
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 24 31 .436 7
1
⁄2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 31 23 .574 —
Columbus (Indians) ................. 26 29 .473 5
1
⁄2
Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 26 29 .473 5
1
⁄2
Louisville (Reds) ...................... 17 39 .304 15
Saturday's Games
Rochester 3, Columbus 0, 1st game
Lehigh Valley 5, Pawtucket 4, 1st game
Durham 8, Louisville 3
Norfolk 3, Yankees 1, 1st game
Charlotte 5, Gwinnett 2
Columbus 1, Rochester 0, 2nd game
Buffalo at Toledo, late
Syracuse at Indianapolis, late
Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley, late, 2nd game
Norfolk vs. Yankees at Norfolk, late, 2nd game
Today's Games
Columbus at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Yankees at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m., 1st game
Syracuse at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m.
Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m.
Durham at Louisville, 2:05 p.m.
Norfolk vs. Yankees at Norfolk, 3:45 p.m., 2nd
game
Gwinnett at Charlotte, 5:15 p.m.
Buffalo at Toledo, 6 p.m.
Eastern League
At A Glance
All Times EDT
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
New Britain (Twins) ............... 32 22 .593 —
Trenton (Yankees) ................. 31 22 .585
1
⁄2
Reading (Phillies)................... 29 22 .569 1
1
⁄2
Binghamton (Mets) ................ 25 27 .481 6
Portland (Red Sox) ................ 23 31 .426 9
New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 20 33 .377 11
1
⁄2
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Akron (Indians) ....................... 33 19 .635 —
Harrisburg (Nationals) ........... 29 26 .527 5
1
⁄2
Erie (Tigers) ............................ 27 27 .500 7
Altoona (Pirates)..................... 24 29 .453 9
1
⁄2
Richmond (Giants) ................. 25 31 .446 10
Bowie (Orioles)....................... 22 31 .415 11
1
⁄2
Saturday's Games
Portland 5, Altoona 3, 1st game
Harrisburg 4, New Britain 3
Erie 3, Richmond 2, comp. of susp. game
Trenton 3, New Hampshire 2, 14 innings, comp. of
susp. game
Akron at Binghamton, late
Portland at Altoona, late, 2nd game
Reading at Bowie, late
Today's Games
Akron at Binghamton, 1:05 p.m.
New Hampshire at Trenton, 1:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at New Britain, 1:35 p.m.
Reading at Bowie, 2:05 p.m.
Erie at Richmond, 2:05 p.m.
Portland at Altoona, 6 p.m.
N B A
Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
CONFERENCE FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami 2, Boston 1
Monday, May 28: Miami 93, Boston 79
Wednesday, May 30: Miami 115, Boston 111, OT
Friday, June 1: Boston 101, Miami 91
Sunday, June 3: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 1
Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City
98
Tuesday, May 29: San Antonio120, Oklahoma City
111
Thursday, May 31: Oklahoma City102, San Antonio
82
Saturday, June 2: San Antonio at Oklahoma City,
8:30 p.m.
Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9
p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Oklahoma
City, 9 p.m.
x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9
p.m.
H O C K E Y
NHL
Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
STANLEY CUP FINALS
Los Angeles 1, New Jersey 0
Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles 2, NewJersey1,
OT
Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 8
p.m.
Monday, June 4: NewJersey at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 8
p.m.
x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 8
p.m.
x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 8
p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jer-
sey, 8 p.m.
G O L F
PGA Tour
The Memorial Par Scores
Saturday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,352; Par: 72
Third Round
Spencer Levin...............................67-72-69—208 -8
Rory Sabbatini...............................69-69-71—209 -7
Rickie Fowler ................................71-71-69—211 -5
Tiger Woods..................................70-69-73—212 -4
Ryo Ishikawa.................................72-70-71—213 -3
Henrik Stenson.............................74-68-71—213 -3
Jonathan Byrd...............................71-70-72—213 -3
Vijay Singh ....................................72-73-69—214 -2
Ryan Moore...................................70-73-71—214 -2
Andres Romero ............................69-73-72—214 -2
Kyle Reifers...................................71-70-73—214 -2
Aaron Baddeley ............................69-72-73—214 -2
Daniel Summerhays.....................69-71-74—214 -2
Scott Stallings...............................66-73-75—214 -2
David Hearn..................................70-75-70—215 -1
Matt Every......................................69-75-71—215 -1
Dustin Johnson.............................71-71-73—215 -1
Jim Furyk.......................................72-68-75—215 -1
Justin Rose ...................................73-72-71—216 E
Kevin Stadler ................................72-73-71—216 E
David Mathis..................................71-71-74—216 E
Trevor Immelman.........................71-70-75—216 E
Davis Love III ................................74-72-71—217+1
Blake Adams.................................69-77-71—217+1
Stewart Cink..................................71-73-73—217+1
Johnson Wagner ..........................72-72-73—217+1
Bo Van Pelt ...................................73-69-75—217+1
Erik Compton................................67-75-75—217+1
Lucas Glover.................................74-68-75—217+1
Troy Matteson...............................72-69-76—217+1
Champions Tour
Principal Charity Classic Par Scores
Saturday
At Glen Oaks Country Club
West Des Moines, Iowa
Purse: $1.75 million
Yardage: 6,897; Par: 71
Second Round
Jay Haas ............................................66-65—131-11
Larry Mize..........................................66-68—134 -8
Tom Lehman .....................................68-67—135 -7
Andrew Magee..................................68-68—136 -6
Fred Funk...........................................70-67—137 -5
Kenny Perry.......................................68-69—137 -5
Peter Senior.......................................67-70—137 -5
Dan Forsman.....................................67-70—137 -5
John Cook..........................................71-67—138 -4
Lonnie Nielsen ..................................69-69—138 -4
Rod Spittle .........................................68-70—138 -4
Dick Mast ...........................................68-70—138 -4
Jeff Freeman .....................................68-70—138 -4
Russ Cochran....................................67-71—138 -4
Mark Brooks ......................................67-71—138 -4
Tom Pernice Jr..................................66-72—138 -4
Mike Goodes .....................................64-74—138 -4
Bernhard Langer ...............................70-69—139 -3
Bob Gilder ..........................................70-69—139 -3
Jim Gallagher, Jr...............................67-72—139 -3
Willie Wood........................................71-69—140 -2
Fulton Allem.......................................71-69—140 -2
Chip Beck...........................................69-71—140 -2
Brad Bryant ........................................69-71—140 -2
Jim Carter ..........................................69-71—140 -2
Joel Edwards.....................................69-71—140 -2
David Eger .........................................69-71—140 -2
Mark Calcavecchia...........................68-72—140 -2
Eduardo Romero ..............................67-73—140 -2
Kirk Triplett.........................................67-73—140 -2
Jeff Sluman........................................67-73—140 -2
Loren Roberts ...................................73-68—141 -1
Mark Wiebe .......................................71-70—141 -1
Jeff Hart..............................................70-71—141 -1
Brad Faxon ........................................70-71—141 -1
Steve Lowery.....................................69-72—141 -1
Mark McNulty ....................................68-73—141 -1
David Frost ........................................66-75—141 -1
Olin Browne.......................................71-71—142 E
D.A. Weibring ....................................71-71—142 E
Gary Koch..........................................67-75—142 E
Nationwide Tour
The Rex Hospital Open Scores
Saturday
At TPC Wakefield Plantation
Raleigh, N.C.
Purse: $550,000
Yardage: 7,257;Par: 71
Second Round
Justin Hicks .............................................66-66—132
Oscar Serna............................................67-66—133
Shane Bertsch.........................................65-69—134
Jeff Curl....................................................65-69—134
B.J. Staten ...............................................66-68—134
Jim Renner ..............................................63-71—134
Reid Edstrom..........................................65-70—135
James Hahn ............................................67-68—135
Alex Prugh...............................................68-67—135
Steven Bowditch.....................................65-70—135
Andrew Svoboda....................................68-68—136
Nicholas Thompson ...............................67-69—136
Steve Friesen..........................................69-67—136
Scott Parel ...............................................67-69—136
Scott Gardiner.........................................66-70—136
Connor Arendell......................................69-67—136
Derek Fathauer .......................................69-68—137
Daniel Chopra .........................................68-69—137
Russell Henley........................................68-69—137
Andres Gonzales....................................68-69—137
Tyrone Van Aswegen.............................69-68—137
Scott Sterling...........................................69-69—138
Brian Stuard.............................................71-67—138
Darron Stiles ...........................................70-68—138
Dustin Bray ..............................................67-71—138
Sam Saunders.........................................71-67—138
Jim Herman .............................................67-71—138
Cameron Percy.......................................69-69—138
Camilo Benedetti ....................................71-67—138
John Chin.................................................70-68—138
Will MacKenzie .......................................72-67—139
Michael Letzig.........................................69-70—139
Stuart Anderson......................................68-71—139
Zack Miller ...............................................68-71—139
Andy Bare ................................................68-71—139
Robert Damron .......................................68-71—139
Brice Garnett ...........................................69-70—139
Joseph Bramlett ......................................68-71—139
Josh Broadaway......................................67-72—139
Paul Stankowski......................................71-68—139
Scott Gutschewski..................................70-69—139
Lee Williams............................................70-69—139
Will Wilcox ...............................................67-72—139
Paul Claxton ............................................70-69—139
Casey Wittenberg...................................68-71—139
Scott Langley...........................................70-69—139
Justin Bolli ...............................................70-70—140
Brad Adamonis .......................................72-68—140
Aaron Goldberg ......................................69-71—140
Tag Ridings .............................................70-70—140
Morgan Hoffmann...................................71-69—140
Ryan Nelson............................................69-71—140
James Sacheck.......................................71-69—140
Charlie Beljan..........................................70-70—140
Ryan Yip...................................................68-72—140
Aron Price................................................70-70—140
Robert Streb............................................74-66—140
Jin Park ....................................................69-71—140
Brent Delahoussaye...............................71-69—140
Bio Kim.....................................................70-70—140
PGA European
Wales Open Leading Scores
Saturday
At Celtic Manor (Twenty Ten course)
Newport, Wales
Purse: $2.83 million
Yardage: 7,378;Par: 71
Third Round
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand............71-68-67—206
Ross Fisher, England.......................70-66-71—207
Joost Luiten, Netherlands................74-69-64—207
Tim Sluiter, Netherlands ..................68-72-68—208
Carlos Del Moral, Spain...................75-68-66—209
Marcel Siem, Germany ....................68-75-66—209
George Coetzee, South Africa........71-71-68—210
Mark Foster, England.......................72-69-69—210
Richard McEvoy, England...............71-70-69—210
David Lynn, England ........................73-71-67—211
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark..................71-72-68—211
Gregory Bourdy, France ..................74-69-68—211
Richard Sterne, South Africa ..........73-69-69—211
Damien McGrane, Ireland................71-71-69—211
Matteo Manassero, Italy...................76-68-68—212
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, Spain........69-74-69—212
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark............73-68-71—212
Jaco Van Zyl, South Africa ..............72-69-71—213
Lorenzo Gagli, Italy ..........................77-70-66—213
Romain Wattel, France.....................73-72-68—213
Keith Horne, South Africa................79-66-68—213
Joel Sjoholm, Sweden .....................69-74-70—213
Emiliano Grillo, Argentina................73-69-71—213
Raphael Jacquelin, France..............76-65-72—213
Chris Wood, England .......................72-67-74—213
N A S C A R
Nationwide Series
5-hour ENERGY 200 Results
Saturday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200 laps, 150 rating, 0
points
2. (1) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 200, 127.5, 43
3. (5) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 111.5, 41
4. (9) Kurt Busch, Toyota, 200, 116.7, 0
5. (7) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 114.2, 40
6. (11) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 108.5, 38
7. (6) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 102.7, 37
8. (3) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 97.4, 0
9. (14) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 90, 0
10. (15) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 199, 82.7, 34
11. (23) Michael Annett, Ford, 199, 91.4, 33
12. (12) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, 199, 90.9, 0
13. (10) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 199, 96, 31
14. (19) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 199, 86.2, 30
15. (30) Jason Bowles, Toyota, 198, 70.2, 29
16. (20) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 198, 72.9, 28
17. (28) Jeff Green, Toyota, 198, 70.4, 27
18. (27) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 198, 66.1, 26
19. (21) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 197, 76.2, 25
20. (13) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 197, 75.5, 0
21. (34) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 194, 51.7, 23
22. (18) Josh Richards, Ford, 194, 65.2, 22
23. (22) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 193, 61, 21
24. (32) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 193, 47.5, 20
25. (40) Brad Teague, Chevrolet, 190, 43.3, 19
26. (36) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 189, 44.9, 18
27. (29) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet, 179, 57.6, 17
28. (41) Tim Bainey Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 144,
41.2, 16
29. (35) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, transmis-
sion, 144, 47.8, 15
30. (17) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, accident, 133,
61.1, 14
31. (26) Timmy Hill, Ford, accident, 120, 56.3, 13
32. (4) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 119, 56.1, 12
33. (8) Mike Bliss, Toyota, electrical, 36, 61.5, 11
34. (39) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, vibration, 14,
40.8, 10
35. (37) Matt Carter, Chevrolet, electrical, 11, 39.5,
9
36. (38) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, suspension, 10,
41.4, 0
37. (24) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, ignition, 5, 39.3, 0
38. (16) Scott Speed, Chevrolet, vibration, 4, 37.7, 0
39. (25) Kevin Lepage, Toyota, vibration, 4, 36.2, 5
40. (31) Tim Andrews, Ford, accident, 2, 34.9, 4
41. (42) Blake Koch, Chevrolet, brakes, 2, 33.1, 3
42. (33) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, electrical, 2,
31.5, 2
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 110.497 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 48 minutes, 36 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.526 seconds.
Caution Flags: 6 for 27 laps.
Lead Changes: 5 among 3 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-42;J.Allgaier
43-45;J.Logano 46-151;R.Truex 152-194;J.Logano
195-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): J.Logano, 3times for 154laps;R.Truex, 1time
for 43 laps;J.Allgaier, 1 time for 3 laps.
Top10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 454;2. R.Stenhouse
Jr., 442;3. A.Dillon, 440;4. S.Hornish Jr., 404;5.
J.Allgaier, 376;6. C.Whitt, 366;7. M.Annett, 364;8.
M.Bliss, 302;9. J.Nemechek, 287;10. T.Malsam,
282.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running
Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under
Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Fin-
ish.
Sprint Cup
FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 158.297.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 158.263.
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 158.235.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 158.047.
5. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 157.985.
6. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 157.867.
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 157.839.
8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 157.839.
9. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 157.611.
10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 157.549.
11. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 157.542.
12. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 157.494.
13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 157.418.
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 157.405.
15. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 157.363.
16. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 157.343.
17. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 157.329.
18. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 157.178.
19. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 157.061.
20. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 156.822.
21. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 156.822.
22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 156.781.
23. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 156.638.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 156.563.
25. (79) Scott Speed, Ford, 156.488.
26. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 156.461.
27. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 156.27.
28. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 156.216.
29. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 156.121.
30. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 155.723.
31. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 155.676.
32. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 155.266.
33. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 154.912.
34. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 154.672.
35. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 154.56.
36. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 154.56.
37. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 154.48.
38. (32) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 154.096.
39. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 154.024.
40. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, owner points.
41. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, owner points
Points.
42. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, owner points.
43. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 154.48.
Failed to Qualify
44. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 154.288.
45. (74) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 154.242.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
June 1
At Sands Casino Resort, Bethlehem, Pa. (NBCSN),
Gabriel Rosado vs. Sechew Powell, 12, junior mid-
dleweights; PreniceBrewer vs. RonaldCruz, 12, for
thevacant WBCContinental Americas welterweight
title.
June 2
At Aviator Sports Complex, Brooklyn, N.Y., Sadam
Ali vs. Franklin Gonzalez, 10, welterweights.
At HomeDepot Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO), Anto-
nio Tarver vs. Lateef Kayode, 12, for Tarver’s WBO
cruiserweight title; Austin Trout vs. Delvin Rodri-
guez, 12, for Trout’s WBA World light middleweight
title; Vusi Malinga vs. Leo Santa Cruz, 12, for the
vacant IBF bantamweight title; Ronald Wright vs.
Peter Quillin, 10, middleweights; Winky Wright vs.
Peter Quillin, 10, middleweights.
At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif., An-
drew Cancio vs. Rocky Juarez, 10, junior light-
weights.
At the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Bei-
but Shumenov vs. Enrique Ornelas, 12, for Shume-
nov’s WBA World and IBO light heavyweight titles.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3C
➛ B A S E B A L L
MI NOR L EAGUES
The Florida State League
All-Star game is coming up on
Saturday, June 16.
A trio of Tampa Yankees were
named to the team in pitcher
Mark Montgomery, catcher J.R.
Murphy and outfielder Rob
Segedin.
Montgomery is the Single-A
team’s top reliever, going 4-1
with a 1.35 ERA, eight saves and
43 strikeouts in 26
2
⁄3 innings
this season. Murphy, 21, is bat-
ting .234 with two home runs
and 14 RBI this season.
Segedin is the top hitter for
the T-Yankees this season hit-
ting .287 with six home runs, 30
RBI and eight stolen bases.
The game will be played at
Charlotte Sports Park in Port
Charlotte, Fla. Tampa is current-
ly 24-29 and in fourth place in
the Florida State League North
Division.
Here are the New York Yan-
kees top-10 prospects according
to MLB.com.
1. Manny Banuelos, LHP,
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (Triple-
A): The left-hander, currently on
the disabled list, is 0-2 with a
4.50 ERA in six starts for Yan-
kees with 22 Ks in 24 innings.
2. Dellin Betances, RHP,
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (Triple-
A): The 6-foot-8, 260-pound
righty had a solid outing on
Wednesday to pick up his third
win of the season, allowing two
runs and four hits in six innings
of a win over Toledo.
3. Gary Sanchez, catcher,
Charleston (A): The 19-year-old
has been on fire in his last five
games, ringing up three home
runs, 16 RBI and nine hits in 22
at-bats. In the span, he had a
seven-RBI game and a five-RBI
game for the RiverDogs. In the
last week, he has more than
tripled his home run total to
seven this season.
4. Mason Williams, outfielder,
Charleston (A): The fourth-
round selection in 2010 is bat-
ting .286 for the RiverDogs this
season with three home runs
and 17 RBI. The 20-year-old is
also a speedster with three
triples, 11 doubles and 14 stolen
bases.
5. Jose Campos, RHP, Char-
leston (A): A19-year-old ac-
quired as part of the Michael
Pineda-Jesus Montero trade in
the offseason was off to a good
start and is currently on the D.L.
with elbow inflammation.
6. Slade Heathcott, outfielder,
TBA: The 2009 first-round draft
pick is currently in extended
spring training rehabbing a
shoulder injury that sidelined
him for the end of the 2011
season. He’s expected to play
his first game of 2012 on June 5
with High-A Tampa.
7. Austin Romine, catcher,
TBA: A 23-year-old who was
expected to be with Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre this season, he is
currently on the disabled list
with an inflamed disc in his
back and is not expected back
until at least July.
8. Dante Bichette Jr., third
base, Charleston (A): The Yan-
kees first pick in 2011 (51st
overall) has been on a roll of
late hitting .349 (15-for-43)
during a nine-game hitting
streak that was snapped on
Friday. He also hit his first home
run of the season last week. He’s
batting .262 with 18 RBI.
9. Cito Culver, shortstop,
Charleston (A): A first-round
pick in 2010 (32 overall), the
19-year-old switch-hitting No. 2
hitter in the RiverDogs’ lineup
has reached base in 21 straight
games. He’s only hitting .250
(20-for-80) in the span, but he’s
scored 18 runs, drawn 16 walks
and stolen five bases.
10. Adam Warren, RHP,
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (Triple-
A): He picked up his fifth qual-
ity start of the season in a no-
decision against Toledo. For the
season, he’s 2-3 with a 4.88 ERA
and 41 strikeouts in 55
1
⁄3 innings.
YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S
Tampa lands three
on All-Star squad
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
In 2009, the Phillies didn’t
have a first round draft pick,
losing out on the selection by
signing Raul Ibanez after win-
ning the World Series in 2008.
So their first pick in the draft
came at No. 75, when they took
outfielder Kelly Dugan out of
Notre Dame High School in
California.
In his first two-plus seasons in
the organizations, the most
games he played in during one
season was 47 in 2011.
So far this season, he’s not
only played in 32 games, but the
20-year-old is having a good
season for Low-A Lakewood.
Dugan, the son of actor and
director Dennis Dugan, leads
the BlueClaws with a .272 bat-
ting average to go along with
five home runs, 16 RBI and an
on-base percentage of .359.
Here are Philadelphia’s top 10
prospects according to
MLB.com and how they are
faring in 2012.
1. Trevor May, RHP, Reading
(Double-A): A fourth-round pick
in the 2008 draft, he’s had back-
to-back outings where he’s al-
lowed two home runs in each
start. In eight previous starts, he
didn’t allow any longballs. Last
week, he took a no-decision
pitching 6
1
⁄3 innings allowing
four runs. For the season, he’s
5-2 with a 4.28 ERA and 53
strikeouts in 54
2
⁄3innings.
2. Jesse Biddle, LHP, Clear-
water (A-Advanced): It’s now
been seven great starts for the
first round draft pick in 2010 as
he threw seven innings of one-
run, four-hit ball in a no-deci-
sion last week. Over his last
seven starts, he’s allowed just
six earned runs in 39 innings for
a 1.38 ERA. With two bad starts
to begin the campaign, he’s 2-2
with a 2.86 ERA and 52 strike-
outs in 50
1
⁄3 innings this season.
3. Brody Colvin, RHP, Clear-
water (A-Advanced): He’s been
moved to the bullpen after a few
rough starts. In two appearances
in relief, he’s allowed one run in
four innings and may be
straightening out a bit. To date
for the Threshers, he has a 5.36
ERA with a 3-4 record to go
with 36 strikeouts and 31 walks
in 48
2
⁄3 innings.
4. Larry Greene, first base,
TBA: The first-round pick from
last June has yet to play in a
professional game. The 19-year-
old is currently in extended
spring training.
5. Phillippe Aumont, RHP,
Lehigh Valley (Triple-A): The
6-foot-7, 260-pound 23-year-old
reliever was taken off the DL
last week and saw his first game
action since May 2 when he
threw three innings last week.
On the season, his ERA is 5.25
with a 1-0 record and 18 strike-
outs and 14 walks in 12 innings.
6. Sebastian Valle, catcher,
Reading (Double-A): The 21-
year-old is hitting .232 with five
home runs and 20 RBI this
season. He appears to be getting
back on track with three mul-
tiple-hit games in his last eight.
7. Justin De Fratus, RHP,
TBA: On the disabled list, he
began a throwing program last
week.
8. Maikel Franco, third base,
Lakewood (Class A): Only 19,
he was signed as a non-drafted
free agent in 2010. He’s batting
.222 with five home runs and 22
RBI in 49 games.
9. Jonathan Pettibone, RHP,
Reading (Double-A): After four
straight solid outings, the 21-
year-old was hit hard in his last
outing giving up eight runs in
six innings as his record fell to
4-5 and his ERA jumped to 3.92
this season.
10. Roman Quinn, shortstop,
TBA: With Freddy Galvis now
ineligible to be on the list due to
too much Major League service
time, Quinn steps in. He has not
yet played after being drafted
out of high school just last year.
He’s a speedster and was hailed
by some scouts as the fastest
player in the 2011 draft when he
was picked by the Phillies in the
second round (66 overall).
P H I L L I E S P R O S P E C T S
OF Dugan acting
like he belongs
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Today
at Indianapolis
1:15 p.m.
Monday
at Indianapolis
7:05 p.m.
Tuesday
Gwinnett
7:05 p.m.
at Rochester
Wednesday
Gwinnett
7:05 p.m.
at Rochester
Saturday
at Rochester
7:05 p.m.
Friday
Gwinnett
7:05 p.m.
at Rochester
Thursday
Gwinnett
7:05 p.m.
at Rochester
UPCOMI NG SCHEDUL E
Russ Canzler, Hazleton
Area, Columbus (Cleveland,
Triple-A): The Hazleton native
is mired in a slump for the
Clippers going hitless in his
last 15 at-bats.
To date for the Clippers,
he’s hitting .261 with three
home runs, 15 RBI and a .307
on base percentage.
Of the regular players on
Columbus’ roster, Canzler is
third in batting average and
hits (49).
The back-to-back Gover-
nors’ Cup champion Clippers
are currently tied for second
in the International League
West Division, six games
behind Indianapolis.
The reigning International
League Most Valuable Player
was originally drafted by the
Cubs in the 30th round in
2004. He was signed as a
minor league free agent by
Tampa Bay last year and then
traded to Cleveland in this
offseason.
Cory Spangenberg,
Abington Heights, Lake
Elsinore (San Diego, Class A
advanced): Drafted last June
by the Padres 10th overall,
Spangenberg has reached
base in 10 consecutive games
for the Storm and has hit
safely in nine of those,
posting an average of .359
(14-for-38) in that period.
The No. 6 overall prospect
in the Padres system accord-
ing to MLB.com has seven
multiple hit games in his last
19. For the season, the left-
handed batting second
baseman is hitting .297 with
19 stolen bases in 24 at-
tempts to go along with five
triples, 10 doubles and 27 RBI
in 53 games. After 2011, he
was rated by Baseball Amer-
ica as having the best strike-
zone discipline in the Padres
organization. To date, he has
walked 13 times and struck
out 39 times in 219 at-bats.
Ray Black, Coughlin,
San Francisco (extended
spring training): A power
pitcher, Black is nursing a
shoulder injury which arose
at the end of spring training
and he’s been sidelined for
about two months while in
extended spring training in
Scottsdale, Ariz.
He threw two bullpen
sessions last week and is
slated for one more Tuesday.
If all goes well, he can see
game action in Arizona later
in the week.
The seventh-round draft
pick (237th overall) out of the
University of Pittsburgh last
June is hoping to join the
Short Season Salem-Keizer
Volcanoes in Oregon – which
begins play June 14 – or the
Low Class A team in Augusta
or possibly join the Arizona
Rookie League Giants.
Rich Thompson,
Montrose, Tampa Bay Rays:
The 33-year-old is finally
getting a shot in the major
leagues. He only has one hit
in 15 at-bats for the Rays, but
he’s making an impact on the
base paths. He has picked up
two stolen bases, scored a
run and knocked in a run.
Earlier this month, he was
traded to Tampa from the
Phillies and was immediately
called up to the big leagues.
He’s 1-for-15 for the Rays in
limited playing time during
seven games.
Before the trade, he was
hitting .307 for Lehigh Valley
with seven stolen bases and
an on-base percentage of
.390 for the IronPigs.
Originally drafted in the
sixth round by the Blue Jays
in 2000 out of James Madi-
son, he is now playing for his
seventh organization.
He has played in the minor
leagues for Toronto, Pitts-
burgh, Boston, Arizona and
Kansas City before joining
the Phillies in 2008
Kyle McMyne, Old
Forge, Bakersfield (Cincinnati,
Class A Advanced): Taken by
the Reds in the fourth round
(145th overall) of last year’s
draft out of Villanova, the
right-handed reliever was
promoted to Class A Ad-
vanced Bakersfield.
In three appearances so
far for the Blaze, he’s allowed
three earned runs in 4
1
⁄3
innings.
Before his promotion in
Low A Dayton, he threw in 24
1
⁄3 innings with 22 strikeouts
and just eight walks. He was
3-2 with a 2.59 ERA in 18
appearances holding oppo-
nents to a .215 batting aver-
age and only allowed one
home run.
D I S T R I C T 2 ’ S P R E S E N C E I N P R O F E S S I O N A L B A S E B A L L
A year ago, Ray Black had
just ended his junior season
with the University of Pitts-
burgh and was waiting to see if
he would be taken in the Major
League Baseball Amateur
Draft.
Now a member of the Giants
organization after being taken
in the seventh round by San
Francisco, the 21-year-old is
trying to advance past extend-
ed spring training in Scotts-
dale, Ariz., before this week’s
draft adds more potential pro-
spects to the more than six
dozen players vying for a spot
on a minor league team.
The 2008 Coughlin grad has
run into a few roadblocks,
though.
The 6-foot-5, 225-pound
reliever was cruising along in
spring training, throwing the
ninth inning of minor league
games before a shoulder injury
sidelined him right before
teams were about to leave
Arizona. He’s been out of game
action for more than two
months now, but has been
progressing.
A power pitcher, he’s thrown
many bullpen sessions in Ari-
zona with his fastball topping
out at 99 mph. Another bull-
pen session is scheduled for
Tuesday and if all goes well,
he’s likely to see game action
later this week.
He takes that as great news
because he’s chomping at the
bit to get back into games.
“I’m pretty excited and antsy
because at the end of spring
training, I was injured and
wasn’t able to leave with a
team,” Black said. “I saw every-
body leave to go on to full
season teams. It gave me a
little more fire. I’m really try-
ing to get back. That’s where I
want to be. It’s where everybo-
dy wants to be.”
Extended spring training
ends next week and the Giants’
short Season team in Salem-
Keizer (Oregon) begins play
June 14. Black hopes to be on
the Volcanoes’ 25-man roster
when the schedule begins. If
not, he’s likely to stay in Scotts-
dale and play in the Arizona
Rookie League.
“Hopefully, when I get
healthy I’ll have a chance to
make that team,” Black said
about the chance of starting his
pro career in Oregon. “And
then, from there, just start
moving up.”
No matter what, Black is
happy to be part of an orga-
nization that develops stud
pitchers like two-time Cy
Young Award winner Tim
Lincecum to go with Matt Cain
and Madison Bumgarner. San
Francisco has a 3.38 team ERA
this season, good for fourth in
the majors.
“The Giants develop pitchers
very well,” Black said. “A lot of
their guys pitching in the bigs
right now, Sergio Romo, Tim
Lincecum, they’re all prospects
the Giants had.”
A typical day at extended
spring training begins at 6
a.m., with batting and fielding
practice. A game is played later
in the morning around 11 in
100-plus degree weather. All
players in Scottsdale follow the
same schedule while living in a
hotel and earning $20 a day.
“Nobody wants to be here.
Everyone wants to be some-
where else on a full team ros-
ter,” said Black, who had Tom-
my John surgery in 2008 before
graduating from Coughlin.
“Right now it’s a grind to try
and work your way up to work
out of here.”
A good aspect of being in
Scottsdale is that Black has
been around former and cur-
rent Major League veterans,
picking the brain of injured
players working their way back
such as Giants closer Brian
Wilson or third baseman Pablo
Sandoval. He’s also been work-
ing with former Major League
closer Lee Smith, who was a
power pitcher like Black. Also,
according to Black, there’s
more than 100 years of MLB
service time among all the
coaches helping out the roo-
kies.
“It’s good to talk to them and
listen to what they have to
say,” Black added.
And someday he may be
talking to them as a teammate
or a seasoned veteran himself.
Coughlin grad hoping to land short season spot
Black is nearly back
Coughlin grad Ray Black is shown pitching for Pittsburgh last
season before being drafted by the San Francisco Giants.
Local players who may go in the draft
Ray Black was drafted in the seventh round by the San Francisco
Giants last year. With the 2012 MLB Amateur Draft being held
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, here are some local players who
might be taken in this year’s draft
Tommy Alexander, RHP, Sr., Wyoming Valley West: The Spartans
ace, who has committed and signed to Old Dominion, has topped
out in the low 90s on the radar gun. As a senior, he was the top
pitcher in the Wyoming Valley Conference going 8-0 with 73
strikeouts and a 0.59 ERA. He helped lead Valley West to a district
championship this season, starting and winning both games in the
District 2 tournament, and coming up with a game-winning
two-run double in the title game.
Dave Bartuska, RHP, Dominican College (Pittston Area): Expected
to be drafted last year, Bartuska has been out of college for a year
but has been playing ball and throwing. He earned praise last year
and filled out paper work for as many as a dozen MLB teams but
went undrafted. He was rated as one of the top collegiate pitchers
in the country prior to the 2011 season. For Dominican in 2011, he
went 9-2 with a 1.59 ERA and 86 strikeouts in 79
1
⁄3 innings.
Scott Davis, infielder, Sr., Delaware State (Lake-Lehman): Davis
hit .353 for the Hornets as a sophomore, .418 last season and
finished this season batting .272. He had several key hits to help
Delaware State to a 40-17-1 record. He also was hit by a pitch 37
times, tying the NCAA Division I record and netted a .447 on base
percentage. He was a preseason All-American honorable mention
by collegebaseballinsider.com and was the 2011 Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference Player of the Year.
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
- Dave Rosengrant
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5C
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
NEW YORK — R.A. Dickey
followed up Johan Santana’s
no-hitter by shutting out St.
Louis, David Wright homered
and the New York Mets beat
the Cardinals 5-0 on Saturday.
Dickey (8-1) gave up seven
hits, struck out nine and walk-
ed none in his third career
shutout — first this season.
The Mets scored three runs in
the second, on a mishandled
grounder and two run-scoring
groundouts to win for the sixth
time in eight games.
Marlins 5, Phillies 4
PHILADELPHIA — Hanley
Ramirez hit two homers and
drove in three runs to help the
Miami Marlins beat the Phila-
delphia Phillies .
Ricky Nolasco (6-3) allowed
four runs on eight hits in sev-
en-plus innings to improve to
6-1 in seven career starts at
Philadelphia for the Marlins.
Miami has won four of its last
five and denied Cole Hamels
(8-2) his ninth victory.
Nationals 2, Braves 0
WASHINGTON — Stephen
Strasburg pitched four-hit ball
for seven sharp innings and
Jesus Flores homered, leading
the Washington Nationals over
the Atlanta Braves.
Reds 12, Astros 9
HOUSTON — Drew Stubbs
homered and drove in four
runs, Brandon Phillips added
three RBIs and the Cincinnati
Reds outlasted Houston to
hand the Astros their eighth
straight defeat.
Brewers 5, Pirates 1
MILWAUKEE — Brooks
Conrad ended his 0-for-27
slump to start the season,
hitting a homer and driving in
three runs to lead the Mil-
waukee Brewers past the Pitts-
burgh Pirates.
Diamondbacks 4, Padres 2
SAN DIEGO — Daniel Hud-
son pitched eight strong in-
nings and Paul Goldschmidt
homered, leading the Arizona
Diamondbacks to a win over
the San Diego Padres.
Dodgers 6, Rockies 2
DENVER — Aaron Harang
pitched six strong innings,
Bobby Abreu homered for the
first time this year and the Los
Angeles Dodgers ended a sea-
son-worst five-game losing
streak with a 6-2 win over the
Colorado Rockies on Saturday.
Giants 2, Cubs 1
SAN FRANCISCO — Matt
Cain pitched into the ninth
inning on the way to winning
his fifth straight start and the
San Francisco Giants beat the
Chicago Cubs.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
New York Mets starting pitcher R.A. Dickey throws against the
St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning of a game on Saturday at
Citi Field in New York.
Dickey shuts out
Cardinals on 7 hits
The Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
Brian Matusz pitched effective-
ly into the eighth inning and
the Baltimore Orioles ended a
six-game losing streak by de-
feating the Tampa Bay Rays 2-1
Saturday.
Matusz (5-5) didn’t give up a
hit until the fifth inning. He
permitted two hits in 7 1-3
innings, striking out seven and
walking three.
The Orioles scored the go-
ahead run in the seventh on a
two-out throwing error by
Drew Sutton.
Endy Chavez homered in the
third off Jeremy Hellickson
(4-2).
Tigers 4, Yankees 3
DETROIT — Miguel Cabre-
ra hit two prodigious homers
and Omir Santos’ sacrifice fly
in the ninth inning gave the
Detroit Tigers a wild victory
over the New York Yankees.
Detroit overcame a blown
save by Jose Valverde (3-1) and
an awful night of defense from
Santos, a third-string catcher
pressed into duty because of
injuries. Santos made two
errors and allowed five stolen
bases — but his fly to right off
Boone Logan with the bases
loaded in the ninth was deep
enough to score Brennan
Boesch.
Athletics 9, Royals 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The
struggling Oakland Athletics
took advantage of some bum-
bling Kansas City defense to
pile up their most offense in
more than three weeks, helping
them snap a nine-game losing
streak with a victory over the
Royals.
Brandon McCarthy (4-3)
came off the disabled list to
throw six innings, Jemile
Weeks reached base four times
and Josh Reddick had a two-
run triple during a four-run
fifth for Oakland.
Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 4
TORONTO — Felix Dou-
bront won for the fifth time in
six starts, Nick Punto homered
and the Boston Red Sox beat
the Toronto Blue Jays.
Mariners 10, White Sox 8
CHICAGO — Ichiro Suzuki
homered twice, John Jaso hit a
tiebreaking double in the 12th
inning and the Seattle Mari-
ners ended Chicago’s nine-
game winning streak by beat-
ing the White Sox.
Jesus Montero led off the
10th with a double against
Addison Reed (0-1). One out
later, Jaso drove in pinch-run-
ner Munenori Kawasaki.
Chone Figgins followed with
an RBI single.
Twins 7, Indians 4
CLEVELAND — Joe Mauer
broke out of a slump with three
hits and three RBIs, including
a two-run homer, to lead the
Minnesota Twins to a win over
the Cleveland Indians.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Matusz, Orioles beat Rays,
stop 6-game losing skid
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
F R I D A Y ’ S
L A T E B O X E S
Rockies 13, Dodgers 3
Los Angeles Colorado
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GwynJ cf 4 0 2 0 Fowler cf 5 2 3 2
DeJess
3b-2b 5 0 1 0 Scutaro ss 4 0 2 1
Ethier rf 4 0 1 0 CGnzlz lf 4 0 2 1
Lindlm p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0
AKndy ph 1 0 0 0
Nelson
ph-3b 1 1 1 1
HrstnJr 2b-ss 3 2 1 0 Cuddyr rf 4 4 2 1
VnSlyk 1b-rf 4 1 2 0 Rogers p 0 0 0 0
Cstllns lf 3 0 2 2 Helton 1b 3 1 2 0
Treanr c 2 0 0 1 Colvin ph-rf 1 0 0 0
DGordn ss 3 0 0 0
Pachec
3b-1b 5 1 1 0
JWrght p 0 0 0 0 WRosr c 4 3 1 3
Loney ph-1b 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 1 1 1
Capuan p 2 0 0 0 Outmn p 1 0 0 0
EHerrr 3b 2 0 1 0 CTorrs p 1 0 0 0
Ottavin p 1 0 0 0
EYong ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 310 3 Totals 38131510
Los Angeles .................... 000 101 010 — 3
Colorado.......................... 020 114 32x — 13
E—Hairston Jr. 2 (2), Treanor (2), De Jesus (1).
DP—Los Angeles 1, Colorado 2. LOB—Los An-
geles 9, Colorado 6. 2B—Gwynn Jr. (5), De Jesus
(3), Hairston Jr. (6), Van Slyke (2), Helton (9).
3B—Castellanos (1). HR—Nelson (1), Cuddyer (7),
W.Rosario (8). SB—Gwynn Jr. 2 (7), Treanor (1),
Cuddyer (7), W.Rosario (2), LeMahieu (1). SF—
Castellanos.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Capuano L,7-2 ........ 5
1
⁄3 7 7 4 4 3
J.Wright .................... 1
2
⁄3 6 4 3 1 1
Lindblom.................. 1 2 2 2 0 1
Colorado
Outman..................... 3
1
⁄3 2 0 0 1 5
C.Torres................... 2 3 2 2 3 1
Ottavino W,1-0 H,2. 1
2
⁄3 2 0 0 0 3
Belisle....................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Rogers...................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP—Capuano, C.Torres. PB—W.Rosario.
Padres 7, Diamondbacks 1
Arizona San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Blmqst ss 4 0 2 0 Denorfi rf-lf 4 1 1 0
A.Hill 2b 4 1 0 0 Maybin cf 4 1 2 1
J.Upton rf 4 0 1 0 Alonso 1b 3 1 1 0
MMntr c 3 0 1 1 Quentin lf 4 0 1 1
CYoung cf 3 0 0 0 Bass pr 0 1 0 0
Gldsch 1b 4 0 2 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0
RRorts 3b 4 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 0 0
GParra lf 4 0 0 0 Hundly c 3 0 0 1
Miley p 3 0 1 0 ECarer ss 4 0 0 0
DHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Amarst 2b 4 2 2 0
Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Richrd p 2 0 0 1
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0
Cashnr p 0 0 0 0
Guzmn ph 1 1 1 2
Venale rf 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 7 1 Totals 32 7 8 6
Arizona............................... 001 000 000 — 1
San Diego.......................... 001 000 06x — 7
E—J.Upton (4). LOB—Arizona 7, San Diego 4.
2B—Goldschmidt (13). 3B—Maybin (4), Amarista
(1). HR—Guzman(1). CS—C.Young(2). SF—Hun-
dley.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
Miley L,6-2............... 7
1
⁄3 6 4 4 0 4
D.Hernandez ........... 0 2 3 2 2 0
Ziegler ......................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
San Diego
Richard..................... 6
2
⁄3 7 1 1 1 3
Gregerson................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Cashner W,3-3........ 1 0 0 0 1 1
Brach........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
D.Hernandez pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
Giants 4, Cubs 3
Chicago San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Campn cf 4 0 1 0 GBlanc rf 3 1 0 0
SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 Theriot 2b 3 2 3 1
Mather 3b 4 1 1 0 MeCarr lf 4 1 2 1
ASorin lf 3 1 1 3 Posey c 3 0 1 2
RJhnsn rf 4 0 0 0 Pagan cf 4 0 1 0
JeBakr 1b 3 0 2 0 Pill 1b 4 0 1 0
LaHair ph 1 0 1 0 Arias 3b 4 0 0 0
IStewrt pr 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 2 0 1 0
Barney 2b 4 0 3 0 Bmgrn p 2 0 0 0
Clevngr c 4 0 0 0 SCasill p 0 0 0 0
Mahlm p 2 0 0 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
BParkr p 0 0 0 0
CColmn p 0 0 0 0
Cardns ph 1 0 0 0
Marml p 0 0 0 0
DeJess ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 311 3 Totals 29 4 9 4
Chicago.............................. 000 000 003 — 3
San Francisco.................... 202 000 00x — 4
DP—Chicago 2, San Francisco 2. LOB—Chicago
6, San Francisco 6. 2B—LaHair (11), Theriot (2).
3B—Me.Cabrera (7). HR—A.Soriano (8). SB—
Campana (16), Pill (1). CS—S.Castro (6). S—Bum-
garner. SF—Posey.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Maholm L,4-4 .......... 5
1
⁄3 8 4 4 2 4
B.Parker ................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 1 1
C.Coleman...............
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Marmol ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
San Francisco
Bumgarner W,6-4... 8 8 2 2 0 11
S.Casilla H,1............
1
⁄3 3 1 1 0 0
Ja.Lopez S,1-3........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Bumgarner pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP—by Bumgarner (A.Soriano). Balk—Bumgar-
ner.
Angels 4, Rangers 2
Texas Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 Trout cf-lf 4 1 2 3
Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 4 0 1 0
Hamltn cf 4 1 1 0 Pujols 1b 2 0 0 1
Beltre 3b 4 0 2 1 KMorls dh 4 0 1 0
MYong dh 4 1 1 0 Trumo lf 4 0 0 0
DvMrp lf 3 0 1 0 Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0
BSnydr ph 1 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 0 0
N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 3 1 1 0
Napoli c 3 0 1 1 Aybar ss 2 1 0 0
Morlnd 1b 3 0 0 0 Hester c 2 1 1 0
MIzturs ph 1 0 0 0
BoWlsn c 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 30 4 6 4
Texas.................................. 100 100 000 — 2
Los Angeles....................... 000 002 20x — 4
E—Kinsler (6), Callaspo (2). DP—Los Angeles 3.
LOB—Texas 6, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Kinsler (18),
Hamilton (10), Hester (1). 3B—Trout (3). SB—An-
drus (9), Dav.Murphy (4), N.Cruz (4). SF—Pujols.
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
Lewis L,4-4 .............. 6
2
⁄3 4 4 2 1 5
Ogando.....................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Uehara ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Los Angeles
Williams W,6-2 ........ 7 7 2 2 2 4
S.Downs H,10......... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Frieri S,3-3............... 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP—by Lewis (Aybar).
S T A N D I N G S
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Baltimore........................................ 30 23 .566 — — 3-7 W-1 14-13 16-10
Tampa Bay..................................... 30 23 .566 — — 5-5 L-1 18-11 12-12
New York ....................................... 28 24 .538 1
1
⁄2 1
1
⁄2 7-3 L-1 14-11 14-13
Boston............................................ 28 25 .528 2 2 7-3 W-2 13-14 15-11
Toronto........................................... 27 26 .509 3 3 3-7 L-2 15-12 12-14
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Chicago ........................................ 30 23 .566 — — 9-1 L-1 13-14 17-9
Cleveland ..................................... 28 24 .538 1
1
⁄2 1
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 16-15 12-9
Detroit ........................................... 25 28 .472 5 5 5-5 W-1 12-13 13-15
Kansas City.................................. 22 29 .431 7 7 5-5 L-1 6-18 16-11
Minnesota .................................... 19 33 .365 10
1
⁄2 10
1
⁄2 4-6 W-1 9-17 10-16
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas ............................................. 31 21 .596 — — 5-5 L-3 15-11 16-10
Los Angeles .................................. 27 26 .509 4
1
⁄2 3 9-1 W-1 14-11 13-15
Seattle ............................................ 24 31 .436 8
1
⁄2 7 4-6 W-1 9-13 15-18
Oakland.......................................... 23 30 .434 8
1
⁄2 7 1-9 W-1 10-15 13-15
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Washington ................................... 30 21 .588 — — 6-4 W-1 16-8 14-13
Miami .............................................. 30 23 .566 1 — 6-4 W-1 16-10 14-13
New York ....................................... 30 23 .566 1 — 7-3 W-2 18-11 12-12
Atlanta............................................ 28 25 .528 3 2 2-8 L-1 12-11 16-14
Philadelphia................................... 28 26 .519 3
1
⁄2 2
1
⁄2 7-3 L-1 12-14 16-12
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cincinnati ....................................... 30 22 .577 — — 7-3 W-2 15-9 15-13
St. Louis......................................... 27 26 .509 3
1
⁄2 3 3-7 L-4 13-11 14-15
Pittsburgh ...................................... 26 26 .500 4 3
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 16-11 10-15
Milwaukee...................................... 24 29 .453 6
1
⁄2 6 7-3 W-1 12-14 12-15
Houston ......................................... 22 31 .415 8
1
⁄2 8 2-8 L-8 16-12 6-19
Chicago.......................................... 18 34 .346 12 11
1
⁄2 3-7 L-2 12-15 6-19
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles................................. 33 20 .623 — — 3-7 W-1 21-9 12-11
San Francisco.............................. 29 24 .547 4 1 6-4 W-2 16-11 13-13
Arizona ......................................... 24 29 .453 9 6 5-5 W-1 10-15 14-14
Colorado....................................... 22 30 .423 10
1
⁄2 7
1
⁄2 7-3 L-1 14-15 8-15
San Diego..................................... 18 36 .333 15
1
⁄2 12
1
⁄2 2-8 L-1 13-17 5-19
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 1
N.Y. Yankees 9, Detroit 4
Boston 7, Toronto 2
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 2, Oakland 0
Chicago White Sox 7, Seattle 4
L.A. Angels 4, Texas 2
Saturday's Games
Boston 7, Toronto 4
Oakland 9, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 2, Tampa Bay 1
Seattle 10, Chicago White Sox 8, 12 innings
Minnesota 7, Cleveland 4
Detroit 4, N.Y. Yankees 3
Texas at L.A. Angels, (n)
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-5) at Detroit (Verlander
5-3), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Bard 5-5) at Toronto (Hutchison 4-2), 1:07
p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 2-6) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore1-5),
1:40 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 6-4) at Kansas City (Mazzaro1-0),
2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Millwood 3-4) at Chicago White Sox (Sale
6-2), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Diamond 3-1) at Cleveland (Masterson
2-4), 3:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 6-3) at L.A. Angels (Haren 3-5),
3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 6, Miami 4
Atlanta at Washington, ppd., rain
N.Y. Mets 8, St. Louis 0
Cincinnati 4, Houston 1
Pittsburgh 8, Milwaukee 2
Colorado 13, L.A. Dodgers 3
San Diego 7, Arizona 1
San Francisco 4, Chicago Cubs 3
Saturday's Games
Washington 2, Atlanta 0
Miami 5, Philadelphia 4
L.A. Dodgers 6, Colorado 2
N.Y. Mets 5, St. Louis 0
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 1
Arizona 4, San Diego 2
San Francisco 2, Chicago Cubs 1
Cincinnati 12, Houston 9
Sunday's Games
Atlanta (Hanson 5-4) at Washington (G.Gonzalez
7-1), 1:35 p.m.
Miami (Zambrano3-3) at Philadelphia(Blanton4-5),
1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-3) at Houston (Lyles 0-1), 2:05
p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 4-2) at Milwaukee (Fiers
1-0), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 0-1) at Colorado (White 1-3),
3:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-1) at San Francisco (Zito
4-2), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 2-5) at San Diego (Stults 1-1), 6:35
p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 4-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-2),
8:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
B O X E S
Mets 5, Cardinals 0
St. Louis New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Furcal ss 4 0 1 0 Niwnhs lf 5 0 0 1
Descals
2b-1b 4 0 2 0 ATorrs cf 5 0 1 1
Hollidy lf 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1
Beltran rf 4 0 1 0 Duda rf 4 0 1 0
Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 2 0
YMolin c 3 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 1 1 0
MAdms 1b 2 0 0 0 Quntnll ss 1 1 0 0
VMarte p 0 0 0 0 Thole c 4 1 2 0
ESnchz p 0 0 0 0 Dickey p 3 0 0 1
Chamrs ph 1 0 0 0
Boggs p 0 0 0 0
Roinsn cf 3 0 2 0
Lynn p 1 0 0 0
Greene 2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 31 0 7 0 Totals 33 5 9 4
St. Louis............................. 000 000 000 — 0
New York ........................... 030 000 11x — 5
E—Holliday (2), Ma.Adams (2). DP—New York 3.
LOB—St. Louis 4, New York 11. 2B—Beltran (5),
Robinson (4), D.Wright (19), Dan.Murphy (15).
HR—D.Wright (6). S—Dickey.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
Lynn L,8-2................ 4
2
⁄3 5 3 2 4 3
V.Marte..................... 1
1
⁄3 3 1 1 0 1
E.Sanchez ............... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Boggs ....................... 1 1 1 1 0 2
New York
Dickey W,8-1........... 9 7 0 0 0 9
V.Marte pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP—by Lynn (Quintanilla). WP—E.Sanchez.
Umpires—Home, Lance Barksdale;First, Fieldin
Culbreth;Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Gary Ce-
derstrom.
T—2:34. A—27,914 (41,922).
Dodgers 6,
Rockies 2
Los Angeles Colorado
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GwynJ cf 4 3 0 0 Fowler cf 2 1 1 0
EHerrr 3b 5 0 2 2 Scutaro ss 3 0 0 0
Abreu lf 2 1 1 1 CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0
VnSlyk lf 1 0 0 0 Cuddyr 1b 4 0 1 1
Ethier rf 4 1 2 2 Colvin rf 4 0 0 0
AKndy 2b 5 0 1 1 Nelson 3b 3 0 0 0
Loney 1b 5 0 2 0 Nieves c 3 0 0 0
A.Ellis c 4 0 1 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0
DGordn ss 4 1 1 0 Rogers p 0 0 0 0
Harang p 2 0 0 0 EYong ph 1 0 0 0
Cstllns ph 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 0
Guerra p 0 0 0 0 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0
Elbert p 0 0 0 0 Roenck p 1 0 0 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 MtRynl p 0 0 0 0
Jansen p 0 0 0 0 WRosr c 2 0 1 1
Totals 37 610 6 Totals 31 2 6 2
Los Angeles....................... 120 102 000 — 6
Colorado ............................ 100 000 100 — 2
E—LeMahieu (1). DP—Los Angeles 1. LOB—Los
Angeles 10, Colorado 7. 2B—E.Herrera (4), Ethier
(18), Loney (12), Cuddyer (18), W.Rosario (7).
3B—Fowler (5). HR—Abreu (1). SB—Gwynn Jr.
(8). S—Harang, Mat.Reynolds.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Harang W,4-3.......... 6 4 1 1 3 6
Guerra......................
1
⁄3 2 1 1 1 0
Elbert H,5.................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Belisario ................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jansen...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Colorado
Nicasio L,2-3 ........... 1
2
⁄3 4 3 2 1 1
Roenicke.................. 2
1
⁄3 2 1 1 3 2
Mat.Reynolds........... 2 4 2 2 0 2
Brothers ................... 2 0 0 0 1 2
Rogers...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Balk—Brothers.
Umpires—Home, Chad Fairchild;First, Alfonso
Marquez;Second, Brian O’Nora;Third, Tom Hal-
lion.
T—3:29. A—36,175 (50,398).
Nationals 2,
Braves 0
Atlanta Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 Lmrdzz lf 4 0 0 0
Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 SBurntt p 0 0 0 0
McCnn c 3 0 1 0 Ankiel cf 0 0 0 0
D.Ross c 1 0 0 0 Harper cf-rf 2 0 1 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 0 0 0
FFrmn 1b 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 0 0
Heywrd rf 3 0 1 0 Morse rf 4 0 0 0
Smmns ss 3 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
Beachy p 2 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 1 0
Durbin p 0 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 2 1 0 0
Venters p 0 0 0 0 Flores c 2 1 1 1
M.Diaz ph 1 0 1 0 Strasrg p 2 0 0 0
CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Berndn ph 0 0 0 0
Constnz lf 3 0 2 0 Nady ph-lf 1 0 1 1
Totals 31 0 6 0 Totals 27 2 4 2
Atlanta ................................ 000 000 000 — 0
Washington ....................... 000 010 10x — 2
DP—Washington 2. LOB—Atlanta 4, Washington
6. 2B—Constanza (1), Nady (3). HR—Flores (2).
SB—Espinosa (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Beachy L,5-4........... 6
1
⁄3 3 2 2 4 6
Durbin....................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Venters.....................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
C.Martinez ............... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Washington
Strasburg W,6-1...... 7 4 0 0 0 9
S.Burnett H,7........... 1 2 0 0 0 0
Clippard S,4-5......... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Durbin pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP—Venters.
Umpires—Home, Derryl Cousins;First, Ron Kulpa-
;Second, D.J. Reyburn;Third, Jim Wolf.
T—2:35. A—41,042 (41,487).
Marlins 5, Phillies 4
Miami Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Reyes ss 3 0 1 1 Rollins ss 5 1 2 1
Infante 2b 4 1 1 0 Pierre lf 3 1 2 0
HRmrz 3b 4 2 2 3 Pence rf 2 1 1 2
Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 0 1
Morrsn 1b 4 1 2 0 Victorn cf 3 0 1 0
Ruggin lf 4 0 1 1 Wggntn 1b 4 0 0 0
Coghln cf 3 1 0 0 Polanc 3b 4 1 2 0
Hayes c 4 0 0 0 Fontent pr 0 0 0 0
Nolasco p 2 0 0 0 Galvis 2b 3 0 1 0
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Hamels p 2 0 0 0
H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0
Orr ph 1 0 0 0
Schwm p 0 0 0 0
Valdes p 0 0 0 0
Schndr ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 5 7 5 Totals 32 4 9 4
Miami .................................. 000 202 100 — 5
Philadelphia....................... 111 000 010 — 4
DP—Miami 2, Philadelphia1. LOB—Miami 3, Phila-
delphia 6. 2B—Reyes (11), Ruggiano (1), Galvis
(15). 3B—Rollins (1). HR—H.Ramirez 2(10), Pence
(13). SB—Reyes (16), Pierre 2 (8), Pence (4). CS—
Ruggiano (1). S—Nolasco, Galvis. SF—Pence.
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
Nolasco W,6-3 ........ 7 8 4 4 2 5
Cishek H,6............... 1 0 0 0 1 2
H.Bell S,11-15......... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
Hamels L,8-2........... 6
2
⁄3 7 5 5 2 8
Qualls .......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Schwimer .................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Valdes ...................... 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Nolasco pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert;First, DougEddings-
;Second, Dana DeMuth;Third, Kerwin Danley.
T—2:44. A—45,509 (43,651).
A M E R I C A N
L E A G U E
B O X E S
Orioles 2, Rays 1
Baltimore Tampa Bay
ab r h bi ab r h bi
EnChvz lf 4 1 1 1 C.Pena 1b 3 0 0 0
Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 BUpton cf 2 0 0 0
C.Davis dh 4 0 0 0 Zobrist rf 3 0 1 0
AdJons cf 4 0 1 0 Scott dh 4 0 0 0
Wieters c 4 0 1 0 SRdrgz 2b 4 1 1 0
MrRynl 1b 3 1 1 0 Matsui lf 4 0 0 0
Betemt 3b 4 0 0 0 Sutton 3b 3 0 0 1
Flahrty rf 2 0 0 0 Loaton c 3 0 0 0
Andino 2b 3 0 0 0 EJhnsn ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 5 1 Totals 29 1 2 1
Baltimore............................ 001 000 100 — 2
Tampa Bay......................... 000 010 000 — 1
E—Mar.Reynolds (7), Lobaton(2), Sutton(2). DP—
Baltimore 1. LOB—Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 5.
2B—Hardy (12), Mar.Reynolds (9), S.Rodriguez
(6). HR—En.Chavez (1). SB—Ad.Jones (9). CS—
B.Upton (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Matusz W,5-5 .......... 7
1
⁄3 2 1 1 3 7
Strop H,9..................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Ji.Johnson S,17-17 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson L,4-2 ...... 6
2
⁄3 4 2 1 1 8
McGee......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Jo.Peralta................. 1 0 0 0 0 2
Badenhop.................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
Howell.......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
WP—Strop.
Athletics 9, Royals 3
Oakland Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
JWeeks 2b 2 2 2 0 AGordn lf 5 1 2 0
Rosales
pr-2b 1 1 1 2 YBtncr 2b 3 0 1 1
Cowgill rf 4 0 1 1 Butler dh 3 1 0 0
Reddck dh 4 1 1 2 Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0
Cespds lf 5 2 3 1 Francr rf 4 0 2 1
Kaaihu 1b 5 0 1 1 Maier rf 0 0 0 0
Inge 3b 5 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 1
Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 0 1 0
KSuzuk c 4 2 1 0 Dyson cf 4 1 3 0
Pnngtn ss 4 1 0 0 Quinter c 2 0 0 0
B.Pena c 2 0 1 0
Totals 38 910 7 Totals 33 311 3
Oakland.............................. 100 140 030 — 9
Kansas City ....................... 100 001 100 — 3
E—A.Escobar (5), Y.Betancourt (2), Dyson (4).
DP—Oakland 3. LOB—Oakland 9, Kansas City 8.
2B—Cespedes (6), Ka’aihue (9), A.Gordon (15),
Hosmer (8), B.Pena (7). 3B—J.Weeks (4), Reddick
(3). SB—A.Escobar (9). S—Pennington, Y.Betan-
court. SF—Y.Betancourt.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
McCarthy W,4-3...... 6 8 2 2 2 2
Balfour ...................... 1 2 1 1 0 2
R.Cook ..................... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Blevins...................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
Hochevar L,3-6 ....... 4
2
⁄3 5 6 6 3 3
Collins....................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 3
L.Coleman ............... 1
2
⁄3 1 2 0 2 2
Crow.........................
1
⁄3 3 1 0 0 0
Mijares...................... 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP—Hochevar. PB—Quintero.
Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 4
Boston Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Nava lf 3 0 1 2 KJhnsn 2b 5 0 2 1
Aviles ss 5 0 0 0 YEscor ss 4 0 1 0
AdGnzl rf-1b 5 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 1 1 1
Ortiz dh 4 1 1 0 Encrnc 1b 3 1 2 0
Sltlmch c 3 1 0 0 Rasms cf 4 0 0 0
Youkils 1b-3b 3 1 1 0 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0
Sweeny cf-rf 2 1 1 1 RDavis lf 4 0 0 0
Mdlrks 3b 3 1 1 1 Cooper dh 4 1 0 0
Byrd cf 1 0 0 0 Mathis c 4 1 2 1
Punto 2b 4 2 3 2
Totals 33 7 8 6 Totals 36 4 9 3
Boston................................ 040 100 011 — 7
Toronto............................... 001 110 010 — 4
E—Sweeney (2), Doubront (1), Bautista (2), Drabek
(3). DP—Toronto 2. LOB—Boston 7, Toronto 6.
2B—Youkilis (4), Punto (2). HR—Punto (1), Bautis-
ta (13), Mathis (3). SB—Nava (2). CS—Lawrie (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Doubront W,6-2 ...... 6
1
⁄3 7 3 2 1 7
Albers H,2................
2
⁄3 1 1 0 0 0
A.Miller H,7..............
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Padilla H,13.............
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Aceves S,14-17 ...... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Toronto
Drabek L,4-6 ........... 6
2
⁄3 6 5 4 4 4
Frasor .......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Oliver ........................
1
⁄3 1 1 1 1 0
Cordero....................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Villanueva ................ 1 1 1 1 1 1
Albers pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP—by Villanueva (Nava).
Mariners 10, White Sox 8
Seattle Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
ISuzuki rf 6 2 2 2 De Aza cf 5 2 3 0
Ackley 2b 5 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 6 1 3 4
Seager 3b 6 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 5 0 0 0
JMontr dh 6 0 2 0 Konerk 1b 5 0 0 0
Kawsk pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Rios rf 5 2 2 1
Smoak 1b 6 1 2 1 Przyns c 5 1 1 2
Jaso c 5 2 2 1 Viciedo lf 5 1 1 1
Olivo c 0 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 5 0 0 0
Carp lf 4 1 1 0 OHudsn 3b 5 1 1 0
Figgins lf 2 0 1 1
MSndrs cf 6 2 4 2
Ryan ss 5 1 1 2
Totals 511015 9 Totals 46 811 8
Seattle .................... 111 200 030 002 — 10
Chicago.................. 021 120 110 000 — 8
E—Smoak (1), Pierzynski (2), O.Hudson (3). DP—
Seattle 1. LOB—Seattle 8, Chicago 4.
2B—J.Montero (10), Jaso (8), Ryan (7), O.Hudson
(2). HR—I.Suzuki 2 (3), Smoak (10), M.Saunders
(5), Beckham (8), Rios (5), Pierzynski (9), Viciedo
(12). SB—M.Saunders (8), Ryan (4), De Aza (13),
Rios (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Noesi ........................ 4
1
⁄3 7 6 6 0 5
Furbush.................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
League ..................... 1 2 1 1 0 2
Luetge ...................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Pryor ......................... 1
1
⁄3 1 1 1 0 2
Wilhelmsen W,2-1 .. 3 1 0 0 0 4
Iwakuma S,2-2........ 1 0 0 0 1 1
Chicago
Floyd......................... 5 9 5 5 0 4
Ohman H,1 ..............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Z.Stewart ................. 0 0 0 0 1 0
H.Santiago H,3........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Crain BS,2-2............ 1 2 3 2 1 3
Thornton...................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
N.Jones.................... 2 1 0 0 0 2
Reed L,0-1............... 1
1
⁄3 3 2 2 0 1
Quintana...................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Floyd pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Z.Stewart pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Luetge pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
PB—Jaso. Balk—H.Santiago.
Brewers 5, Pirates 1
Pittsburgh Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Tabata lf 4 0 1 0 CGomz cf 5 0 0 0
GJones rf 4 1 2 1 Aoki lf 4 0 1 0
AMcCt cf 3 0 1 0 Hart rf 4 0 0 0
PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 2 2 0
Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 Maysnt ss 1 0 0 0
Hague 1b 4 0 1 0 RWeks 2b 2 1 2 0
Barmes ss 3 0 0 0
Ransm
ss-3b 3 1 1 2
McKnr c 3 0 0 0 Conrad 1b 2 1 1 3
Bedard p 1 0 0 0 Mldnd c 4 0 0 0
Resop p 1 0 0 0 Marcm p 2 0 0 0
JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0
JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0 Green ph 0 0 0 0
Slaten p 0 0 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 30 5 7 5
Pittsburgh .......................... 000 100 000 — 1
Milwaukee.......................... 010 400 00x — 5
E—P.Alvarez (11). DP—Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Pitts-
burgh 5, Milwaukee 8. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (16),
R.Weeks (8). HR—G.Jones (6), Conrad (1). SB—
R.Weeks 2 (4). SF—Conrad.
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
Bedard L,3-6............ 3
2
⁄3 5 5 5 3 5
Resop....................... 2
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
J.Hughes.................. 1 1 0 0 0 0
Slaten........................ 1 0 0 0 3 1
Milwaukee
Marcum W,4-3 ........ 7 5 1 1 0 8
Loe............................ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Veras ........................ 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP—Slaten.
Umpires—Home, Gerry Davis;First, Phil Cuzzi;Se-
cond, Manny Gonzalez;Third, Greg Gibson.
T—3:05. A—39,603 (41,900).
Giants 2, Cubs 1
Chicago San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Campn cf 4 0 2 0 GBlanc rf 4 0 0 0
SCastro ss 3 0 0 0 Theriot 2b 4 1 1 0
DeJess rf 3 1 1 1 MeCarr lf 4 1 1 0
ASorin lf 4 0 1 0 Posey c 4 0 1 0
LaHair 1b 3 0 1 0 Pagan cf 4 0 1 0
Clevngr c 3 0 0 0 A.Huff 1b 3 0 0 1
Barney 2b 3 0 0 0 Belt 1b 0 0 0 0
Mather 3b 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 3 0 0 1
Garza p 2 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 2 0 1 0
Camp p 0 0 0 0 M.Cain p 3 0 1 0
IStewrt ph 1 0 0 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
Marml p 0 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 1 5 1 Totals 31 2 6 2
Chicago.............................. 000 100 000 — 1
San Francisco.................... 000 002 00x — 2
E—Mather (2). DP—San Francisco 2. LOB—Chi-
cago 3, San Francisco 7. 2B—A.Soriano (10),
B.Crawford (12). HR—DeJesus (2). SB—Campana
2 (18), DeJesus (1). CS—Campana (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Garza L,2-4.............. 6 5 2 2 1 6
Camp........................ 1 1 0 0 0 0
Marmol ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
M.Cain W,6-2 .......... 8 5 1 1 2 7
Ja.Lopez H,6 ...........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Romo S,1-1 .............
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
M.Cain pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP—by Garza (B.Crawford).
Umpires—Home, Chris Conroy;First, Cory Blaser-
;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Angel Hernandez.
T—2:45. A—41,239 (41,915).
Diamondbacks 4, Padres 2
Arizona San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GParra rf 4 1 1 1 Venale rf 4 1 1 0
Blmqst ss 5 0 3 0 Maybin cf 4 1 1 1
Kubel lf 4 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 1
Gldsch 1b 5 1 1 1 Quentin lf 3 0 1 0
MMntr c 3 2 1 0 Headly 3b 4 0 1 0
CYoung cf 2 0 0 0 Hundly c 3 0 0 0
J.Bell 3b 3 0 1 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0
A.Hill 2b 4 0 0 0 Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0
DHdsn p 2 0 0 1 ECarer ss 2 0 1 0
Putz p 0 0 0 0 Amarst 2b 3 0 0 0
Volquez p 1 0 0 0
Denorfi ph 1 0 0 0
Thtchr p 0 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0
Hinshw p 0 0 0 0
Grandl c 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 4 7 3 Totals 31 2 6 2
Arizona............................... 000 110 110 — 4
San Diego.......................... 000 200 000 — 2
DP—Arizona 1. LOB—Arizona 10, San Diego 4.
2B—Bloomquist (9), M.Montero (8), E.Cabrera (5).
HR—Goldschmidt (5). SB—Venable (7), Alonso
(2). CS—Bloomquist (7). SF—D.Hudson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
D.Hudson W,2-1..... 8 5 2 2 1 5
Putz S,12-15............ 1 1 0 0 0 0
San Diego
Volquez .................... 6 4 2 2 5 5
Thatcher L,0-1.........
2
⁄3 2 1 1 0 1
Gregerson................ 1 1 1 1 2 1
Hinshaw.................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Brach........................ 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
Hinshaw pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP—by Putz (Quentin). Balk—Thatcher.
Umpires—Home, ToddTichenor;First, AlanPorter-
;Second, Tony Randazzo;Third, Brian Gorman.
T—3:08. A—36,559 (42,691).
Reds 12, Astros 9
Cincinnati Houston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Cozart ss 6 3 2 0 Schafer cf 5 1 1 1
Stubbs cf 5 3 3 4 Altuve 2b 5 3 3 0
Votto 1b 4 3 4 2 Lowrie ss 4 2 2 2
BPhllps 2b 5 0 2 3 JDMrtn lf 5 1 2 3
Heisey rf 4 0 1 1 CJhnsn 3b 2 1 2 1
Bruce ph-rf 0 0 0 0 FMrtnz rf 5 0 1 2
Ludwck lf 5 1 1 1 MDwns 1b 5 0 2 0
Frazier 3b 4 1 1 1 JCastro c 3 1 1 0
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 WRdrg p 1 0 0 0
Hanign c 4 1 0 0 Bogsvc ph 1 0 0 0
Latos p 0 0 0 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0
Cairo ph 1 0 0 0 Maxwll ph 1 0 0 0
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0
Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 Myers p 0 0 0 0
Costanz ph 1 0 0 0
Marshll p 0 0 0 0
Valdez ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 40121412 Totals 37 914 9
Cincinnati ......................... 350 011 020 — 12
Houston ........................... 203 400 000 — 9
E—Cozart (5), Lowrie (6), Altuve (6). DP—Cincin-
nati 2. LOB—Cincinnati 7, Houston 7. 2B—Cozart 2
(15), Stubbs (7), B.Phillips (8), Lowrie(10), J.D.Mar-
tinez (6), C.Johnson (9), F.Martinez (1), J.Castro
(6). HR—Stubbs (7), Votto (9), Ludwick (6), Frazier
(6), Lowrie (9). CS—Votto (1), M.Downs 2 (2). S—
Latos 2, W.Rodriguez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Latos ......................... 3
1
⁄3 7 7 4 1 5
Hoover......................
2
⁄3 3 2 2 1 1
LeCure W,1-1.......... 2 3 0 0 2 2
Arredondo H,2......... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Marshall H,5 ............ 1 0 0 0 0 2
Chapman S,5-6....... 1 0 0 0 1 3
Houston
W.Rodriguez ........... 5 9 9 7 2 3
Fe.Rodriguez L,1-6 1 2 1 1 0 1
D.Carpenter............. 1 0 0 0 0 2
Lyon.......................... 1 3 2 2 2 1
Myers........................ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds;First, Dan Iassog-
na;Second, James Hoye;Third, Jim Joyce.
T—3:47. A—22,991 (40,981).
Twins 7, Indians 4
Minnesota Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Span cf 5 1 2 0 Choo rf 5 1 1 0
Revere rf 5 2 2 0 Kipnis 2b 5 2 2 0
Mauer c 5 1 3 3 ACarer ss 3 0 1 1
Wlngh lf 4 0 1 0 JoLopz dh 3 0 1 0
Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Brantly cf 4 0 1 2
Doumit dh 3 1 0 0 Ktchm 1b 4 0 0 0
Dozier ss 4 0 1 0 Damon lf 3 1 0 0
Plouffe 3b 4 1 2 3 Chsnhll 3b 4 0 1 0
ACasill 2b 0 0 0 0 Marson c 3 0 1 1
JCarrll 2b-3b 4 0 0 0 Duncan ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 38 712 7 Totals 35 4 9 4
Minnesota.......................... 400 001 200 — 7
Cleveland........................... 101 110 000 — 4
DP—Cleveland 2. LOB—Minnesota 5, Cleveland
7. HR—Mauer (3), Plouffe (6). SB—Kipnis (13),
Chisenhall (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Walters..................... 4
1
⁄3 8 4 4 3 2
Duensing W,1-2...... 2 0 0 0 0 1
Burton H,8................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
Perkins H,7.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Capps S,11-12........ 1 1 0 0 0 2
Cleveland
Tomlin L,2-3 ............ 6 10 5 5 1 3
Sipp........................... 1 2 2 2 0 0
J.Smith ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Barnes ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP—Barnes.
Tigers 4, Yankees 3
New York Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 3 0 0 0 Berry cf 3 0 1 1
Grndrs cf 5 0 1 0 Worth 2b 3 0 0 0
AlRdrg 3b 4 0 1 0 MiCarr 3b 4 2 3 2
Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 Fielder 1b 4 0 1 0
Teixeir 1b 3 1 1 1 DYong dh 4 0 1 0
Ibanez lf 5 0 0 1 Boesch rf 4 1 1 0
CStwrt c 0 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0
Swisher rf 4 0 1 1 Kelly lf 3 1 1 0
ErChvz dh 2 0 2 0 RSantg ph 0 0 0 0
AnJons
ph-dh 2 0 1 0 OSants c 2 0 1 1
Martin c 3 0 1 0
Wise pr-lf 0 1 0 0
Totals 35 3 9 3 Totals 31 410 4
New York ........................... 000 001 011 — 3
Detroit................................. 000 110 011 — 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
E—O.Santos 2 (2). LOB—New York 12, Detroit 6.
2B—Er.Chavez (5), Mi.Cabrera (15), Fielder (12).
HR—Mi.Cabrera 2 (11). SB—Jeter (5), Granderson
(3), Swisher (1), Wise 2 (3), Berry (6). S—Jeter,
Worth, O.Santos. SF—O.Santos.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Kuroda...................... 7 7 2 2 1 4
Wade........................ 1 1 1 1 0 0
Phelps L,1-2 ............
1
⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
Logan........................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Detroit
Porcello.................... 6 6 1 1 1 3
Coke ......................... 0 2 0 0 0 0
Benoit H,13.............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Dotel BS,2-3............ 1 1 1 1 1 1
Valverde W,3-1
BS,3-12.................... 1 0 1 1 2 0
Coke pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP—by Valverde (Martin, Al.Rodriguez). WP—
Kuroda.
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
race by myself,” said Porfirio,
who also won the First Female
West Pittston Resident to Finish
Award. Race director Don Shear-
er, won the First Male West Pitt-
ston Resident to Finish Award.
“I didn’t see any other females
near me throughout the race,”
Porfirio said. “So I just tried to
settle into a nice steady pace the
rest of the way.
“I run this course all the time,”
Porfirio said. “So I’m very famil-
iar with the twists and turns
along the course. I knewwhat to
expect.”
35thannual West PittstonAnthracite 4 Mile Run
results
Top 10
Frankie Redmond, 23, Harding, 21:48
James Connors, 18, Pittston, 23:27
Ed Kraftchisin, 41, Pittston Twp., 23:33
Dan Toye, 24, Dalton, 23:35
Doug McLean, 19, Pittston Twp., 23:52
Nick McGuire, 15, Mountain Top, 24:22
Mike McAndrew, 52, Avoca, 24:43
Tyler Baran, 18, Wilkes-Barre, 25:08
Brenden Ehret, 16, Dallas, 25:12
Mike Havrilla, 15, Pittston, 25:16
Male award winners: Overall: 1. Redmond; 2.
Connors; 3. Kraftchisin. Age group winners: 14 &
under: 1. NicoVasquez, W. Pittston, 29:34; 2. Pres-
tonShearer, Montoursville, 34:01; 3. MarcMinichel-
lo, W. Pittston, 36:29. 15-19: 1. Dave McLean, Pitt-
ston Twp., 23:52; 2. Nick McGuire, Mountain Top,
24:22; 3. Tyler Baran, Wilkes-Barre, 25:08. 20-24: 1.
Dan Toye, Dalton, 23:35; 2. Dave Riviello, Pittston
Twp., 26:09; 3. Jeff Mikolaichik, W. Wyoming,
29:38. 25-29: 1. JonMilias, Plymouth, 30:57. 30-34:
1. Jarrod Monta, Luzerne, 31:59; 2. Jeff Rogish,
Wyoming, 32:49; 3. Mike McFarland, Jenkins Twp.,
33:31. 35-39: 1. Rob Baron, Plains Twp., 25:26; 2.
James Igoe, JimThorpe, 29:52; 3. Chris Keller, Dal-
las, 30:09. Maters division: 40-44: 1. Paul Manloy,
Plymouth, 27:30; 2. Randy Lyback, Dupont, 27:51;
3. Don Shearer, W. Pittston, 27:53. 45-49: 1. Mike
Mullon, S. Abington, 27:39; 2. Matt Domines, Old
Forge, 28:55; 3. Brian Lisowski, JimThorpe, 29:33.
50-54: 1. Mike McAndrew, Avoca, 24:43; 2. Greg
Bassham, Mountain Top, 26:20; 3. Joe Kichilinsky,
W. Wyoming, 26:43. 55-59: 1. Dave Jiunta, W.
Wyoming, 27:59; 2. John Sobota, Forty Fort, 28:07;
3. Ron Ruda, Dallas, 37:59. 60 & over: 1. Len So-
winsky, Scott Twp., 27:52; 2. Ed Kelly, Archbald,
28:30; 3. Joe Dutko, Mountain Top, 28:36. Special
award: First Male West Pittston Resident to Finish:
Don Shearer, 27:53.
Top 3 females
Deedra Porfirio, 35, W. Pittston, 25:40
Whitney Lukas, 19, Courtdale, 26:21
Jen Heck, 40, W. Wyoming, 28:42
Female awardwinners: Overall: 1. Porfirio; 2. Lu-
kas; 3. Heck. Age group winners: 14 & under: 1.
Grace Remus, Jenkins Twp., 41:49; 2. Emma
Hurst, W. Pittston, 43:55. 15-19: 1. Chelsea Shear-
er, Montoursville, 35:46; 2. Madison Shearer, Mon-
toursville, 40:59. 20-24: 1. MiaPagnotti, W. Pittston,
41:57. 25-29: 1. Heather McAndrew, Duryea,
31:22; 2. Alexis Kalpakas, Wilkes-Barre, 35:02; 3.
Sarah Deutchman, Scranton, 35:52. 30-34: 1.
Charlene Aquilina, Wyoming, 29:56; 2. Tracy Za-
lenski, Plains Twp., 31:35; 3. Virginia Ziegler, Sha-
vertown, 32:20. Maters division: 40-44: 1. KimJa-
nosky, Dallas, 38:53. 45-49: 1. Peggy Manlay, Ply-
mouth, 32:53; 2. Jan Arroyopabon, Drums, 40:33.
50-59: 1. BevTomasak, Edwardsville, 33:48; 2. Pat-
ty Phillips, Hanover Twp., 34:38; 3. Sharon Davies,
Mountain Top, 35:24. 60 & over: 1. Dee Cordora,
Swoyersville, 34:54; 2. Pat Perugini-Hosmer, Ma-
rietta, Ga., 43:36. Special award: First FemaleWest
Pittston Resident to Finish: Porfirio.
Field: 137finishers (run; 10finishers (walk). Official
starter: Charlie Burns. Timing: Vince Wojnar
(Wyoming Valley Striders). Results: Insata Results.
Race director: Don Shearer.
Schedule
Sunday, June 17: Wilkes-Barre Duathlon (3 mile
run, 16.9 mile bike, 3 mile run) at Wilkes-Barre Pub-
lic Square at 7:30 a.m. Info: Nicky Pachucki (YM-
CA), 823-2191, ext. 141 or Bill Buzza (JCC), 824-
4646, ext. 232.
Ryan, Shockey win third leg
of Xterra
HICKORYRUN–James Ryan,
19, of Wilkes-Barre, won has
third straight event in the 5 Race
Xterra Trail Series on Saturday
at Hickory Run State Park.
Ryan finished the 6.2 mile
train run with a time of 45:45,
seven seconds ahead of his near-
est competitor, Grant Farrell, 31,
of Lancaster.
Jaclyn Shokey, 34, of Jim
Thorpe won the women’s divi-
sion with a time of 51:11, better
thantwominutes faster thansec-
ond-place finisher Shari Steward
of Bloomsburg.
Third Stage of the 5 Race Xterra Trail Series
Top 10
JimRyan, 19, Wilkes-Barre, 45:45
Grant Farrell, 31, Lancaster, 45:52
Aaron Bova, 34, Allentown, 46:23
Joe Drumsta, 43, Scranton, 48:10
Brian Hess, 42, Mohntown, 49:24
Pete Miller, 28, Avoca, 49:54
Rich Bergunder, 32, Pittsburgh, 50:14
Chris Allman, 31, Scranton, 50:21
Keith Austin, 46, Sweet Valley, 50:30
TimNash, 43, Orefield, 50:37
Top Five Women
Jaclyn Shokey, 34, JimThorpe, 51:11
Shari Steward, Bloomsburg, 53:32
Stacey Zander, 29, Lewisburg, 56:07
Kyla Hennigan, 19, Shickshinny, 56:40
Sarah Miller, 22, Avoca, 57:13
“I run these streets almost ev-
ery day,” said Redmond, who
runs for the Keystone Elite Track
Club, basedinHarrisburg. “It’s in
my back yard, so to speak. It’s
like a hometown race for me.
That’s why I like it so much.”
Porfirio, wholives inWest Pitt-
ston, won top female honors for
the second year in a row. She
broke the tape in 25:40. The 35-
year-old, whohaswonmorelocal
races so far this season than any
other female, outraced second-
place finisher, Whitney Lukas,
19, of Courtdale, by 41 seconds.
Jen Hawk, 40, of West Wyoming,
finished third in 28:42.
Like Redmond, Porfirio be-
lieved she went out a little too
fast at the start. Nevertheless,
she virtually wasn’t challenged
throughout the race.
“I pretty much ran most of the
RUN
Continued from Page 1C
urday.
Brunn Jr. converted birdies
on the eighth through 14th
holes, and after breaking the
string on No. 15, hit yet an-
other birdie on the final hole.
“Today,” Brunn Jr. said, “it
was my day. It just sort of
happened. It was a streak
that didn’t want to end, for
some reason. I looked back
and said ‘Wow!’ ”
That was pretty much the
response of the small gallery
watching the action, and it
shocked the favored Fisher
team.
“It’s a big win for us,”
Brunn Jr. said. “On paper, we
should not beat these guys.
They shot 7-under and lost.
That doesn’t happen in golf.”
It so happens Wasilewski –
a semi-regular on the local
tournament scene – and his
partner Rick Berry didn’t
make today’s semifinals, but
a few other teams did. The
duo fell to Tom Biscotti and
John Mikiewicz, 2 and 1.
The team of Joe Weiscarg-
er and John Gershey also ad-
vanced to today’s 9 a.m.
semifinals, along with Ken
Ralston and his playing part-
ner Brandon Matthews, the
former PIAA champion from
Pittston Area.
The championship flight fi-
nals tee off at 3 p.m.
“Sometimes, destiny’s on
your side,” Brunn Jr. said.
“We’ve got to go out there,
tee it up and play it as well
(today), carry that roll into
the semifinals.
“Hopefully, the golf gods
will be with us.”
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Floyd Bowen hits his way out off the rough on the 12th hole Saturday at the Wyoming Valley Country Club Classic.
Lou Mastrini chips out of the sand trap on the 12th hole during play Saturday.
Mike Hirthler Sr. tees off on
the 13th hole.
Mike Hirthler Jr. lines up a putt on the 12th green during
play Saturday at Wyoming Valley Country Club.
Dann Cornali tees off on the 13th hole during play Saturday
at Wyoming Valley Country Club in Hanover Township.
BIRDIE
Continued from Page 1C
Following Northwest’s first
District 2 tournament champion-
ship, the Rangers will keepthings
close to home for their state tour-
nament debut.
Nanticoke’s return to the state
tournament will have a familiar
feel.
Two Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence schools are four wins away
froma state championship as the
PIAAsoftball tournaments begin
Monday.
The Rangers open play in the
Class Abracket against District 3
champion Greenwood at King’s
College. First pitch is set for 4:30
p.m. Monday.
Both Greenwood (14-5) and
Northwest (12-2) were the top
seeds in their district tourna-
ments, with the Rangers defeat-
ing perennial District 2 power
Blue Ridge 4-1 on Friday. This
will be Northwest’s first game at
King’s since its loss toElkLake in
the 2009 District 2 Class 2A
championship game.
The Trojans will start out
against Pine Grove (22-1) on
Monday at 4 p.m. Nanticoke
(17-2) last played at Blue Moun-
tain High School in Schuylkill
Haven in the 2010 first round
against Pine Grove, winning 2-1.
Three games later, Nanticoke
was celebrating a state cham-
pionship.
P I A A S O F T B A L L
Rangers, Trojans
stay close to home
The Times Leader staff
All teams are listed by (district-seed)
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 4
• North Penn (1-1) vs. Lower Dauphin (3-3), 5:30
p.m., Spring Ford H.S.
• Williamsport (4-1) vs. Pennsbury (1-4), noon,
Bloomsburg University
• St. Hubert’s (12-1) vs. Dallastown (3-2), 5 p.m.,
Temple University
• Liberty (11-1) vs. Central Bucks South (1-3), 6
p.m., Patriots Park, Allentown
• Central Dauphin (3-1) vs. Hatboro-Horsham
(1-5), 5 p.m., Lebanon Valley College
• Bishop Shannon (1-2) vs. Central (12-2), 3 p.m.,
Plymouth Whitemarsh H.S.
• Cannon McMillan (7-1) vs. McDowell (10-1), 4
p.m., Fairhaven Park
• Central Mountain (6-1) vs. Hempfield Area
(7-2), 12:30 p.m., Penn State University
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 7
First-round winners at neutral sites, TBA
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 11
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites, TBA
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 15
Semifinal winners at Nittany Lion Softball Park,
State College, 5:30 p.m.
__________
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 4
• Sun Valley (1-1) vs. Greencastle Antrim (3-2),
3:30 p.m., Spring Ford H.S.
• Valley View (2-1) vs. Milton (4-1), 3 p.m.,
Marywood University
• Conwell Egan (12-1) vs. Pottsville (11-1), TBA,
Temple University
• Manheim Central (3-1) vs. Springfield Delco
(1-2), 3 p.m., Lebanon Valley College
• Bellefonte (6-1) vs. Big Spring (3-3), 7 p.m.,
Penn State University
• Fort LeBoeuf (10-1) vs. Elizabeth Forward (7-2),
1 p.m., Penn State Behrend
• Montour (7-1) vs. Punxsutawney (9-1), 4 p.m.,
North Allegheny H.S.
• Carrick (8-1) vs. Greensburg Salem (7-3), 3:30
p.m., McGibbney Field, Pittsburgh
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 7
First-round winners at neutral sites, TBA
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 11
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites, TBA
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 15
Semifinal winners at Nittany Lion Softball Park,
State College, 12:30 p.m.
__________
CLASS 2A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 4
• Kutztown (3-1) vs. Chestnut Ridge (5-1), 5 p.m.,
Lyons Field, Fleetwood
• Pine Grove (11-1) vs. Nanticoke (2-1), 4 p.m.,
Blue Mountain H.S.
• Christopher Dock (1-1) vs. District 12 champ, 5
p.m., Plymouth Whitemarsh H.S.
• Warrior Run (4-1) vs. Annville-Cleona (3-2), 4
p.m., Bloomsburg University
• Deer Lakes (7-1) vs. Wilmington (10-2), 2 p.m.,
North Allegheny H.S.
• Cranberry (9-1) vs. Central (6-2), 3 p.m.,
Brockway H.S.
• Phillipsburg Osceola (6-1) vs. Neshannock
(7-3), 5 p.m., Penn State University
• Fairview (10-1) vs. Greensburg Central Catholic
(7-2), 3 p.m., Penn State Behrend
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 7
First-round winners at neutral sites, TBA
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 11
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites, TBA
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 15
Semifinal winners at Nittany Lion Softball Park,
State College, 3 p.m.
__________
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 4
• Northeast Bradford (4-1) vs. Claysburg-Kimmel
(6-2), 2 p.m., Bloomsburg University
• Northwest (2-1) vs. Greenwood (3-1), 4:30
p.m., King's College
• Minersville (11-1) vs. Southern Columbia (4-2),
2 p.m., Blue Mountain H.S.
• GAMP (12-1) vs. Bristol (1-1), 1 p.m., Temple
University, Ambler
• Chartiers Houston (7-1) vs. Brockway (9-2), 2
p.m., Fairhaven Park
• Bellwood Antis (6-1) vs. Saegertown (10-1),
2:30 p.m., Penn State University
• Fannett Metal (5-1) vs. Carmichaels (7-2), 4
p.m., Everett H.S.
• Elk County Catholic (9-1) vs. Sto-Rox (7-3), 5
p.m., Brockway H.S.
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 7
First-round winners at neutral sites, TBA
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 11
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites, TBA
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 15
Semifinal winners at Nittany Lion Softball Park,
State College, 10 a.m.
P I A A S O F T B A L L P L A Y O F F S
were No. 12 Nicolas Almagro,
No. 13 Juan Monaco and No. 20
Marcel Granollers, a five-set
winner against Paul-Henri
Mathieu, the Frenchman who
edged John Isner in an 18-16
fifth set in the second round.
The second-seeded Sharapo-
va’s matches haven’t contained
a shred of intrigue so far. Not
surprisingly, that’s absolutely
OK with her.
After a 6-2, 6-1 victory over
No. 28 Peng Shuai put her in
the fourth round, Sharapova
was asked whether any part of
her feels bad for someone pay-
ing a lot of money to watch an
hour or so of tennis.
“The last thing that’s on my
mind when I’m going out on
court is thinking about who
paid for a ticket and how long
they’re going to watch my
match for,” said Sharapova,
who is trying to complete a ca-
reer Grand Slam by winning
her first French Open cham-
pionship. “I mean, I’m not sure
if that’s selfish or not, but my
job is to go out on the court and
to try to win. Whether it’s 6-0,
6-0, whether it’s a tough three-
set match, you’re trying to do
what you have to do.”
Sharapova’s section of the
draw seems to be getting a bit
easier by the hour.
One potential quarterfinal
opponent, 13-time major cham-
pion Serena Williams, lost in
the first round. Another, for-
mer No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki,
exited 6-1, 6-7 (3), 6-3 against
No. 23 Kaia Kanepi of Estonia.
And a third, No. 25 Julie Goerg-
es of Germany, was beaten 7-6
(5), 2-6, 6-2 by 88th-ranked
Arantxa Rus of the Nether-
lands.
Wozniacki got into a couple
of extended arguments over
line calls with chair umpire
Poncho Ayala, including about
a second-set shot by Kanepi
that landed near the baseline to
earn a service break for the Es-
tonian.
“How can you sit there and
be so arrogant? Have you gone
to school?” Wozniacki said to
Ayala, drawing boos from spec-
tators.
At her postmatch news con-
ference, Wozniacki said: “When
the ball is clearly out, I don’t
think there should be anything
to argue about. You know, if
they cannot see, they should
have other umpires on the lines
or (use replay technology) on
these courts. It’s a disgrace that
mistakes like this are made.”
Not only are Williams, Woz-
niacki and Goerges out of the
way, but in the fourth round,
Sharapova gets to face 44th-
ranked Klara Zakopalova of the
Czech Republic, who eliminat-
ed No. 22 Anastasia Pavlyu-
chenkova of Russia 6-3, 7-5.
Also in Sharapova’s half of
the field, No. 12 Francesca
Schiavone, the 2010 French
Open champion, was a 3-6, 6-3,
8-6 loser against Varvara Lep-
chenko, who joined 19-year-old
Sloane Stephens to give the
United States two unseeded
women in the fourth round of a
Grand Slam tournament for the
first time in 10 years.
“I don’t think it’s the right
way to look at things to see
somebody lose and say, ‘Oh,
well, now the draw is open.’ ...
You can’t go about playing a
Grand Slamlike that,” Sharapo-
va said. “You’ve got to be ready
to face your toughest oppo-
nents from the first round, on.
And if you’re not ready, then
you should probably not be
here.”
For years, she traveled to
tournaments with her father.
Now he’s at home in Florida,
taking care of Sharapova’s dog,
so it’s Mom’s turn to be on the
road.
Dad still likes to offer tennis
advice from afar, but Sharapova
isn’t a fan of his texting skills.
“He can’t text. It’s useless.
He writes half-Russian, half-En-
glish. The words are all mixed
up, misspelled. I just ask him to
call me,” she said with a hearty
laugh.
RULE
Continued from Page 1C
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 7C
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PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
BOSTON — Everywhere
Dwyane Wade turned, two Bos-
tonCeltics seemedto be waiting.
And as long as Chris Bosh is
out, he understands it’s probably
going to stay that way. The Bos-
ton Celtics can double-team him
without fear, knowing LeBron
James is the only other Miami
player who can consistently hurt
them.
Wade scored only18 points Fri-
day in the Heat’s 101-91 loss in
Game 3, snapping his streak of 12
straight 20-point playoff games
against Boston that was the long-
est since Jerry West had 18 in a
rowfrom1966-69.
Wadeisn’t expectingBoshback
from his lower abdominal strain
today in Game 4, so the scheme
probably won’t change. But he
vows that his performance will.
“I’m not coming here crying,”
he said Saturday. “I can score the
basketball, I’vejust got tofindoth-
er ways todothat. It might not be
a 41-point effort like it was inIndi-
ana, you never know what each
game takes, but I’m just going to
goout hereandplaythegamethat
I played for so many years and I
will finda way to be effective.”
Wadeshot 9of 20inhis second-
lowest scoring performance of
this postseason, after a five-point
effort in Game 3 of the second
round against Indiana. He was
struggling with knee pain then,
but insisted there was nothing
wrong physically now.
The only problem, he said, was
the two defenders closing on him
whenever he came off a pick or
caught theball anywherenear the
lane. He was also largely con-
tained in Game 2, managing only
15 points in regulation before
scoring eight in overtime to help
theHeat pull out a115-111victory.
“As a team, we have to figure
out ways to exploit the double
team,” James said. “As his team-
mates, we’ve got to make our-
selves available to make plays for
ourselves, andalsowhenthe dou-
ble team is not there early on of-
fense, we’ve got to get the ball to
himearlysohecanattackwithout
a double team.”
Wade didn’t attempt a free
throwfor thefirst timeinaplayoff
game since 2004, when he was a
rookie, and managed just six
points on 3-of-9 shooting in the
first half. Still, he was far fromthe
only problemfor the Heat.
“You look at all the effort areas
we dominated the first two
games, we got our butt kicked in
all of themlast night,” said coach
Erik Spoelstra, rolling through
the list quicklyas if afraidhe’dfor-
get one if he stoppedfor a breath.
N B A P L AYO F F S
Heat’s Wade: ‘I will find a way to be effective’
By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
Durant powers Thunder past Spurs 109-103
OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant scored 18 of his 36 points in a
scintillating final 7 minutes, Serge Ibaka added a career-high 26
points and the Oklahoma City Thunder evened the Western
Conference finals at two games apiece by beating the San Antonio
Spurs 109-103 Saturday night.
After seeing his team’s 15-point lead dwindle to four, Durant took
over midway through the fourth quarter by scoring all 16 of the
Thunder’s points during a span of just over 5 minutes to keep the
Spurs at bay.
With All-Star teammate Russell Westbrook limited to seven points,
Durant did almost all of the damage late to send the series back to
San Antonio all square for Game 5 on Monday night.
together for the second time in
a month, this time with a little
more riding on their scores.
They were in the same group
the opening two rounds of The
Players Championship.
Ryo Ishikawa, using a local
caddie from Muirfield Village,
ran off three straight birdies on
the back nine and finished with
a 71. The Japanese star was in a
group at 213 that included
Henrik Stenson (71) and Jo-
nathan Byrd (72).
Vijay Singh had the other 69
and was in the group at 214, six
shots behind.
DUBLIN, Ohio — Spencer
Levin gets another crack at his
first PGA Tour win, this time
with a smaller lead and a lot
more star power behind him.
Levin felt as though he could
do no wrong Saturday at the
Memorial when he chipped in
for eagle, chipped in for birdie
and even had a par putt swirl
around the cup and fall in. That
allowed him to make a few
mistakes on the back nine and
still post a 3-under 69 for a
one-shot lead over Rory Sabba-
tini (71).
Rickie Fowler also had a 69,
one of only three rounds in the
60s, and was three shots be-
hind.
Fowler will play in the final
round with Tiger Woods, a
four-time Memorial champion
who is very much in the pic-
ture. Woods had a share of the
lead early, but fell back with a
sloppy short game on the back
nine and had to settle for a 73.
He was four shots back.
Levin, a self-styled Califor-
nian who rarely hides his emo-
tions, had a six-shot lead going
into the final round of the Phoe-
nix Open this year until he
squandered it away on the back
nine and wound up losing to a
remarkable comeback by Kyle
Stanley.
What did he learn?
“People have been asking me
that question, and I don’t know
yet,” Levin said. “I’ll be able to
answer that tomorrow.”
Muirfield Village figures to be
a far stronger test, not only the
course but who is chasing him
down.
A strong wind and firm con-
ditions — not to mention a few
pins tucked near the edges of
the greens — made for difficult
scoring. Only 14 of the 71 play-
ers managed to break par.
That’s one reason this tourna-
ment is far from over. The other
reason comes from the six
players right behind him. All of
them have either won majors,
regular PGA Tour events or
played in the Presidents Cup.
Levin was at 8-under 208 and
will play for the second straight
day with Sabbatini, two animat-
ed players in their own way.
Woods and Fowler will play
“Four shots is definitely man-
ageable around this golf course,
considering the conditions and
what they’re going to be tomor-
row,” Woods said. “A lot of guys
are still in this ballgame. It’ll be
an exciting day tomorrow.”
Levin provided plenty of
excitement during the first few
hours Saturday.
He rolled in a 35-foot birdie
putt on the second hole. From
behind the green on the par-5
fifth, with the green running
away from him, he holed his
chip for eagle to seize control.
After going out in 32, he ap-
peared to be in trouble on the
10th when his second shot
came up 30 yards short. No
problem. He holed that chip for
birdie to become the only play-
er all week to reach 10-under
par.
LPGA Tour
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, NJ
— Stacy Lewis tied a tourna-
ment 36-hole record with a
second-round 65 on Saturday at
the ShopRite LPGA Classic at
the Stockton Seaview Hotel and
Golf Club to maintain the lead
entering Sunday’s final round.
Lewis’ two-day total of 130
leads Anna Nordqvist, who shot
a 67, by six strokes and holds a
seven-stroke edge over the
third-place foursome of So Yoen
Ryu, Azahara Munoz, Kathe-
rine Hull and Paula Creamer.
Nordqvist rebounded nicely
in the second round, surging
from sixth place the first day
after making birdies on six
holes, including three consec-
utive ones on 11, 12 and 13.
Yani Tseng, the world’s No. 1
player, finished in a four-way tie
for seventh. She had a nice spell
with birdies on four-straight
holes before falling off in the
latter portion of the round,
stung by bogies on the par-four
fourth hole and par-three sev-
enth hole. Tseng closed with a
birdie on the par-five ninth
hole.
Champions Tour
WEST DES MOINES, Iowa
— Jay Haas will carry a three-
shot lead into the final round of
the Principal Charity Classic
after shooting a 6-under 65 on
Saturday.
Haas, who won the Cham-
pions Tour event at Glen Oaks
Country Club in 2007 and 2008,
will try to become the first
golfer to win three times in
Iowa. He is at 11 under follow-
ing his bogey-free performance
in the second round.
Larry Mize eagled the 18th
hole to get within three of Haas
at 8 under.
Tom Lehman is four strokes
back, followed by Andrew Ma-
gee at 6 under. Fred Funk and
Kenny Perry lead four players
at 5-under 137.
PRO GOL F
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods tees off on the 16th hole during the third round of the Memorial at the Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio, on
Saturday. Woods is 4-under-par after three rounds, four strokes behind the leader Spencer Levin.
Levin leads Memorial as Woods looms 4 back
The Associated Press
Spencer Levin reacts to making a putt on the 17th hole during
the third round of the Memorial Saturday in Dublin, Ohio.
They can make a pass at 200
mph, but can they go all-in hold-
ing deuces?
NASCAR drivers Jeff Burton,
Kurt Busch and Jeff Gordon, as
well as NASCAR president Mike
Helton, will be the special celeb-
rity guests for the Pocono Celeb-
rity Charity Poker Showdown on
Thursday.
The event, presented by Poco-
no Raceway andhostedby Mohe-
gan Sun at Pocono Downs, will
raise money to benefit the NAS-
CAR Foundation and the Armed
Forces Foundation. The poker
showdowncoincides withthe Po-
cono 400 weekend of events at
the Long Pond track, with the
Sprint Cup race set for Sunday,
June 10.
A$50 donation to the charities
includes a ticket to the event,
while playing spots are available
for $150. A $250 donation adds a
meet-and-greet with the racing
celebrities as well as taking part
in the tournament.
To register for the showdown,
visit nascar.com/unites. For
more information about the
event, visit poconodowns.com.
N A S C A R
Charity poker coming
to Pocono Downs
The Times Leader staff
TUNKHANNOCK -- Tunk-
hannock scored twice in the
bottom of the sixth in game
two to steal a win and ensure
a doubleheader sweep of
Mountain Top in Senior
American League baseball ac-
tion Saturday.
Tunkhannock won the first
game 10-1, and the second tilt
7-6.
In the nightcap, Rich Con-
deelis drove in three runs on
two hits for Tunkhannock,
while Josh McClain added
two hits, including a double,
and two RBI.
Eric Rineheimer and Aaron
Piavis each drove in a pair of
runs for Mountain Top.
In the first game of the day,
Condeelis, Josh McClain and
Wes Custer all drove in a pair
of runs for the winners.
McClain doubled and tripled
as well as combined with
Ryan Weiss and Condeelis to
hold Mountain Top to one hit
for the game.
L E G I O N B A S E B A L L
Tunkhannock sweeps pair
from Mountain Top
The Times Leader staff
NORFOLK, Va. – The Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees have
now lost three straight games
over the past two days on the
road in Norfolk.
The Tides swept a twin bill
with Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on
Saturday night with a 3-1 win in
game one and a 5-1 victory in
game two.
The only Yankee run in game
one was set up by a double off the
bat of Russel Branyan. Francisco
Cervelli then brought Branyan
home with an RBI single just one
at bat later cutting the Norfolk
lead to 2-1. However, the Cervelli
RBI single was all the offense
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre could
create in game one. Miguel Teja-
da led the Tides in game one go-
ing 2-3 with two-RBI.
The Tides offense continuedto
produce in game two as they
jumped out to an early 2-0 lead in
the top half of the first onRBI sin-
gles off the bat of Jamie Hoffman
andJai Miller. Norfolk addedtwo
more runs in the top of the fourth
on back-to-back RBI doubles by
Hoffman and Miguel Tejada. Xa-
vier Avery extended the Tides
lead to 5-1 with a sacrifice fly to
right field in the top half of the
fourth. This proved to be more
thanenoughas theTides hungon
for the 5-1 win in game two.
First game
Norfolk 3, Yankees 1
Yankees Norfolk
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Russo cf 3 0 1 0 Avery cf 2 1 1 0
Joseph 2b 3 0 1 0 Hoes lf 3 1 1 0
Laird 3b 3 0 1 0 Ford dh 2 1 1 1
Cust dh 2 0 0 0 Tejada 3b 3 0 2 2
Mustelier lf 3 0 0 0 Mahoney 1b 3 0 0 0
Branyan 1b 3 1 1 0 Hoffman rf 3 0 0 0
Cervelli c 3 0 1 1 Exposito c 2 0 0 0
Curtis rf 2 0 0 0 Davis ss 2 0 1 0
Pena ss 2 0 1 0 Rojas 2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 24 1 6 1 Totals 22 3 6 3
Yankees ................................... 010 000 0 — 1
Norfolk ...................................... 200 001 x — 3
DP—Yankees 1. LOB—Yankees 3, Norfolk 3.
2B—Branyan (1), Hoes (1). 3B—Hoes (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Yankees
Figueroa (L, 3-2)...... 6 6 3 3 1 3
Norfolk
Hunter (W, 1-0) ........ 7 6 1 1 1 1
Second game
Norfolk 5, Yankees 1
Norfolk Yankees
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Avery lf 3 0 0 1 Russo rf 4 0 0 0
Hoes cf 3 2 2 0 Joseph 2b 4 0 1 0
Hoffman 1b 3 2 2 2 Laird 3b 4 0 0 0
Mahoney 1b 1 0 1 0 Cust dh 3 0 1 0
Tejada dh 3 0 1 1 Mustelier lf 3 0 2 0
Miller rf 4 0 1 1 Branyan 1b 3 0 1 0
Waring 3b 4 0 0 0 Molina c 3 1 1 0
Robinson c 3 0 1 0 Curtis cf 2 0 2 0
Davis ss 2 1 2 0 Pena ss 3 0 2 1
Rojas 2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 29 510 5 Totals 29 110 1
Norfolk ...................................... 202 100 0 — 5
Yankees ................................... 001 000 0 — 1
LOB—Norfolk 7, Yankees 8. 2B—Hoes (2), Hoff-
man(10), Tejada(2), Davis (4), Mahoney (9), Molina
(2). 3B—Hoes (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Norfolk
Clark (W, 2-0)........... 5.1 7 1 1 0 3
Phillips....................... 0.2 2 0 0 1 1
Neshak...................... 1.0 1 0 0 0 3
Yankees
O’Connor (L, 1-2) .... 4.0 8 5 5 0 5
Whitley....................... 3.0 2 0 0 2 3
M I N O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
SWB Yankees drop
doubleheader to Tides
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
AT PLAY
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 9C
Bodines aiding golf event
Allied Services Integrated Health System, NASCAR star
Todd Bodine and his wife Janet Bodine are planning the
third annual ‘Onion Slice Open,’ which will be held Aug. 2 at
the Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club. Last year’s Onion Slice Open
was the largest fundraising golf tournament in Blue Ridge
Trail history. This year’s tournament is being presented by
Northeast Toyota Dealers and Jack Williams Tire. Last
year’s event was sold out in July. For event details or reser-
vations, please email Janet Paczkowski Bodine at ja-
net@teamonion.com or call 417-2978 to reserve your team
or to provide monetary or auction support for Pediatric
Brain Injury Patients treated at Allied Services Integrated
Health System’s Heinz Rehab Hospital. Pictured, from left:
Bill Conaboy, Esq., president/CEO, Allied Services Integrat-
ed Health System; Jim Brogna, assistant vice president,
advancement, Allied Services Foundation; Kim Mattioli,
occupational therapist, Allied Services Heinz Rehab Hospi-
tal; Janet Paczkowski Bodine; Todd Bodine; Rose Kuscav-
age; Len Paczkowski.
Prociak reaches milestone
Rebecca Prociak of Wyoming Area Catholic recently
scored her 500th varsity point in a game versus Good
Shepherd. Prociak was presented with a 500-point ball by
principal Christopher Tigue. Pictured, from left: Patricia
Prociak, Michael Prociak, Rebecca Prociak, Nicholas Pro-
ciak, coach Mike Prociak, coach Frank Trainor, Matthew
Prociak.
St. Jude’s honors top athletes
The St. Jude School Sports Association held its annual
banquet in the spring to honor the athletes who have par-
ticipated in the interscholastic programs offered at the
school. This year’s celebration was held at Blue Ridge Trail
Golf Course Clubhouse. Words of welcome were delivered
by association president Carol Wills followed by the invoca-
tion by Rev. Joseph Evanko. Special recognition was given
to the following: the Peter Fiascki Memorial Award was
presented to Patrick Ganter for being the Most Valuable
Player on the boys varsity basketball team; the Kathryn
Konopelski Memorial Award was presented to Kayla Hons
for being the Most Valuable eighth grade Lady Nomad bas-
ketball player; and the George Overa Memorial Award was
presented to Adam Abad for being the boys varsity basket-
ball player who exhibited the most hustle in practices and
in games. Pictured, from left: Jeanne Rossi, principal; Abad;
Ganter; Hons; Lester Kempinski, boys varsity basketball
coach.
Golf For The Kids event set
The Woodlands Inn will host its eighth annual Golf For The
Kids classic on Aug. 2. Proceeds of the event, which has
become one of the largest annual golf outings in North-
eastern Pennsylvania, will aid Big Brothers Big Sisters of
The Bridge and the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association.
The event will take place at the Mountain Laurel Golf Club
in White Haven and Jack Frost National in Blakeslee. Cost is
$125 per person and includes lunch at The Woodlands,
round-trip transportation from The Woodlands to the golf
course, 18 holes of golf and, upon return, dinner and cock-
tails at The Woodlands. Those interested in participating,
or those area businesses interested in becoming a corpo-
rate sponsor, may call 824-9831, ext. 393. Pictured, from
left: Tom Malloy, event chairman and vice president of the
board of directors, Children’s Service Center; Alan Stout,
community and resource development coordinator, Big
Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge; Tanya Olaviany, pro-
gram director, Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge; Eric
Mahler, advisory board, Big Brothers Big Sisters of The
Bridge; Mitch Kornfeld, The Woodlands; Bill Yeager, vice
chairman of the advisory board, Big Brothers Big Sisters of
The Bridge.
Ballers win 8th grade title
Luzerne County Ballers won the JB Hoops King of the
Court eighth grade boys division, going 4-0 and beating
NEPA Warriors 60-41 in championship game. Pictured, first
row: Robbie Hopkins (Crestwood), Josh Malkemes (Crest-
wood). Second row: Coach Don Hopkins, Shane Planutis
(Hazleton), Patrick Ganter (St Jude’s), Brent Piontkowski
(Nanticoke), Bobby Planutis (Hazleton), Benny Sersen
(Nanticoke), Josh Kaminski (Crestwood), coach Jef Piont-
kowski.
Wimpfheimer picks Shenandoah
Crestwood High School’s Kevin Wimpfheimer has accept-
ed an invitation to attend Shenandoah University and com-
pete on the school’s soccer team. Front row, from left:
Diane Wimpfheimer, mother; Kevin Wimpfheimer; and Ro-
nald Wimpfheimer, father. Second row: Chris Gegaris, high
school principal; Tony Mozeleski, director of athletics; Bon-
nie Gregory, assistant principal. Absent from photo is Pa-
trick Upton, Crestwood head boys soccer coach.
Vipers tops at Drifton Cup
The U12 Wyoming Valley Vipers recently won the Drifton
Cup Championship. The Vipers defeated the Fusion 6-2 in
the championship game. The Vipers posted a 5-0 record,
outscoring opponents 42-4 in the tournament. First row,
from left: Jordan Olenginski, Kristen Coffay, Miranda Bohn,
Jaden Belles, Sarah Benscoter. Second row: Cassy Nova-
kowski, Audi Welles, Meg Armstrong, Chloe VanGorden,
Taylor Brown. Third row: Coach Shawn Welles, manager
Steve Armstrong, coach Mark Brown, coach Jay Bohn.
JCC 3-Mile Run/Walk held
The annual JCC River Street 3-mile Run/Walk was held on
May 20. The event was sponsored by Valley Cycle and Bar-
tikowsky Jewelers. Winners in each division received a
watch courtesy of Bartikowsky. Pictured, from left: Bill Buz-
za, JCC recreation director and Max Bartikowsky, owner of
Bartikowsky Jewelers.
Fusion place second at tourney
The PA Fusion U12 softball team earned second place in
the Spring Kickoff Tournament, ASA Eastern National Qual-
ifier held in Jessup. Front row, from left: Michaela Buckley,
Brinley Sobeck, Melinda Holena, Mandi Zawadzki, Taylor
Zabrenski, Morgan Kline, Megan Murphy. Second row: Cas-
sidy Graham, Tiffany Toporcer, Melodi Raskiewicz, Jenna
Lipowski, Morgan Klosko, Karly Bennett. Third row: Brian
Graham, coach; Marc Lipowski, coach; Charlie Holena, man-
ager; Mark Klosko, coach.
The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and stories
fromreaders about youth and adult recreation activities. We’re
also encouraging anyone in a league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc.
– tosubmit standings andresults tous. E-mailedphotos should
be sent in a jpeg format. Those that are not in a jpeg format
might not be published. All submitted items should have con-
tact information as well to ensure publication.
Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They may be
e-mailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At Play” in the
subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times Leader or
mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18711-0250.
AT P L AY P O L I C Y
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ A U T O R A C I N G
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Congrats to Mike
and Jen! Have a
great time on your
trip. To celebrate, I
think today should
be an island
theme...Castaway
or Shelter? Submit
your thoughts now
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$40,900. call
570-760-2365
503 Accounting/
Finance
PART-TIME
ACCOUNTANT
Part-time Account-
ing position avail-
able. Must have at
least an Associates
Degree. 2 years
experience. Must
possess analytical
skills. Some duties
include bank and
account reconcilia-
tion, journal entries.
Microsoft Excel,
Word, and AS400
skills. 20 hours per
week. 401K avail-
able. Interested
candidates should
reply to:
AMERICAN SILK MILLS
75 STARK STREET
PLAINS, PA 18705
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
Part time, possible
Full time.
(570) 793-5501
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
15 15 IT HELP DESK
POSITIONS
Available in Wilkes
Barre. Paid
training begins
06/11/12. Send
resumes to
Jessica.McClaske
y@expresspros.co
m
570.208.7000
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
522 Education/
Training
ASSISTANT
WOMEN’S TENNIS
COACH, PART TIME
Assist the Head
Coach in organiz-
ing, developing and
coaching all
aspects of the
women varsity ten-
nis program. 1-3
years of successful
coaching experi-
ence, and a Bache-
lors Degree
required, knowl-
edge of NCAA rules
preferred.
HEAD VOLLEYBALL
COACH, PART TIME
The primary
responsibilities
include: recruiting,
scheduling and
related administra-
tive duties involved
with the volleyball
program. Bache-
lor’s degree and 2-
3 years experience
as a volleyball
coach required.
Knowledge of
NCAA rules pre-
ferred.
For additional infor-
mation see
www.marywood.edu
or call
570-961-4724.
A complete
Marywood applica-
tion is required.
Marywood University
2300 Adams Avenue
Scranton, PA 18509
jobs@marywood.edu
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNI-
TY/
AFFI RMATI VE ACTI ON
EMPLOYER
522 Education/
Training
CLINICAL FACULTY
King’s College
seeks a full time
non-tenure track
Clinical Faculty
member for its
Physician Assistant
Studies Program.
This 12-month facul-
ty position begins
Aug. 20, 2012. The
applicant must be a
NCCPA certified PA
with clinical experi-
ence and have a
master’s degree
from an ARC
accredited pro-
gram. Prior experi-
ence in an academ-
ic setting is pre-
ferred. Duties
include assisting the
Clinical Dir in coordi-
nating and monitor-
ing clinical rotation
sites and schedules,
recruiting new clini-
cal sites, establish-
ing affiliation agree-
ments with rotation
sites, developing
exams and other
clinical assessment
tools, sharing in the
didactic responsibil-
ities of academic
instruction, proctor-
ing exams, clinical
skills demonstration
and testing, OSCEs,
physical diagnosis
lab, as assigned by
the Program Dir.
Candidate will also
assist with Program
assessment, be will-
ing to travel, and
computer fluency is
required.
Send letter of inter-
est, CV, and 3 let-
ters of professional
reference to: PA
Search Committee,
Academic Affairs
Office, King’s Col-
lege, 133 N. River
St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18711. Materials
must be received by
July 1, 2012. No
electronic applica-
tions will be accept-
ed. Only complete
applications will be
reviewed.
King’s is a private,
Catholic, teaching
college of the liberal
arts and sciences
and pre-profession-
al programs spon-
sored by the Con-
gregation of Holy
Cross. It serves
over 2000 full-time
and 350 part-time
undergraduate stu-
dents and 300 grad-
uate students.
A rigorous core cur-
riculum provides the
foundation for all
majors. King’s is
committed to
recruiting a diverse
faculty and student
body and welcomes
applications from
persons of tradition-
ally under-repre-
sented groups. EOE
www.kings.edu and
http://departments.
kings.edu/paprog/
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
Sovereign is seek-
ing full time staff
members to work
Monday-Friday.
These are excel-
lent positions for
anyone seeking
facility services
work. General
cleaning, floor care,
restroom and a
variety of training
in all facets, will be
provided. You
need to be profes-
sional, have a sta-
ble work history,
valid license, clean
DMV and ability to
work between
Luzerne and Lack-
awanna areas.
Travel and mileage
also paid. Compa-
ny van also avail-
able.
APPLY ONLINE AT
WWW.SOVEREIGNCS.
COM. EOE AND DRUG
FREE WORKPLACE
Environmental
Cleaning Staff Needed
2ND SHIFT
4PM-12MID OR 5-1AM.
UP TO $11.00 DOE
Line up a place to live
in classified!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
We are growing
and we are looking
for Class A CDL
Route Delivery Dri-
vers. Core-Mark is
accepting
applications for
FULL TIME 3 OR
4 DAY WORK
WEEK - Mon thru
Fri - weekends
off!
This is ideal for
drivers who want
to be able to be
home with their
families.
We are a national
convenience store
distribution compa-
ny seeking full time
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS. We are a
national conven-
ience store distribu-
tion company seek-
ing full time CLASS A
CDL DRIVERS. Gen-
erous benefit pack-
age to include Med-
ical/Dental/Vision/ST
D/LTD and 401k.
$1,500 sign on
bonus as well as
Attendance/Safety
and Performance
Bonus programs
available. Annual
and merit increases.
Designed Route
Deliveries. Com-
pany provided uni-
form and work
boots. Guaranteed
40 hours/week.
WILL CONSIDER
RECENT DRIVING
SCHOOL GRADS!
Apply @
100 West End Rd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
570-823-6865
All applicants sub-
ject to pre-employ-
ment drug and
background check.
E.O.E
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Driver
Local Drivers
$2,000 SIGN ON BONUS
HOME EVERY DAY.
CDL A WITH HAZMAT
1 YEAR OTR. PM SHIFT
MONDAY - FRIDAY
877-628-3748
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
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548 Medical/Health
THE PITTSTON AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
is seeking applicants
for the following
position:
SCHOOL PHYSICIAN
All Students &
Sports Examina-
tions for the 2012-
2013 School Year
Salary to be deter-
mined by the Board
of School Directors.
All interested par-
ties are to submit a
letter of interest,
Act 34 and Act 151
Clearances & FBI
Fingerprinting to:
Deborah A.
Rachilla— Board
Secretary
Pittston Area
School District
5 Stout Street
Pittston, Pa 18640
Deadline For Sub-
mission: Wednes-
day, June 13, 2012
At 11:00 A.M.
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
FULL TIME
SURGICAL TECH
We need an LPN or
ST who will screen
patients for their
office visit as well as
assist the physician
in surgery.
FULL TIME
MD TECHNICIAN
Looking for an
experienced oph-
thalmic tech who
will screen patients
for their visit and
perform patient
testing. Ideal candi-
date will be a friend-
ly, calm person who
will constantly strive
to do accurate
work. Experience
and C.O.A. pre-
ferred. Ideal candi-
date must be avail-
able to travel and
rotate evenings &
weekends with our
team.
APPLY ONLINE:
www.icare
specialists.com
SUBMIT RESUME:
HR Dept.
703 Rutter Ave.
Kingston, PA 18704
Fax: 570-287-2434
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
TSR
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No Cold
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• Must be 16
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Please Call To
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EEO Employer
915 Manufactured
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941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
Very large,
remodeled, 2
bedroom
apartment, some
utilities & stove
included. Nice
backyard. Available
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$725.00 a month
Call 570-842-0740
no calls after 8pm.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Deluxe duplex, 2nd
floor, 3 bedrooms,
den, 1.5 bath, living
and dining rooms,
eat in kitchen , all
appliances+ wash-
er/dryer, carpeted,
A/C, garage, no
pets/smoking.
Lease required
570-287-1733
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
Carey’s Patch
Nice yard, quiet
area. 2 bedroom.
Carpeted. Washer /
dryer hookups. Gas
heat / water. $600 +
security & utilities.
570-821-7005
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
DOVER, Del. — Joey Logano had
wasted enough shots at winning Dover
to feel like he was on the brink of doing
it again.
Out in front for most of the race, Lo-
gano fell back after a four-tire pit stop,
paving the way for Ryan Truex to take
the lead.
Back in the pack, Logano wondered if
he’d blown another win at Dover.
“I was thinking the same thing was
happening today,” Logano said. “It fig-
ures.”
Logano instead powered his way to
the lead with six laps left when Truex
got mired in lapped traffic on Saturday
to win the Nationwide Series race at
Dover International Speedway.
“When you lead it and you think you
gave it away, and then you get it back
there at the end,” Logano said, “that’s
exciting.”
Truex started from the pole and
raced for the first time since he needed
an appendectomy nearly two weeks
ago. He had the top car toward the end
of the race until he got loose with less
than 10 laps left. Logano capitalized
and made the late charge outside
through a pair lapped drivers to zip past
Truex for his fourth Nationwide win of
the season.
“I’m not happy,” Truex said. “It’s sec-
ond and I should be happy with it, but
we had a winning car.”
Truex questioned where the spotters
were for the cars that got in his way on
the final laps and helped cost him the
victory on the Monster Mile. Truex fin-
ished second and Brian Scott third for a
1-2-3 finish for Joe Gibbs Racing.
Elliott Sadler took seventh and wrest-
ed the points lead away from Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. Stenhouse wrecked early
in the race and finished 32nd.
Truex felt sharp pain in his stomach
the afternoon of May 21 and was rushed
to the hospital. His appendix hadn’t
burst, but needed it to be removed.
He would have surrendered his ride
to his older brother, Cup driver Martin
Truex Jr., had he not been cleared to
compete.
Ryan Truex said he was 100 percent
and felt no discomfort around his stom-
ach.
Logano wins Nationwide Series race
By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joey Logano poses with his trophy
after winning the Nationwide Series
race at Dover International Speedway
on Saturday, in Dover, Del.
DOVER, Del. — Mark Martin has
more poles than candles on the birth-
day cake.
Not bad for a driver pushing limits in
a stock car long after so many elite ath-
letes have settled into retirement.
Martintookthelast qualifyingrideof
the day andturneda lapof 158.297mph
on Saturday to win the pole at Dover
International Speedway.
The 53-year-old Martin now has 54
career Sprint Cup poles and won it in
the No. 55 Toyota.
That 53-54-55 trifecta paid off big for
Martin on the Monster Mile. Even with
all those 50s, Martin is no golden oldie.
He has three poles this season in 10
races while racing a limited schedule
for Michael Waltrip Racing. He’s look-
ing for his first Cup win Sunday since
2009.
“I feel like a lucky guy to be strapping
in that 55,” Martin said.
Waltrip was among the first to greet
Martin after the winning lap.
“I’m so proud of you. That’s amaz-
ing,” Waltrip told him.
Martin has turned into a driver-for-
hire over the latter stages of a career
that has seen him do it all except win a
Cup championship. He spent the past
three seasons with Hendrick Motor-
sports, but changedteams inthe offsea-
son, joiningWaltripfor a partial season.
Martin is slated to run 24 of 36 races
this season while sharing seat time
with Waltrip. He has four top-10 finish-
es over his first nine races andwas third
at Texas.
“They’re learning about me, I’m
learning about them, and we’re having
a blast,” Martin said.
Jimmie Johnson, who was six career
wins at Dover, was poised to earn the
top spot with a lap of 158.263 mph until
Martin knocked him off.
Johnson heard some good-natured
razzingfromdriver Matt Kensethinthe
garage as they waited for the rest of the
field to qualify.
“It was the purple balloons! It was
the purple balloons!” Kenseth shouted.
Johnson was briefly confused about
the good-luck charm until he realized
he hadballoons onhis firesuit as part of
his one-race deal to promote the talk-
ing-animal movie, “Madagascar 3: Eu-
rope’s Most Wanted.”
Johnsonhas yet towinapolethis sea-
son. Ryan Newman, Clint Bowyer and
Kenseth round out the top five. Points
leader Greg Biffle starts seventh.
Johnson, who won the All-Star race
in Charlotte, wants to keep Hendrick
Motorsports’ recent of runof strongfin-
ishes going at Dover. Johnson and
teammate Kasey Kahne won the last
two Cup races. Teammates Jeff Gordon
starts 14th and Dale Earnhardt Jr. is
17th.
“We don’t want tolet the boss down,”
Johnson said of Rick Hendrick. “We
want to get all four in the Chase.”
Martin has five poles to go with his
five wins onthe1-mile concrete track at
Dover.
Martin is as physically fit and dedi-
cated to healthy eating and clean living
as any other driver in the garage. His
lifestyle has played as much a critical
part of extending a Cup career that
dates to 1981.
“I’mgoingtohavetolookintohis die-
tary intake and start eating what he
does before qualifying, because it’s
been working,” Newman said. “He’s al-
ways been an awesome qualifier.”
Martin, who turned 53 in January,
won his first NASCAR race at Dover in
1987 on the second-tier circuit now
known as the Nationwide Series.
Joey Logano, who starts 11th, was
born in 1990.
“You couldn’t get a ride when you
were Joey Logano’s age when I was
coming in,” Martin said. “You had to
wait for Bobby Allison or Richard Petty
or Cale Yarborough or somebody to
step aside because there were only sev-
en, eight, nine or 10 good cars.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Driver Mark Martin poses with the flag after he won the pole during qualifying
for Sunday’s Sprint Cup race Saturday in Dover, Del.
Cagey vet Martin
wins pole at Dover
By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
DETROIT — Scott Dixon won his
first pole of the year, snapping Penske
Racing’s streak of having the fastest car
in IndyCar qualifying this season.
Dixon hopes the favorable position
—thanks to clocking a track recordof 1
minute, 10.3162 seconds Saturday —
will help him snap a five-race winless
skid this year.
It certainly should help the two-time
series champion’s chances to win the
28th race of his career at the Detroit
Grand Prix, where a slick and tight
2.07-mile course isn’t known for much
maneuvering. The past two races on
Belle Isle, in 2008 and 2007, had just
nine lead changes combined when Jus-
tin Wilson and Tony Kanaan won.
“It’s one of the toughest tracks we
come to as far as passing,” Dixon said
after earning his 18th career pole. “It’s
definitely a handful to get around here.
“It’s a funtrack, but manit’s crazy out
there.
Penske’s Will Power, the IndyCar
points leader, will start Sunday’s race
alongside Dixon in the front row, Alex
Tagliani will begin a season-best third
with Simon Pagenaud fourth.
Dixon gave Chip Ganassi Racing its
first pole this year andhopes togive the
team its second straight win.
It will be tough for
Dario Franchitti to do
it.
The reigning Indi-
anapolis 500 cham-
pion and Ganassi
driver will start 15th
in the 25-car field. He
blamed Ed Carpen-
ter’s sputtering car and questionable
tactics for getting in his way and slow-
ing him down in qualifying.
“When a faster car does come up, get
the hell out of the road,” Franchitti said.
“At some point, whenwe’re inthat posi-
tion we can return the favor.”
Franchitti, though, acknowledged it
might be difficult to get payback by
winningaracethat doesn’t lenditself to
passing.
“There’s going to be a lot of aggres-
sion fromeveryone back there,” he said
Franchitti started his last race 16th
and finished in front, winning his third
signature race in open-wheel racing af-
ter making an Indianapolis 500-record
35th lead change.
Dixon finished second to Franchitti
for the sixth time in his career last Sun-
day and was a runner-up for the third
time in five races this season. He led 44
laps at the Indy 500 and exchanged
leads with Franchitti 10 times during
the last 60 laps.
Dixon charges to front starting
spot of Detroit IndyCar field
By LARRY LAGE
AP Sports Writer
Dixon
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 11C
➛ S P O R T S
NOW OPEN
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steps and maintaining my balance. My feet would swell and hurt so
bad that even a blanket on them would be painful. It limited me
because I couldn’t walk even in my bare feet. Now I can walk in my
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top notch
Strength and Speed techniques
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Kirby Park Wilkes-Barre, PA
10:00am to 2:00pm
For Registration Call 570-823-6994
Division One Athletics.com & Fitness
Headquarters
will be hosting a Sports Performance
Seminar on June 23rd at Kirby Park
Wilkes-Barre, PA.
Speaker: Rick Scarpulla
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Invitees,
5 student athletes that have a good chance
at college sports will be invited from each
school along with the strength coach or
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Now through 7-8-12
Come rain
or shine next
Sunday, Main
Street in Lu-
zerne will
transform into

Well, it
won’t exactly be a stage of the
Tour de France, but hey, you
will be able to get a funnel cake
and watch some bike races.
What could be better than
that?
That’s all because the small
borough that is home to some
of the better hot spots in
Northeastern Pennsylvania will
be hosting the second annual
Luzerne Criterium and Festival
presented by the Upstate Velo
Club.
Paul Lukas, president of the
Upstate Velo Club, credited
Luzerne with being, “a progres-
sive little town” for hosting the
event.
In addition to food vendors
and bicycle racing, there will
be live music.
All in all, it makes Luzerne
the place to be next Sunday if
you are a cyclist, fan of bike
racing or just enjoy a good
time.
The event will feature races
for the youngest beginner to
the state’s top riders.
The racing, which begins at
noon, is expected to bring out
a top-notch group of racers,
including some pros, according
to Phil Cable of Fawcett Cy-
cling.
“Pennsylvania is a hot bed of
cycling,” Cable said.
Cable said he expects at
least 500 riders total to show
up nine different divisions of
racing.
It doesn’t hurt the turnout
that the races are part of the
Pennsylvania BAR season. The
BAR series is a season-long
points series that allows riders
of different classes and cate-
gories to compete in a state-
wide basis.
The racing begins at noon
with a Cat 4 21-mile race, fol-
lowed by the Pro123 40-miler.
The Jack Williams Youth
Challenge races begin at 3 p.m.
And the whole day will wrap
up sometime in the evening,
depending on how the other
races run, with a women’s open
25-miler.
For a complete race sched-
ule, go to nepacycling.com.
If you plan on racing, regis-
tration opens at 10:30 a.m. and
closes 15 minutes before start
times for each individual race
or you can preregister at bike-
reg.com.
If you are just going to watch
the races and enjoy the food
and music, there is no need to
register to eat a funnel cake.
Confusion at the Giro
It’s been a weird season
already in Europe.
First Levi Leipheimer lost
out on a chance to win the
Paris-Nice race when he ran
into a police motorcycle that
was parked around a blind
corner on the course.
Now, last week Taylor Phin-
ney lost a chance to win the
final time trial in the Giro
d’Italia when he took a wrong
turn that led the American
rider off course.
It’s kind of like Joe West
being named home plate um-
pire for Game 1 of World Series
and running out to center field
at the start of the game.
The mishap may be doubly
painful for Phinney, the son of
well-known American rider
Davis Phinney and Olympic
gold medalist Connie Carpen-
ter-Phinney, who was hoping to
use a strong finish to impress
USA Cycling and earn the last
spot on the Olympic time trial
team.
Phinney’s main competition
for that spot, Dave Zabriske,
was busy winning his seventh
national time trial title while
Phinney was having his prob-
lems in Europe.
Should be interesting to see
who USA Cycling selects.
Upcoming rides
Just a quick reminder that
the Heritage Explorer Bike
Tour in Peckville and the
American Cancer Society’s
Endure for a Cure ride are
approaching.
The Heritage Ride is sched-
uled for June 16. You can find
more information about it at
www.HeritageExplorer.org.
Endure for the Cure is sched-
uled for Aug. 12. You can find
more information about it at
acsendure.org.
Cycling’s new home at TL
We have a new one-stop
shopping spot for all your
cycling news at www.timeslea-
der.com.
Our cycling page is finally up
and running on our website.
We will keep it updated with
all the local, national and in-
ternational cycling news you
need. (And all my Cycling
Scene columns.)
To view the page, simply go
to www.timesleader.com, then
hover your cursor over
“Sports” and then click on
“Cycling.”
Be sure to bookmark the
page.
A day of races
set for Luzerne
Joe Soprano is a page designer for
The Times Leader and an avid
cyclist. His Cycling Scene column
appears every other Sunday. Reach
him at jsoprano@timesleader.com
or 829-7164.
JOE SOPRANO
C Y C L I N G S C E N E
A nose. That’s all that
separated Real Quiet from
racing immortality. He was
beaten by the smallest of
margins in the 1998 Belmont
Stakes, the longest and
toughest leg of thoroughbred
racing’s Triple Crown.
Affirmed was the last to
sweep the Kentucky Derby,
Preakness and Belmont, 34
years ago. Since then, 11
horses have won the first two
only to come up short in the
Belmont, felled by a safety
pin picked up in a stall, a
stumble out of the gate or a
jockey’s judgment.
Nowit’s I’ll Have Another’s
turn to try to become the
12th Triple Crown winner.
The chestnut colt chased
down pacesetter Bodemeis-
ter in the final 100 yards to
win the Kentucky Derby on
May 5. Two weeks later, he
surged past Bodemeister a
fewyards fromthe finish line
in the Preakness to win by a
neck.
Bodemeister won’t be back
to challenge I’ll Have Anoth-
er in the Belmont. But 10
other rivals are likely, in-
cluding Derby also-rans
Dullahan, Optimizer and
Union Rags. The others are
horses that skipped one or
both of the first two legs,
leaving themwell-rested for
the 1
1
⁄2 mile run around the
deep, sandy dirt track.
“It ain’t like the old days
where everyone used to run
in all three,” said Hall of
Fame jockey Mike Smith,
who is 1 for 13 in the Bel-
mont. “It’s taxing on the
horse to run in all three. If
somebody is hiding behind
the bushes waiting to jump
you when they’re all fresh,
they can beat you.”
Smith will be aboard one of
the fresh ones in next Sat-
urday’s Belmont. He’ll ride
Paynter, who skipped the
Derby and Preakness.
Nineteen times since 1944
horses have come to the
Belmont with a chance to
win the Triple Crown.
Big Brown was the last
horse to take a shot in 2008.
But he bombed out in the
Belmont, mysteriously get-
ting eased at the top of the
stretch and leaving nearly
95,000 fans stunned at the
sight of the colt with the bad
feet failing to finish.
The final 1
1
⁄2 miles on the
Triple Crown trail can do a
number on a horse, trainer
and jockey.
Sometimes, a horse finds
trouble in his own stall.
On the morning of the
1979 Belmont, a safety pin
was discovered embedded in
Spectacular Bid’s hoof. He
didn’t appear lame, so he ran
in the race. His teenage jock-
ey, Ron Franklin, gunned the
colt to the early lead before
he eventually faded to third.
Silver Charmin1997, Real
Quiet in1998 and Smarty
Jones in 2004 were the only
three since Affirmed’s victory
to lose by a length or less.
In Real Quiet’s case, he
owned a five-length lead with
a quarter-mile left in the
Belmont. Victory Gallop,
second in the Derby and the
Preakness, moved up on Real
Quiet and jockey Kent Des-
ormeaux. The horses crossed
the wire in a photo finish, but
Victory Gallop got his nose in
front. A stride past the finish
line, Real Quiet had regained
the lead.
“I thought he won it,” said
Bob Baffert, the Hall of Fame
trainer who had his hopes
dashed with both Silver
Charmand Real Quiet.
In1997, Baffert watched
fromthe stands as Silver
Charmfought off Free House
for the lead with a quarter-
mile to go and appeared to
have clear sailing to the wire.
Then Touch Gold made a
move on the far outside.
Jockey Gary Stevens didn’t
see his rival and Silver
Charmwas beaten by three-
quarters of a length.
When the gates sprang
open in the 2002 Belmont
and War Emblemnearly fell
to his knees, Baffert knewhis
horse was doomed.
The winner was 70-1 shot
Sarava. War Emblemcame
home in eighth, beaten by
19
1
⁄2 lengths.
Smarty Jones may have
moved too soon. The small
black colt had trouble relax-
ing with horses on either side
of him. So jockey Stewart
Elliott guided himinto the
lead entering the backstretch
with a mile remaining.
Around the far turn, Smar-
ty Jones led by nearly four
lengths before Birdstone
came flying past himin the
stretch and left Smarty with a
one-length defeat.
Birdstone’s trainer, Nick
Zito, and owner, Marylou
Whitney, both apologized
afterward for spoiling the
Smarty Party.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Belmont Stakes is end of grueling trio
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Funny Cide, second from right, with jockey Jose Santos, leads the field along the back
stretch during the Belmont Stakes on June 7, 2003. From left are Supervisor, with jockey
John Velazquez; Ten Most Wanted, with Pat Day up; Empire Maker, with Jerry Bailey up;
Dynever with Edgar Prado up; Funny Cide; and Scrimshaw, with with Gary Stevens up.
The stretch run
By BETH HARRIS
AP Racing Writer
Belmont Stakes
Saturday, June 9
TV: NBC, 4:30 p.m.
MONTGOMERY, Ala. —Play-
ers testing positive for marijuana
in the mighty Southeastern Con-
ference do not face the one-year
suspension that comes from get-
ting busted by the NCAA.
In the most successful league
of the BCS-era, players routinely
get third, fourth and even fifth
chances before they’re booted
from the team; failed drug tests
administered by the NCAA re-
sult in the automatic suspension.
The finding comes froman As-
sociated Press examination of
the drug policies at 11 current
members of the SEC. Vanderbilt,
a private institution, declined to
make its rules available.
All the SEC schools the AP
looked at had far more lenient
drug policies than the NCAA,
though the penalties varied
widely.
The NCAA conducts its own
drug checks and leaves testing
policies to the schools, but the
governing body released a report
in January saying that more than
a quarter of college football play-
ers admitted in 2009 that they
smoked marijuana in the previ-
ous year.
Just how many suspensions
for recreational drug use are
handed down in the SEC or any
NCAA-affiliated conference is
unknown because privacy rules
prohibit schools from disclosing
positive tests. They’re not even
required to tell the NCAA.
However, several SEC stand-
outs have been in the news re-
cently.
Former Auburn running back
Mike Dyer testified in an April
court case involving a teammate
that he consistently smoked syn-
thetic marijuana during his Ti-
gers career, LSU star Tyrann
Mathieu was suspended one
game for violating the team’s
drug policy last year and Georgia
All-America safety Bacarri Ram-
bo could miss a game or two
next season for failing a drug
test.
Ole Miss athletic director Ross
Bjork, who was hired in March,
is hoping to strengthen his
school’s policy by the middle of
the summer. Currently, a second
positive test at Mississippi might
simply mean the loss of free tick-
ets for family and/or community
service.
A third positive requires sus-
pension for three games or
events. Subsequent violations
call for three games tacked onto
that, though the athletic director
and head coach can dismiss the
athlete or opt not to renew the
scholarship.
“We need to tighten it up quite
a bit and come up with a good
policy for everyone involved,”
Bjork said.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
Rules have
SEC looking
like dopes
League’s marijuana policices
are far more lenient that
those enforced by NCAA.
By JOHN ZENOR
AP Sports Writer
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
THE RED ROCK CHAPTER OF
THE NATIONAL WILD TUR-
KEY FEDERATION is once
again preparing for its annual
Hunting Heritage Banquet/
Auction. This year the event was
moved from February to July
and to a new location.
This year’s event will be held on
July 14 at Konefals Grove on
Chase Road in the outdoor
facility, complete with a picnic
style dinner, casual dress and
relaxing atmosphere.
Doors will open at 5 p.m. and
attendees will have a chance to
visit and play the raffles before
dinner. Once again this year
several guns will be auctioned,
including a Milnium 40 cal., a
Mossberg .308 Night train and
several others. A women’s table,
silent auction and the live
auction and Sportsman Raffle
will also be held.
Cost for the event is $60 per
person which includes one meal
and membership, $85 per
couple which includes two
meals and one membership. A
sponsor price is also available.
If you cannot attend and would like
to renew membership you may
also do that. For more informa-
tion contact Chris at 696-2406
or bowhuntergirl@frontier.com.
Donations are also being sought
for ads for the program, under-
writes and items to be used as
door prizes, for the silent auc-
tion or the women’s table.
Money raised at the event goes
toward preserving our hunting
heritage, scholarship program,
JAKES events, planting projects
for wildlife and much more.
NESCOPECK STATE PARK will
host the following events in
June (for more information or
to register call 403-2006):
Saturday, June 9 – National Get
Outdoors Day Hike; 9-10 a.m.
(Meet at the Lupine Trailhead)
Saturday, June 9 – Whip-poor-wills;
8-9 p.m. (Meet at park office,
then carpool)
Saturday, June 16 – Morning Bird
Walk; 8-10 a.m. (Meet at the
wooden bridge by the park
office)
HICKORY RUN STATE PARK
NATURALIST MEGAN TAY-
LOR will host a hike on State
Game Lands 141 on June 8. The
hike is the fourth in the 2012
Hickory Run State Park Hiking
Series. The easy 2.5 mile hike
begins at 9 a.m.
To reach the meeting point, from
Route 903 between Albrights-
ville and Jim Thorpe, turn onto
Church Road at Bear Mountain
Butterflies. Turn left onto Beh-
rens Road at the stop sign. Turn
right into the large State Game
Lands 141 parking area.
The entire series will cover 43
miles of trails on a variety of
public lands. Come out to get
some exercise while exploring
your natural areas, learning
about the natural history along
the trail, and relaxing in the
fresh air.
On June 27, Taylor will host a 2.5
mile hike on the Shades of
Death and San Spring Trails
Loop in Hickory Run. The hike
will begin at 9 a.m. and is con-
sidered difficult due to some
steep, rocky areas that may be
wet. Highlights include beech/
maple forests, a creek crossing
and the stunning cascades
along Sand Spring Run.
For more information, contact
Taylor at hickoryrunen-
vedsp@pa.gov or 403-2006.
COLUMBIA COUNTY BASSMAS-
TERS, in partnership with the
Columbia County Commission-
ers, Borough of Berwick and
Columbia-Montour Visitors
Bureau, is hosting its third
annual Bassmasters Fishing
Tournament at the Berwick Test
Track Park Boat Launch the
weekend of June 23-24. There
will be cash prizes in the
amount of $12,500 for the
tournament, with the first place
team winning $5,000; and
paying 10 places.
In addition, each day a $500
lunker will be awarded, with the
first day “lunker” winner auto-
matically advancing to the
second day. A $100 gift certif-
icate will be awarded each day
to the second-place lunker. And
for junior fishermen (16 and
under), a $100 award will be
given on Sunday for the overall
junior lunker.
There is a strict 100 boat limit, with
two fishermen per boat. Cost is
$140 per boat and breakfast and
a free T-shirt are provided. The
boundaries on the Susquehanna
River extend from the Danville/
Riverside bridge to the Nanti-
coke bridge.
Applications, including all tourna-
ment rules, can be downloaded
from the Columbia-Montour
Visitors Bureaus website,
www.iTourColumbiaMon-
tour.com/Bassmasters, or the
Columbia County Bassmasters
website, www.ColumbiaCounty-
Bassmasters.com.
For more information, call Mike
“Chuck” Monico at 752-3223.
Outdoors news items will not
be accepted over the tele-
phone. Items may be faxed to
831-7319, dropped off at the
Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N,
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250.
OUT DOORS
NEWS
I
t wasn’t a fancy press release. There
was no logo, graphic, computer-
generated font or uniform spacing
between each sentence.
But the handwritten message con-
tained on the sheet of paper was as
important as anything I’ve seen on any
press release.
It was dropped off by a reader last
week. The handwriting – all capitals,
was crude yet full of thought. The
author of the note put a lot of time and
passion into each handwritten word.
It was written by Jack Harris. He
lives in Scranton and appreciates the
outdoors as much as anyone I know.
Harris is the author of a book, “Be-
yond My Wildest Dreams,” which
chronicles his lifetime of adventures in
the Alaskan wilderness, Galapagos
Islands and other locales around the
world.
Through his travels, Harris’ love of
the outdoors grew exponentially.
So did his disdain for any action that
would harm it, including litter.
That’s why Harris took the time to
handwrite his own press release and
drop it off last week. The release con-
tains a simple request: pick up litter.
Harris is asking people to pick up at
least one piece of litter every day. And
he’s not just including his hometown of
Scranton or even Northeast Pennsylva-
nia.
Harris is taking his anti-litter crusade
worldwide, and dubbed his cause
“Jack’s International Litter-Up Founda-
tion” (read more at Harris’ website,
www.jackswildlifedreams.com).
It’s a tremendously lofty goal on a
scale too large to grasp.
But what can it hurt?
Best of all, Harris is leading by exam-
ple.
Daily devotion
He wrote that, for the last several
years, he has picked up at least one
piece of litter every day during his
daily walks around his home in Scran-
ton.
When he sees a recycling container
nearby, Harris will scan the area for a
plastic bottle or aluminum can and toss
it in.
“Every time I drop something in, I
know I have done more than talk about
the environment,” Harris wrote.
“It has become an obsession for me.”
It’s a good obsession to have.
We’ve all seen the litter that mars the
sides of area roadways. It’s become so
common that a stretch of road without
litter catches my attention more than
one lined with trash.
But the littering problem isn’t limit-
ed to roads.
We’ve all seen it scattered through
farm fields, along streams and in the
woods.
Empty beer cans, candy bar wrap-
pers and plastic shopping bags – you
can find it anywhere.
I’ve even come across litter in some
of the most remote expanses in the
area, including State Game Lands 57 in
Wyoming County. It’s a place so des-
olate and wild that being there con-
jures up feelings of being in a true
wilderness.
But that feeling is smashed by reality
when one comes upon a wrapper, can
or other litter left behind by someone
who doesn’t share the same apprecia-
tion for an otherwise pristine place.
Sure, Harris set a lofty goal with his
international campaign against litter-
ing.
But it’s a goal that we should all
share and strive to achieve.
And it starts by simply picking up
the trash that others leave behind.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
A campaign
for ‘Litter-Up’
benefits all
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com.
Pennsylvania trappers could have a new
species to pursue in the near future.
The Pennsylvania Game Commissionis
embarking on a pair of initiatives that
could lay the groundwork for a river otter
trapping season in the northeast and pos-
sibly other parts of the state.
This July, the Game Commission will
partner with Penn State University to
study population monitoring and abun-
dance of otters in the northeast part of the
state. At the same time, the agency is also
working on a draft management plan for
river otters – a step that is typically taken
before a season is proposed.
“We’re looking for an otter season in the
future, but several steps have to be taken
first,” said agency spokesman Jerry Feas-
er, referring to the study and draft man-
agement plan. “In some areas they’re do-
ing very well.”
The northeast is one of those areas, ac-
cording to Barry Warner, public relations
director for the Pennsylvania Trapper’s
Association, which supports the creation
of an otter season. Warner is a former di-
rector of the PGC’s Northeast Region of-
fice. In the early 2000s, Warner said, the
agency trappedotters inthe northeast and
relocated them in other areas of the state.
“We have such a good population here
that we were sharing them with other ar-
eas,” Warner said. “You can find otter
signs on just about any streamhere. I have
full confidence that we have a population
that could sustain a season.”
Feaser said if the draft management
plan is completed in time for the agency’s
board meeting in the fall, a public com-
ment period will follow. The plan may not
include specifics for a season, and such a
recommendation would have to be ap-
proved by the board.
The upcoming study and management
plan aren’t the only two factors indicating
an otter season may be on the horizon.
Numbers kept by the PGCalso indicate
the otter population is increasing in some
areas.
According to the agency’s Bureau of
Wildlife Management annual report for
July 2010 – June 2011, otters occupied 91
percent of the Wildlife Conservation Offi-
cer districts in the state in 2010. In 1995,
otters occupied 51 percent of WCO dis-
tricts.
That expansion is just one reason why
Warner feels a season is warranted. He
said a limited trapping season would al-
low trappers to utilize those otters that
are caught in beaver sets each year and
must be turned over to the Game Com-
mission.
“It’s very frustrating to see incidental
catches each year and trappers not able to
utilize them,” Warner said, adding he has
had two incidental otter captures in bea-
ver sets.
In 2010, there were 51 incidental otter
captures in the state – the highest figure
since the PGC starting keeping track in
1995. In that year there were 15 incidental
captures. In the northeast region there
were four incidental otter captures during
the 2010-11 beaver season, and one road-
kill.
As far as season details, Warner advised
it would be best to start out small and
monitor the harvest closely.
“It could be a season based on a limited
harvest number, a limited amount of time
or restricted to certain areas,” Warner
said. “We don’t want a permit system,
however, because it’s very burdening.”
Warner also acknowledged that a pro-
posed otter season could generate opposi-
tion from groups opposed to trapping.
The Game Commission faced a similar
scenario when they proposed a bobcat
season in 2000 and were faced with law-
suits from groups trying to stop the ac-
tion.
“All court decisions ruled in our favor
and we haven’t heard much about it since
then,” Feaser said.
Easing concerns about an otter trap-
ping season is another reason why such a
proposal would need to be implemented
slowly and monitored closely, Warner
said.
“Start out small,” he said. “We do have
respect for the resource and we want to
see it managed and utilized correctly. We
have to establish a limited season and go
from there.”
Time may be right for a river otter season in state
HAL KORBER/PENNSYLVANIA GAME COMMISSION
River otter populations have been expanding across the state, and the northeast is considered a stronghold.
Catch-and-keep on horizon
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com Otter captures
Reported incidental otter captures
statewide:
1995 – 15
1996 – 15
1997 – 31
1998 – 26
1999 – 30
2000 – 35
2001 – 25
2002 – 27
2003 – 26
2004 – 42
2005 – 50
2006 – 44
2007 – 57
2008 – 47
2009 – 36
2010 – 51
The Pennsylvania Game Commission will partner with Penn State this summer to
study river otter populations in the northeast. An otter trapping season could be
proposed in the future.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 13C
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Poachers plead guilty
Three Northumberland Coun-
ty residents pled guilty last
week for an array of wildlife
crimes committed during a
two-day spree in Montour, Ly-
coming and Columbia counties.
Those agreeing to guilty pleas
were Codey Jonathan Bomberg-
er, 18, of Watsontown, and Jus-
tin Thomas Munson, 18, and
Mathew Jay Stoltzfus, 19, both
of Turbotville. District Judge
Marvin K. Shrawder presided
over the case, and Montour
District Attorney Rebecca War-
ren prosecuted the three indi-
viduals.
All violations stemmed from
incidents that occurred on the
evening of Nov. 23 and the early
morning hours of Nov. 24.
An investigation conducted
by Northumberland/Montour
wildlife conservation officer
Ricky A. Deiterich revealed that
Bomberger, Munson, Stoltzfus
and an unnamed juvenile set out
in a silver Ford F-150 on a deer
killing spree on the evening of
Nov. 23, that started in Turbot-
ville. The group possessed a
spotlight and a .243-caliber
hunting rifle.
According to the investiga-
tion, Bomberger drove the truck
while Munson, Stoltzfus and the
unnamed juvenile were pas-
sengers. From around 11:30 p.m.
on Nov. 23, until around 3 a.m.
on Nov. 24, the vehicle traveled
on several roads in the three
counties, as the occupants shot
at deer. Evidence showed that
several deer were killed while
others were wounded and ran
off.
The shooting began on Walti-
myer Road in Montour County,
where an antlerless deer was
killed. Other antlered and an-
tlerless deer were killed or
wounded along Fox Hollow,
Dennon Hill, Fairview, Muncy
Exchange and County Line
roads. Additional deer were
killed or wounded in Lycoming
County along Ridge Road and G
Wagner Road. As the individuals
entered Columbia County via G
Wagner Road, they shot at more
deer on Shetler Road. After
traveling back to Montour
County, an antlerless deer was
shot and killed on Walburn
Road.
Munson and the juvenile were
eventually dropped off in Tur-
botville, while Bomberger and
Stoltzfus traveled back to Ridge
Road in Lycoming County to
retrieve one antlerless deer,
which was dumped in a ditch in
Union County on Thanksgiving
Day.
A total of five antlerless and
four antlered deer were con-
firmed killed, while countless
others were likely wounded.
Bomberger pled guilty to two
counts each of misdemeanor
and first-degree misdemeanor
violations involving the un-
lawful killing or taking of big
game, and 40 counts of sum-
mary violations, including 10
counts each of loaded firearms
in vehicles, unlawful use of
lights while hunting, restric-
tions on recreational spotlight-
ing, shooting on or across high-
ways, and hunting through the
use of a motorized vehicle. He
was sentenced to pay $7,000 in
fines for all summary violations,
and received two years proba-
tion for misdemeanor viola-
tions.
Munson pled guilty to two
counts each of misdemeanor
and first-degree misdemeanor
violations involving the killing
or taking of big game, and 32
counts of summary violations,
including unlawful use of lights
while hunting, restrictions on
recreational spotlighting, shoot-
ing on or across highways, and
hunting through the use of a
motorized vehicle. He was or-
dered to pay $4,850 in fines, and
received two years probation for
misdemeanor violations.
Stoltzfus agreed to plead
guilty to two counts each of
misdemeanor and first-degree
misdemeanor violations in-
volving the killing or taking of
big game, and 26 counts of
loaded firearms in vehicles,
unlawful use of lights while
hunting, restrictions on recre-
ational spotlighting, shooting on
or across highways, and hunting
through the use of a motorized
vehicle. He was sentenced to
pay $4,200 in fines, and will
receive two years probation for
misdemeanor violations.
Licenses on sale June 11
Beginning Monday, June 11,
Pennsylvania hunting and fur-
taker licenses for the 2012-13
seasons will go on sale. Licenses
will be available through the
Game Commission’s Pennsylva-
nia Automated License System
(PALS), over-the-counter at all
Game Commission region offic-
es and the Harrisburg head-
quarters, as well as the more
than 600 in-state and out-of-
state issuing agents. Licenses
also are available through the
PALS website: https://
www.pa.wildlifelicense.com.
Report gobbler harvest
With the conclusion of spring
gobbler season last week, Penn-
sylvania Game Commission
executive director Carl G. Roe
reminds hunters who harvested
a spring gobbler to report their
harvest using any one of the
three methods offered by the
agency.
While spring gobbler hunters
using their general hunting
license only must report if they
harvested a bird, Roe empha-
sized that the more than 13,000
hunters who purchased a sec-
ond spring gobbler license have
a mandatory reporting require-
ment, regardless of whether
they harvested a bird using this
special license.
“Hunters can report both
harvests or no harvest of their
special spring gobbler license
through the agency’s website,
through the toll-free telephone
reporting system, or by using
one of the pre-paid postage
cards for turkey that appear in
the annual Pennsylvania Hunt-
ing and Trapping Digest provid-
ed free to each license buyer,”
Roe said. “Harvest reporting
rates have been declining for
years, and we’re hoping these
three reporting options make it
easier for hunters to become
more active in wildlife manage-
ment and that reporting rates
improve.”
To report online, go to the
Game Commission’s website
(www.pgc.state.pa.us), click on
“Report Your Harvest” in the
upper right-hand corner, click
on “You can link to PALS by
clicking here,” check “Harvest
Reporting,” scroll down and
click on the “Start Here” button
at the bottom of the page,
choose the method of validating
license information, and click on
the checkbox for the harvest tag
being reported. A series of op-
tions will appear for a hunter to
report. After filling in the in-
formation, click on the “Contin-
ue” button to review the report
and then hit the “Submit” but-
ton to complete the report.
Failing to hit the “Submit” but-
ton will result in a harvest re-
port not being completed. Also
at the end of the process, hun-
ters will be presented with a
receipt page that they are en-
couraged to print for their re-
cords.
Hunters using the toll-free
telephone reporting system can
call the Interactive Voice Re-
sponse (IVR) number, which is
855-PAHUNT1 (855-724-8681).
Those using the toll-free num-
ber will receive a confirmation
number, which they should
write down and keep as proof of
reporting. Callers should have
their Customer Identification
Number (hunting license num-
ber) and harvest or hunting
information with them when
they call.
OUTDOOR NEWS
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 67/56
Average 74/53
Record High 94 in 1919
Record Low 38 in 2003
Yesterday 0
Month to date 0
Year to date 94
Last year to date 94
Normal year to date 35
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.09”
Month to date 0.84”
Normal month to date 0.27”
Year to date 14.32”
Normal year to date 14.07”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 3.16 0.60 22.0
Towanda 2.05 0.26 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.34 0.07 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 69-76. Lows: 51-53. Showers and
thunderstorms will develop today, then
expect showers overnight.
The Poconos
Highs: 76-79. Lows: 57-60. There may be
an isolated thunderstorm late today.
Showers will be possible tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 64-70. Lows: 48-54. Showers and a
few thunderstorms will be likely today,
and showers will continue into tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 76-79. Lows: 54-60. Isolated thun-
derstorms may form late today. Expect a
few showers overnight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 78-80. Lows: 57-63. Expect isolated
late-day thunderstorms. A few showers
will be possible overnight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 61/44/.00 57/44/sh 60/45/pc
Atlanta 80/55/trace 87/66/pc 90/69/t
Baltimore 74/57/.00 79/62/sh 73/57/t
Boston 61/55/.70 70/55/pc 57/51/sh
Buffalo 65/51/.04 64/53/sh 66/56/sh
Charlotte 76/57/.00 84/59/pc 86/63/pc
Chicago 76/49/.00 80/61/pc 75/57/sh
Cleveland 73/49/.00 71/55/sh 70/56/pc
Dallas 95/72/.00 93/72/pc 93/73/pc
Denver 87/51/.00 89/58/pc 89/60/pc
Detroit 74/48/.00 74/57/sh 73/55/pc
Honolulu 82/72/.00 85/72/s 85/72/s
Houston 94/68/.00 94/74/pc 94/76/pc
Indianapolis 72/48/.00 78/62/pc 79/61/sh
Las Vegas 103/83/.00 102/80/s 99/73/s
Los Angeles 69/62/.00 67/60/pc 67/58/pc
Miami 88/76/.09 91/76/pc 91/76/pc
Milwaukee 75/48/.00 79/56/pc 71/52/sh
Minneapolis 75/54/.00 81/62/c 83/60/pc
Myrtle Beach 81/70/.00 82/69/s 85/69/pc
Nashville 77/48/.00 86/68/pc 84/68/t
New Orleans 87/65/.00 92/74/s 91/75/pc
Norfolk 73/65/.50 82/62/pc 82/64/pc
Oklahoma City 85/54/.30 90/71/pc 90/70/pc
Omaha 81/53/.00 85/67/t 86/64/pc
Orlando 91/71/.00 93/74/s 95/75/pc
Phoenix 106/79/.00 104/75/s 101/76/s
Pittsburgh 67/50/.00 73/51/t 69/47/pc
Portland, Ore. 65/57/.01 64/53/c 61/50/sh
St. Louis 79/55/.00 85/67/pc 87/65/t
Salt Lake City 93/64/.00 88/66/pc 89/61/pc
San Antonio 91/72/.00 94/75/pc 95/75/pc
San Diego 64/59/.00 66/60/pc 67/60/pc
San Francisco 66/53/.00 68/51/pc 59/49/sh
Seattle 65/53/.01 65/51/pc 60/52/sh
Tampa 87/75/.00 91/72/pc 92/74/pc
Tucson 102/70/.00 100/72/s 101/71/s
Washington, DC 74/61/.00 79/60/pc 76/58/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 61/43/.00 56/49/sh 58/47/c
Baghdad 100/72/.00 104/78/s 109/77/s
Beijing 84/61/.00 88/71/sh 89/72/pc
Berlin 61/43/.04 63/54/pc 62/48/c
Buenos Aires 70/59/.00 57/42/pc 53/42/pc
Dublin 59/54/.00 52/47/sh 58/48/pc
Frankfurt 70/52/.00 68/61/sh 69/49/sh
Hong Kong 88/79/.00 83/78/t 85/78/t
Jerusalem 91/66/.00 88/63/s 82/56/s
London 66/54/.00 55/50/sh 62/47/sh
Mexico City 82/55/.00 76/51/t 75/53/t
Montreal 61/54/.00 67/56/sh 66/48/sh
Moscow 68/43/.00 54/42/sh 64/44/pc
Paris 79/54/.00 63/59/c 68/42/sh
Rio de Janeiro 84/72/.00 86/66/pc 88/68/pc
Riyadh 104/82/.00 105/81/s 106/79/s
Rome 77/61/.00 74/63/pc 74/57/t
San Juan 93/78/.00 87/76/pc 87/77/pc
Tokyo 75/66/.00 71/60/sh 77/62/pc
Warsaw 55/45/.04 62/45/pc 63/53/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
78/60
Reading
77/55
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
71/53
73/52
Harrisburg
74/55
Atlantic City
79/59
New York City
79/58
Syracuse
67/53
Pottsville
72/54
Albany
75/51
Binghamton
Towanda
70/48
70/48
State College
68/50
Poughkeepsie
75/53
93/72
80/61
89/58
103/73
81/62
67/60
65/51
83/68
80/58
65/51
79/58
74/57
87/66
91/76
94/74
85/72
58/43
57/44
79/60
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:32a 8:32p
Tomorrow 5:32a 8:33p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 7:55p 4:38a
Tomorrow 9:00p 5:36a
Full Last New First
June 4 June 11 June 19 June 26
Today will be
mostly cloudy
with rain show-
ers and a light
breeze. It’s a bit
of the same
story for Monday
and Tuesday,
with cloudy
skies, showers,
and tempera-
tures not even
breaking 70. The
chance for rain
will stay with us
for Wednesday,
Thursday and
Friday. On
Saturday, it looks
like we will final-
ly break the
cycle and see a
partly cloudy
day with temper-
atures in the mid
70s.
- Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms will become numerous across the Northeast
today, but the Southeast will enjoy plenty of sunshine and seasonable conditions. Showers and thun-
derstorms will become likely over parts of the Plains, and thunderstorms are expected over portions
of the Rockies and northern Intermountain West, as well.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Partly sunny, rain
MONDAY
Partly
sunny,
rain
68°
50°
WEDNESDAY
Rain
and
clouds
70°
48°
THURSDAY
Partly
sunny,
rain
70°
48°
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny,
p.m. rain
75°
50°
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny
75°
50°
TUESDAY
Rain and
clouds
67°
50°
73
°
49
°
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012
timesleader.com
A
fter two weeks traveling in Eu-
rope, I couldn’t wait to get back
to the States. The crumbling
roads, roving bands of unemployed
youth and rows of vacant, unfinished
homes gave me the willies. And the
cowardly politicians! Why, after three
years of scolding by virtuous Amer-
icans you’d think they would have
shaped up and solved their debt crisis
by now. How hard could it be to scale
back some of their profligate social
spending, raise the retirement age and
get a couple hundred million people to
agree to work more for less?
In truth, it was hard to tell there’s a
financial crisis during a visit to Spain
and France, with a quick stop in Swit-
zerland. Yes, there’s a semi-permanent
encampment of protesters in Barcelo-
na’s main square and there was a long,
loud but peaceful march through the
streets. Otherwise the city showed
little evidence of a crisis. That may not
be an accurate reflection of the nation
as a whole, though, since tourism is
such a large part of the local economy.
With its sunshine and beaches easily
accessible to northern Europe, the
capital of the semi-autonomous region
of Catalonia ranks in the world’s top 20
destinations.
Not that everything is coming up
roses. Maribel Font, who rents apart-
ments to tourists, sounded like busi-
ness people everywhere when she
described the current profit squeeze.
Bookings are about equal to last year,
but only because she has held off rais-
ing prices while the cost of utilities and
other expenses have gone up.
As in Barcelona, tourists swarmed
Paris sidewalks and excursion buses
filled the streets in our neighborhood
east of the Luxembourg Gardens, al-
though cafés seemed to have plenty of
available seats. That may have had
more to do with sky high prices than a
lack of hungry customers.
In between the cities, small towns
and villages showed little evidence of
stress, roads and highways were in
their usual good condition and a new
tunnel was taking shape near the bor-
der between France and Switzerland.
At midweek, restaurants were full, with
tourists in the minority.
None of this means the European
economy is not under great pressure.
Parts of Spain, in particular, look eerily
like parts of Miami and Las Vegas, with
ghost cities built only because credit
was easy to come by, for both builders
and buyers, until the merry-go-round
stopped. And high unemployment —
particularly among youth — holds the
potential to make recovery more diffi-
cult on individuals and national trea-
suries.
While the crisis in Europe has al-
lowed American media and politicians
to sneer at the Continent’s perceived
shortcomings, there are more simi-
larities than differences between the
EU and U.S. A common theme is the
inability of the 17-nation bloc’s leaders
to agree on a rescue strategy; our two
parties manage to create the same
gridlock. Critics complain that Europe-
an officials aren’t reacting with appro-
priate vigor, while ours have done
nothing to slow America’s headlong
rush toward a debt cliff of enormous
proportions.
There’s even talk the Chinese will
step in to buy European bonds and
stop the freefall. Sound familiar?
Perhaps things simply haven’t gotten
bad enough to spark serious reactions
on either side of the Atlantic. Or maybe
there just isn’t the kind of leadership in
either the public or private sectors that
is willing to put national interest ahead
of personal wealth and status, explain
the challenges and take action.
If that doesn’t change, we’ll all pay a
bigger price than necessary to get out
of this mess.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
EU, U.S. share
challenges,
lack of action
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 970-7157.
IF YOU BUY four
items on sale at
Walgreens this week,
the full purchase
price will be reim-
bursed by way of a
Register Reward on
your receipt. That means a coupon
will print on your receipt good for a
future store purchase. The four
items, and their prices, are Brain-
strong Kids Gummy Drop $10; Ome-
ga Smart Ultra Fish Oils Super Crit-
ical Softgel $10; Walgreens Lansopra-
zole $6; and Goody Ouchless $2.
If you’re reading this column on-
line or on your smart phone, make
sure you buy a copy of today’s
Times Leader. You’ll find hundreds
of dollars of valuable coupons inside
including a coupon booklet from
McDonald’s worth more than $45 in
savings. And don’t forget, all sizes
of soft drinks and sweet tea are $1
for a limited time at the Golden
Arches.
If Dunkin Donuts is more your
style for cold drinks, then rejoice,
there is a coupon booklet for that
company, too, with coupons for 99
cent iced teas, Coolattas, iced cof-
fees or frozen coffees.
There’s also a great coupon that
will get you and all the diners at
your table a lunch entrée for less
than $6 at Lone Star Steakhouse. I’d
go with the Sidewinder Chicken
Sandwich.
There’s a valuable brown bag
tucked inside today’s paper that you
can take to Office Max and get 20
percent off most of the items in the
store you can fit into it. Stock up
for back to school a bit early, or for
those with home offices, now’s the
time to replenish staples, paper
clips, pens, liquid paper and more.
Price Chopper may have ended
the spend $50 get 10 cents off a
gallon of gas promotion, but its
promise to offer better deals
throughout the store is certainly
being upheld. This week, in addition
to buy one, get two free deals on
Stroehmann Sunbeam king or ranch
bread loaves, Entenmann’s chocolate
chip cookies and more, you can also
use the coupon on the front page of
the grocer’s circular to get red seed-
less grapes for 88 cents a pound.
If you’re thinking a diet may help
you fit into that swimsuit this sum-
mer, Target is selling selected
SmartOnes frozen entries for $1.89
and if you buy six of them you’ll
get a free four pack of SmartOnes
frozen dessert.
On most Saturdays plenty of peo-
ple throughout the Valley yell “I’ll
have another.” This Saturday will be
no different, but the reason people
are screaming it will be.
The horse of that name will be
running in the third leg of the Tri-
ple Crown at the Belmont Stakes
looking to be the first horse to
achieve the feat since 1978 when
Affirmed won the Kentucky Derby,
the Preakness and the Belmont
Stakes.
And Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs will be throwing quite the
party to celebrate the possibility.
The patio, party tent and Pacer’s
Clubhouse all will open at 2 p.m.
for Belmont Stakes festivities. From
2-6, guests can swipe their Player’s
Club card or Racing Rewards card
at any kiosk for a chance to win
one of five $1,000 live race betting
vouchers or $5,000 in cash. The
official drink will be the Belmont
Breeze which comes in a special
souvenir glass. Food from Johnny
Rockets and sweet treats from Ben
& Jerry’s will be available for guests
and if I’ll Have Another wins the
Triple Crown, all party goers will be
treated to a drink on the house.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
You can register big savings across the Valley this weekend
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7269. Follow
him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder
LOS ANGELES — The nation’s big-
gest banks like to tout their low-cost
checking accounts, extensive ATMnet-
works and loans to home buyers and
Main Street merchants.
“Investing in the places we all call
home,” arecent JPMorganChasetelevi-
sion ad intoned. “This is the way for-
ward.”
Somehowthose folksy messages nev-
er seemtoget aroundtomentioningan-
other part of the banking business:
high-pressure trading rooms where a
company’s best and brightest bet hun-
dreds of millions of dollars on arcane fi-
nancial instruments such as over-the-
counter syntheticderivatives andcredit
default swaps.
These activities aren’t showcased in
ads and news releases, but they are as
central to modern banking as certifi-
cates of deposit and debit cards. The
risks are considerable, however, a fact
underscored by JPMorgan Chase &
Co.’s recent loss of at least $2 billion on
such trades.
Comingjust four years after thefinan-
cial collapse of 2008, JPMorgan’s hum-
bling admission has spurred lawmak-
ers, regulators andevenmany seasoned
Wall Street hands to question whether
banks — shepherds of trillions in con-
sumer deposits —should be allowed to
make such investments at all.
Speculative trading can turbocharge
profit in a way a revolving credit card
loan portfolio cannot, but it comes at
the risk of losses that, at the extreme,
could threaten the bank itself or force
yet another taxpayer bailout.
“We have to understand that these
losses are not rare,” said Christopher
Whalen, senior managing director of
Tangent Capital Partners in New York.
“Thesearerecurringevents that haveto
dowiththefact that banks don’t want to
lend money. They want to trade
opaque, illiquid securities that are not
well understood, andI’mnot sure banks
should be doing that.”
For decades, banks were prohibited
fromsuch trading by the Glass-Steagall
Act, a Depression-era lawseparating re-
tail and commercial banking from in-
vestment bankingandtrading. But both
the spirit and the letter of that lawwere
progressively weakened over time and
abolishedin1999, clearingthe way for a
huge expansionof activities that hadlit-
tle relationship to conventional lending
and borrowing.
Now an increasingly large share of
bank profit comes fromclosely guarded
With old rules gone, bankers make risky bets
By KEN BENSINGER
Los Angeles Times
See BANKERS, Page 2D
LOSANGELES-- After months of
crude prices above $90 a barrel,
many companies are trying to
wring the oil out of their oper-
ations.
Ford Motor Co. is using soybean
foam in its upholstery. McDonald’s
is testing paper cups for hot drinks
in place of polystyrene containers,
which start out as petroleum. Coca-
Cola andPepsiCoare becoming bio-
plastic bottlers.
“When oil was cheap, it became
pervasive throughout our economy
in hundreds and hundreds of invis-
ible ways, as a raw material,” said
Daniel Yergin, an energy consultant
who wrote a Pulitzer Prize-winning
history of the oil industry. “Now
there are accelerating efforts to
squeeze oil out and find ways to
substitute for it. That is the power
of price.”
The Energy Department expects
U.S. benchmark West Texas Inter-
mediate crude to set a record aver-
age above $105 a barrel in 2012. U.S.
oil imports based on the price of
Brent North Sea oil have been av-
eraging more than $117 a barrel this
year.
“When a company’s raw materi-
als come from oil, it’s a double
whammy,” said Bruce Bullock, ex-
ecutive director of the Maguire En-
ergy Institute at Southern Metho-
dist University.
The global chemicals market is
worth about $3 trillion annually, ac-
cording to the American Chemistry
Council. Its products can be found
in 95 percent of all manufacturing
processes. Much of it involves pe-
trochemicals, which account for
about 24 percent of the crude oil
used in the U.S., according to the
Energy Department.
“Alot of brandowners, particular-
ly those that rely heavily on packag-
ing, are interested in protecting
their long-termcosts,” saidDouglas
A. Smock, a plastics analyst who
Bioplastics
replace oil
in products
See OIL, Page 2D
By RONALD D. WHITE
Los Angeles Times
S
ACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Res-
taurant owner Sonny May-
ugba was given an offer he
almost could not refuse this month.
Not by a local gangster, but by a
user of a popular online reviewsite,
Yelp.com.
Mayugba saidthe user threatened
to blast the Red Rabbit Kitchen and
Bar in Sacramento, which Mayugba
co-owns, on Yelp because he be-
lieved he and his party got food poi-
soning from their meals.
Mayugba said it was impos-
sible to prove whether the man
got food poisoning from the
restaurant but offered to give
him a $60 gift card to a restau-
rant of his choice. The man
said he deserved $100. If the
restaurant did not pay up, he
said he would write a bad Yelp
review and report him to
health authorities.
Restaurant owners say on-
line websites have changed
consumer behavior as many
people rely more on citizen re-
views than on reviews of pro-
fessional critics or advertise-
ments. Yelp had a monthly av-
erage of more than 71 million
unique visitors and 27 million
reviews worldwide this year
from January to the end of
March, the company said.
In the end, Mayugba said, he
refused to give the man any-
thing and is not sure if the man
posted a reviewon Yelp. But he
said the experience made him
rethink the value of Yelp and
websites like it, which he said
he loves.
“I was so upset,” Mayugba
said. “He was taking some-
thing that was inherently good
to use it as a tool to extort a res-
taurant. It was just so wrong.”
Other owners have a name
for it: “Yelp extortion” -- when
customers threaten to write a
bad review if the restaurant
does not offer some sort of ben-
efit, such as a gift card, free
meal or preferred seating.
Kristen Whisenand, public
MCT PHOTO
The Red Rabbit Kitchen and Bar, co-owned by Matt Nurge, left, and John Bays, was the apparent target of a local
Yelp.com user in Sacramento, Calif.
‘Yelp extortion’
Restaurants say online reviewers may exploit their power
By TIMOTHY SANDOVAL
McClatchy Newspapers
See YELP, Page 2D
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
Q: I am extremely worried
about losing my health care cov-
erage. My wife was recently diag-
nosed with a serious medical
condition which will eventually
require an organ transplant, fol-
lowed by long-term medical
care.
Because our industry is prone
to erratic business cycles, layoffs
are always a possibility. If I were
to lose my job, I have no idea
how we would manage without
health insurance. Even if I found
a position with another compa-
ny, a new policy might not cover
my wife’s pre-existing condition.
I’m trying to decide whether
to tell my manager about my
wife’s medical issues. In the
event of a layoff, I would like him
to knowthat I’mwilling to take a
significant pay cut in order to re-
main employed and keep my in-
surance. Do you think I should
talk to him?
A: I amtruly sorry to hear that
youandyour wife are facing such
a difficult diagnosis. My hope is
that your company will be sym-
pathetic and supportive, but un-
fortunately that’s not always the
case. Before sharing these con-
cerns with your boss, you should
try to anticipate management’s
likely reaction.
The corporate response to
family problems depends largely
on the values of top manage-
ment. Compassionate execu-
tives who feel loyal to employees
would never want to deprive
someone of badly needed health
care coverage. If that describes
your company, then informing
your boss might be a good idea.
But if management views em-
ployees as just another expense,
your disclosure could have ex-
actly the opposite effect. You
might actually be placed in the
layoff group to avoid an increase
in health care costs or the need
to grant you an extended leave.
Of course, no one would ever say
this was the reason.
One indisputable fact, howev-
er, is that you must protect your-
self by becoming intimately ac-
quainted with both the details of
your insurance plan and your
rights under the Family & Med-
ical Leave Act. You might also
consider consulting an attorney
who specializes in workplace is-
sues.
If the new health care law re-
mains in place, people who are
currently held hostage by their
health insurance will eventually
begin to have more options.
That’s because denial of cover-
age for pre-existing conditions is
prohibited beginning in 2014.
Q: One of my employees re-
cently sent an email to my boss
complaining about me. I respon-
ded with an email to both of
them in which I invited the em-
ployee to discuss her concerns. I
have not heard back from either
the employee or my boss. Should
I send another email or just for-
get about it?
A: You must be either a very
new manager or one of those
people who views email as a per-
manent replacement for speech.
Despite its many virtues, elec-
tronic communication is hardly
the most effective way to inter-
act with a disgruntled staff mem-
ber. Instead, you need to walk
down the hall or pick up the
phone and find out what’s both-
ering this employee, then let
your boss knowwhat you plan to
do about it.
OFFICE COACH
Weigh corporate climate before disclosing illness
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of "Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics." Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
Paulette Bielawa, employment
vocational
coordinator,
State Correc-
tional In-
stitution at
Retreat, has
been named
“Employee of
the Quarter.”
For being
selected, Bielawa will be eligible
to be nominated for the De-
partment of Corrections’ Out-
standing Performance Award.
HONORS & AWARDS
WORKSITE SUBSTANCE ABUSE:
Wednesday, 5:30-8 p.m., CAN
DO, 1 S. Church St., Hazleton,
second floor. Speaker Edward L
Pane will describe current trends
in the types of drugs of abuse,
the signs to look for and treat-
ment approaches to effectively
help the employee remain a
productive member of the com-
pany. Buffet dinner begins at 6
p.m. $15 includes cost of dinner.
For reservations, call 522-2978
or 742-3321 or email
gstropp@evanhospital.com.
HUMAN RESOURCE SEMINAR:
Thursday, 7:30a.m.-1 p.m., Lu-
zerne County Community Col-
lege, fourth floor, 100 W. Broad
St., Hazleton. Three sessions,
two topics to choose from in
each session, keynote speaker,
continental breakfast and lunch.
For human resource managers
and owners of small to mid-size
businesses. $50 for Greater
Hazleton Chamber members;
non-members $75, includes
continental breakfast, lunch and
materials on all topics. Reserva-
tions required; call 455-1509,
email jferry@hazletoncham-
ber.org or online at www.hazle-
tonchamber.org.
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS SEMI-
NAR: June 13, 8:30-10:30 a.m.,
Greater Hazleton Chamber, 20
W. Broad St., Hazleton. Speaker
Todd A. Shawver will discuss
ethical theories and practices in
an interactive seminar that
includes strategies to improve
ethics within an organization.
$25 for Chamber members;
non-members $30, includes
materials and refreshments.
Reservations required; call 455-
1509, email jferry@hazleton-
chamber.org or online at
www.hazletonchamber.org.
CHAMBER MIXER: June 14, 5:30-
7:30 p.m., River Street Jazz
Café, 667 N. River St., Plains
Township. Free for Greater
Wilkes-Barre Chamber members;
non-members $10. Call 570-823-
2101, ext. 1 13 to reserve.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Send announcements by email to
tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail
to Business Agenda, Times Leader, 15
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1 or
by fax to 829-5537. Include a contact
phone number and email address.
The submission deadline is Wednes-
day for publication on Sunday.
FIDELITY BANK
Carl Witkowski III has been
appointed
assistant vice
president in
the business
banking
division. He
earned his
Bachelor of
Arts degree
from Wilkes
University.
FIRST NATIONAL
COMMUNITY BANK
Joseph A. Castrogiovanni has
been promoted to senior vice
president,
commercial
lending man-
ager. Castro-
giovanni is a
graduate of
Dunmore
High School
and Blooms-
burg Uni-
versity where
he earned a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in finance. He
received a master’s in finance
from Marywood University. He
is also a graduate of the ABA
Graduate Commercial Lending
School.
Donna M. Czerw has been pro-
moted to senior vice president.
Czerw re-
ceived a
Bachelor of
Science in
accounting
and a mas-
ter’s in fi-
nance from
the University
of Scranton.
She is a certi-
fied fraud examiner as well as a
certified bank auditor, trust
auditor and financial services
auditor.
Kendrick C. Smith, CFA, has been
promoted to senior vice presi-
dent, treasury officer. Smith
earned a
Bachelor of
Science de-
gree in busi-
ness adminis-
tration from
Central Michi-
gan Uni-
versity. He
received a
master’s in
business administration from
Nova South Eastern University.
He earned his chartered fi-
nancial analyst (CFA) desig-
nation in 1995.
CORPORATE LADDER
The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions,
hirings and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be
included as space allows. Submit an announcement by email to tlbusi-
ness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711; or
by fax to 829-5537. Photos in jpeg format may be attached to emails.
Witkowski
Castrogiovanni
Czerw
Smith
Bielawa
Submit announcements of business
honors and awards to Business
Awards by email to tlbusiness@time-
sleader.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1-0250; or by fax
to 829-5537. Photos in jpg format
may be attached to email.
relations manager for Yelp, said
in an email that the website al-
lows for users and business own-
ers toflagreviews that violate the
website’s terms of service. If it is
determined the reviewis fake, bi-
ased or malicious, it will be taken
down.
She also said Yelp is different
from other review websites be-
cause it has an automated review
filter that attempts to remove re-
views that are biased, malicious
or phony. The system is not per-
fect and sometimes removes le-
gitimate reviews and leaves up
bad reviews, she acknowledged.
Regardless, some restaura-
teurs question the credibility and
motives of some online review-
ers.
Josh Nelson, co-owner of The
Kitchen restaurant in Sacramen-
to, saidhe is suspicious that shills
might be giving good reviews to
competitors. He also said he is
concerned about how websites
such as Yelp verify whether the
person has actually been to the
business they are reviewing.
“We do pay attention to Yelp
because we want to know what
people are saying,” he said.
“Sometimes (the reviews) have
merit, sometimes they don’t.”
Nelson said he also has had to
deal with customers’ emails sug-
gestingtheywouldwrite a badre-
view if they did not get some-
thing in return from the restau-
rant.
Yelp’s Whisenand said the
site’s filter overall works. “The fil-
ter does a good job given the
sheer volume of reviews and the
difficulty of its task,” she said.
She declined to reveal how the
filter recognizes phony reviews,
saying some users could use the
information to deliberately skirt
the system.
But Nelson said reviews he re-
quested be taken down on Yelp
for bias were not removed. Not
that bad reviews on the website
have affected the restaurant too
much: The Kitchen currently has
an average five-star rating on
Yelp, the highest a business can
get.
Nelson said he thinks consum-
ers will return to depending on
the reviews of professional critics
as the number of reviewers on
Yelp grows.
“There maybe somuchchatter
and noise on the websites that
the value of a critic is going to
grow,” he said.
But Mayugba, of the Red Rab-
bit, said he thinks consumers’ re-
liance on these websites will only
increase.
“More people trust citizen re-
views these days,” said Mayugba,
who started a social networking
website for the restaurant indus-
try in 2007.
“Social media is a wonderful
thing for the world, but when its
integrityis compromised, what is
it worth?”
YELP
Continued from Page 1D
wrote a report for market re-
search firm BCC Research that
predicted a boom in plant-based
bioplastics. “They want more
predictable cost structures go-
ingforward. The highprice of oil
is responsible for the rapidemer-
gence in interest in bioplastics.”
Ford said it has eliminated 5
million pounds of petroleum an-
nually by using soybean-based
cushions inall of its NorthAmer-
ican vehicles. The company said
it got rid of an additional
300,000 pounds of oil-based res-
ins a year by making door bol-
sters out of kenaf, a tropical
plant in the cotton family.
“Finding alternative sources
for materials is becoming imper-
ative as petroleumprices contin-
ue to rise and traditional, less-
sustainable materials become
more expensive,” said John Vie-
ra, Ford’s global director of sus-
tainability and vehicle environ-
mental matters.
Smaller business are making
big changes too.
BioSolar Inc. of Santa Clarita,
Calif., dealt every day with the
fact that solar modules are typ-
ically made with a glass front, an
aluminum frame and a back
sheet made out of a petroleum-
based plastic or polymer.
“We saw where the price of
petroleum was going,” BioSolar
Chief Executive David Lee said.
“That was one of our motiva-
tions. We’re not economists, but
we knewthat the price of oil was
going to keep going up. The cost
of photovoltaic cell manufactur-
ing was going to skyrocket.”
BioSolar has changed its proc-
ess to instead use castor beans.
Saving money isn’t the only
motivation. Many businesses
are responding to younger cus-
tomers who are concerned
about the environment.
“There is a strong generation-
al interest in not using oil,” said
Amy Myers Jaffe, associate di-
rector of Rice University’s Ener-
gy Program. “Andthat interest is
more ideological than econom-
ic. These are people concerned
about climate change andthe so-
cial-justice issues of how the oil
industry operates.”
San Francisco environmental
advocacy group As You Sowgar-
nered support last year from 29
percent of McDonald’s sharehol-
ders for a proposal urging the
fast-foodgiant toconsider “more
environmentally beneficial bev-
erage containers.”
InMarch, McDonald’s begana
tryout of double-walled paper
hot-drink cups in 2,000 restau-
rants, mainly on the West Coast.
With PepsiCo claiming to
have developed the first 100 per-
cent plant-based and renewably
sourced plastic bottle last year,
Coca Cola developed its own
PlantBottle Packaging Project
last year. The PlantBottle reduc-
es the use of petroleum-based
products compared with tradi-
tional plastic bottles by using 30
percent plant-based materials
derived from sugar cane — cut-
ting its use of fossil fuels.
Coke aims to use plant-based
material inall of its packagingby
2020, said Scott Vitters, general
manager of Coca-Cola’s Plant-
Bottle initiative.
“With crude oil, you’re talking
about a finite resource,” Vitters
said. “We’re making a long-term
bet that the price of oil isn’t real-
ly going to go down. This makes
goodeconomic sense interms of
long-termcost containment, but
it also makes sense environmen-
tally.”
OIL
Continued from Page 1D
MCT PHOTO
Tom Lopez, a driver for the Coca-Cola Los Angeles Distribution
Center, loads half-liter bottles of Dasani water at the plant. Co-
ca-Cola is using bottles made from organic products rather than
petroleum.
trading operations with limited
outside oversight, run by people
chasing seven-figure bonuses
whotreat FDIC-insureddeposits
like so many chips at the Wall
Street casino.
JPMorgan’s chief investment
office, which made the infamous
trade, has a fewhundredtraders,
only a small portion of the com-
pany’s 260,000employees world-
wide, but those traders manage
about $360 billion, more than15
percent of the assets of the na-
tion’s largest bank.
And because bigger bets can
spell richer rewards, themost ag-
gressive speculation is concen-
trated at the top. Just four banks
— JPMorgan, Citibank, Bank of
America and Goldman Sachs —
control almost 95 percent of the
marketplace for derivatives.
Derivatives are specialized in-
vestments usually tiedtothe val-
ue of an underlying asset. Asim-
ple example is a future contract
for oil, in which investors bet on
what they think the price of oil
will be in months ahead.
Theseinvestments potentially
offer something conventional
lending doesn’t: big returns.
With interest rates near record
lows, banks find it increasingly
hard to make money on auto
loans and lines of credit.
“Traditional banking just isn’t
that profitable,” said Frank Part-
noy, a professor of law and fi-
nance at the University of San
Diego. “Bankers liketomakelots
of money, and they are finding
other ways to do it.”
At JPMorgan, the chief invest-
ment office makes many conser-
vative investments in stable se-
curities like Treasuries, but it al-
so relies on high-end financial
analysis performed by math ex-
perts known as quantitative
analysts, or quants, who devise
strategies to guide traders on
more exotic positions.
Jamie Dimon, chairman and
chief executive of JPMorgan, has
contended that the chief invest-
ment office’s trades were intend-
ed to be hedges, essentially per-
forming as insurance against the
potential for losses in its overall
loanportfolio. By the bank’s own
admission, those trades turned
intoapositionthat wasnolonger
a hedge at all.
That’s an important distinc-
tion to make as Washington fi-
nalizes the so-called Volcker
rule, which bars banks from
speculating with federally in-
sured deposits, but has a loop-
hole: Investments designed spe-
cifically as hedges would be per-
mitted.
On Capitol Hill, lawmakers in-
cluding Sen. Carl Levin, D-
Mich., have begun advocating
changes to the Volcker rule that
couldprohibit thekindsof trades
JPMorgan executed. The presi-
dents of the Dallas and St. Louis
Federal Reserve Banks, mean-
while, have advocated a breakup
of big banks like JPMorgan.
Still others say the trading of
securities that aren’t directly
linked to real-world assets, the
so-called synthetic derivatives
that were at the heart of the
mortgage collapse, should be
banned altogether.
Opponents can be expected to
fight any such regulation fu-
riously and will point to the fact
that despite the loss, analysts
still expect JPMorgan to book a
$4 billion profit for the quarter.
Dimonhimself hassaidhewould
embrace rules that prevent such
bad trades from happening, but
does not endorse a full-scale re-
trenching of the banking busi-
ness.
BANKERS
Continued from Page 1D
ROVIO SPREADS ITS WINGS
AP PHOTO
R
ovio, the Finnish gaming company that made the eponymous Angry Birds title —
with more than 1 billion downloads to date — is now spreading its wings beyond the
virtual world. It has already launched plush toys, lunch boxes, clothing, stationery, food
and drink items, a Formula 1 driver sponsorship deal and a jewelry line with the Angry
Birds theme. Rovio last week announced it would launch an Angry Birds-branded debit
card in Russia in partnership with a local bank. Next up: Angry Birds Land, one of the
highlights of a theme park opening next month in the Finnish city of Tampere. Rovio had
barely a dozen employees during the 2009 launch of Angry Birds, which features a col-
orful cast of avian characters who are launched by catapult, and smash their way
through a series of defenses created by their Pig enemies, who have stolen eggs from
the Angry Birds nest. The latest incarnation of the game — Angry Birds Space — was
downloaded 50 million times in the first 35 days of release, and currently sits at number
two in the iPhone and iPad paid download charts.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3D
➛ B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
VIX CLIMBINGAGAIN
Volatility is creeping back in-
to the stock market. An in-
dex known as the market’s
fear gauge was up 55 per-
cent for the 60-day period
that ended Thursday. The
Chicago Board of Options
Exchange Volatility Index
has returned to levels last
seen in December, triggered
by fears about Europe’s
debt crisis and mixed U.S.
economic data. The VIX
shows how much investors
are worried that stocks
might drop over the next 30
days. It measures the price
of options, or contracts to
buy or sell stocks.
CLOSING ITS DOOR
Investor interest in high-
yield bonds has been so
great recently that Van-
guard closed its high-
yield fund to most new in-
vestors. Vanguard is still
allowing current investors
in its High-Yield Corpo-
rate fund (VWEHX) to
add more money. The
nearly $17 billion bond
fund had attracted $2 bil-
lion in net deposits over
six months. Vanguard
says the closure is an at-
tempt to stem the surge
of incoming cash so the
fund can be managed ef-
fectively.
AP
Source: FactSet Source: Morningstar
12
19
26
M A M F J
DIVIDENDS STAND FIRM
Dividend-paying stocks lived up to their low-volatili-
ty reputation in May. The Standard & Poor’s 500 in-
dex fell 6.3 percent, its worst month since Septem-
ber. But
Morningstar’s Divi-
dend Yield Focus in-
dex was down just
1.5 percent. It’s an
index of 75 stocks
including such
names as AT&T,
Pfizer, Johnson &
Johnson and Veri-
zon. To get into the
index, stocks must
be high-yielding, and
pass qualitative and
quantitative tests for
stability.
VIX
Volatility index for the S&P 500 this year
S&P 500
index
Morningstar's
Dividend
Yield Focus
index
-6.3%
-1.5%
Kent Croft likes to buy stocks when
they’re out of favor and hold them for
years. That philosophy has led his
Croft Value fund to a 5.3 percent an-
nualized return over the last decade,
compared with a 4.1 percent annual
return for the S&P 500. Now he’s fo-
cusing on natural gas. Its price has
tumbled since 2008 on worries about
too much supply, and it fell to a de-
cade low in April.
What are you buying now?
One of the areas we like the most,
over the next several years, is natu-
ral gas names. The stocks are very
cheap. We’re buying right now, and
we think we’re buying low.
But what about the dropping price
of gas? What caused that?
Looking out, the fact that we’ve found
all this gas enables you to build out
the infrastructure to take advantage
of it. We are going to get our gas out
into the international markets in the
next several years (by building export
facilities to ship liquefied natural gas
to other countries).
We’ve had all this gas, and it’s
had nowhere to go. That’s why
you’ve had oil go up and gas go
down. But Europe will pay $8 per
1,000 cubic feet for liquefied natural
gas. It’s $2 here. Asia will pay $12
to $15. You’ve got that, and you’ve
got natural gas being championed
on both sides of the aisle in Wash-
ington. You’ve got a lot behind it.
What types of companies are you
buying?
I think the exploration and produc-
tion companies are the cheapest
now. That’s for a reason: The price
of gas is down, and costs are up, so
they’re not making any money. So
you’re seeing them shut down pro-
duction at the wells that aren’t mak-
ing any money. What we’ve been do-
ing is buying companies that we be-
lieve have good, big bases of assets
that can make money at lower prices
than peers. Southwestern (SWN) is
one that we own . Also, Ultra Petro-
leum (UPL), which has been getting
hammered. They’re both good, low-
cost producers.
But don’t you need gas prices to
rise for those stocks to rise?
I’m not saying you need gas to go
to $6 to make a lot on these compa-
nies. You just need it to reverse di-
rection, which has started to happen.
But this argument has been made
for natural gas for a while, and it
hasn’t panned out yet.
You’re right. I could have sat here
and said the same thing last year -
and we were buying them last year
too. But we’re a year closer to where
things are happening (where export
terminals will be finished and more
natural gas-fired power plants will
come online). If you’re looking on-
ly at next year, certainly nothing can
happen. But there is a lot happening
three to five years out.
These stocks are cheap, why not
own them now and hold them for
the long term? We’re not betting the
ranch on the thing, but we feel pret-
ty strongly about it. possibility.
Where to
buy low
InsiderQ&A
AP
Who he is:
Co-manager of the Croft Value fund
(CLVFX)
What he suggests: Consider natural
gas stocks
Track record: The Croft Value fund
ranks in the top 8 percent of all
large-cap blend stock mutual funds
for 10-year returns.
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
Kent Croft
Where the buys are
For most homebuyers, uncertainty over real
estate often can be boiled down to a simple
question: Is it the right time to buy?
The housing market is showing signs of recovery.
Home sales are well ahead of
last year’s level and price
declines have slowed nation-
ally. But the answer for
homebuyers lies in what’s
going on in their particular
market.
To identify which markets
might be most attractive, Zillow,
a real estate information and
listings provider, crunched
housing and economic data on 120 metropolitan areas.
“We’re not just trying to capture price apprecia-
tion,” says Stan Humphries, Zillow’s chief econo-
mist. “We’re trying to capture more broadly markets
where buying a home makes a
lot of sense.”
The analysis doesn’t take into
account subjective consider-
ations such as crime rates,
school quality, walkability or
weather. Someone in Los
Angeles, ranked dead last, may
not see Detroit, ranked No. 3, as
a more attractive housing
market.
Source: Zillow Alex Veiga; J.Paschke • AP
1. Grand Rapids, MI
2. Ann Arbor, MI
3. Detroit, MI
4. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX
5. Dayton, OH
6. Rochester, NY
7. Phoenix, AZ
8. Toledo, OH
9. Pittsburgh, PA
10. Canton, OH
Attractive markets: Zillow equally weighted four scores for each market: affordability; unemployment;
home price volatility, by analyzing the direction of home prices; and the price-to-rent ratio, which compares
the cost of buying a home relative to renting over time.
AFFORDABILITY
LOW
UNEMPLOYMENT
PRICE
VOLATILITY
PRICE-TO-
RENT RATIO
C A A B
C A A C
A+ D B A+
A B C B
A C C A
B C B A
B C A+ C
B C C A
C C B B
B C B C
Here’s a grading
system to help show
how each of the 120
markets performed in
Zillow’s category
rankings.
Ranked #1 = A+
Top-10 ranking = A
Top-25 ranking = B
Above median = C
Below median = D
Air Products APD 72.26 2 98.01 76.88 -3.06 -3.8 t t -9.8—13.94 3 1.8 14 3.3
Amer Water Works AWK 25.39 0 34.89 34.16 0.10 0.3 s s 7.2+18.47 129.9a 19 2.9
Amerigas Part LP APU 36.76 1 46.47 37.59 -1.22 -3.1 t t -18.1 —9.22 3 6.2 34 8.5
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.28 0 23.24 23.16 0.14 0.6 s s 5.0 +7.45 2 2.7 22 2.8
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 8 33.98 30.92 -1.33 -4.1 t t 8.1 +1.59 2 -0.4 15 2.3
AutoZone Inc AZO 266.25 9399.10 373.68 -0.69 -0.2 t t 15.0+27.49 1 23.5 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 4.92 4 11.92 7.02 -0.12 -1.7 t t 26.3—37.19 4-26.8 ... 0.6
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 3 28.36 19.65 -0.99 -4.8 t t -1.3—25.65 4-10.9 10 2.6
Bon Ton Store BONT 2.23 4 10.94 4.85 0.83 20.6 t t 43.9—50.44 5-35.5 ... 4.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 31.30 9 46.22 43.60 -1.38 -3.1 t t 6.9+15.10 1 3.4 16 1.5
Cigna Corp CI 38.79 3 52.95 42.58 -1.92 -4.3 t t 1.4—13.34 3 -5.3 9 0.1
CocaCola KO 63.34 7 77.82 73.09 -2.14 -2.8 t s 4.5+12.36 1 9.1 19 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.19 9 30.88 28.63 -0.22 -0.8 t t 20.8+19.19 1 2.0 18 2.3
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.67 6 29.47 25.67 -1.10 -4.1 t t -7.7 +11.53 1 7.6 13 4.1
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 5 28.99 21.39 -1.27 -5.6 t t 22.6—23.33 4 -11.0 9 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 30.78 3 47.34 35.41 -2.26 -6.0 t t -12.7—10.02 3 2.4 21 7.1
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 1 9.55 4.85 -0.10 -2.0 t t -21.1—42.12 4-24.5 6 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 3 18.30 12.43 -1.08 -8.0 t t 3.2—29.33 4 -7.8 15 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.06 1 8.97 3.52 0.02 0.5 t t -31.7—51.94 5-12.7 21 11.4
Genpact Ltd G 13.37 5 18.16 15.30 -0.95 -5.8 t t 2.3 —4.14 212.3a 20 1.2
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.00 4 10.24 8.21 -0.07 -0.8 s t -9.7+12.07 1-18.1 12 4.1
Heinz HNZ 48.17 6 55.48 52.51 -0.99 -1.9 t t -2.8 +1.32 2 4.9 18 3.9
Hershey Company HSY 53.80 8 69.46 65.90 -1.82 -2.7 t s 6.7+21.90 1 6.4 23 2.3
Kraft Foods KFT 31.88 8 39.99 37.57 -1.00 -2.6 t t 0.6 +11.52 1 4.7 19 3.1
Lowes Cos LOW 18.07 6 32.29 26.36 -0.88 -3.2 t t 3.9+13.49 1 -2.8 17 2.4
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 6 90.00 78.57 -2.55 -3.1 t t 2.9 —5.25 2 -3.6 13 3.6
McDonalds Corp MCD 80.00 4102.22 86.71 -3.64 -4.0 t t -13.6+10.42 1 14.0 16 3.2
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.05 4 24.10 19.22 -0.82 -4.1 t t -13.1 —5.03 2 0.2 11 4.2
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 5.53 3 10.28 6.55 -0.22 -3.2 t t -16.5 —4.24 2-14.8 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 42.70 7 67.89 58.07 -4.02 -6.5 t t 0.7 -.75 2 -2.4 10 2.8
PPL Corp PPL 25.00 5 30.27 27.47 -0.05 -0.2 s t -6.6 +3.29 2 -5.7 10 5.2
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 6 17.34 12.15 -0.46 -3.6 t t 16.4—22.38 4-17.8 ... 5.3
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 8 71.12 67.51 -0.59 -0.9 s s 1.7 —.99 2 2.2 17 3.2
Philip Morris Intl PM 60.45 8 91.05 82.79 -2.59 -3.0 t t 5.5+20.64 127.5a 16 3.7
Procter & Gamble PG 57.56 4 67.95 61.55 -0.94 -1.5 t t -7.7 —4.09 2 2.1 16 3.7
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 2 65.30 44.74 -2.46 -5.2 t t -10.7—23.99 4-13.3 5 3.2
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 5 17.11 13.69 0.25 1.8 t t 2.1—14.70 3-24.0 13 3.7
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 39.00 3 60.00 44.05 -0.89 -2.0 t t 12.9 ... 0.0 ... 5.0
TJX Cos TJX 24.60 9 42.81 40.90 0.03 0.1 t s 26.7+59.21 1 24.7 19 1.1
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 5 33.12 28.38 -0.39 -1.4 t s -3.5—10.06 3 2.5 17 3.8
Verizon Comm VZ 32.28 0 41.96 41.03 -0.42 -1.0 s s 2.3+18.60 1 4.6 44 4.9
WalMart Strs WMT 48.31 0 66.66 65.55 0.24 0.4 s s 9.7+23.53 1 7.6 14 2.4
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 8 45.90 43.17 -0.90 -2.0 t s 8.1+16.58 1 3.0 15 2.8
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
Data through June 1 Sources: Goldman Sachs; FactSet
StockScreener
Professional investors have low expectations for Johnson
& Johnson, and so far this year, it hasn’t disappointed.
The stock has dropped 6 percent in 2012 as it works
through a series of recalls for Tylenol and other products.
Investors can profit from a stock’s falling price by “short”
selling it. In such a trade, investors borrow a share of the
stock, sell it and then hope it falls so they can buy it later
and pocket the difference in price.
This screen from Goldman Sachs shows stocks that
hedge funds are selling short, and Johnson & Johnson
is at the top of the list. Many of the other stocks are big
and carry well-known brands, such as Exxon Mobil and
Intel.
But not all of the listed stocks have made money for
short sellers recently. Amazon.com’s stock has risen 20
percent so far this year.
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) $2.9 $61.78 $59.08 $68.05 -7.1%
Exxon Mobil (XOM) 2.8 77.92 67.03 87.94 -5.0
Intel (INTC) 2.6 25.14 19.16 29.27 14.3
IBM (IBM) 2.4 189.08 157.13 210.69 13.5
Amazon.com (AMZN) 2.4 208.22 166.97 246.71 8.2
AT&T (T) 2.3 33.90 27.29 34.41 8.8
Chevron (CVX) 2.1 96.41 86.68 112.28 -5.9
Verizon (VZ) 1.8 41.03 32.28 41.96 13.1
Duke Energy (DUK) 1.7 22.35 16.87 22.40 20.3
Walt Disney (DIS) 1.5 44.40 28.19 46.10 9.9
VALUE OF
SHARES
SOLD SHORT
IN BILLIONS LOW HIGH CLOSE
1-YR
STOCK
CHANGE* COMPANY
Stocks the pros expect to drop
52-WEEK
American Funds BalA m ABALX 18.55 -.31 -6.3 +1.6/A +1.5/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.81 +.08 +.9 +6.3/B +3.9/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 49.03 -.74 -5.3 -2.4/A -.6/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 31.88 -.89 -9.9 -12.9/C -3.2/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 34.46 -1.01 -12.3 -19.0/B -3.9/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 35.56 -1.13 -9.8 -6.3/D -1.8/B
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 29.81 -.93 -9.7 -5.1/D -1.8/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 16.63 -.27 -5.5 -.6/B +.3/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 27.50 -.73 -8.5 -3.1/C -2.1/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 26.69 -.80 -10.3 -9.6/B -.9/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 28.28 -.74 -8.1 +.8/A -1.7/A
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 18.08 -.25 -6.9 -7.7/C +1.9/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 18.18 -.25 -6.9 -7.4/C +2.2/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.69 +.08 +.2 +4.8/D +6.9/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 27.70 -.91 -14.0 -22.9/E -6.7/B
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 102.39 -3.47 -10.2 -8.6/D -5.6/D
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 71.17 -2.16 -8.4 +1.4/A +1.8/A
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 86.14 -3.73 -11.3 -1.5/B +3.3/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 36.14 -1.19 -10.6 -6.2/A +.1/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX 45.46 -1.39 -8.8 -.7/A -1.5/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A x FKINX 2.05 -.04 -5.0 -3.0/E +1.4/D
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C x FCISX 2.07 -.04 -5.0 -3.5/E +.8/E
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 18.43 -.47 -8.9 -15.2/A -4.1/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 12.23 -.21 -6.5 -6.1/E +7.9/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 12.20 -.21 -6.4 -5.8/E +8.2/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 51.82 -1.87 -13.0 -17.5/A -3.5/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 27.03 -.80 -7.5 -4.1/D +2.6/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 11.68 -.09 -4.7 -.7/A +5.3/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.47 +.02 +.3 +2.4/B +5.6/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 11.31 +.08 +1.1 +6.0/C +8.7/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 11.31 +.08 +1.1 +6.1/C +8.9/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 11.31 +.08 +1.1 +6.4/B +9.2/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 11.31 +.08 +1.1 +6.1/C +8.9/A
Permanent Portfolio PRPFX 46.27 -.05 -5.0 -3.4/E +7.2/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 23.25 -.67 -8.6 -3.5/B -2.6/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 34.19 -1.30 -10.2 +2.2/A +.6/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.57 -.05 -2.5 +1.8/C +6.3/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 53.95 -2.16 -10.1 -5.6/B +2.8/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.82 +.07 +.7 +5.6/C +7.0/B
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 118.23 -3.61 -8.8 -.6/A -1.5/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 118.21 -3.61 -8.8 -.8/A -1.6/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.09 +.03 +.6 +5.7/C +7.1/A
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 117.46 -3.59 -8.8 -.6/A -1.5/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 117.47 -3.59 -8.8 -.6/A -1.4/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 28.91 -.95 -9.1 -2.0/B -1.0/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.29 +.04 +.8 +9.1/B +5.6/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.74 +.02 +2.0/B +4.5/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 12.42 -.23 -7.1 -3.7/B -.1/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 11.16 +.10 +1.4 +7.1/A +6.9/B
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 11.16 +.10 +1.4 +7.1/A +6.9/B
Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX 12.49 -.33 -13.2 -21.0/C -6.5/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 31.94 -1.05 -9.1 -2.0/B -1.1/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 31.95 -1.04 -9.1 -2.0/B -1.0/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 31.93 -1.05 -9.1 -2.1/B -1.2/B
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 56.62 -2.0 +6.5/A +5.9/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 31.69 -.47 -5.6 +.6/A +2.4/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 54.74 -.82 -5.6 +.7/A +2.5/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 46.64 -1.38 -9.0 -1.5/A -3.0/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 26.27 -.78 -9.1 -1.5/A -3.1/C
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 11.81 -.17 -4.6 -3.9/ +1.3/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
-2.7%
-7.1%
Nasdaq
-3.2%
-7.1%
S&P 500
-3.0%
-6.7%
Russell 2000
-3.8%
-6.9%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
q
q
q
q
p
q
q
p
q
q
q
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
-0.8%
+5.5%
+1.6%
-0.5%
Mortgage rates drop to record
The average rate on 30-year and 15-year fixed
mortgages dropped to record lows again this
week, with the 15-year loan dipping below 3 per-
cent for the first time ever. Rates on the 30-year
loan have been below 4 percent since early De-
cember. The low rates are a key reason the hous-
ing industry is showing modest signs of a recov-
ery this year .
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D 0.13 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.01
Vanguard OH Tax-Exempt MMF 0.09 $ 3,000 min (800) 662-7447
Broad market Lehman 1.97 -0.09 t t -0.74 2.88 1.97
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 3.63 -0.13 t t -1.25 5.16 3.63
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.30 -0.12 s t -0.31 4.03 3.25
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.35 -0.05 t t -0.93 5.36 4.35
U.S. high yield Barclays 7.88 0.04 s s 1.09 10.15 6.79
Treasury Barclays 0.86 -0.14 t t -1.04 2.00 0.86
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.06 -0.02 t t 0.02 0.12
1-year T-Bill 0.19 -0.03 t t -0.01 0.25 0.07
6-month T-Bill 0.11 -0.02 t r 0.01 0.15 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.25 -0.04 t t -0.19 0.47 0.16
5-year T-Note 0.62 -0.14 t t -1.02 1.79 0.62
10-year T-Note 1.45 -0.29 t t -1.57 3.19 1.45
30-year T-Bond 2.52 -0.33 t t -1.73 4.40 2.52
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
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C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012
timesleader.com
STEVE BLAKE of the
Los Angeles Lakers
missed what would
have been the winning
shot in a critical game.
His wife got death
threats.
Singer John Leg-
end’s fiancée, Chrissy Teigen, criticized
singer Chris Brown’s performance on an
awards show. She got death threats.
Clint Eastwood’s daughter Francesca
publicly destroyed a $100,000 purse as a
piece of performance art. She got death
threats.
Aconservative teenage activist from
North Carolina posted a video support-
ing her state’s constitutional amendment
banning same-sex marriage. She report-
ed death threats.
All these threats came within the last
two weeks. All were delivered online.
Welcome to the seamy underbelly of
the communications revolution.
Professional athletes have this expres-
sion. When the doughy guy in the
stands, fortified by the overconsumption
of hops and barley, yells abuse to some
chiseled giant down on the field, he is
said to possess “beer muscles.” The
aforementioned revolution has produced
its equivalent. Call it “Internet courage.”
It does not always manifest itself in
death threats. Sample the message
boards attending your average opinion
column, blog or controversial news story
and you will find Internet courage by the
bucket – people flaming the writer and
one another with gleeful abandon you
knowthey’d never dare display in the
flesh and mortar world.
Perhaps you remember when new
technology was supposed to make us
better, bind our families, strengthen our
communities, bring our world together.
At least, that is what was promised in all
those gauzy TV commercials and futur-
ist essays that practically glowed with
the warmth of human potential.
The reality, unfortunately, has proven
a more mixed bag. Yes, it is nowpossible
to video chat with Nana who lives three
states over or share notes with a col-
league who works on the other side of
the planet. But it is also possible to be
bullied even after you’ve come home
fromHell High and retired to the sancti-
ty of your room. It is possible to be re-
lentlessly stalked and viciously threat-
ened by people you’ve never even met.
One imagines the twisted sorts who
do that kind of thing regard it as fun.
The communications revolution empow-
ers themto commit acts of emotional
terrorismon the cheap, a species of
abuse whose cruelty is exceeded only by
its cowardice, which is in turn exceeded
only by its laziness. You can nowfright-
en and alarmsomeone without leaving
the comfort of your bed.
In a sense, there’s nothing newabout
Internet courage. People have been
abusing one another under pseudonyms
since Benjamin Franklin. But what is
newis the sudden ubiquity and reach.
And ease.
If one is a student of history and/or
human nature, one has no right to be
surprised that the technology has been
turned toward these ends. Yet somehow,
one always is. It calls to mind Wile E.
Coyote in the old Warner Brothers car-
toons – not only perpetually unable to
catch the Road Runner, but also perpetu-
ally shocked when he fails.
You always think the newtechnology
is going to liberate something shining
and profound in humankind. And some-
times, it does. But it also, invariably,
becomes a mediumby which we release
the malignant droppings of our lizard
brains. Instead of liberating our best, it
liberates our worst.
Gauzy TV commercials and futurist
essays, you see, tell lies of omission.
Every year, there’s an upgrade. Every
year, there’s a shiny newdoodad. Every
year, the hardware changes. Every year,
it is supposed to make us better.
But the only piece of hardware with
the power to do that lies between the
ears and its upgrades are the work of a
lifetime.
Technology will not make us better.
There is no app for that.
COMMENTARY
L E O N A R D P I T T S J R .
Technology
has given us
beer muscles
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitz-
er Prize for commentary, is a columnist for
the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL
33132. Readers may write to him via email at
lpitts@miamiherald.com.
THE STATE of affairs
in Newark Mayor
Cory Booker’s life in
late May was painfully
amusing to watch.
Painful because
Booker, a rising Dem-
ocratic star, is such a
good guy. Amusing, because rarely are
Americans treated to such premier
seats in the political theater of truth
and consequence.
That is, tell the truth and beware the
consequences.
Booker gained much unwelcome
attention from his own political party,
while being nearly sanctified by Repub-
licans, for the singular offense of telling
the truth.
And then untelling the truth
And then ... stay tuned.
To know Booker is to like him. He’s
one of those political figures whose
persona telegraphs “honest broker.”
Educated at Stanford, Oxford and Yale
Law School, he’s also a popular mayor
in one of America’s toughest, most
challenged cities. Open-minded and
solution-oriented, he’s what we hope
for in public officials. Or say we do.
But honesty is not always a reward-
ing trait in politics, especially during
high-stakes election years, as Booker
promptly learned when he recently
spoke from the heart on “Meet the
Press.” He said that attacks on Bain
Capital, where Mitt Romney made a
fortune, were “nauseating” to him, as
were similar attacks from the right to
resurrect the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.
“I have to just say from a very person-
al level, I’m not about to sit here and
indict private equity. To me, it’s just this
– we’re getting to a ridiculous point in
America, especially that I know. I live
in a state where pension funds, unions
and other people are investing in com-
panies like Bain Capital. If you look at
the totality of Bain Capital’s record, it
ain’t – they’ve done a lot to support
businesses, to grow businesses.”
Hearts leapt.
While regular folks shielded their
eyes from the blinding light of Truth,
political operatives left and right shift-
ed into warp speed. Republicans pro-
duced an insta-ad capitalizing on Book-
er’s remarks – See? Even Democrats
dislike the president’s attack on Bain –
while their counterparts on the left
began launching correctives.
David Axelrod promptly made the
rounds and explained to talk show
hosts what Booker really meant. (As
though Americans can’t understand
what they plainly hear.) Others pointed
out Booker’s own cozy relationship
with equity capital political donors.
And Booker, obviously scrambling to
recapture favor with the Obama cam-
paign, posted a YouTube video before
another sun had set.
What he “really” meant: “Let me be
clear. Mitt Romney has made his busi-
ness record a centerpiece of his cam-
paign,” Booker says in the video. “He’s
talked about himself as a job creator.
And therefore it is reasonable – and in
fact I encourage it – for the Obama
campaign to examine that record and
to discuss it. I have no problem with
that.”
Commentators have all cast their
ballots as to whether Booker should
have corrected himself. Almost unani-
mously, the answer was no.
Obviously, if you’re a surrogate for
the president, as Booker described
himself on “Meet the Press,” your job is
to regurgitate talking points. No wan-
dering around the reservation, no inde-
pendent thinking, certainly no personal
confessions. You absolutely do not
declare the centerpiece of the presi-
dent’s attack on his opponent to be
“nauseating.”
Unless it is. And unless it’s true. For
you, you know when you’re alone with
your conscience. Or having lunch with
your private equity donors, as the case
might be. But definitely not while on
TV!
On Rachel Maddow’s show, Booker
dug a little deeper: “Obviously, I did
things in the ‘Meet the Press’ interview,
as I told you, that did not land the
points that I was trying to make. And in
some ways, you know, frustratingly, I
think I conflated the attacks that the
Republicans were making with Jere-
COMMENTARY
K A T H L E E N P A R K E R
The Bain
of Booker’s
recent days
See PARKER, Page 2E
S
EATTLE - When Gillian Godlewski wanted to support breast-cancer research, she
bought a pink Kitchen Aid mixer, pink spatula, pink scraper, pink wallet, pink note-
pads, pink compact anda pink shirt - all withthe SusanG. Komenfor the Cure logo.
• “Well, if I want that item anyway and the pink donates money, that’s an all-around win,
right?” she figured. • Nowafter the controversy over the national Komen organization’s deci-
sion early this year to eliminate breast-screening grants to Planned Parenthood, Godlewski says
her pink days are over.
Although Komen quickly re-
versed itself and is continuing to
send money to Planned Parent-
hood, Godlewski remains angry.
Politics, she says, shouldn’t affect
such basic women’s health care.
As Seattle’s annual 5K Race for
the Cure nears — the year’s big lo-
cal Komen fundraiser — it appears
that many once loyal to the organi-
zation have turned away. So far,
about 5,000 fewer people have reg-
istered for the June 3 event, a drop
of 36 percent fromlast year’s 14,000
race-day participants, said Cheryl
Shaw, executive director of Ko-
men’s Puget Sound chapter.
The result is about a half-million-
dollar drop in pledges — less mon-
ey for education, screening and sup-
port services for those who can’t af-
ford it.
Registrations for the annual Ko-
men 3-Day for the Cure, a 60-mile
walk in September, are down, too.
A sizable decline in race partici-
pation is occurring in several cities,
organization officials said, with
chapters in Seattle, Fort Worth, De-
troit and Raleigh, N.C., among the
hardest hit.
The national office says programs
and the women they serve will suf-
fer.
“We are seeing some signs that
people understand the important
work that Komen does locally, espe-
cially in local communities,” An-
drea Rader, national spokeswoman,
said in an email. But, she added,
“We want them to know that the
people who will be hurt by any up-
set with us are the women we are
working so hard to serve.”
Whether there will be significant
loss of sales from licensed pink
products — a Komen trademark —
is unknown and something the na-
tional headquarters will continue to
study throughout the year, Rader
said.
Money from those sales stays
with the national organization, and
$50 million of the total $472 million
raised last year came from corpo-
rate sponsorships and marketing.
Local chapters rely on the races for
much of their funding.
Planned Parenthood funding
The backlash started after the na-
tional headquarters announced in
late January it would pull funding
from Planned Parenthood, which
received $680,000 last year from
Komen.
The local chapter quickly object-
ed.
On Feb. 2, Shaw and board presi-
dent Joni Earl wrote to the national
office expressing dismay that na-
tional had failed “to consider feed-
back from the affiliates before tak-
ing this action,” calling the decision
“misguided,” and asking that na-
tional consider the “implications of
this policy on women worldwide.”
But for many donors, the damage
was done.
Terry Tazioli and his family and
friends for years had one of the lead-
ing fundraising Seattle teams, Kai’s
MCT PHOTO
About 5,000 fewer people have registered for the June 3, 2012, Komen Race for the Cure, the group’s 5K
walk, resulting in about a half-million-dollar drop in pledges. In this photo, participants dance and celebrate at
the end of the 2010 event.
“WE WANT THEM to know that the people who will be hurt by any
upset with us are the women we are working so hard to serve.”
Andrea Rader
National spokeswoman for Susan G. Komen for the Cure
BATTLING
Fallout from Komen controversy hurts Race for the Cure
BACKLASH
By NANCY BARTLEY The Seattle Times
See BACKLASH, Page 2E
LOS ANGELES — A Long Beach
hospital charged Jo Ann Snyder
$6,707 for a CT scan of her abdomen
and pelvis following colon surgery.
But because she had health insurance
with Blue Shield of California, her
share was much less: $2,336.
Then Snyder tripped across one of
the little-known secrets of health care:
If she hadn’t used her insurance, her
bill would have been even lower, just
$1,054.
“I couldn’t believe it,” said Snyder, a
57-year-old hair salon manager. “I was
reallyupset that I got chargedsomuch
and Blue Shield allowed that. You ex-
pect them to work harder for you and
negotiate a better deal.”
Unknown to most consumers,
many hospitals and physicians offer
steep discounts for cash-paying pa-
tients regardless of income. But
there’s a catch: Typically you can get
the lowest price only if you don’t use
your health insurance.
That disparity in pricing is coming
under fire from people like Snyder,
who say it’s unfair for patients who
pay hefty insurance premiums and de-
ductibles to be penalized with higher
rates for treatment.
The difference in price can be stun-
ning. Los Alamitos Medical Center,
for instance, lists a CT scan of the ab-
domen on a state website for $4,423.
Blue Shield says its negotiated rate at
the hospital is about $2,400.
When the Los Angeles Times called
for a cash price, the hospital said it
was $250.
Many hospitals, doctors offering cash discounts
By CHAD TERHUNE
Los Angeles Times
MCT PHOTO
Jo Ann Snyder is suing Blue Shield
of California in a potential class-
action suit.
See DISCOUNTS, Page 2E
C M Y K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ItalianConnection, whichraised
about $100,000 over the years.
Started in the 1990s by his sis-
ter Kai Leamer after her breast-
cancer diagnosis, the team be-
came knownfor its parties team-
ing with Italian food, wine and
camaraderie — an effective fun-
draising formula.
Leamer died from cancer in
2002, and another family mem-
ber died from breast cancer as
well. The team continued to
grow.
But when Tazioli, a former
Seattle Times editor, heard
about thedecisionfromKomen’s
Dallas headquarters, “disap-
pointed was an understate-
ment,” he said. “I was really an-
gry, but I was really more hurt. I
felt a little bit betrayed for all the
work we’d done.”
Even with the reversal, Tazioli
won’t come back. It’s a matter of
trust, he said.
By Komen’s own statistics,
when breast cancer is treated
early, the five-year survival rate
is 98 percent; later detection
drops this to 23 percent.
Denying funding to pay for
breast examinations is “playing
with people’s lives,” Tazioli said.
For many, Komen’s decision
mixed politics with the life-or-
death issue of women’s health.
The plan to withdraw the
Planned Parenthood funding
stemmed from Komen’s earlier
decision not to fund any agency
going through a local, state or
federal investigation. A Florida
congressman asked that
Planned Parenthood be investi-
gated to ensure no federal mon-
ey is spent for abortions, an in-
vestigation women’s groups ob-
jected to, calling the claims un-
founded.
The national office’s decision
“was a surprise on some levels,”
said Thalia Syracopoulos, a past
board member of the Seattle
chapter of the National Organi-
zation for Women, who had sup-
ported Komen events. “Like
most people, we sawthe Komen
people as providing access to
medical care. We felt betrayed.
The idea that the foundation
was making a decision (like
that) was reprehensible.”
The decision resulted in the
resignation of a Komen vice
president of public policy and
unmasked unspoken discontent
among some participants. For
years, many enthusiastically
supported Komen but felt they
no longer identified with what
they saw as a pink-ribboned cor-
porate behemoth that even got
NFL players, including the Sea-
hawks, to include pink on their
uniforms.
“I think it was a very good
cause in the beginning but I
think they’re more interested in
their brand than what their orig-
inal purpose is. How can you
turn your back on any organiza-
tion that is doing what you sup-
port?” asked Karen Boe, of Lake
Stevens.
“My feeling is they let politics
get in the way of what their mis-
sion was,” she said. Like Go-
dlewski, Boe is no longer buying
pink-ribboned products.
For some who are angry at Ko-
men, the remedy has been easy.
Many, such as Godlewski, an
oil-rig engineer who grew up in
Pierce County, donated to
Planned Parenthood. West Seat-
tle psychologist Kayla Weiner,
who had breast cancer and has
participatedinthe Komenthree-
day walk, this year is donating to
the Breast Cancer ActionCenter
in San Francisco, which looks to
environmental causes for breast
cancer.
Tazioli and his family have in-
tensified their fundraising ef-
forts toward Kai’s Fund, a schol-
arship they set up in Leamer’s
name, andGilda’s ClubSeattle, a
support network of friends and
families of those living with can-
cer.
BACKLASH
Continued from Page 1E
MCT PHOTO
Susan G. Komen for the Cure staff members fold pink T-shirts in
Seattle, Wash. From left: Elisa Del Rosario, director of grants
and education and advocacy; Jennifer Teeler, volunteer coor-
dinator; Cheryl Shaw, executive director; Leah Johnston, intern;
and Gail Lapasin, director of development.
“It frustrates people because
there’s no correlation between
what things cost and what is
charged,” said Paul Keckley, ex-
ecutive director of the Deloitte
Center for Health Solutions, a re-
search arm of the accounting
firm. “It changes the game when
health care’s secrets aren’t so se-
cret.”
Snyder’s experience is hardly
unique. In addition to Los Alami-
tos, the Times contacted seven
other hospitals across Southern
California, andnearly all hadsim-
ilar disparities between what a
patient would pay through an in-
surer and the cash price offered
for a common CT, or computed
tomography, scan, which pro-
vides a more detailed image than
an X-ray.
Health insurance still offers
substantial value for consumers
by providing preventive care at
no cost and offering protection
from major medical bills that
could bankrupt most families.
But cash prices — typically
available for hundreds of com-
mon outpatient services and
tests —have a real appeal to mil-
lions of consumers who are on
the hook for a growing share of
their medical costs as employers
and insurers cut back on cover-
age and push more high-deducti-
ble plans.
Some doctors are trying to
spread the word about cash pric-
es and they’re urging patients to
pressurehospitals andinsurers to
offer a better deal.
David Belk, an internist in Ala-
meda, launched a website about
medical costs and speaks to com-
munity groups about the huge
markups compared with the pre-
vailing cash price.
Belkrecentlytolda groupgath-
ered at a seniors center about the
vast price difference when he re-
quested routine blood work for a
patient last year. A local hospital
charged her $782. Her insurer
said that with its discount, she
owed only $415.
“She could have gotten it for
$95 in cash. How does that make
sense?” Belk said. “The last thing
the insurance companies want
you to know is how inexpensive
this stuff really is.”
For those patients who have in-
surance, getting the lower price
would typically mean withhold-
ing that information from the
hospital or clinic. Experts warn
that doing so, however, means
any payments don’t apply to cus-
tomers’ annual insurance limits
for out-of-pocket spending.
The decision on whether to
pay cash or apply the fee toward
the deductible will depend on a
variety of factors, including the
amount of the deductible and
whether the person expects to in-
cur more medical bills that year.
The cash discounts have
evolved over time after hospitals
were criticized in recent years for
charging the uninsured their
highest rates and then hounding
them at times with overzealous
collection efforts.
New government rules ensued
that limited in many cases what
hospitals could charge lower-in-
come patients who were footing
their own bills. Meantime, hospi-
tals have beentryingtoboost rev-
enue by encouraging more pa-
tients to pay upfront so they can
avoidalengthyanduncertaincol-
lections process.
The California Hospital Asso-
ciation says that discounted cash
prices are intended for the unin-
sured, not those who have cover-
age. Jan Emerson-Shea, a vice
president at the industry group,
said most hospitals offer a sepa-
rate discount to insured patients
who are willing to pay their por-
tion upfront.
“If you have insurance, you are
under that insurance plan’s nego-
tiated rate with the hospital,” she
said.
In the view of Robert Beren-
son, a senior fellow at the Urban
Instituteandvicechairmanof the
Medicare Payment Advisory
Commission, big hospitals are
exerting their market power to
charge ever-increasing rates and
major insurers go along with it
because they can pass along the
costs to employers and consum-
ers. Insurance industry officials
say that health plans negotiate
the lowest prices they can, but
that they also need to include
prominent hospitals favored by
customers in the network, and
those institutions can command
higher prices.
Hospital executives say they
don’t like to charge insured pa-
tients more, but say that’s a result
of the country’s broken health
care system.
At Long Beach Memorial Med-
ical Center, where Snyder got her
CT scan, the hospital’s chief fi-
nancial officer said insured pa-
tients like her pay more to subsi-
dize the uncompensatedcare giv-
entothe uninsuredandlowreim-
bursements for Medicaid
patients.
“We end up being forced to
charge a premiumto health plans
to make the books balance,” said
John Bishop, the hospital’s fi-
nance chief. “It’s a backdoor tax
on employers and consumers.”
Those higher prices charged
by hospitals and other medical
providers drove up health care
spending at double the rate of in-
flation during the recession even
as patients used less medical
care, according to a newstudy by
the Health Care Cost Institute.
Health-policy experts say the
growing awareness of cash prices
should accelerate the trend to-
ward increased disclosure of all
types of medical costs. But en-
trenchedinterests are likely to re-
sist.
“The insiders inthe healthcare
industry don’t want to lose con-
trol over this information,” Keck-
ley said. “But price transparency
is inevitable.”
DISCOUNTS
Continued from Page 1E
“I was really upset that I
got charged so much
and Blue Shield allowed
that. You expect them
to work harder for you
and negotiate a better
deal.”
Jo Ann Snyder
miahWright withsome of the at-
tacks on the left. And those can’t
even be equated.”
Worse, from the party per-
spective, Booker described him-
self as an “independent Demo-
crat.” Oops.
Wemight likeindependents in
theory, but surrogates don’t get
to be independent. You gotta
pick one or the other. This has
been the immediate lesson for
Cory Booker. But the broader
lesson for the public is that
there’s no space in our body poli-
tic for an independent mind,
even though more Americans
describe themselves as inde-
pendent than either Democrat
or Republican.
Thinking outside the box
might solve problems in the real
world. But in the political realm,
creative noodling will get you
cast into the outer darkness. No
matter which way you lean, The
Machinery requires cogs, not
cognizance.
PARKER
Continued from Page 1E
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
kathleenparker@washpost.com.
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3E
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“We all want to make this city a
better place to live and raise our
families.”
The Rev. Shawn Walker
The pastor of First Baptist Church in Wilkes-Barre
last week addressed participants at a community
meeting scheduled as part of the startup “Building Bridges” campaign
– an effort to connect neighbors and combat the social ills that
contribute to youth violence. More public-input sessions are set for
later this month at city schools.
I’M NOT talking.
Not to a phone.
It might be all the rage
for celebrities in iPhone
commercials to have pithy
exchanges with Siri, the
female-sounding voice
assistant, but if you ask me, they just
sound stupid.
Like actress Zooey Deschanel, in her
pajamas, telling her iPhone, “Remind me
to clean up ... tomorrow.” Really? If you
can’t remember to do your chores, how
can you remember to check the phone?
What if you can’t find it because the place
is so messy? How about reminding you to
get out of your pajamas?
Or Samuel L. Jackson telling Siri, “Find
me a store that sells organic mushrooms
for my risotto.” First of all, Sam Jackson
making risotto is tough enough on the
credibility. But don’t you think, if you’re
that advanced in the culinary arts, you’ve
gone shopping for food before? Or did you
suddenly wake up as Julia Child?
Maybe the worst is John Malkovich,
who sits in a chaise with classical music
playing and asks Siri for a “joke.”
“Two iPhones walk into a bar,” the ma-
chine says. “I forget the rest.”
Malkovich laughs, proving he’s a good
actor.
Sorry. Not joining this club. I have often
been guilty of purchasing the “latest tech-
nology” (and by “latest,” I mean things
that were new for six minutes). But I have
enough experience talking to machines to
know that a microchip is not your friend,
no matter how close you keep it to your
bed.
Have you forgotten the frustrating elec-
tronic voices that now answer almost
every business number you dial? “For
English, press one. Para Espanol, dos. If
you’d rather stick needles in your eye,
press three.”
Or the voice technology in your car? I
tried this once. It went like this:
“Call Dad.”
“Baghdad.”
“Not Baghdad.”
“Starting call.”
“Stop.”
“Calling cop.”
“No – call Dad.”
“To call Fred, say yes.”
“No!”
“Calling Nome.”
Conversations with a car should be one
way only. And they should be limited to
“Oh, come on, come on” (when it won’t
start) and “You gotta be kidding me!”
(every other problem).
Asking a car to find the nearest Belgian
restaurant is not really what Henry Ford
had in mind.
But what really bothers me about this
Siri rage is that the very devices that are
keeping us from communicating with
each other now suggest you get verbally
cozy with them.
But using voice recognition software
and bouncing it through a server to a
series of digital modeled answers is not
the same as a lover whispering into your
ear.
These iPhone ads with Deschanel, Jack-
son and Malkovich suggest being alone
with your device is sort of comfy, one-on-
one time.
It isn’t. We’ve become so desensitized
to one another that communication –
even eye contact – is becoming a lost art.
What scares me most about this Siri busi-
ness isn’t that they have technology that
can mimic human conversation, but that
humans might actually prefer it over the
real thing.
What I’d prefer to hear in one of those
spots is this:
“Siri, how many ounces in a cup?”
“Can’t you ask your mother?”
“All right, text mother.”
“She’d rather hear your voice.”
“I don’t want to talk to –
“Too late, here she is.”
“Son, is that you?”
“Uh, hi, Mom. Just thinking of you ...”
Let me know when they invent a dia-
logue string like that. Until then, I’ll limit
my conversation partners to those who
have lips and tongues. Even if they can’t
find organic mushrooms.
Save your questions for humans, not your ‘smart’ phone
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free
Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free
Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via
email at malbom@freepress.com.
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
I GIVE it up to CBS sports-
caster Chick Anderson who
will call the race for you.
We’re ready to go
For this tremendous Bel-
mont Stakes
Everybody’s in line
And they’re off!
Looks like the early lead goes to My Gallant
Yes, My Gallant going for the lead
With Twice a Prince on the outside
Secretariat away very well has good position
on the rail
And in fact is nowgoing up with the lead-
ers.
They’re moving for the first turn. It’s Secre-
tariat.
Shamon the outside is also moving along
strongly
And nowit’s Sham
Shamand Secretariat are right together into
the first turn
Those two together, Shamon the outside.
Shamgetting ahead in front as they move
around the turn
With Secretariat second, then there’s a large
gap
Make it eight lengths back to My Gallant in
third
And Twice a Prince fourth
And Private Smiles is still the trailer.
They’re on the backstretch
It’s almost a match race now
Secretariat’s on the inside by a head
Shamis on the outside
They’ve opened10 lengths on My Gallant
who is third.
They continue down the backstretch
And that’s Secretariat nowtaking the lead
He’s got it by about a length and a half, still
Sham
Ten lengths back My Gallant, Twice a
Prince
They’re moving on the turn now.
For the turn it’s Secretariat
He looks like he’s opening, the lead is in-
creasing
Make it three …three and a half, he’s mov-
ing into the turn
Secretariat holding onto a large lead, Sham
is second
And then it’s a long way back to My Gallant
and Twice a Prince.
They’re on the turn and Secretariat is blaz-
ing along
The first three quarters of a mile in1:09 and
four- fifths
Secretariat is widening now
He is moving like a tremendous machine!
Secretariat by 12
Secretariat by 14 lengths on the turn
Shamis dropping back, it looks like they’ll
catch himtoday
As my Gallant and Twice a Prince are both
coming up to himnow.
But Secretariat is all alone
He’s out there almost a sixteenth of a mile
Away fromthe rest of the horses
Secretariat is in a position that seems im-
possible to catch
He’s into the stretch.
Secretariat leads this field by 18 lengths
And nowTwice a Prince has taken second
And My Gallant has moved back to third
They’re in the stretch.
Secretariat has opened a 22-length lead
He is going to be
The Triple Crown winner
Here comes Secretariat to the wire
An unbelievable, an amazing performance.
He hits the finish 25 lengths in front
An amazing, unbelievable performance by
this miracle horse
This most magnificent animal
Who has today run the most sensational
Belmont Stakes
In the history of this race.
The time of this race 2:24 almost unbeliev-
able
Secretariat has accomplished the unbeliev-
able task
Of breaking the mile and a half record by 2
and three-fifths seconds.
That is a record that may stand forever!
Will it? I’ll Have Another won the Kentucky
Derby and The Preakness with times 2.4 and
only 1.5 seconds behind those of Secretariat
(1973).
I’ll Have Another will compete on Saturday
in the Belmont Stakes against horses present
and past, a time of 2:24, in the shadowof
Secretariat, for that not realized in 34 years –
The Triple Crown.
At Belmont, will I’ll Have Another be poetry in motion?
Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and
politics appears every Sunday.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
A
S ANOTHER school
year closes across
Northeastern Penn-
sylvania, parents and
guardians can spare their chil-
dren– andthemselves – plenty
of heartache by having a
straightforward talk about
summer.
Remind the youths you love
that the June-through-August
stretch, aside from providing
plenty of freedom, poses
heightened risks. And oppor-
tunities, too.
Three topics youshouldcov-
er:
•Road safety. For teen driv-
ers – who statistics show are
especially prone to vehicle ac-
cidents, including fatal ones –
the span between Memorial
Day and Labor Day has been
designated the “100 most dan-
gerous days.” Graduation par-
ties. Road trips. “Cruising.”
Those things, plus novice driv-
ers, can add up to disaster.
Remind your child of the
hazards of distracted driving
and of speeding. Lay down the
law on drunken driving: no
way, no how. And emphasize
theimportanceof always strap-
ping on a seatbelt. (State po-
lice recently reported that of
the 13 highway fatalities they
investigated in Pennsylvania
over the four-day Memorial
Day holiday this year, nine in-
volved individuals who were
not wearing a seatbelt.)
Don’t forget that the Keys-
tone State enacted a no-text-
ing-while-driving law – some-
thing particularly relevant to
hyper-social teenagers andoth-
er frequent tweeters.
Also, in late December,
Pennsylvania began enforcing
updatedpassenger restrictions
for junior drivers. For specifics,
visit the state Department of
Transportation’s website, at
www.dmv.state.pa.us, and
click on “New teen driver law
2011.”
•Water safety. The allure of
cool water pulls school-age
children not only to backyard
swimming pools, but also to
rivers and ponds, “stripping
pits” and other remote sites.
Fueled by peer pressure or
foolish bravado, too many
youths dive in to situations
they’re not prepared to handle
– sometimes with dire conse-
quences.
Urgeyour childtoswimonly
at lifeguard-protected pools or
other supervised spots. Warn
that the Susquehanna River,
even when running “low,” can
be deceptive and deadly. Set a
solid example and forgo any
foolishness while swimming
or boating with the family.
• Idle hours. Encourage
your child to use his or her
“free” time productively by ex-
ploring hobbies, volunteering
or securing a summer job. At
any age, young people can
learn the importance of mak-
ing good life choices and bene-
fiting later from the conse-
quences. Talk to themabout it.
If they don’t hear it fromyou
now, how will they know?
OUR OPINION: SUMMER SAFETY
One last lesson
as school lets out
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
I
F JURORS HAD been
asked to decide whether
John Edwards was a
cheating lowlife, it would
have taken them 10 minutes.
He fathered a child with a for-
mer campaign worker while
his wife was terminally ill,
then lied about it long and
loud while campaigning for
president of the UnitedStates.
OK, five minutes.
What jurors were asked,
though, was whether Edwards
broke the law by using nearly
$1 million in campaign contri-
butions to cover up that affair.
It took them nine days to find
him not guilty on one of six
counts. A judge declared a
mistrial on the other five.
It’s a wholly unsatisfying
verdict. But let’s not bother
with Season 2. This reality
show has been one big flop.
It suffered fromlack of char-
acter development. The 101-
year-old heiress named “Bun-
ny,” who routed secret pay-
ments to an Edwards aide to
keep the mistress hidden, was
too frail for even a cameo ap-
pearance. The Other Woman
wasn’t called to testify. The
defendant decided not to take
the stand.
As for the
plot – well,
jurors
couldn’t de-
cipher it,
and they
tried a lot
harder than
the rest of us. They sat
through 17 days of testimony
and sifted through 500 exhib-
its. Their job was to decide
whether he knewabout the se-
cret payments and, if so,
whether he knewthey were il-
legal.
We can’t fault the jury for
failing to agree on something
the government can’t seem to
figure out. The Federal Elec-
tion Commission, which audi-
ted the campaign accounts,
didn’t consider the payments
campaign contributions. The
Justice Department did.
Prosecutors might have
done a better job convincing
them if they’d rehearsed their
argument in previous cases.
But this was the first time
they’d charged such behavior
as a crime. It was clearly a re-
ach.
Chicago Tribune
OTHER OPINION: THE VERDICT
Edwards jury
did best it could
Edwards
An company
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ V I E W S
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Driver has trouble
passing bicyclists
O
n Monday I came upon a
dangerous condition on
Middle Road: a line of
about 30 bicyclists, all trav-
eling nose to tail, leaving little
space between them.
Overtaking them safely
meant spanning the double
yellow line for a distance of
about 300 feet. This was be-
cause the bicyclists did not
leave room between one an-
other so that drivers could
overtake them safely.
The rules of the road, Sec-
tion 3310(c), are:
“Caravans and motorcades.
– Upon any roadway outside
of an urban district, motor
vehicles being driven in a
caravan or motorcade, wheth-
er or not towing other vehi-
cles, shall be so operated as to
allow sufficient space between
each vehicle or combination of
vehicles so as to enable any
other vehicle to enter and
occupy space without danger.
This subsection does not
apply to funeral processions,
which shall not be interrupted
by any vehicle other than an
emergency vehicle.”
Bicyclists, please be safe out
there!
A. Kozlofski
Nanticoke
Synthetic cornea
clears her sight
H
ave you had multiple
corneal transplants that
have failed? I’ve had four
since 1999 and each time the
cornea rejected after a few
months to a year.
Then my ophthalmologist
suggested a synthetic cornea,
which is relatively new but has
had a good success rate.
My eye problem had pro-
gressed over the years and
finally caused me to leave a
nursing career I loved for
almost 40 years. I had learned
to accept poor depth percep-
tion, diminished peripheral
vision and a one-eyed exist-
ence.
So in August I went to Wills
Eye Institute and had my fifth
transplant, this time with a
synthetic, artificial cornea. I
can’t say I was overly optimis-
tic. The surgery seemed exact-
ly the same as my other trans-
plants.
I can’t guarantee anyone’s
results, but I have maintained
20/20 vision in that eye,
which is better than when all
this started so many years
ago.
It requires antibiotic eye
drops several times a day, but
I find this a small price to pay
for such amazing vision.
Maybe the fifth time is the
charm!
Gretchen Homza
Harveys Lake
Club for Growth
unfair in attacks
I
believe a little more context
is necessary to truly eval-
uate the Club for Growth’s
recent attacks on Congress-
men Tom Marino and Lou
Barletta.
First, I think it is important
to understand that the Club
for Growth might have some
common beliefs with the tea
party, but it is not the tea
party. It is cafeteria conserva-
tism, at best, to pick a few
issues that matter to this club
and pretend neither of these
men has a record on anything
else.
In calculating its scores, the
club didn’t count one vote
these men cast to stop illegal
immigration, to protect life, to
protect our Second Amend-
ment freedoms or to stop any
of President Obama’s uncon-
stitutional policies other than
“Obamacare” – issues impor-
tant to me as a tea party sup-
porter.
Second, its attack is very
disingenuous. Chris Chocola,
president of the Club for
Growth, was also a U.S. con-
gressman and has a voting
record. Chocola’s club com-
plains about the national debt,
but he himself voted to in-
crease the national debt. Cho-
cola complains about energy
subsidies for things such as
natural gas exploration, but he
voted for them when they
benefited his state. The in-
consistency of this club’s lead-
ership is astounding.
Finally, Chocola’s club went
after these men over issues
such as protecting LIHEAP
funding for seniors, providing
and increasing disaster relief
for flood victims and defend-
ing agriculture. Most shocking
to me, Chocola’s club actually
wanted Marino and Barletta to
eliminate all federal flood
assistance to people who lost
their homes and businesses in
flooding such as we experi-
enced in Pennsylvania.
If providing assistance to
victims of natural disasters,
helping seniors with their
heating bills that have been
driven up by President Oba-
ma’s failed energy policies and
protecting Pennsylvania’s
farmers earned them bad
grades from Chocola’s club,
these men should wear it as a
badge of honor.
They are doing exactly what
we sent them to do in Wash-
ington.
Alan Lispi
Old Forge
Luzerne pantry
thanks donors
T
he volunteers of Holy
Family Food Pantry in
Luzerne thank the follow-
ing groups for their recent
food collections:
The U.S. Postal Service
employees, the Wyoming
Valley West Middle School
social studies class, Cub Scout
Pack 123 of Forty Fort, Holy
Name/St. Mary’s Church in
Swoyersville, Holy Trinity
Church in Swoyersville and
Alex and Sandra Rendina of
Larksville.
The need continues to be
great for many people in our
area. The donations from
group collections enable us to
continue to provide extra food
for the families who visit our
pantry.
God bless you all for your
support!
Carol Cardoni
Holy Family Food Pantry
Luzerne
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and
daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5E
➛ V I E W S
A VERY
strange story,
a 6,000-word
front-page
New York
Times piece
on how, every
Tuesday,
Barack Obama shuffles “base-
ball cards” with the pictures
and bios of suspected terrorists
from around the world and
chooses who shall die by drone
strike. He even reserves for
himself the decision of whether
to proceed when the probability
of killing family members or
bystanders is significant.
The article could have been
titled “Barack Obama: Drone
Warrior.” Great detail on how
Obama personally runs the
assassination campaign. On-the-
record quotes from the highest
officials. This was no leak. This
was a White House press re-
lease.
Why? To portray Obama as
tough guy. And why now? Be-
cause in crisis after recent cri-
sis, Obama has looked partic-
ularly weak: standing helplessly
by as thousands are massacred
in Syria; being played by Iran in
nuclear negotiations; being
treated with contempt by Vladi-
mir Putin, who blocks any
action on Syria or Iran.
The Obama camp thought
that any political problem with
foreign policy would be cured
by the Osama bin Laden oper-
ation. But the administration’s
attempt to politically exploit
the raid’s one-year anniversary
backfired, earning ridicule and
condemnation for its crude
appropriation of the heroic acts
of others.
A campaign ad had Bill Clin-
ton praising Obama for the
courage of ordering the raid
because, had it failed and Amer-
icans been killed, “the down-
side would have been horrible
for him.” Outraged veterans
released a response ad pointing
out that it would have been
considerably more horrible for
the dead SEALs. Obama only
compounded the self-aggran-
dizement problem when he
spoke a week later about the
military “fighting on my be-
half.”
The Osama-slayer card hav-
ing been vastly overplayed,
what to do? A new card: Oba-
ma, drone warrior, steely and
solitary, delivering death with
cool dispatch to the rest of the
al-Qaida depth chart.
So the peacemaker, Nobel
laureate, nuclear disarmer,
apologizer to the world for
America having lost its moral
way when it harshly interrogat-
ed the very people Obama now
kills, has become – just in time
for the 2012 campaign – Zeus
the Avenger, smiting by light-
ning strike.
A rather strange ethics. You
go around the world preening
about how America has turned
a new moral page by electing a
president profoundly offended
by George W. Bush’s belliger-
ence and prisoner maltreat-
ment, and now you’re ostenta-
tiously telling the world that
you personally play judge, jury
and executioner to unseen
combatants of your choosing,
and whatever innocents happen
to be in their company.
This is not to argue against
drone attacks. In principle, they
are fully justified. No quarter
need be given to terrorists who
wear civilian clothes, hide
among civilians and target
civilians indiscriminately. But it
is to question the moral amne-
sia of those whose delicate
sensibilities were offended by
the Bush methods that kept
America safe for a decade – and
who now embrace Obama’s
campaign of assassination by
remote control.
Moreover, there is an acute
military problem. Dead terror-
ists can’t talk.
Drone attacks are cheap –
which is good. But the path of
least resistance has a cost. It
yields no intelligence about
terror networks or terror plans.
One capture could potentially
make us safer than 10 killings.
But because of the moral inco-
herence of Obama’s war on
terror, there are practically no
captures anymore.
This administration came out
opposing military tribunals,
wanting to try Khalid Sheik
Mohammed in New York, read-
ing the Christmas Day bomber
his Miranda rights and trying
mightily (and unsuccessfully,
there being – surprise! – no
plausible alternative) to close
Guantanamo. Yet alongside this
exquisite delicacy about the
rights of terrorists is the cam-
paign to kill them in their beds.
You festoon your prisoners
with rights – but you take no
prisoners. The morality is per-
verse. Which is why the results
are so mixed. We do kill terror
operatives, an important part of
the war on terror, but we gratui-
tously forfeit potentially life-
saving intelligence.
But that will cost us later. For
now, we are to bask in the mor-
al seriousness and cool purpose
of our drone warrior president.
Obama’s new card:
The Drone Warrior
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammer’s email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
A
lmost every job description these days carries the caveat ‘and other
duties as assigned.’ For workers, the words usually translate later into
occupational experiences both high and low.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Aimee Dilger
and words by Mark E. Jones
SINCE illegal
immigration
is on the de-
cline, perhaps
now we can
form a hu-
manitarian
immigration
policy and welcome Latinos
into our culture.
Since leaving the Wyoming
Valley 12 years ago, I have
formed many friendships
with Latinos that have en-
riched my life.
In the Miami area, while
living near my mother, I was
welcomed into the warmth of
a Guatemalan family whose
dinners and holiday parties I
greatly miss, let alone the
wonderful woman in that
family whom I dated.
Sundays were fun in a large,
Latino family setting. It was a
Spanish-speaking family, but
when I would enter the room,
the conversation would
switch to English as a simple
courtesy.
I did have to watch my
tongue, however. They were
mostly Republican, which is
common in the professional
ranks in Miami.
One of my good friends
from those years is an econo-
mist at the Catholic Universi-
ty in Santiago, Chile. She
often lectured me on the dan-
gers of Friedman economics,
or “supply side” economics,
which was implemented in
Chile in the 1970s and nearly
wiped out the middle class.
For a short time in 2001 I
wrote for an advertising agen-
cy in Miami at which I came
in contact with the best of the
Cuban-American population.
Just about everyone is bi-
lingual, educated and sophis-
ticated. The Coral Gables
area surrounding the Uni-
versity of Miami, once falling
into ghetto-status, is now one
of the nicest urban areas in
the country because of the
Latino influence.
Later, when I sold kitchen
remodeling for Sears, I would
relish my assignments to
Latino households. Whether
they bought my product or
not, I always ran into respect
and great food.
When mom died, I moved
to Colorado to be near my
daughter and I worked and
lived with people from Mex-
ico and Honduras. I thought
we worked hard until I
worked with these people.
I was a front desk agent at a
hotel in the wealthy Vail area,
where Latinos do most of the
work and many are second-
generation Americans; but
they remain segregated from
the protective, white pop-
ulation.
On my first day of work, I
put my things in the break
room with all the Latinos
while the other white office
workers kept their personal
items near their desks. I
made fast friends and got first
crack at leftover food and
beer.
“Save the Gringo food for
John,” they would say. I had
more bagels and wheat bread
than I could eat.
My shift was three to 11.
Two “housemen,” Jose and
Oscar, both about my age,
would work with me. The
difference was that both Jose
and Oscar also worked other
jobs from eight to three be-
fore they joined me for the
night shift. Sixteen hours
straight.
I didn’t have a car, so I
would pay Jose $3 per night
for a ride home, and despite
our language barrier we be-
came good friends. Jose
would send most of his pay
back to Mexico where one of
his sons had a kidney trans-
plant. He kept health insur-
ance in two countries.
I don’t understand the xe-
nophobia of Americans who
are reluctant to accept Lati-
nos into the core of American
culture. That’s no surprise,
considering my experiences
with good, hardworking peo-
ple who live in many different
places in the United States
but share a native language
from their ancestral home
and at the very least, an ap-
preciation for the country
where they live.
Congress should pass the
Dream Act now and provide a
path to citizenship for those
who work so hard to be here.
It would enrich our country.
Look to the south for friendships and commerce
JOHN WATSON
C O M M E N T A R Y
John Watson is the former editor of
the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston. He
lives in Seattle.
I don’t understand the
xenophobia of Americans who
are reluctant to accept Latinos
into the core of American
culture. That’s no surprise,
considering my experiences
with good, hardworking people
who live in many different
places in the United States …
IT’S GRADUATION
time again, and accord-
ing to the National
Center for Education
Statistics, about 1.78
million students will
walk across a stage
and pick up a college
diploma. Then they will face terrifying
statistics about employment, pressure to
make their 20s the best years of their
lives and slogans that suggest that what
you do right after college might not
matter anyway.
What not enough graduates are hear-
ing, however, is that – recession or not –
our 20s are life’s developmental sweet
spot. They matter. A lot.
Katherine came to my office just
before graduation. She filled her mind
with day-to-day drama to distract herself
from her anxiety about the future, and
she seemed to want the same for her
therapy hour. She kicked off her Toms,
hiked up her jeans and caught me up on
her weekends. Things went multimedia
as she pulled up texts and photos to
share, and tweets chirped into our ses-
sions with late-breaking news.
Somewhere between updates, I found
out this: She hoped to figure out what
she wanted to do by age 30. By then, she
joked, the economy might improve. “30
is the new 20,” she said, sounding un-
convinced.
Katherine didn’t invent this idea.
Some researchers say the 20s are an
extended adolescence; others call them
“emerging adulthood.” This “changing
timetable” for adulthood demotes young
adults to the ranks of kids, just when
they need to engage the most.
It doesn’t help that today’s students
are graduating into a global financial
downturn. Research shows that those
who start their adult lives in hard times
are inclined to believe that luck, not
their own efforts, determines success.
Twentysomethings such as Katherine
have been caught in a swirl of hype and
misunderstanding, much of which has
trivialized what is actually the most
defining decade of our adult lives.
Consider this: About two-thirds of
lifetime wage growth happens during
the first 10 years of a career, with the
biggest gains coming from job-hopping
or earning advanced degrees before
marriage, family and mortgages take
hold. Even the underemployed can take
heart in knowing that wage losses dis-
appear by about age 30, if they move
through post-college jobs and degrees
strategically.
Personality changes for the better
during our 20s more than at any other
time in life, if we engage with adult roles
and, as researchers say, “get along and
get ahead.” Good jobs might seem elu-
sive, but even some workplace success –
even just goal-setting – in our 20s is
associated with greater confidence and
well-being in our 20s and 30s.
More than half of Americans are mar-
ried, or are dating or living with their
future partner, by age 30. Along the way,
committed relationships in our 20s
make us more secure and responsible –
and less depressed and anxious – wheth-
er these relationships last or not.
Female fertility peaks at about age 28.
And the brain caps off its last growth
spurt in our 20s, making these years our
best chance to learn to manage emo-
tions and wire ourselves to be the adults
we want to be.
Far from being an irrelevant in-be-
tween time, the 20s are a crucial period
that comes only once. I know this be-
cause even more compelling than my
sessions with overwhelmed twentyso-
methings are my sessions with those in
their 30s and 40s. I have witnessed the
true heartache that accompanies the
realization that life is not going to add
up quite as they’d like.
When a lot has been left to do, the
pressure is enormous to make money,
get married, buy a house, go to graduate
school, start a business, save for college
and retirement, and have children in a
much shorter period of time.
Newly minted college graduates such
as Katherine are living with a stagger-
ing, unprecedented amount of uncertain-
ty. Uncertainty makes people anxious,
and distraction is the 21st century opiate
of the masses. It’s easy to stay distracted
and wait for deliverance at 30. It’s almost
a relief to imagine that twentysomething
jobs and relationships don’t count.
But a career spent studying adult
development tells me this isn’t true. And
a decade of listening to young adults
tells me that, deep down, they want to
take their lives seriously. The 30-year-
olds who feel betrayed by their 20s
almost always ask, “Why didn’t someone
tell me this sooner – like when I gradu-
ated from college?”
So here goes. I’ll say what I said to
Katherine. I’ll even make it short enough
to tweet:
“30 is not the new 20. Don’t be de-
fined by what you didn’t know or do.
You’re deciding your life right now.”
College grads should not believe the mantra that 30 is the new 20
COMMENTARY
M E G J A Y
Meg Jay, a clinical psychologist at the Uni-
versity of Virginia, is the author of “The
Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter –
and How to Make the Most of Them Now.”
She wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.
TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO
The ‘Need Work’ message atop this graduate’s commencement cap suggests
that, amid a sea of his peers, he grasps the importance of a solid start.
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ V I E W S
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Government limits
liberty, opportunity
A
lthough the Democrats
have not decided exactly
how much money makes
you rich, they all are singing
the same song when it comes
to increasing taxes. Whether
they decide you are rich once
you make $250,000 or $1 mil-
lion, their proposal would
allow the government to de-
cide when you have more than
your fair share and confiscate
more of your money in the
name of “fairness.”
Since the government will
decide what “rich” is, it also
will have the power to change
its definition of “rich” anytime
it wants to raise taxes on more
people. No reason they cannot
decide next year that rich is
$100,000 or even $50,000.
For those of you who, like
me, do not currently fall into
the rich category, you might
want to consider this: If their
is no limit to how much the
government can take from the
rich, then there certainly is no
limit to how much it can take
from you.
The president did have
some of his rich friends stand
before the cameras and say
they want to pay more taxes.
Well, that is just great; show
us your check to the IRS.
Our problem is not rich
people. Our problem is that
this economy offers less op-
portunity than ever for people
to become rich.
There is hardly any aspect
of our lives that the govern-
ment has not somehow man-
aged to regulate or tax. The
free-enterprise system that
built this country is not very
free today.
This is a nation built by
people from all corners of the
world. They came here with
the promise of nothing but
liberty and opportunity.
Both of those things are
threatened by the president’s
goal of transforming this na-
tion into his personal vision of
what it should be – a vision
that he has yet to clearly re-
veal to the people.
Tax the rich, but don’t
spend too much time dancing
in celebration. We are all go-
ing to pay for our bloated
government spending.
The price goes up every day
we fail to face the reality. You
cannot spend or print your
way out of debt.
Let’s hope we don’t have to
learn that lesson the hard way.
Bob McDougal
Wilkes-Barre
Don’t allow Obama
to undermine law
M
ost of us can remember
acts of poor judgment
that we and/or class-
mates performed in high
school or even college. We
recall, for example, more than
one classmate who had to be
carried home on his or her
shield in the manner of the
Spartans after too much in-
dulgence in alcohol.
We were not happy to learn
that Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney alleg-
edly bullied a high school
classmate. “Dreams From My
Father” (page 93 of the paper-
back version), meanwhile,
shows that President Barack
Obama used marijuana and
“blow” (cocaine), and belittled
an African-American class-
mate for dating a white wom-
an (pages 101-102).
We also expect people’s
judgment and character to
mature with age, and the
manner in which a middle-
aged person conducts himself
or herself is more worthy of
scrutiny than a youthful indis-
cretion. Bill Clinton, Mark
Sanford, John Edwards and
Eliot Spitzer were, for exam-
ple, all in middle age when
they exercised appalling judg-
ment with interns, mistresses
or prostitutes.
Obama similarly was in his
40s and 50s when he helped
establish the precedent that
our country has one set of
laws for the 99.9 percent (or-
dinary people, including a
local bar owner who got a
criminal record and probation
for his role in an Internet
gambling operation) and a
very different set of laws for
the 0.1 percent in his inner
circle. In 2007 and 2008, the
Obama campaign conducted
an Internet gambling oper-
ation in which donors of $5 or
more were entered into a
drawing for an expenses-paid
trip to have dinner with Oba-
ma. Mr. Obama personally
made a YouTube video in
which he promoted this lot-
tery: “We want to have four
people who donate money this
week to sit down and have
dinner with me ... We’ll fly you
in, I’ll pay for dinner.” His
campaign also sent emails to
the same effect. The promo-
tion was changed to allow
entry without a donation only
after complaints from Minne-
sota law enforcement.
“Buy a gun for somebody
who can’t, buy 10 years in jail,”
meanwhile, does not apply to
Eric Holder’s Justice Depart-
ment, which orchestrated
more than 2,000 straw pur-
chases of firearms in Oper-
ation Fast and Furious. Mex-
ican drug gangs used these
weapons to murder two U.S.
law enforcement officers and
more than a hundred Mexican
nationals, thus making the
United States a sponsor of
terroristic violence against a
friendly nation. This might be
considered an unprovoked act
of war against Mexico.
Obama also appeared at an
event for the National Action
Network, a group acting under
the leadership of the anti-
Semite Al Sharpton. Obama
later invited Sharpton to the
White House.
Voters must decide this
November whether Mr. Oba-
ma will continue to under-
mine the rule of law while
putting the dignity of his of-
fice behind some of the coun-
try’s worst hatemongers.
William A. Levinson
Wilkes-Barre
Charities deserve
our 100 percent
U
sing a charity’s name and
then keeping 97.5 percent
– that gave me the ulti-
mate shock when I read an
article in The Times Leader
(May 20) outlining a fundrais-
er that did just that!
I am no stranger to volun-
teering. Often, I use books
that I authored to raise funds
for specific charities.
For one several years ago, I
pledged $2,000 to initiate a
project by selling my chil-
dren’s books (with local chil-
dren dressed like the book’s
characters and accompanying
me), giving all funds above
the small cost of the books to
the pledged charity.
When those people who
were to begin the service with
the $2,000 asked for the funds,
I had only $1,300 collected
with the house-to-house sales
of the books. Rather than
disappoint the charitable
effort, I added the needed
$700 out of my own funds,
planning to recoup my losses
of the cost of the books by
continuing the sales effort.
I was told by the powers
that be I could not continue to
use the charity’s name to
recover the $700 after I had
fulfilled the pledge, so I walk-
ed away from it. Actually,
knowing it was targeted for
children made it okay.
The point I am making is
this: Those people who greet-
ed us at their homes, stopped
us in their cars and made sure
they contributed in other ways
were willing, actually eager,
participants. Every house,
every individual was welcom-
ing. Imagine how many of us
there are and do the math.
My thought is that perhaps
some of them could go a step
further and raise funds inde-
pendently that would not be
eaten up by office space, sup-
plies, transportation, per diem
expenses, utility bills, etc.
Many such smaller efforts
would equal or surpass a cut
as low as 2.5 percent and
involve less money from the
contributors and more money
for the charity.
Simple logic, isn’t it?
There are many ways indi-
viduals can change the fabric
of charitable giving now that
we know that such a tiny
portion of the major fundrais-
ers’ money actually sees the
pledged charity. Don’t knock
bake sales, yard sales, bicycle
trips by the mile, public
square fairs and book sales.
There are as many ideas as
there are citizens with imag-
inations.
Let’s not see 97.5 percent of
our donations be swallowed
up by the trappings of expen-
sive spaces, parking lots, sala-
ries (and yes, charitable fun-
draisers do get salaries), etc.
Let’s everyone open those
front doors, get out into the
streets, find his/her unique
way to help and give 100 per-
cent of the funds to the needy
charity. The reward is in-
describable when one sees the
results of his or her efforts.
Harriet Clyde Kipps
Glen Lyon
Writer rebukes
minister’s letter
T
his is in response to the
letter from the Rev. Glen
Bayly (“Minister sounds
caution over gay marriage
switch,” May 25).
Love your neighbors as
yourself, unless they are gay, it
would seem from your letter.
Both the Old and New Test-
ament speak of homosexuality
as a sin, but do they not also
list as sins that of adultery and
the taking of the Lord’s name
in vain? Adultery is listed as a
sin to be avoided in the Ten
Commandments; homosexual-
ity is not, as I assume you are
well aware.
Christ never spoke one
word about homosexuality, as
I assume you also are well
aware. It would seem to me
that if you are trying to be
“Christ-like,” you would follow
his example.
I assume you also are well
aware that in the Old Testa-
ment (Leviticus chapter 20,
verse 10, to be exact), it de-
fines the punishment for adul-
tery as death to both parties.
Yet I hear no one advocating
that. Nor are people who have
committed adultery, or any
other “sin” for that matter,
denied a civil marriage li-
cense.
You, sir, in your zeal to
show “love” to homosexuals
incorrectly, and I believe on
purpose, blame gays for the
scourge of AIDS, completely
ignoring the fact that in Africa
the transmission and contrac-
tion is almost totally due to
unprotected heterosexual
relations. In this country in-
travenous drug use also has
contributed to those who have
this disease, yet you turn a
blind eye to that as well. Many
diseases now rampant in the
world are totally due to hete-
rosexual relations. In your
show of “love” to the gay
community you rush to equate
the horrendous scandal at
Penn State with gay life. How
despicable.
It seems people such as you
and your ilk forget that gay
and lesbian people have chil-
dren, and these children are
denied the hundreds of bene-
fits that the children of hetero-
sexual parents are given, re-
gardless of how many times
they have been married or
how much of a sinner each is.
Gays and lesbians are not
asking for a seat in the pew at
your church, or a seat in your
synagogue or a place in your
mosque. What they want is a
simple piece of paper, issued
by the state, not a religious
institution.
If you believe the Bible,
then we are all sinners, sir. Yet
we do not use that as a reason
to deny basic civil rights to
people in our nation. We do
not vote on the civil rights of a
minority, because plain and
simple, a majority would vote
against them. The majority is
not always correct.
Thankfully, I firmly believe
those opposed to gay marriage
are on the wrong side of histo-
ry, much the same as those
who fought against interracial
marriage.
Sid Pesotine
Luzerne
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
NEW YORK — All this time I’ve been
hate-watching, and I never even knew it.
Turns out, “hate-watch” is a fancy term
for watching shows you don’t like but get
perverse satisfaction from.
Hate-watching is a sport that used to
fall under thebroadterm“guiltypleasure”
but nowseems retrofittedfor theageof so-
cial media. It goes something like this:
You watch a showyou wouldn’t choose to
watchfor anyreasonother thantomockit
for its awfulness — say, by sharing snide
Twitter exchanges with like-minded hate-
watchers when the program airs. Collec-
tive delight.
Lately, hate-watching seems to have
flourishedat the expense of NBC’s drama-
focused-on-a-Broadway-musical,
“Smash.”
But as I think back through my years in
front of the TV, I can’t recall a more plea-
surable experience of what I now recog-
nize as hate-watching than the long-ago
Fox prime-time soap, “Melrose Place.”
Just consider the following circa-1994
gem of dialogue, as Michael confesses
sheepishlytoKimberly, “I don’t knowhow
to say this, but ... um... when I heard that
you had died — y’know, grief and confu-
sion — well, it’s just ... um ... I got MAR-
RIED!”
Classic hate-watching content! And
even back in those dial-up, pre-Web days
when “Melrose Place” was on the air, a
howler like this line of dialogue could be
savoredcommunally, thanks toaninnova-
tive form of proto-social media: Mere
hours after “Melrose Place” had aired,
“The ‘Melrose Place’ Update” was ready
and emailed to fellow fans by a twentyso-
mething visionary in Bellevue, Wash.,
named Ian Ferrell.
“I think they’re making something
cool,” Ferrell explained to me at the time,
referring to the “Melrose” production
team. “But I don’t thinktheyhaveanyidea
what they’re doing.”
That, of course, is what makes hate-
watching so delicious: An awfulness, and
hence an inadvertent coolness, the pro-
gram doesn’t know it has.
It was therefore left to Ferrell to decon-
struct each episode, cataloguing its mea-
ningful glances, its tearful “I’msorry” con-
fessions and all the scenes that culminat-
ed with sex — not to mention shining a
light into its cavernous plot holes.
Ferrell (who today works at Microsoft)
alsowelcomedother viewers’ thoughts on
the show, such as this satisfied assess-
ment from one “Melrose” regular: “It’s
badly written, not very well-acted, and ir-
ASSOCIATED PRESS
At least one reporter has a hard time
with the fourth hour of ‘The Today
Show,’ hosted by Hoda Kotb and Kathie
Lee Gifford, who here ride exercise
bikes as part of the segment ‘Lose it
With Kathie Lee and Hoda.’
Hit TV
we hate
to love
In the social-media age, we watch
some shows solely so we can mock.
By FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer
See TV, Page 4F
LOSANGELES—Hollywoodisknown
for snatching up best-selling books and
turning them into big-screen blockbus-
ters: “Twilight,”“HarryPotter,”“TheHun-
ger Games,” “The Help” and countless
others.
But the adaptations that recently hit
theaters didn’t needanovel’s characters or
built-in narrative, just a well-known brand
name.
The must-read pregnancy manual
“What to Expect WhenYou’re Expecting”
hasbecomeanall-starcomedyrompabout
thepitfallsof newparenthood. Thebookis
full of helpful advice, “but it’s almost like a
medical manual,” saidShauna Cross, who
co-wrote the screenplay. “That’s not that
entertaining to go and watch.”
So the cinematic version stars Jennifer
Lopez, Cameron Diaz, Chris Rock, Eliza-
bethBanks, DennisQuaidandothersinin-
tertwining tales about various experienc-
es of pregnancy, from infertility and mis-
carriage to trouble-free twins.
Also playing is “Battleship,” an action
flick inspired by the 45-year-old board
game starring Taylor Kitsch, Liam Nee-
son, BrooklynDecker andRihanna. Based
on finding a hidden enemy by searching
coordinates on a grid, the classic game
may be best known to some readers by an
oldTVcommercial inwhichanexasperat-
ed player proclaims, “You sank my battle-
ship!” Thefilm, set duringawar-games ex-
erciseonthePacificOcean, showshowthe
U.S. Navymight respondtoanalienattack
at sea.
“There are certain elements from the
board game that lent themselves well to
the DNA of a movie,” said director Pete
Berg. “Two enemies trying to locate and
kill each other violently is, good God, a
movie. ... The rest is classic creative en-
deavor.”
Coming up with characters and narra-
tives around popular brands that intrinsi-
cally have neither one has become busi-
ness as usual in Hollywood.
“With movies costing so much, studios
are looking for any kind of a hook that
would ring a bell with an audience,” said
veteran film critic Kenneth Turan, who
writes for the Los Angeles Times. “It’s
the same reason why they have all the
sequels andthings fromTVshows and
remakes: They’re desperate to ring
that bell.”
Still, seizing on a popular brand
doesn’t guarantee a successful film.
The1985filmversionof theboard ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rihanna in
’Battleship.’
Hollywood looks to ring a bell with moviegoers
O
pening a folder to reveal a pile of correspond-
ence, Steamtown archivist Patrick McKnight
sorted past such mundane yet exquisitely hand-
written bits of information as “Trains on time this morn-
ing,” penned in 1891. • Then, so gently, he pulled out a
longer letter, an 1894 request to railroad executive Sa-
muel Sloanaskingfor a donation. •“Lookat this one,” he
said, directing a pair of visitors toward the name of the
man who had written it: Booker T. Washington. “I think
this is an original. I don’t think it’s a copy.”
Over the signature of the fa-
mous black leader was a re-
quest asking Sloan for a grant
to help educate the students at
the Normal and Industrial
School in Tuskegee, Ala. An ac-
companying pamphlet ex-
plained “200 girls and 250
boys” were learning trades and
studying to become teachers
there.
So far, McKnight hasn’t
come across any indication of
whether Sloan, president of the
Delaware, Lackawanna &
Western Railroad, gave a dona-
tion. But, thanks to a recent gift
from Syracuse University, he
has tons, literally, of archival
material to investigate. Who
knows what he might find?
As Steamtown superintend-
ent Kip Hagen explained, “We
originally approached Syracuse
with an offer to help process
some of their collection tied
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Pallets of ledgers from the Lackawanna & Bloomsburg
Railroad await cleaning and organizing.
Pat McKnight displays a print from a glass plate nega-
tive titled ‘Locomotive Shops - Lackawanna Railroad,
Scranton, PA. 8.21.11.’
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
What: Archives from historic
railroads that used to serve the
area
When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily
except Thanksgiving Day, Christ-
mas and New Year’s Day.
Where: Steamtown National
Historic Site, 150 S. Washington
Ave., Scranton
More info: 570-340-5244
IF YOU GO
See STEAMTOWN, Page 4F
By SANDY COHEN
AP Entertainment Writer
See HOLLYWOOD, Page 5F
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
KENKEN
JUMBLE
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
People want what you
have. You’ll be approached
by many, and you don’t
have time to address each
person’s individual need.
Find a way to help several
people en masse.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
You’ll go the extra mile
to make sure that your
actions not only match
your words but also
exceed the expectation
that your words set up.
That’s why you’ll be pro-
moted in the esteem of
others.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You’ll capture someone’s
imagination. That’s not
what you set out to do, but
you’ll do it all the same.
And once you’ve caught
this imagination, you can
bring it wherever you want
to go.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
You’re objective when
it comes to your work,
and what you observe
about it now will inspire
you. Like a sculptor who
steps back to behold a
work in progress from a
distance, you begin to see
the shape of your life.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). As
you follow your curiosity
about ordinary people and
daily life, you discover that
there is no such thing as
an “ordinary person” and
that each day is really
entirely different from the
last.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Whether you’re traveling
to the grocery or to anoth-
er country, travel light. It’s
simpler, easier and cheap-
er. Plus, it sends a signal
that you trust the universe
to bring all you need.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You really appreciate
what’s going so right
in your life now, which
includes your relationship
with a few people you
cherish. You’ll be moved
to let them know in
little ways that they are
special.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
As you rise to meet the
challenges of the moment,
new influences march into
your life. You’ll be smart
about which ones to adopt.
It’s brave, the way you are
always changing.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Making backups is
favored, whether it’s a
digital copy of your
computer files or a plan
B for today’s schedule.
Thinking ahead to what
might go wrong will make
it more likely that things
go right.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). You feel a transition
coming on, and you want
to be graceful with this
change. The element of
surrender will help you.
Let go and trust that you’ll
have a soft landing.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Sometimes loved
ones treat you like
you’re an on-call problem
solver. Take the pres-
sure off yourself. You
don’t have to have all of
the answers. Go off-duty.
There’s peace in saying “I
don’t know.”
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Respond promptly to
phone calls. This one rule
will save you from confu-
sion, miscommunication
and/or awkwardness.
Handling things in real
time gives you power.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY
(June 3). You’ll powerfully
create environments that
would never exist if not
for you. A project will be
completed over the next
six weeks. Mutual love
captures your attention
and a good chunk of your
time in August. September
features a savvy invest-
ment. You’ll contribute
to someone’s educa-
tion in October. Travel
in November. Libra and
Cancer people adore you.
Your lucky numbers are:
40, 2, 14, 39 and 29.
LETTER OF INTRODUCTION
Gail Grabowski
6/3/12
1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies:
Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3F
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
©1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
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PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION
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O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
6/3
DEAR ABBY
Long-distance move gets
short shrift from family
Dear Abby:
I am a
30-year-old
woman in a
long-distance
relation-
ship with an
amazing man for more than
a year. We visit each other
every few months and chat
online every night. We’re in
love and feel we are ready to
move on to the next step —
living together.
We live in different coun-
tries. He is much more
established in his country
and very close to his family.
I am in a temporary job, and
while I care for my family
very much, there really isn’t
anything to tie me here. It
makes more sense for me to
move there. (It’s a five-hour
plane ride from here.)
My family, especially my
parents, are making me
feel extremely guilty about
even considering this move.
They say I am “abandoning”
them, and ask how could I
live with myself if something
ever happened?
Abby, my parents are in
their early 50s and in excel-
lent health. My two sisters
live near them. I fail to see
why I am getting so much
grief, when I just want to
move on to the next stage of
my life. Any advice?
— Pulled in Two Directions
Dear Pulled In Two: Your
parents are anxious because
even at 30, you are still their
child, and they are experi-
encing separation anxiety.
However, at your age, you
should be mature enough to
decide your future.
I do have a word of advice
I hope you’ll consider: Be-
fore you commit to leaving
the United States to join
your boyfriend, please do
some research on the rights
of women in his country.
Here in the U.S. we enjoy
many privileges that are not
shared by women outside
our borders. They concern
marriage, divorce, division of
property and child custody.
It is important that if you
choose to marry him, you do
it with your eyes wide open.
That way there will be no
surprises.
Dear Abby: My adult son,
“Jake,” is in prison for the
fourth time for an indiscre-
tion in his early 20s. He
hasn’t repeated the offense,
but he doesn’t comply with
the rules of his probation
and ends up back in prison.
I fully supported my son
when the incident happened
because I felt he got a bad
break, but I feel he should
take responsibility for his
actions.
Jake’s repeated offenses
for noncompliance are part
of a rebellious and stubborn
attitude and an unwilling-
ness to accept the lifelong
consequences of his initial
offense. To compound the is-
sue, he has three daughters.
He keeps popping in and out
of their lives, which is very
disruptive. If it weren’t for
them, I’d probably write him
off (I have done that emo-
tionally anyway), but I keep
trying to maintain some kind
of connection between them
in case he comes around
someday.
Is this foolish thinking
on my part? By the way, my
son never married the girls’
mother and has never paid
child support, but she has
still been willing to let him
be part of their lives.
— Writing Him Off in
Illinois
Dear Writing Him Off: If
you’re asking me for permis-
sion to take yourself out of
the equation, you have it. It
is not your job to maintain
Jake’s relationship with his
daughters — that’s HIS re-
sponsibility. If the mother of
the girls is willing to tolerate
his irresponsibility, that is
her choice. But if you have
had enough, then it’s time to
take a step backward.
For an excellent guide to
becoming a better conversa-
tionalist and a more sociable
person, order “How to Be
Popular.” Send your name
and mailing address, plus
check or money order for $7
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Popularity Booklet, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most
frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for
$3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
KenKen
6/3
New York Times
6/3
Bonus Puzzle
6/3
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ E T C .
NO PASSES
SNOW WHITE
AND THE
HUNTSMAN
SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN
(XD-3D) (PG-13)
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BATTLESHIP (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL, THE
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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CHERNOBYL DIARIES (DIGITAL) (R)
10:50AM, 1:05PM, 3:20PM, 5:35PM, 7:50PM,
10:05PM
CROOKED ARROWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:40AM, 2:10PM, 4:40PM, 7:10PM, 9:40PM
DARK SHADOWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:00AM, 1:40PM, 4:15PM, 7:00PM, 9:35PM
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DOES NOT PLAY THURS. 6/7), 10:45PM
FOR GREATER GLORY (DIGITAL) (R)
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NOT PLAY ON WED. 6/6 OR MON. 6/4)
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MEN IN BLACK 3 (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 1:30PM, 2:50PM, 5:30PM, 8:10PM,
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SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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8:25PM, 9:25PM
WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE
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PLAY ON WED. 6/6)
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Snow White and the Huntsman in
DBOX - PG13 - 125 min
(1:10), (4:05), 7:05, 9:45
*Snow White and the Huntsman -
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closely to Northeast Pennsylva-
nia to make it more accessible to
the public.”
Syracuse said yes.
Inrecent weeks, boxes andbox-
es of ledgers, receipts and other
papers have arrived at Steam-
town. They nearly double the na-
tional park’s archival collection,
McKnight said.
On a recent afternoon, mainte-
nance employee Russell Hazlett
used an industrial vacuum clean-
er to remove what appeared to be
years of dust fromsome hard-cov-
er volumes.
After the dust, and the occa-
sional little insect, have been re-
moved, all sorts of interesting de-
tails emerge.
Pull out a decades-old receipt
and you can read that a railroad
paidaplumber namedR.H. Jones
from South Hancock Street in
Wilkes-Barre $1.80 for three
hours’ workinstallinga ladies toi-
let.
Youmight come across the em-
ployment application in which a
railroad brakeman, seeking to be-
come a conductor, answered
such questions as if he wore a
truss (no), if he’d ever been in-
jured (yes, he lost two fingers at
the first joint) and if he used li-
quors, wines or malt (no.)
“They always answered ‘no’ to
the questionabout if they drank,”
said McKnight, who doesn’t be-
lieve for a minute there were so
many teetotalers.
In a sobering reference to the
higher rates of childhood mortal-
ity in the days before routine vac-
cinations and antibiotics, the old-
time applications also asked for
“number of children living.”
The archives are a potential
gold mine for genealogists, said
McKnight, who doesn’t expect
them all to visit in person. He
wants to get as much available
online as possible and welcomes
volunteers – anyone from high-
school students to senior citizens
– to input pages of old records in-
to a computer.
“If you’re willing to work for
free, I’ve got lots of work for you,”
he said. And that work could
yield a wealth of information.
“There’s plenty of (material for)
Ph.D. dissertations here.”
STEAMTOWN
Continued from Page 1F
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A letter hand-written by Booker T. Washington is part of the Syra-
cuse Collection, which was recently donated to The Steamtown
National Historic Site.
These vouchers, yellowed with
age, are from the Lackawanna
and Wyoming Valley Railroad
Company.
These rail plans for downtown
Scranton are dated July 7,
1899.
resistible.”
These days, it’s “Smash” that’s
winning similar hate-love. A
spirited discussion on a recent
edition of Slate magazine’s “Cul-
ture Gabfest” podcast explored
the term “hate-watch,” with
“Smash” singled out as a glaring
example. On Twitter, (hash)ha-
tewatching became a trending
topic.
A scathing review on the New
Yorker.com website was head-
lined, “Hate-Watching ‘Smash.’”
And on The Huffington Post,
critic Maureen Ryan wrote,
“When it comes to group hate-
watching, ‘Smash’ is the gift that
keeps on giving.”
I must quickly add that I dis-
agree with this particular posi-
tion. I watched the entire first
season of “Smash” but never in
hate-watching mode. I am
pleasedtosayI love“Smash,” mi-
nority voice though I may be.
Even so, I’m all for taking a
newlookat appreciatingTV—if
that’s what hate-watching is.
But what exactly is it?
Definitions vary, but “Culture
Gabfast” framed the phenom-
enon as “celebratory” viewing
“in an aggressive, nasty way.”
And among definitions volun-
teered by its listeners, this one
sounds solid: “Hate-watching
provokes feelings of outrage, in-
dignation, contempt or loathing
so intense they become pleasur-
able.”
But where, I wonder, is the
hate in hate-watching directed?
Toward the characters on the
show? To the show overall? To
the people who created it or put
it on the air? To the wide-eyed
viewers who truly like it and
watch with no ulterior motives?
The answer is unclear. But the
essence of hate-watching seems
to take its cue from a wisecrack
once made about newspapers:
TV shows are never good
enough, but a bad one is a joy for-
ever. Hate-watching can redeem
a multitude of sins.
This arms me with a new way
to approach my TV consump-
tion. And possibly a fresh way to
find pleasure in shows I might
otherwise scorn or avoid alto-
gether.
So I wonder if I told myself I
was hate-watching the fourth
hour of “The Today Show,” not
simply watching it, could I stom-
ach its pink slime of news and in-
formation?
If I convinced myself I was
hate-watching “Grey’s Anato-
my,” not just watchingit, wouldI
be entertained by its sappiness,
instead of fighting the urge to
clawmy face into ribbons?
If I convinced myself I was
hate-watching “Jersey Shore,”
not merely watching it, would I
reach true enlightenment and
findamusement inits boozy, hor-
ny nincompoops?
Or would I fall short in my ef-
fort to find TV pleasure in TV
pain? Odds are, I’d surrender
longbefore the showis over, hob-
bledbythis thought: Nomatter if
it hurts so good to watch, its aw-
fulness will always still be awful-
ness.
TV
Continued from Page 1F
AP FILE PHOTO
NBC’s smash-hit ‘Smash,’ star-
ring Katharine McPhee, has
inspired plenty of mockery.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
➛ timesleader.com
game “Clue” flopped (though it
later gained a cult following). But
“Transformers,” based on Has-
bro’s shape-shiftingrobot toys, be-
came a multi-billion-dollar global
franchise.
Berg said turning “Battleship”
into a movie “was one of the great
and really fun creative challenges
of my career.”
As with “Battleship,” adapting
advicebooks suchas “What toEx-
pect WhenYou’re Expecting” and
Steve Harvey’s 2009 dating guide,
“Act Like a Lady, Think Like a
Man,” requires writers to develop
characters and story lines that
aren’t inthe books.
“Think Like a Man,” which
topped the box office for two
weeks when it was released last
month, successfully spun Har-
vey’sbookintoaromanticcomedy
following five couples navigating
their relationship issues.
“One of the main challenges of
an adaptation like this is the book
alreadyhasaloyal following,” said
producer Will Packer. “All youcan
really do is mess it up. It’s very
tough to elevate it and take it be-
yond.”
The appeal of tapping such a
successful bookassourcematerial
is, of course, that it “potentially
has a built-in audience,” Packer
said. “It helps youcut throughthe
clutter in a very, very crowded
marketplace in terms of the out-
lets and mediums trying to get at-
tentionfromconsumers.”
Still, thosewhoreliedon“What
to Expect” during their pregnan-
cieswon’t reallyfindthebook’sad-
vice onscreen.
“It’s the source material we
wanted to include, but there’s so
littletherethat wasactuallyused,”
said Heather Hach, who co-wrote
the screenplay. “It’s not anadapta-
tion in the truest sense, but with-
out this wonderful pregnancy bi-
ble that countless women have
consulted, the germ wouldn’t
have beenthere.”
Director Kirk Jones said that
while some have called adapting
the pregnancy handbook “desper-
ate,” anticipating a baby is a natu-
rally funny experience.
“Just stop and look beyond the
manual and think about pregnan-
cy and that nine-month period: It
affects guys and it affects girls in
the most extraordinary ways,” he
said. “It was really just taking the
essenceof thebook. ... You’rebasi-
cally enhancing the brand, be-
cause people are already familiar
withthe title.”
The book’s author, Heidi Murk-
off, is one of the film’s executive
producers. Hasbro’s president and
chief executive, BrianGoldner, isa
producer of “Battleship.”
Hach said guidebooks are great
for adapting into movies: “What’s
interesting about advice books is
there are somany ways totackle a
problem. There are so many ways
to think about a situation, and
that’s what our characters are do-
ing.”
Turan, the film critic, expects
the trend to continue, whether or
not the results are worthy.
“This is not about makinggood
movies. It’s about getting people
into theaters. ... Everything else is
secondary,” he said. “They might
make a movie out of Scrabble.”
HOLLYWOOD
Continued from Page 1F
AP FILE PHOTO
Chris Rock, left, and Tom Lennon are shown in a scene from ’hat
to Expect When You’re Expecting.’ This movie didn’t need a
novel’s characters or built-in narrative, just a well-known brand
name.
It’s hard to imagine a Richard Ford
novel without Frank Bascombe, the
philosophically inclined sportswriter
turned real-estate agent and first-per-
son narrator of Ford’s three most fa-
mous novels. Frank was Ford’s fic-
tional alter ego, the introverted mid-
dle-aged seeker who reached his peak
with the Pulitzer-winning “Independ-
ence Day” (1996) and said goodbye10
years later in “The Lay of the Land.”
Ford’s first post-Bascombe novel,
“Canada,” introduces a new protago-
nist who shares a few traits with his
predecessor. Dell Parsons is prone to
long, contemplative interior mono-
logues that address modes of looking
at and experiencing the world. He
does a lot of thinking about thinking;
in another era he might be a more
plain-speaking stateside cousin of
some Henry James character consid-
ering life through generous chunks of
prose.
“Canada” is colored with a fatalistic
hue from its very first sentences:
“First I’ll tell you about the robbery
our parents committed. Then about
the murders, which happened later.”
Alrighty then. Dell is looking back on
formative childhood experiences
from the perspective of late middle
age; we know he survived his early
hard knocks because he is, after all,
our narrator, and Ford isn’t one to in-
dulge in “Lovely Bones”-like afterlife
reveries. As Dell continues to casual-
ly offer key pieces of data we also de-
termine that he, and Ford, are more
interested in the how and why of the
matter than the what.
The dexterity of Ford’s prose helps
distract from the haziness of the
botched crime and its buildup, and
the wisdom that Dell accumulates
gives the author a worthy surrogate
to comment on life’s unpredictable
detours. Dell takes just such a side
trip when he’s sent to live in Sas-
katchewan under the tutelage of a
shady enigma named Remlinger. If
Dell needs a steady replacement fa-
ther figure, this guy is not it. If he
were, “Canada” would be a mighty
short and uneventful novel.
Actually it feels a bit uneventful as-
is. I could have used a little more nar-
rative thrust, a little more balance be-
tween the keen observations, of soul
and landscape, and actual deeds per-
formed. We know something bad will
go down; Dell has warned us. But
when it happens, it sort of dashes in
from the cold, provides a quick,
shocking jolt (as real violence often
does) and sends us on our way.
Ford often seems like the muse of
existence periods, the father of char-
acters who find ways to coast even as
grave danger lurks. Dell has had a
hard-knock life and an adolescence
that never really started.
This state of suspended identity
gives “Canada’s” narrative voice what
tension and heft it musters.
‘Canada’
asks how
and why
“Canada” by Richard Ford; HarperCol-
lins (432 pages, $26.99)
By CHRIS VOGNAR
The Dallas Morning News
“S
trindberg’s Star” (Viking), by Jan Wallentin: World War II,
Jules Verne and secret societies mesh in journalist Jan Wal-
lentin’s debut thriller, “Strindberg’s Star.”
Erik Hall loves to cave dive. He learns of an abandoned
mine near his home and decides to take the plunge. While
exploring the dark and damp cavern, he stumbles onto a well-preserved body
wearing an ankh, an ancient Egyptian symbol of life. The news spreads about
his discovery, and Hall becomes a celebrity.
Don Titelman learns of Hall’s
retrieval and tries to set up a
meeting. Titelman is an expert
in religious symbols and thinks
there is more to the discovery
than a body in a mine. When he
arrives for the meeting, he
finds Hall dead. Titelman be-
comes the prime suspect. With
the help of his attorney, Eva
Strom, he tries to prove his in-
nocence.
Titelman and Strom soon are
knee- deep in a conspiracy that
encompasses decades of se-
crets. Forced to run for their
lives, they travel the European
continent and the North Pole to
stay one step ahead of their pur-
suers — and to find answers.
What’s the real story behind the
ankh?
Some of the characters in the
narrative are difficult to like,
but the main plot is an intrigu-
ing thrill ride. Imagine a combi-
nation of the secrets and sym-
bols of Dan Brown with the ad-
ventures of Jules Verne, ancient
mysteries and experiments con-
ducted by the Nazis. Wallen-
tin’s background as a journalist
gives the story line credibility,
and Rachel Willson-Broyles
does a great job translating
from the original Swedish.
“Strindberg’s Star” is unlike
anything else you’ll read this
year.
By JEFF AYERS
For The Associated Press The second Quinn Colson
thriller in the new series by
Ace Atkins, “The Lost Ones”
opens with gunrunning and a
haunting crime afoot in the
rural Mississippi county
where Colson is now sheriff.
Colson must sort out the
villains and the victims,
which is difficult when one of
the former may be his high
school friend, the freewheel-
ing Donnie Varner, who, like
Colson, is back home from
war.
The debut Colson novel,
“The Ranger,” deftly intro-
duced the series hero as a for-
mer U.S. Army Ranger with
festering corruption and fam-
ily problems to deal with in
his rundown hometown of
Jericho.
The second novel is a page-
turner in part because of a
dark Colson family secret that
emerges and the romantic
eyes thrown at Colson by old
and new loves.
But it is almost completely
taken over by Varner, who is
an irresistible thriller cre-
ation: a heavy drinking chain
smoker scarred by what he
calls the “Trashcanistan” war,
he is incredibly foulmouthed
and criminally inclined, but
he is at times hilarious and
even likable. There are ro-
mantic eyes for him, too.
Atkins sets this series in the
fictional Tibbehah County, a
forlorn Mississippi outpost
that saw better days back in
the last century. It is William
Faulkner country, and Atkins,
who now lives on a farm near
Oxford, Miss., had fun in
“The Ranger” alluding to
some of Faulkner’s characters.
In “The Lost Ones,” Donnie
Varner and his father, Luther
Varner, who operates Varner’s
store, make a bow to the Var-
ners of Faulkner’s fiction, who
also owned a store. And Ike
McCaslin, the boy at the heart
of Faulkner’s “The Bear,” is
the name of a deputy who
turns up to help the sheriff,
except he’s black this time.
The second novel in the
Colson series is every bit as
riveting a read as the first,
perhaps more so as it delves
more deeply into Colson’s
character, family and roman-
tic life. Its story line involves
a murderous Mexican gang
and abused babies being sold
on the illegal market, but
there’s less mayhem this time
and more intriguing intimacy.
Atkins published two nov-
els in May: “The Lost Ones”
and “Robert B. Parker’s Lulla-
by,” the latest crime fiction
from the Spenser series cre-
ated by the late Boston writ-
er. Atkins was chosen by the
Parker estate to keep Spenser,
a Boston private eye, on the
job.
Atkins had to move mind
and body to a vastly different
locale before returning to the
Colson saga, but he shows
with “The Lost Ones” it was
double duty in which he can
excel.
Dark secret,
new love stir
Colson saga
By KENDAL WEAVER
For The Associated Press
“The Lost Ones,” (G.P. Putnam’s
Sons), by Ace Atkins
AP PHOTO
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C
ORONADO, Calif. —LikeaHollywoodstar,
Coronado’s 1.5 mile-long beach literally
sparkles, thankstothemineral micaglinting
in its sand. • That’s one of the reasons why
Coronado—flankedby the iconic hotel fea-
tured in Marilyn Monroe’s 1958 film“Some
LikeIt Hot” —has beennamedtheNo. 1beachintheUnited
States inthe2012surveyby“Dr. Beach” professor StephenP.
Leathermanof Florida International University.
Itisthefirsttime“Dr. Beach”has
given the top slot to California in
the more thantwo decades that he
has been ranking beaches in the
United States based on their envi-
ronmental quality and safety for
swimmers.
CoronadoBeach, ona peninsula
across the bayfromSanDiego, has
near-perfect Mediterraneanweath-
er anda postcardbackdrop.
“I thinkit’soneof themost super
beaches around,” said Leather-
man, director of FIU’s Laboratory
for Coastal Research.
Roundingoutthetop10thisyear
were No. 2, KahanamokuBeachin
Waikiki, Honolulu, Hawaii; No. 3,
Main Beach, East Hampton, N.Y.;
No. 4, St. GeorgeIslandStatePark,
Florida Panhandle; No. 5, Hamoa
Beach, Maui, Hawaii; No. 6, Coast
Guard Beach, Cape Cod, Mass.;
No. 7, WaimanaloBay BeachPark,
Oahu, Hawaii; No. 8, Cape Florida
State Park near Miami.; No. 9,
Beachwalker Park, Kiawah Island,
S.C.; and No. 10, Cape Hatteras in
NorthCarolina.
Leathermanranksbeacheson50
criteria, includingthelookandfeel
of the sand, water quality, weather,
facilities andcrowds. Atopscoreis
250. Coronado came in the 230s,
losing points because its water
temperaturehoveringinthe60s al-
lows for only a quick dip for most,
Leatherman said. California’s chil-
ly coastal waters have cost its pris-
tine beaches points when they’ve
been up against balmy contenders
in Florida and Hawaii in the past.
Coronado Beach was runner-up
last year to Florida’s Siesta Beach.
Once a beach tops Leatherman’s
list, it is retiredfromconsideration
for future rankings.
A No. 1 spot on the popular list
typically brings a 15 to 20 percent
boost invisitors.
Leatherman said Coronado is
great forskimboarding(glidingon
the water witha small, finless surf-
board) andwalking. The wide, flat
beach is lined by majestic man-
sions and the Hotel del Coronado.
Known as “Hotel Del,” the Nation-
al Historic Landmark with its
peaked red roof was built in 1888
andisthelast of California’sVictor-
ianseaside resorts.
Coronadoisalsothenameof the
swanky-yet-quaint city on a penin-
sulapopulatedbyNavyofficersand
some of California’s wealthiest. It
can be reached by ferry boat for a
few dollars from downtown San
Diego.
There is free parking at the
beach, but it is ona public street so
it can be challenging, Leatherman
said.
On a recent spring afternoon,
tourists from China to Russia
sprawledoutonitsbeachinfrontof
“Hotel Del,” lounging on blankets
in the sun. A Navy ship dotted the
horizon. One man aimed his cam-
era upward, thrilled as the quiet
lapping of waves was interrupted
with the roar of a Navy jet from a
nearby base doing a training exer-
cise.
Lifelong San Diego County resi-
dent 55-year-old Nellie Landeros
saidit is her favorite beach.
“It’s gorgeous,” she said. “Just
the setting alone feels like we’re in
another world.”
BillyPavlacka, 51, has beenvisit-
ing Coronado Beach weekly for 30
years. Known as “The Sand Castle
Man,” Pavlacka was building a to-
wering castle with rows of arches
andspheres. He saidhe spottedan
aircraft carrier and submarine ear-
lier that day. Flecks of the glittery
mica mineral make the sand shim-
mer inthe sunlight.
“If you look at the sand you can
seeit sparkling,” saidatannedPav-
lacka, with gray locks peeking out
from under his baseball cap. “Peo-
ple askme all the time if it’s gold.”
The top10list is inits 22ndyear.
Beachesdonotpaytobeevaluat-
ed for the top 10 best beaches list.
Leatherman said he visits top 10
candidates incognito to collect
sandandwater samples for study.
Rounding out the TOP TEN
AP PHOTOS
Hamoa Beach in Maui, Hawaii, is fifth on the 2012 list of Top 10 Beaches produced annually by coastal expert Stephen P. Leatherman,
also known as ’Dr. Beach,’ director of Florida International University’s Laboratory for Coastal Research.
Coast Guard Beach in Cape Cod, Mass., is number six on the 2012 list of Top 10 Beaches.
Siesta Key public beach in Sarasota, Fla. Coronado Beach was
runner-up last year to Siesta Beach.
A child chases a seagull on
Coronado Beach in Coronado,
Calif. Coronado Beach has been
named America’s best beach.
From Hawaii to the Carolinas,
these beaches are the best
By JULIE WATSON Associated Press
Duke Kahanamoku Beach in Waikiki, Hawaii, is number two on the 2012 list of Top 10 Beaches pro-
duced annually.
Main Beach in East Hampton,
N.Y., is number three on the
2012 list.
Lifeguards keep watch over the
beach along the Cape Hatteras
National Seashore in Buxton,
N.C.
Coronado Beach
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 1G
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
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ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
INVITATION FOR BIDS
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received by
the Wilkes-Barre Area School District at
their Administrative Offices located at 730
South Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18711, until 11:00 AM (prevailing time) on
Wednesday, June 20, 2012 for the follow-
ing projects.
E.L. Meyers High School Water Line
Replacement Project located at 341 Carey
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702. In gen-
eral, this project consists of a single prime
contract (ITB No. 1 – Plumbing Construc-
tion) for the replacement of the water line
and tie-in of laterals.
E.L. Meyers Boiler Building Roof Project
located at 341 Carey Avenue, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa. 18702. In general, this project
consists of a single prime contract (ITB
No. 1 – Roofing Construction) for the
removal and replacement of the existing
roof.
The Bid Documents may be obtained elec-
tronically by contacting the Construction
Manager, Apollo Group, Inc., 440 Pierce
Street, Kingston, PA 18704 at 570-714-
2431. Bid documents may also be
obtained from the Construction Manager
upon a non-refundable payment of One
Hundred Fifty Dollars ($150) made payable
to the Wilkes-Barre Area School District.
Only bidders that are registered with the
Construction Manager as abider will
receive addenda during the bid phase.
Cut-off date for issuance of Bidding Docu-
ments to prospective Bidders will be Tues-
day, June 12, 2012 at 3:00 PM.
All questions shall be directed to Gary Sal-
ijko, Project Manager, Apollo Group, Inc.,
telephone (570) 714-2431, fax (570) 714-
4476.
A Pre-Bid Conference for the E.L. Meyers
Water Line Replacement Project will be
held on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at 9:00
a.m. at the project site main entrance.
A Pre-Bid Conference for the E.L. Meyers
Boiler Building Roof Replacement Project
will be held on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 at
11:00 a.m. at the project site.
Bidders may schedule a supplemental site
visit after the Pre-Bid Conference upon
written request faxed or mailed to the
Construction Manager with a minimum
notice of twenty-four hours.
All Prime Contracts in excess of $25,000
are subject to the provisions, duties, obli-
gations, remedies and penalties of the
Project Labor Agreement as approved
August 27, 2007; effective July 30, 2010.
All Firm Lump Sum Bid Proposals will be
publicly opened and read aloud, and the
bidders are invited to attend.
The Wilkes-Barre Area School District
does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex, religion, age,
disability or familial status in employment
or the provision of services. THE WILKES-
BARRE AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT IS AN
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION EMPLOYER.
THE WILKES-BARRE AREA SCHOOL
DISTRICT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
WAIVE ANY INFORMALITY IN ORDER TO
REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS.
Mr. Leonard B. Przywara
Secretary/Business Administrator
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
W Weekend S eekend Special pecial
$13.95 $13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
7
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COMMERCIAL
REAL ESTATE
AUCTION
FIVE (5) BUILDINGS IN ONE!
63,000 SQUARE FEET,
2.59 ACRES
WED., JUNE 27TH @11:00 A.M.
81-83 WALLER ST.,
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18702
Inspection by appointment & two
hours prior to sale.
Payment: 20% Non-refundable Deposit
By Successful Bidder.
Col. Steve Sitar
Ph: (570) 586-1397 Pa.Lic. AU2124-L
www.sitarauctions.com
Sale in conjunction with:
MERICLE
Commercial Real Estate Services
RivenburgsAuction.com
Antique Auction
Wednesday, June 6th at 4 p.m.
Located at Shadowbrook Inn Located at Shadowbrook Inn
201 Resort Lane, Tunkhannock, PA
400 lots of Collectibles & Paintings
100 lots of Antique Furniture
Go to website for photos
570-945-9493 lic AU 2808-L
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
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570-574-1275
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
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Also, Like
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teries for
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Vito’s &
Gino’s
949 Wyoming
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Forty Fort, PA
574-1275
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Lamoreaux Auto
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LAW
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Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
SHOTTO LAW, P.C.
Affordable Family
Law Services. PFA,
Divorce & Custody.
Mike@Shottolaw.com
570.510.0577
Major Credit Cards
Accepted
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
BEST PRICES
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YOUR CAR
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Anytime
288-8995
LOST 5 year old
grey tabby striped
cat, white paws,
answers to the
name Sarge. Neigh-
borhood of Fort St.,
Forty Fort. REWARD
570-852-3358
ask for Bob
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
120 Found
PATIO CUSHION:
Dropped on road
after the purchase
of 6. Occurred on
Saturday, May 19 on
Forest Road, Moun-
tain Top. 239-9840
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Michael A.
Ramey, late of
Pittston, Pennsylva-
nia, died on Sep-
tember 19, 2011. All
persons having
claims against the
Estate shall present
same to Adminis-
tratrix Jung Lee
Ramey, c/o Donald
W. Jensen, Esquire,
538 Spruce Street,
Suite 730, Scranton,
Pennsylvania 18503
150 Special Notices
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LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Congrats to Mike
and Jen! Have a
great time on your
trip. To celebrate, I
think today should
be an island
theme...Castaway
or Shelter? Submit
your thoughts now
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
In my Kingston
home. Licensed.
Ages 15 months to 6
years.
570-283-0336
WORK WORK W WANTED ANTED
College Junior.
Looking for summer
work in child care.
Please contact
Melissa @ 388-6898
350 Elderly Care
CERTIFIED NURSES AID
Caring & Depend-
able nurse available
for private duty in
your home. Feed,
bath, dress, shop,
clean, cook & more.
357-1951 after 6
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WORK WANTED
Experienced in
homecare. I will
work in your home
taking care of your
loved one. Person-
al care, meal
preparation & light
housekeeping pro-
vided. References,
background check
also provided.
Salary negotiable.
570-836-9726 or
cell 570-594-4165
360 Instruction &
Training
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV Certi-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984. www.Centu-
raOnline.com
Need a math
tutor?
Get ready for
college math! one
on one summer
instruction.
Affordable rate.
experienced
instructor. Topics:
algebra 1, 2 & 3,
plain geometry,
trigonometry, pre
calculus,
& calculus.
Call the
professor at
570-288-5683
380 Travel
BALTIMORE HARBOR
Tall Ships
Sailabration
June 16
1-800-432-8069
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
THE LION
KING
Wed., June 13
$175.
Orchestra
JERSEY
BOYS
Wed., July 18
$150.
“Front Mezz”
PHANTOM
OF THE
OPERA
Wed., July 18
$135.
Orchestra
Call
Roseann @
655-4247
380 Travel
DON’T MISS
OUT!
New! Special
Incredible Last
Minute Deals to
Cancun
and
Punta
Cana
All
inclusive
packages
For Travel
May and
early June
First Come,
First Serviced!
Limited Availability,
Passports Required
Call NOW!
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRIP
(288-8747)
SPORTING EVENTS
Yankees Baseball
Mets 6/9 $99
Indians 6/27 $69
White Sox 6/29
$65*
White Sox 6/30
$109, 200 Level
Seating
White Sox 6/30 $79
Phillies Baseball
Orioles @ Camden
Yards 6/9 $89
Rays 6/24 $89
Orioles Baseball
Phillies 6/9 $89
NASCAR @ Dover
Seats in Turn 1
$144, includes
breakfast & post
race buffet
COOKIE’S
TRAVELERS
570-815-8330
570-558-6889
*includes ticket,
transportation,
snacks, soda & water
cookiestravelers.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVROLET `90
CELEBRITY
STATION WAGON
3.1 liter V6, auto,
A/C. Excellent con-
dition, new tires.
66K. $2,795.
570-288-7249
409 Autos under
$5000
DODGE `98
AVENGER
Rebuilt engine, new
transmission, cus-
tom 3” exhaust.
Weapon R intake,
Blitz front bumper
and side skirts,
custom Evil 8 paint
job, vertical doors,
after market wheel
and tires, over
$10,000 invested.
Asking $4,000.
Call 570-287-8410
or 570-855-2699
FORD `90 MUSTANG
Convertible, red,
new black top, 5.0
auto, runs good,
needs a few things,
$3,900 as is.
(570)283-8235
LEO’S AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
HYUNDAI ‘01
ACCENT
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, excellent gas
mileage. good con-
dition. $2,350.
CHEVY ‘97 LUMINA
4 door, 6 cylinder
auto, good condi-
tion. $1,650
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
GRAND MARQUIS
‘99 GS
Well maintained,
Smooth riding,
4.6L, V8, RWD,
Auto, Power
windows, power
locks, New
Inspection,
Serviced,
Silver over blue.
Good tires
$3,750
Call 823-4008
LINCOLN ‘98
CONTINENTAL
Beige, V8 engine,
74,600 miles.
$3,500. AWD
Loaded.
570-693-2371
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
Line up a place to live
in classified!
SUBARU ‘97 IMPREZA
4 door sedan.
99,000 miles. White
exterior, auto, AWD.
4 cyl., single owner,
clean car fax. Well
maintained, very
reliable, new tires,
alternator, struts,
battery & muffler.
Asking $2600
570-574-5657
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `03
3.2 TL-S
4 door, sport sedan,
auto, full power,
exceptional condi-
tion. Asking $5975.
negotiable. Call
570-674-4713
09 JOURNEY SXT $14,995
10FUSIONSEL $14,995
10IMPALA LT $13,995
07 FORENZA GL $7,995
07SPECTRAEX $9,495
08 Ranger $10,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
BUICK ‘08 LACROSSE
EXL
Silver/Grey leather,
sunroof, 13k miles
$17,000
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
CADILLAC `05 SRX
AWD, V-6, gold with
tan interior, loaded,
91,000 miles. Asking
$11,900. Please call
570-760-7550
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
09 CADILLAC DTS
PERFORMANCE
PLATINUM silver,
black leather,
42,000 miles
08 CHEVY AVEO
red, auto, 4 cyl
07 FORD FUSION SE
Red, 4 cyl, sunroof
07 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, black, V6
07 CHRYSLER PT
Cruiser, white,
auto, 4 cyl.,
68k miles
07 CHRYSLER PT
Cruiser black,
auto, 4 cyl
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 LINCOLN ZEPHYR
grey, tan leather,
sun roof
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
00 ACURA TL
black, tan leather,
sunroof, auto
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
speed, 62k miles,
$12,500
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
07 JEEP COMPASS LT
Olive green 4 cyl.,
auto, 4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT
Blue, grey leather,
7 passenger mini
van
07 CHRYSLER TOWN
& COUNTRUY SILVER,
7 passenger mini
van
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 FORD EXPLORER
XLT, black, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LTD
blue, grey leather
4x4
06 NISSAN TITAN KING
CAB SE white, auto
50k miles 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
red, V6, AWD
05 FORD ESCAPE LTD
green, tan leather,
V6, 4x4
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
04 CHEVY TAHOE LT
4x4 Pewter, grey
leather, 3rd seat
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
red, tan leather,
3rd seat awd
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, silver (AWD)
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
Z71, green, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB SLT SILVER,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO
RT silver, 2 tone
leather, 3rd seat,
4x4
03 FORD RANGER XLT
SUPER CAB
red, auto V6, 4x4
03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LTZ, blue, two tone
leather, V6, 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION
XLT, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
02 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE, Sage, sun
roof, autop, 4x4
01 FORD F150 XLT
white, super cab,
4x4 truck
01 FORD F150 XLT
Blue/tan, 4 door,
4x4 truck
00 CHEVY SILVERADO
XCAB, 2WD truck,
burgundy
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO
MARK III CONVERSION
VAN. Hightop. 93K.
7 passenger.
TV/VCP/Stereo.
Loaded. Great con-
dition. $3,495
(570) 574-2199
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK ‘09 ENCLAVE
CXL top of the line.
AWD, 50K original
miles. 1 owner.
Cocoa brown
metallic. Dual sun-
roofs, power mem-
ory cooled and
heated seats. 3rd
row seating. DVD
rear screen, navi-
gation system, bal-
ance of factory
warranty.
Bought new over
$50,000. Asking
$25,900. Trade ins
welcome
570-466-2771
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
BUICK ‘98
CENTURY CUSTOM
V6, BARGAIN
PRICE! $2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CADILLAC ‘00 DTS
Tan, satellite
radio, leather,
moon roof, loaded
excellent
condition. 136k
miles. $4,995.
570-814-2809
CADILLAC ‘11 STS
13,000 Miles,
Showroom
condition. Price
reduced
$34,900
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 59k miles.
$14,975 or trade.
(570) 639-5329
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘04
MONTE CARLO
Silver with Black
Leather, Sunroof,
Very Sharp!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. FWD. Leather
interior. Great
shape. A/C. CD.
All power.
$6,900. Negotiable
New inspection &
tires.
(570) 760-1005
FORD `07 FOCUS
SES Sedan
Alloy wheels, heat-
ed seats, CD play-
er, rear spoiler, 1
owner, auto, air, all
power, great gas
mileage, priced to
be sold immedi-
ately! $7,995 or
best offer.
570-614-8925
VOLKSWAGEN ‘00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER `05
300
LIMITED EDITION
All wheel drive.
Loaded with all
power options.
Black metallic
with grey leather
interior.
Heated front
seats, sunroof,
6 disc CD
changer, satellite
radio, cruise
control, keyless/
alarm. Too many
options to list.
79,400 miles.
Sharp car, good
condition.
$10,500.
Call 814-9574
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
‘11 DODGE
DAKOTA CREW
4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl.
14k, Factory
Warranty.
$20,899
‘11 Ford Escape
XLT, 4x4, 26k,
Factory Warranty,
6 Cylinder
$19,899
‘11 Nissan Rogue
AWD, 17k, Factory
Warranty.
$18,799
‘10 Subaru
Forester Prem.
4WD 30k Factory
warranty, power
sunroof.
$18,799
‘08 Chrysler
Sebring Conv.
Touring 6 cyl.
32k $12,899
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
4x4 65k, a title.
$12,799
‘06 FORD FREESTAR
62k, Rear air A/C
$7,999
‘03 F250 XL
Super Duty only
24k! AT-AC,
$8,499
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,199
‘11 Toyota Rav 4
4x4 AT
only 8,000 miles,
alloys, power sun-
roof. new condition.
$22,599
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$40,900. call
570-760-2365
Travel
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 3G
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils .
**As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f M a rc h 2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 6 /15 /12 .
®
THE NUM BER 1NISSAN DEAL ER IN THE S TATE O F PA IN NEW VEHIC L E
S AL ES VO L UM E AND C US TO M ER S ATIS FAC TIO N FO R APRIL 2012**
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
TT
H H
EE
RR
AA
CC
E E
II
S S
O O
NN
2012N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S
S E DA N
STK#21003
M O DEL# 13112
V IN# 144280
M SRP $24,155
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
SA VE
$5000 O FF
M SR P !
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, AM / F M / CD,
T ilt, Cru is e In telligen tK ey,
Cru is e & M u ch M o re!
+ T/T
B U Y FOR
$
19,155
*
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S S E DA N L IM ITE D E DITION
6 Cyl, CVT , S u n ro o f, S m o ked Allo y
W heels , Po w erS ea t, In telligen t
K ey & M u ch M o re!
STK#N21359
M O DEL# 16112
V IN# 819004
M SRP $33,835
B U Y FOR
$
27,8 35
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE
$6000 O FF
M SR P !
2012N IS S A N FRON TIE R
K IN G CA B S V 4X4
6 Cyl, Au to , PW , PL , Allo ys ,
K eyles s , S p ra y In Bed lin er,
Utilitra ck S ys tem , Blu eto o th
*$249 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,738; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2202.50. $525 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK#N22106
M O DEL# 31412
V IN# 453073
M SRP $29,365
B U Y FOR
$
24,995
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$
249
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
$
18 9
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,319; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l
d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1810 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
$
28 9
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,948; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l
d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
B IG JU NE
B IG JU NE B IG JU NE
O VER 25 O VER 25
A VA IL A B L E A VA IL A B L E
2012N IS S A N ROGUE S V
A W D
4 Cyl, CVT , Allo yW heel, Po w er
S ea t, Ba cku p Ca m era ,
In telligen tK ey & M u ch M o re!
STK#N21528
M O DEL# 22412
V IN# 382082
M SRP $26,870
B U Y FOR
$
22,8 70
*
+ T/T
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $4000 O FF M SR P
O N A LL 2012 SV
R O G U ES IN STO C K
$
229
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
*$229 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,779; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
O VER 70 O VER 70
A VA IL A B L E A VA IL A B L E
2012N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S
COUP E
4 Cyl, CVT , PW , PL ,
Cru is e, Allo ys , F lo o r
M a ts & M u ch M o re!
STK#N21885
M O DEL# 15112
V IN# 241072
M SRP $25,620
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,620
*
+ T/T
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE
$5000 O FF
M SR P !
$
229
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
*$229 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13,066; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
2012N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R
S 4X4
6 Cyl, Au to , 4x4, PW , PDL ,
Allo ys , K eyles s & M u ch M o re!
STK#N21939
M O DEL# 25012
V IN# 603187
M SRP $31,965
B U Y FOR
$
27,495
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $250 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$
299
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,663; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2202.50. $1750 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E P R IC E
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E P R IC E
2012N IS S A N A RM A DA S V
4X4
V8, Au to , PW , PL , CD, Ba cku p Ca m era ,
Allo ys , Ru n n in g Bo a rd s , Bo s e, Hea ted
M irro r, Blu eto o th & M u ch M o re!
*$499 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $20,518; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2202.50. $100 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK#N21418
M O DEL# 26212
V IN# 603187
M SRP $45,595
B U Y FOR
$
37,995
*
+ T/T
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
$
499
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
OR
L A ST O NE A T L A ST O NE A T
TH IS P R IC E TH IS P R IC E
8 Cyl, Au to , 4x4, Allo y
W heels , PW , PL ,
AM / F M / CD, K eyles s
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs .
STK#N21270
M O DEL# 34412
V IN# 306347
M SRP $34,880
2012N IS S A N TITA N
K IN G CA B S V 4X4
B U Y FOR
$
26,995
*
+ T/T
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $1350 VAL U E TR U CK S AVIN GS
SA VE O VER
$7500 O FF
M SR P !
2 A T TH IS P R IC E 2 A T TH IS P R IC E
2 A T TH IS P R IC E 2 A T TH IS P R IC E
2 A T TH IS P R IC E 2 A T TH IS P R IC E
2 A T TH IS P R IC E 2 A T TH IS P R IC E
L A ST O NE A T TH IS P R IC E L A ST O NE A T TH IS P R IC E
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
, V6, Limited, CD, Pwr. Leather
Heated Seats, Safety Canopy, Side Impact
Safety Pkg., 17” Chrome Wheels, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo
Convenience Pkg.,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
Automatic, 16” Steel Wheels,
Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Door
Locks, Air, Keyless Entry
with Remote, Safety
Canopy, Side Air Bags
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
24
Mos.
XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety
Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PDL,
PW, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass,
Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless
Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience
Pkg.,CD,
XLT, Safety Canopy,
Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s
Seat, Air, Auto., PDL, Fog Lamps, Privacy
Glass, Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Rear Cargo
Convenience Pkg., Keyless Entry,
CD, PW,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
24
Mos.
Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL,
Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air
Bags, Message Center, 1st & 2nd
Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys.,
Keyless Entry, Sirius
Satellite Radio,
24
Mos.
Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message Center
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/4/12.
24
Mos.
CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt,
PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air
Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message
Center,
%
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PLUS NO PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
*
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 5G
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
ACCORD LX
4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW
*
MPG
34 HWY
$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,149.90.
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Used Cars
7-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Warranty
12 month/12,000-Mile Non Powertrain Warranty
150-Point Mechanical & Appearance Inspection
Vehicle History Report
*From the original date of frst use when said as a new vehicle
*Prior sales excluded. Tax & tags Extra. Expires 7-9-12
2007 HONDA PILOT EXL
Black, 56K Miles
$20,950
50 TOCHOOSE FROM
08 HONDA CRV LX
Lt Blue, 63K
$15,250
09 HONDA ACCORDEX CPE
Blue, 33K
$18,950
08 HONDA ACCORDEXL SDN
Gray, 33K
$18,950
08 HONDA ACCORDLXP SDN
Silver, 22K
$15,950
09 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN
Red, 8K
$16,950
09 HONDA CIVIC HYBRIDSEDAN
Black, 37K
$17,950
11 HONDA CROSSTOUR EXL 4WD
Green, 18K
$29,950
11 HONDA CRZ EX
White, 6K
$19,500
09 HONDA PILOT EX
Silver, 33K
$23,750
09 HONDA ACCORDEXL-V6
Silver, 26K
$20,950
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualified
buyers for limited term.
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,952.95
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
• Model #FB2F5CEW • 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission • Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
• Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
• Cruise Control • Remote Entry •
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers • ABS
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA PILOT LX
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $17,388.00
Per Mo.
Lease
• 250-hp 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC®
• 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
• 8 Passenger Seating • Variable
Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4®) • Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Con-
trol • Power WIndows/Locks/Mirrors
• Front and Rear Air Conditioning with
Air-Filtration System • 229-Watt AM/
FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers
including Subwoofer • Remote Entry
• ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Thresh-
old Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection
System (OPDS)
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA CR-V EX
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
• Model RM4H5CJW • 185-hp
• 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder
Engine • Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control
System™ • Vehicle Stability Assist™ (VSA®) with
Traction Control • Automatic Transmission
• Cruise Control • A/C • One-Touch Power
Moonroof with Tilt Feature • Remote Entry
System • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink®
• Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines
• 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6
Speakers • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio
• Pandora® Internet Radio compatibility
• SMS Text Message Function
• USB Audio Interface
• Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags
(SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS)
• Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACUTAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE.
(15) 07-10 CRV 4WD’s
STARTING FROM
3
0
0
H
O
N
D
A
V
E
H
IC
L
E
S
TO
CHOOSE FROM!
TO
P
DO
LLAR
FO
R
YO
UR
TRADE!
$14,950
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 7G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
2009 JEEP
WRANGLER 4X4
STK#120428F
AS LOWAS
$279
NOW
$18,900
WE HAND PICK THE BEST NEW CAR TRADE-INS & LEASE TURN-INS & SELL THEM
RIGHT HERE IN TUNKHANNOCK AT A FRACTION OF THEIR ORIGINAL PRICE.
THEY DRIVE LIKE NEW & SOME SMELL LIKE NEW BUT COST THOUSANDS LESS.
www.TunkAutoMart.com
10 DODGE AVENGER SXT
One Owner, Local Trade, Rear Spoiler ............... $14,400
11 DODGE AVENGER LUX
6 cylinder, 29 MPG HWY, Leather Seating,
Remote Start, Redline Red.................................... $19,300
08 DODGE NITRO SXT 4X4
Local Trade 6 Cylinder, Automatic, Power
WIndows, Locks..................................................... $14,300
10 JEEP PATRIOT LIMITED 4X4
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle,
Leather Seating, Sunroof, 24,778 Miles.............. $19,500
11 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE 4X4
Leather Seating, 6 Disc CD Changer, Power 6 Way,
Driver Seat, Fog Lamps, Four Wheel Drive........ $21,600
10 DODGE CALIBER MAINSTREET
Only 26,000 Miles, Former Chrysler Company Vehicle,
Remote Start, UConnect with Voice Command............ $15,400
10 DODGE AVENGER RT
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle,
GPS Navigation, Leather Seating, Sunroof, V6 ..... $18,600
11 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING SEDAN
V6, 6 Speed Auto,
Power 8 Way Driver Seat ..................................... $17,900
11 DODGE NITRO 4X4
V-6, 18,000 Miles, Satellite Radio,
Heated Mirrors....................................................... $18,900
07 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
Only 48,900 miles, Pwr. Sunroof, 6 cyl.
Automatic, Jeep Green Metallic Ext................... $13,200
07 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
Great Shape, Only 56, 386 Miles,
V-6, Local Trade...................................................... $12,800
08 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
Hard to Find 6-Speed Manual,
One Owner, Local Trade........................................ $15,800
10 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR LS AWD
All Wheel Drive, V6, Local Trade......................... $17,900
11 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
Only 13,000 Miles, V6, Automatic,
Power Windows, Power Locks,
Shift on the Fly Four Wheel Drive........................ $19,500
11 FORD FIESTA SE
Only 7,639 Miles, Automatic, One Owner,
Sync Voice Automated System............................ $17,300
10 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
Power Side Slide Doors, Rear Air,
Stow’N Go Seating................................................. $19,900
10 DODGE JOURNEY SXT AWD
Only 25,500 Miles, All Wheel Drive, 6 Disc
CD Player, Sirius Satellite Radio.......................... $20,900
10 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4X4
Only 22, 000 Miles, Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle,
Hardtop, Pwr. Windows & Locks, Automatic............... $26,800
11 FORD TAURUS LIMITED
Tuxedo Black Metallic, Leather Seating, Reverse
Sensing and Rear Camera, Chrome Wheels..... $24,900
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4
V8, Former Chrysler Company Vehicle,
Only 9,100 Miles, UConnect w/
Voice Command, Sirius Satellite Radio.............. $27,400
11 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CREW
Brilliant Black Exterior, Rear DVD,
Rear Power lilt Gate, Only 18,000 Miles.............. $22,200
11 FORD MUSTANG V6 PREMIUM
Red Candy Metallic Ext, Leather Seating,
SYNC Voice Activated System, Shaker Audio .. $23,700
11 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
Rear DVD. Rear Back up Camera,
Black Cherry Exterior, Only 15,900 miles............ $24,900
06 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING
Only 36,934 Miles, Cool Vanilla Ext.,
Leather Seating, Pwr. Sunroof............................. $14,400
11 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
Stone White Exterior, Rear DVD,
Rear Back up Camera. Only 18,464 miles........... $24,800
11 DODGE CHARGER
Katzkin leather Interior, Exterior Sport Graphic Pkg., Rear Deck Lid,
Spoiler, Hard to find Blackberry Exterior
only 11, 000 miles.................................................... $23,900
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle, Never
titled, Automatic, Only 9,000 Miles...................... $20,800
10 CHEVROLET CAMARO LT
Only 13,500 Miles, One Owner, Local Trade, Synergy
Green Sunroof, Rear Spoiler, Synergy Special Pkg,..$23,800
10 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB TRX4 4X4
Local Trade, One Owner, HEMI V8,
Bucket Seats, Deep Water Blue Ext. ................. $21,900
10 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA 4X4
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle, Leather
Seating, GPS Navigation, Trailer Tow Group..... $24,900
11 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500 DURAMAX DIESEL FLATBED
One Owner, local Trade, Dual Rear Wheels, 4 Wheel
Drive, Automatic, Hidden Gooseneck Trailer Hitch..... $38,800
11 DODGE DURANGO CREW AWD
Former Chrysler Group Development Vehicle,
Hemi V-8, Leather Seating, Navigation,
Sunroof ................................................................... $35,500
10 FORD FUSION SE
Power Moonroof, Rear Spoiler, Power Driver
Seat, 18 inch Aluminum Sport Wheels, Car Fax
One Owner, Only 21,541 Miles.............................. $18,900
11 RAM 1500 SLT OUTDOORSMAN 4X4
Only 9,000 Miles, Former Chrysler Group
Company Vehicle, GPS Navigation, Power
Sunroof, Ram Cargo Management System....... $36,500
10 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED SKYSLIDER 4X4
Retractable Full Open Roof, Leather Seating,
GPS Navigation, Only 7,000 miles........................ $25,600
11 DODGE JOURNEY CREW AWD
All Wheel Drive, 3rd Row Seating,
Rear Air/Heat, UConnect, Remote Start............. $24,600
11 CHRYSLER 300C AWD
All Wheel Drive, Never Titled, Former Chrysler Vehicle
Development Car, Blind Spot & Cross Path Detection,
Only 1,024 miles, 5.7 Hemi........................................... $36,800
Clearance Priced
For Quick Sale!
More Values...
Hand Picked Just for You!
DON’T RISK PAYINGTOO MUCH SOMEWHERE ELSE!
Tunkhannock Auto Mart
www.tunkautomart.com
888-323-6924
OPEN FRIDAYS
TIL 8:00 PM!
Prices are Plus Tax, Registration Fees and Documentation Fees. All payments are for 72 months to qualified buyers with excellent credit @ 6.99 APR. Your rate may
vary depending on credit rating status. $2499 down payment or trade equity. In addition to tax and registration, doc fees. Must take delivery by 6/8/12
Jeep
®
2007 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
STK#120430A
NOW
$12,800
2011 CHRYSLER
200 TOURING
CONVERTIBLE
2012 FORD
MUSTANG V6
CONVERTIBLE
2011 CHRYSLER
200 TOURING
CONVERTIBLE
STK#120405B STK#120316H STK#120413E
AS LOWAS
$310
AS LOWAS
$313
NOW
$20,700
NOW
$25,900
NOW
$20,900
2011 DODGE
DURANGO
CREW AWD
2010 JEEP WRANGLER
SPORT 4X4
STK#120403F
STK#120501H
AS LOWAS
$361
NOW
$14,300
2008 DODGE NITRO
SXT 4X4
STK#120514E
NOW
$32,500
NOW
$23,700
2010 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT
2011 DODGE
CHARGER
2011 HYUNDAI
SONATA
STK#120522C STK #120327B
NOW
$18,900
NOW
$23,900
2011 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE 4X4
2011 FORD
TAURUS LIMITED
STK#120515E STK#120405L
AS LOWAS
$431
AS LOWAS
$381
NOW
$27,800
NOW
$24,900
2009 SUBARU
IMPREZA 2.5i AWD
2012 RAM 1500 ST
QUAD CAB
2010 MAZDA
6i SPORT
STK#120515A STK#120503E STK#120503D
AS LOWAS
$262
AS LOWAS
$311
NOW
$16,300
NOW
$20,800
NOW
$17,900
2011
FORD MUSTANG V6
PREMIUM
2010 VOLVO XC60
3.2 AWD
STK #120405A STK#120525B
NOW
$23,700
NOW
$30,900
AS LOWAS
$361
2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
3500 HD DURAMAX
DIESEL FLATBED
2011 CHRYSLER 300C
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
STK#120525A STK#120329F
NOW
$38,800
NOW
$36,800
HEMI
V8
AS LOWAS
$364
ONLY
1,032
MILES
2011 HONDA
ELEMENT EX 4WD
STK#120413J
NOW
$20,600
AS LOWAS
$308
2006 CHRYSLER 300
TOURING
STK#120523A
NOW
$14,400
ONLY
12,000
MILES
4X4
ONLY
36,900
MILES
2009 FORD
FOCUS SE SEDAN
STK#120503A
NOW
$13,900
AS LOWAS
$194
AS LOWAS
$235
STK#120428G
NOW
$22,400
ONLY
7,884
MILES
AS LOWAS
$218
ONLY
26,827
MILES
AS LOWAS
$279
AS LOWAS
$175
WVON¡MO VALLEV
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Reliable
Cars
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle
up to 36 months
(See sales representative for details)
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle
up to 36 months
1339N. River Street,
Plains, PA. 18702
829-2043
www.jo-danmotors.com
J
O
-
DAN
MOTORS
TAX AND TAGS ADDITIONAL We Now Offer Buy Here-Pay Here!
LOWDOWN PAYMENT CLEAN, INSPECTED VEHICLES
6 MO. WARRANTY ON ALL VEHICLES • FULL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
We Service ALL Makes & Models
Family Owned & Operated for over 40 years
‘ 08 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE
Pearl, Leather, 7-Pass, 48K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
23,995
‘ 08 MERCURY SABLE
Light Blue, Only 16K Miles! Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . .
$
15,995
‘ 10 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING
Burgundy, 4 Cyl. , PW, PDL, 34K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
13,995
‘ 07 SUBARU LEGACY LIMITED
Black, AWD, Leather, Sunroof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
13,995
‘ 08 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
Copper, 5-Speed, Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
12,995
‘ 09 CHEVY AVEO LT
White, Sedan, Auto, CD . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. .
$
10,995
‘ 07 DODGE CALIBER
Orange Met. , 4 Cyl. , Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
10,495
‘ 03 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER LS
Pewter, 4 Dr. , Only 32K Miles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
‘ 07 CHEVY COLORADO
White, Auto. , A/C, Reg. Cab. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
$
9,995
‘ 08 PONTIAC G5
Red, Cpe. , 5-Speed, Spoiler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
‘ 90 CHRYSLER LeBARON CONV.
White, 1-Owner, V-6, Only 29K Miles . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . .
$
8,995
‘ 03 SUZUKI INTRUDER
800CC, Volusia Edition, 4K Miles, Black. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .
$
3,995
SOLD
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI METALS
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487
GOLD - SILVER
COINS - JEWELRY
Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM
No nonsense guarantee
We will beat any competitors
advertised price by up to 20%
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘02
TAURUS SES
LIKE NEW!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD MUSTANG ‘07 GT
PREMIUM CONVERTIBLE
V8 standard
engine, leather
60,0000+ miles
$15,000.
570-690-2408
HONDA `05 ACCORD
LX
Black, 1 owner,
85,000 miles, great
condition, $10,900
570-328-6146
HONDA `07
CR-V EXL
Glacier blue, grey
leather interior,
42,000 miles.
4 cylinder, auto.
Excellent Condition!
$19,500.
570-954-1435
HONDA ‘04 ACCORD
LX SEDAN. 162k
miles. New battery,
excellent condition.
Auto, single owner,
runs great. Upgrad-
ed stereo system. 4
snow tires and rims
& after market rims.
Air, standard power
features. Kelly Blue
Book $7800.
Asking $6800
570-466-5821
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
HONDA ‘08 ACCORD
4 door, 4 cylinder,
auto Price reduced
$15,695
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
HONDA ‘09
CIVIC EX
42k, sunroof, alloys,
$15,495
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
MERCURY `05 SABLE
LS PREMIUM
50,400 miles
Moon roof, alloys,
all power, leather.
Original owner, per-
fectly maintained,
needs nothing.
Trade-in’s welcome.
Financing available.
$8,495.
570-474-6205
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MARZAK MOTORS
601 Green Ridge St, Scranton
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
‘98 VOLVO
STATION WAGON
NEW Listing!
Cross Country, AWD
144,000 miles
$3,695
‘00 FORD WIND-
STAR LX
NEW Listing! 3rd
seat, ice cold air,
132,000 miles
$2,995
BUICK ‘91 ROAD-
MASTER Station
Wagon, white with
woodgrain exterior,
gold leather interior,
3rd seat. Runs
great, high mileage.
$1800
MERCURY ‘99
GRAND MARQUIS
Gold, 4 door, tan
interior, runs great,
116,000 miles, new
inspection $4500
LINCOLN ‘02
TOWNCAR
Signature series,
Silver, grey leather
interior, 99,000
miles, runs great
$5295
AUDI ‘95 A6
2.8 QUATRO
Black, 4 door, grey
leather interior,
loaded $3500
CHEVY ‘05 AVEO
Silver, 4 door, grey
cloth interior, A/C,
re-built transmission
with warranty, 4 cyl.
79,000 miles
$5200
MERCURY ‘96
GRAND MARQUIS
4 door, gold with tan
cloth interior, only
50k miles. Loaded.
Must See! $4200
Warranties Avail-
able
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
570-955-5792
TOYOTA ‘09 CAMRY
18,000 Miles,
1 owner, 4 cylinder.
$16,900
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
OLDSMOBILE `97
CUTLASS SUPREME
Museum kept, never
driven, last Cutlass
off the GM line. Crim-
son red with black
leather interior. Every
available option in-
cluding sunroof. Per-
fect condition. 300
original miles.
$21,900 or best offer.
Call 570-650-0278
TOYOTA `05
SCION TC
Manual, AM/FM
stereo, MP3 multi
disc, rear spoiler,
moon roof, alloys,
ground effects,
90,100 miles, Air.
$9,000, negotiable.
570-760-0765
570-474-2182
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
VOLVO `01 V70
Station wagon. Sun-
roof. ABS brakes.
Radio, tape & CD.
A/C. Heated leather
seats. New alterna-
tor. Recently serv-
iced and inspected.
2 extra tires. 161K
miles. $4,600.
570-714-1296
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `85
CORVETTE
REGISTERED
CLASSIC
Red with blue plexi-
removable roof,
34,000 miles,
$12,000, OBO.
(570) 579-8811
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker
Sedan. 440 Engine.
Power Steering &
brakes. 34,500
original miles.
Always garaged.
Reduced to $5995
Firm. 883-4443
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
GET RIDOF
HIS STUFF
BEFORE YOU GET RID OF HIM
WE’LL HELP YOU
timesleader.com
Plus a FREE
BREAKFAST
fromMcDonald’s.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTING AT
Package includes:
• Sales Kit
• Garage Sale Signs
• A FREE unsold merchandisead
• Your sale mapped FREE on
timesleader.com
and on our mobile app
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE
Golden Anniversary.
Silver/Black. New
Tires. Extras. Excel-
lent Condition.
19,000 miles
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05
V-ROD VRSCA
Blue pearl,
excellent condition,
3,100 miles, factory
alarm with extras.
$8,900.
Tony 570-237-1631
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2009 SPORTSTER 883
Very low mileage.
Dark blue. Garage
kept.Asking $5,299.
570-885-5000.
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
KAWASAKI ‘03
KLR 650.Green
w/cargo bag. Excel-
lent condition.
$3,000
Rick 570-216-0867
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
POLARIS ‘00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
To place your
ad call...829-7130
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
1993 Pace Arrow
Fleetwood RV, 33
feet, good condi-
tion, low mileage,
must sell! $12,000
call 570-208-2883
SPORTSMAN
CAMPER ‘00
30’, 10’ slide.
Queen bed, A/C. 16’
canopy. Sleeps six.
$7,500, OBO.
Near Lake Winola
570-239-6848
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
Line up a place to live
in classified!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `03
S-10
6 cylinder, 2x4 auto-
matic, 45k, extend-
ed cab and cap.
$8,500
(570)722-8650
CHEVY ‘08
TRAILBLAZER LT
Mint condition, V-6,
4x4, sunroof, 51k
miles, $16,495
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘05
SILVERADO X CAB
2 WHEEL DRIVE
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DODGE ‘05 GRAND
CARAVAN
SXT Special Edition.
Stow and go, beau-
tiful van. Leather
heated seats with
sunroof, tinted win-
dows, luggage
rack. Brandy color,
85K miles.
$10,875 negotiable
570-301-4929
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$5,495. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new. $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00
EXPLORER XLT
eXTRA cLEAN!
4X4.
$3,995.
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘04 EXPLORER
V6. Clean,
Clean SUV!
4WD
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘04 RANGER
Super Cab
One Owner, 4x4,
5 Speed,
Highway miles.
Sharp Truck!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP `96 GRAND
CHEROKEE V8
Automatic, four
wheel drive, air
conditioning, new
tires, brakes &
transmission.
$3,300.
570-972-9685
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `07
SIERRA 1500
Regular Cab
37,000 miles,
6 cylinder auto,
4 x 4. Black
Excellent condition.
NEW PRICE
$14,000
570-954-1435
JEEP 02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder 4 WD, air
conditioning power
windows, door
locks, cruise, dual
air bags, tilt wheel,
AM/FM/CD. keyless
remote. 130k miles.
$5400.
570-954-3390
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
HOME HEALTH
CARE AGENCY
- 5 County Area -
Cash flow $125,000
570- 407- 2716
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 9G
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WE’RE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, Sportback, and SX4 Sedan; $1,500 Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki
Grand Vitara and Kizashi; $2,000 Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Equator. Buy now for sal price includes $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator, SX4 Crossover, SX4 Sportback,
Kizashi and Grand Vitara. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 0% financing in lieu of Suzuki Manufacturers
rebates, Owner Loyalty is applicable. Buy now for sale prices valid on IN STOCK vehicles only. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. **0%APR in lieu of Rebates with approved credit (for “S” tier approvals). $13.89
for every $1000 Financed for 72 Months. Offer is with No Money Down. Offer Ends July 2, 2012. See salesperson for details. ***Based on 2010 and 2011 President’s Club Standings.
0
%
APR
FINANCING AVAILABLE
TO QUALIFIED
BUYERS*
A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING***
$
25,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
29,789*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
27,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
2,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
4.0L V6 w/ Automatic Transmission,
Dual Stage Airbags, 17” Aluminum
Wheels, 4-Wheel Anti-Lock
Braking System, Six Standard
Airbags, Power Windows,
Power Locks
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR
CREW CAB SPORT 4X4
2012 SUZUKI
KIZASHI S AWD
Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel
Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Dual
Zone Digital Climate Control,
Automatic CVT Transmission,
TouchFree Smart Key, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Molded
Mud flap package
Stk# S2160
$
19,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel
Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Power
Mirrors, 6 Speed Transmission
2012 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AWD
$
14,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
Stk#S1987
MSRP
$
18,019*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
MSRP
$
23,669*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
NEW
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 LE SEDAN
MSRP
$
18,419*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2083
LE Popular Package, 8 Standard
Airbags, 6 Speed Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels
$
15,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
Stk#S2005
Alberto from Wyoming
Becky From Wilkes-Barre
Alicia from Scranton Theresa from Forty Fort
Dennis & Susan from Wyoming Rosalie from Wilkes-Barre
$
20,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
8 Standard Airbags, Dual Digital
Climate Control, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Power
Mirrors, AM/FM/CD, Alloy
Wheels, Power Seat
2012 SUZUKI
KIZASHI SE AWD
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
24,839*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S1979
$
20,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
4 Wheel Drive, Voice Activated
Navigation w/ Blue Tooth,
Automatic Transmission, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Power
Mirrors, Electronic Stability Control
2012 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4WD
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
24,284*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2132
I
Love
M
y
S
u
zu
k
i
C
ar
C
lu
b
!
Join
The
TODAY!
THESE
PEOPLE
DID!
We’re making it easy to get behind the wheel
with deals that will really send your heart racing!
BE IN THE
WINNER’S
CIRCLE
0
%
APR**
HAS BEEN
EXTENDED
0
%
APR
AVAILABLE
UP TO
72 MOS.**
EXTENDED
NEW NEW
NEW
NEW NEW
0
%
APR
AVAILABLE
UP TO
72 MOS.**
EXTENDED
0
%
APR
AVAILABLE
UP TO
72 MOS.**
EXTENDED
0
%
APR
AVAILABLE
UP TO
72 MOS.**
EXTENDED
0
%
APR
AVAILABLE
UP TO
72 MOS.**
EXTENDED
0
%
APR
AVAILABLE
UP TO
72 MOS.**
EXTENDED
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
of Scranton - NEPA
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 • 1-888-880-6537
www.rjburne.com Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4
1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
WYOMING AVE. E
X
P
W
A
Y
8
1 *TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certifed
2012 Cadillac SRX
Luxury Edition
MSRP $43,085
LEASE IT!
39 MONTHS
$
429
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX AWD Luxury Edition $43,085 MSRP. $429 per
month plus 9% PA sales tax total $467 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles
per year. 39 Monthly payments total $18,213 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles.
$2000 down payment plus $429 frst payment plus tax and tags due at delivery.
Total due at delivery $2650 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF
A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear
and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit
approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per
thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.
2012 Cadillac CTS
All Wheel Drive
MSRP $40,360
LEASE IT!
39 MONTHS
$
279
Lease price based on a 2012 CTS Sdn with All Wheel Drive $40,360 MSRP.
$279 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $306 per month. 39 Month lease
10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $11,934 $.25/mile penalty over
32,500 miles. $2000 down payment plus $279 frst payment plus tax and tags
due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2539 plus tag fees. MUST BE A
CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee re-
sponsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires
ALLY Bank Tier S credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
Example payment per thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.
2012 Cadillac SRX
Front Wheel Drive
MSRP $36,075
LEASE IT!
24 MONTHS
$
329
$
0
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
Per Month
+ Tax*
Per Month
+ Tax*
Per Month
+ Tax*
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX FWD Luxury Edition $36,075 MSRP. $329 per
month plus 9% PA sales tax total $358 per month. 24 Month lease 10,000 miles
per year. 24 Monthly payments total $8,616 $.25/mile penalty over 20,000 miles.
$2000 down payment plus $329 frst payment plus tax and tags due at delivery.
Total due at delivery $2550 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF
A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LEASE. Leasee responsible for excessive wear
and tear. Must take delivery by 5/31/2012. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S credit
approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example payment per
thousand 16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.
2008 Cadillac
CTS
Sunroof, Onstar,
XM, 22K Miles
$
25,998
2007 Cadillac
STS AWD
Dark Blue, Cashmere, Leather, Sunroof, Chrome
Wheels, XM, Onstar, One Owner Low Mileage
$
18,997
2011 Cadillac
SRX AWD
Ultra View Sunroof, All Wheel
Drive, Heated & Memory Seats
$
36,991
2006
Cadillac DTS
$
18,996
2006 Cadillac
CTS
White Diamond w/ Cashmere Interior,
Special Edition, Sports Package
$
16,996
Premium Select Pre-Owned Cars
$
0
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
$
0
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
Memory Settings, Chrome Wheels,
Dark Blue, 26,762 Miles
MEMORIAL DAY EVENT • OPEN MEMORIAL DAY 10AM-2PM
2007 Cadillac
DTS
#12505B, Cognac/Frost, Leather,
Navigation, Chrome Wheels, Sunroof,
Memory & Heated Seats, Only 34,154 Miles
$
23,997
2005 STS
by Cadillac
Redfre Leather,
Chrome Wheels, XM Radio
$
14,995
USED
CARS
HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 7:00pm
Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm
1-888-307-7077
*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & tags. All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approve thru ally bank. See dealer for details.
2010 HYUNDAI TUSCON
$
17,995
Front Wheel
Drive, Local One
Owner, Only
18K Miles
2010 DODGE CHARGER
SXT
$
16,995
Silver Beauty,
Tons of
Warranty
2011 NISSAN ROGUE
$
19,995
All Wheel Drive,
Silver Beauty,
Only 12K Miles
2011 DODGE CHALLENGER
SE
$
23,995
6 Cyl., Power
Galore, Factory
Warranty
2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL
$
33,995
All Wheel Drive,
Just 19K Perfectly
Maintained Miles
2011 FORD FUSION SE
$
17,995
V6, One Owner
2005 HYUNDAI SONATA
$
8,995
2007 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 PICKUP
$
9,850
4x2, W/T Pkg.
2011 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ
$
18,900
White Beauty,
Loaded With
Luxury
2010 DODGE CALIBER
SXT
$
14,995
Inferno Red
Beauty,
Power Pkg.
2010 NISSAN ALTIMA
$
16,995
Just Arrived,
One Owner
$
15,995
Black Beauty,
Leather Seating
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
TOURING
$
14,995
Preferred
Equipment Pkg.
2010 DODGE AVENGER
SXT
$
14,995
Power Equipped,
Local Trade
2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT
$
26,995
“All Wheel Drive”,
8-Passenger
Seating, Tons Of
Warranty
2010 MAZDA MIATA
CONVERTIBLE
$
22,995
Sport Pkg,
13K Miles
2012 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
$
23,995
Just 13K Miles,
Not Even
Broken InYet
2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT’S
$
12,995
Choose From 6,
Balance Of
Warranty
2011 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
$
19,995
Preferred
Equipment Pkg.
2010 VW BEETLE COUPE
FROM
2011 CHEVY AVEO LT’S
Choose From 5,
Balance of
Warranty
Choose From 3,
LT Pkg.
2011 MAZDA CX-7
$
23,995
All Wheel Drive,
Just 17K Miles,
Black Beauty
2011 HYUNDAI SANTE FE
$
20,995
“All Wheel Drive”,
4 Cyl., Only
16K Miles
2011 CHEVY HHR WGN’S
2008 BUICK ENCLAVE
CXL
$
28,995
$
12,995 FROM
$
12,995 FROM
HEVY SILVERADO
CKUP
.
HEVY MALIBU LTZ
ty,
h
g
W BEETLE COUPE
2007 PONTIAC G5
COUPE
$
7,995
Local Trade,
Priced For
Action
2010 LINCOLN MKX AWD
$
28,995
Local One
Owner,
Just 23K Miles
2003 FORD F-350 CREW
CAB DUALLY
DIESEL 4X4
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 REG CAB 4X4
2003 GMC YUKON
DENALI AWD
2011 GMC SIERRA SLE
X-CAB 4X4
2009 CHEVY MALIBU LT 2012 JEEP LIBERTY SP
4X4
$
12,995
$
21,995
$
13,995
$
27,995
$
14,995
$
22,995
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 11G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
DUCTLESS A/C
$84.00 per
month
Call 570-736-
HVAC
(4822)
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Interior painting &
drywall install
DAVE JOHNSON
Expert Bathroom &
Room Remodeling,
Carpentry & Whole
House Renovations.
Licensed &Insured
570-819-0681
DRIVEWAYS,
SIDEWALKS,
STONE WORK
All Top Masonry.
Quality Work.
Call Bahram
570-855-8405
HUGHES
Construction
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
Seasonal Rooms
Roofing, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
PA040387
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
ROOFING & SIDING.
Kitchens & Baths.
Painting. All types
of construction.
Free Estimates. 35
years experience.
570-831-5510
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1024 Building &
Remodeling
SPRING
BUILDING/
REMODELING?
Call the
Building Industry
Association
for a list of
qualified members
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CAVUTO
CHIMNEY
SERVICE
& Gutter Cleaning
Free Estimates
Insured
570-709-2479
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
Connie’s Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Connie Mastruzzo
Brutski - Owner
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
HOUSEKEEPING
Dependable &
professional. Flexible
rates and hours.
Supplies provided.
References Available
357-1951, after 6pm
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
DEMPSKI
MASONRY
& CONCRETE
All Phases
Licensed & Insured
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-824-0130
DempskiMasonry.com
COVERT & SONS
CONCRETE CO.
Give us a call,
we’ll beat
them all!
570-696-3488 or
570-239-2780
D. Pugh
Concrete
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
Masonry - Concrete
Brick-Stonework.
Chimneys-Stucco”
“NO JOB TOO
SMALL”
“Damage repair
specialist”
570-466-2916
WYOMING VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations,pavers,
retaining wall sys-
tems, dryvit, flag-
stone, brick work.
Senior Citizen Dis-
count.570-287-4144
or 570-760-0551
1057Construction &
Building
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
1057Construction &
Building
ALR
CONSTRUCTION
INC.
Additions, siding,
windows, kitchens,
bathrooms, new
homes & more! A
name you can trust.
Guaranteed quality
you can depend on!
570-606-3462
PA087364
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
Skidster/Backhoe
With Operator
I can help make
your spring projects
a little easier. Fully
Insured. Reasonably
Priced.
Free Estimates.
Stan 570-328-4110
1099 Fencing &
Decks
ACTION FENCE
SPRING SALE:
Discounts on wood,
vinyl, chain link, alu-
minum and more!
Call today for a
FREE ESTIMATE!
1-888-FENCE-80
DECK BUILDERS
Of Northeast
Contracting Group.
we build any type,
size and design,
staining & power-
washing. If the deck
of your choice is not
completed within 5
days, your deck is
free!
570-338-2269
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
ETERNITY
FLOORING
*Hardwood
*Laminate
*Ceramic
*Porcelain
Installations
570-820-0233
Free Estimates
PA 089377
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1132 Handyman
Services
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
AFFORDABLE
Junk removal
cleanups,
cleanouts, Large or
small jobs. Fast
free estimates.
(570) 814-4631
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
SPRING CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
Mike’s $5-Up
Removal of Wood,
Trash and Debris.
Same Day Service.
826-1883 472-4321
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1156 Insurance
NEP NEPA A LONG LONG
TERM CARE TERM CARE
AGENCY AGENCY
Offering not only
long/short term
care, but
Medicare supple-
ment plans, life
insurance, annu-
ities for nursing
home care that
pay 6.7%.
Baby Boomers
Welcome!
570-580-0797
www www.babyboom .babyboom
broker broker.com .com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
Š1st Call JOHN’S Š
Landscaping/Hauling
Excavating:Bobcat
Shrub / Tree Trimming
Installation &Removal
Edging, Mulch, Stone
Lawns, Tilling &more!
Handyman/Masonry
ŠŠ 735-1883 ŠŠ
ARE YOU TIRED
OF BEING
RAKED?
Specializing In
Trimming and
Shaping of Bush-
es, Shrubs, Trees.
Also, Bed
Cleanup, Edging,
Mulch and Stone.
Call Joe.
570-823-8465 570-823-8465
Meticulous and
Affordable.
F Free ree E Estimates stimates
JAY’S LAWN SERVICE
Spring clean-ups,
mowing, mulching
and more!
Free Estimates
570-574-3406
TOUGH BRUSH,
mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs,
and hedge
trimming, tree prun-
ing, garden tilling,
Garden leveling,
Summer clean up.
Accepting new
customers this
season. Weekly &
bi-weekly
lawn care.
Fully Insured.
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding, Haz-
ard tree removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot clearing, Stone/
Soil delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1165 Lawn Care
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
Lawn & Garden
Service
Lawn cutting,
Garden
maintenance,
mulching, trimming,
Call 570-675-3517
or 570-855-2409
1183 Masonry
CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
chimneys & repairs.
Quality craftsmanship
at reasonable rates.
570-283-5254
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Licensed - Insured
Certified - Masonry
Concrete - Roofing
Quality
Craftsmanship
Guaranteed
Unbeatable Prices
Senior Citizen
Discounts
Free Estimates
570-574-4618 or
570-709-3577
OLD TIME MASONRY
Voted #1
MasonryContractor
Let A Real
Mason Bid Your
Project!
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Stone,
Chimney &
Stucco Repair,
Retaining Walls,
Patio & Pavers,
Stamped &
Colored
Concrete, etc.
Fully Insured.
570-466-0879
oldtimemasonry.com
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet
Refinishing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
AMERICA
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior.
20 years experi-
ence. Insured.
Senior Discount
570-855-0387
DEVALI’S PAINTING
Residential &
Commercial,
Internal / Exterior
Quality, dependable,
affordable service.
1-888-374-3082
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
Interior, & Exterior
Painting, $50.00 off
with this ad. Call
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
WITKOSKY PAINTING
Interior
Exterior,
Free estimates,
30 yrs experience
570-826-1719,
570-288-4311 &
570-704-8530
1213 Paving &
Excavating
AAA SEAL COATING
Residential & Com-
mercial. Profession-
al, reliable service.
Free Estimates.
570-822-6785
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIP
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1213 Paving &
Excavating
E & L and Son
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Quality Asphalt
repair. Cracked
ceilings. Residen-
tial & commercial.
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-396-3863
Keystone Paving
& Seal Coating
Services
Free Quotes. Resi-
dential / Commer-
cial. Parking lots /
driveways•drainage
•landscaping •hot
tar • asphalt paving
• seal coating. 10%
off for spring!
570-906-5239
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed & Insured
PA013253
570-868-8375
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
D.M. PLUMBING
& HEATING
Specializing in
boilers, furnaces
& water heaters.
10% senior
discount.
Licensed,Insured
&24 hour service
570-793-1930
1252 Roofing &
Siding
ABSOLUTELY FREE
ESTIMATES
E-STERN CO.
30 year architec
tural shingles. Do
Rip off & over the
top. Fully Insured
PA014370
570-760-7725 or
570-341-7411
EVERHART
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing, siding,
gutters, chimney
repairs & more.
Free Estimates,
Lowest Prices
570-855-5738
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SUMMER ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
1297 Tree Care
J BIRD TREE CARE
Tree trimming &
tree removal, shrub
maintenance and
mulch, free esti-
mates and fully
insured. Please call
570-362-3215
1300 Tutoring/
Teaching
TENNIS LESSONS
All Summer Long
Back Mt. Area Cer-
tified
Instructor/Coach
Group and Private
Adults-Children
over 10 years
No Membership or
Club Fees required
Email:joee3028@
comcast.net or Call
570-947-1981
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000.to $200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
We’re ready –Are
you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
NIGHTCLUB FOR SALE
Seven years old.
Luzerne County,
Wilkes-Barre area.
1,800 square feet
bar & 1,800
square feet ban-
quet hall. No
kitchen. Off street
parking for 20
cars. Partner con-
sidered.
$327,000, firm.
P.O. 2827
Wilkes-Barre
PA 18702
SALON FOR SALE
Profitable, growing
hair salon in ideal
location. Strong
customer base.
New equipment.
Owner relocating.
570-313-0343
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
Amana6500 BTU’s,
good condition.
$35. 570-883-0816.
AIR CONDITIONER
Fedders 12,000
BTU’S runs good
$100. 570-287-6162
AIR CONDITIONER
Haier, window type,
10,000 BTU $75.
570-826-1460
AIR CONDITIONER,
Sharp brand for win-
dow. 10400 btu
excellent condition,
used very little. $75.
Cash only.868-6327
706 Arts/Crafts/
Hobbies
ART LESSONS:
Weekly private art
lessons in your
home from a certi-
fied professional.
$18 for one hour.
Some supplies
included. 570-592-
1253
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUE old fash-
ioned coal stove,
white Dickson with
warming closet, can
be used for heating
house, cooking
meals or just for
conversation $550.
570-735-2081
ANTIQUE TOYS
WANTED
Larry - Mt. Top
474-9202
COIN 1938d Walking
Liberty half dollar
$70. NY Mets, David
Wright XRC & R.C.
mint condition both
for $15. 570-262-
0708 or 823-1738
NASCAR ITEMS:
pictures Dale Jr. &
Sr $25. Dale Sr.
large $40. Variety of
1:24 scale cars $15-
$50. Autographed
Rusty Wallace car
$100. Blanket #3
$10. Trailer $7.
Monoply Nascar,
new in box $20.
Dale Jr. pewter stat-
ue $50. Budweiser
steins $10. each.
Sports beanie
beanie bear $10.
Donald Trump bear 1
of 4,000 2005 bear
32068 $15.
570-235-5482
SHAFER’S ATTIC
TREASURES
Antique & Vintage
Furniture
Tables, Hutches,
Beds, Lamps, Pic-
tures, Chairs, this,
and that Items, Etc.
Route 6 & 11
LaPlume
Dalton Carpet Plaza
570-396-6353
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
TRAIN SET electric
Lionel Seaboard
Freight, die cast
metal engine.
Excellent condition.
Used twice. $80!
Call (570) 655-5419.
710 Appliances
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
DISHWASHER.
Danby countertop.
Does 4 place set-
tings & silverware.
Variety of settings.
Works good. Will
need faucet
adapter. Asking
$40. Call 570-871-
3360 or 852-7523
FREEZER
Frigidaire upright. 3
year extended war-
ranty. $350. WASH-
ER, 3 year extend-
ed warranty, $150.
570-851-0718
REFRIGERATOR
Gibson, white, 16.6
total cubic feet,
excellent basic
refrigerator, $150.
OBO. 287-0480
REFRIGERATOR
hotpoint frost free,
18 cu. ft. asking
$125. 540-6794
WASHER Whirlpool
large capacity
$250. Whirlpool
large capacity dryer
$150. Excellent con-
dition 570-655-9221
WASYER & DRYER
Kenmore one Year
Old! Asking $550
obo. Great working
condition. Cash
only, must pick up.
570-814-5712
712 Baby Items
BABY PACK AND
GO great for the
beach 30. Baby
vibrate musical seat
yellow $30.
570-696-9033
716 Building
Materials
DOOR 36”x80” solid
wood, 6panel exte-
rior/interior, natural
oak finish, right or
left with hardware
$200. Handmade
solid wrought iron
mail box stand with
fancy scroll $100.
570-735-8730
570-332-8094
GUTTER GUARDS
36’ brown aluminum
$45. Used sheet
rock section $20.
40 5 gallon buckets
of dirt $95.
570-288-1077
HOT WATER
HEATER 40 gallon
GE, like new, asking
$100. 540-6794
LIGHT FIXTURES
classic hanging, 6
lights & 12 lights, all
porcelain, beautiful
painted flowers,
other parts are
made in 24k gold
both lights for $300.
570-868-6095
LIGHTING FIXTURES
6 light surround
hanging fixture,
great for kitchen, 12
light surround hang-
ing fixture, great for
dining room. Both
white porcelain with
floral design & 24
karat gold compo-
nents. Must see to
appreciate. Must
sell both $300/set.
570-868-6095
USED RED BRICK:
Roughly 1,000
pieces. Free. Call
570-262-9273
726 Clothing
COAT Leather,
medium-extra large.
Brown, new, very
heavy. $75.
570-468-3052
COAT, short, blueish
grey, size 22. new
$30.
570-823-6885
734 Fireplace
Accessories
STOVE VENT: had a
gas stove removed
without even using
it! Snorkle termina-
tion cap was $400.
Selling for $175.
HEARTH PAD cor-
ner hearth pad for a
gas or coal stove.
Paid $300 & never
used the stove!
Selling for $85.
570-655-5419
744 Furniture &
Accessories
All New Mattresses:
Still in Plastic
K - $300, Q - $175,
F - $140
Box included
Must Liquidate
Can Deliver
570-280-9628
DINETTE SET Solid
wood with fruitwood
finish. Oval table
with 2 leaves, 6
upholstered chairs,
triple hutch & serv-
er. Excellent value
at $700. Must be
seen!570-655-5419.
GRANDFATHER
CLOCK pearl, runs
perfect $350.
570-740-7446
744 Furniture &
Accessories
END TABLES (2)
$35. Computer
desk with hutch $15.
White pedestal sink
with base $15. 32”
Sylvania tv $20. Din-
ing room table,
hutch & 6 chairs,
$225.00.
570-709-6664
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. Solid Oak
(real wood) with 31”
opening for TV. Lots
of storage room
below, side storage
area with glass
door. Unit is 54”wx
21.5”dx52” $250.
570-868-5749
FIREPLACE: brick
artificial fireplace
excellent condition
all accessories 150.
Heavy duty wicker
couch great for
enclosed porch
$100. 696-9033
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER ITEMS
Sofa Broyhill $200.
blue LazyBoy reclin-
er rocker $125.
Beige recliner $50.
3 piece living room
suite $100. Kitchen
table with 4 chairs,
2 leaves, Nerchi
sewing machine,
cabinet & chair
$250. Full size bed-
room suite com-
plete $250. Glider
rocker $40.
570-340-4606
KITCHEN TABLE
with 4 chairs. Wood
$50. Entertainment
center 50wx48hx
17d $35. 468-3052
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $139
Full sets: $159
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
PORCH fabric
chairs, new $30.
Sofa, matching
chairs & pillows, flo-
ral pattern, blue
white, burgundy,
very good condition,
asking $300. OBO.
Beautiful crystal
lamps $100. Beauti-
ful large picture
49”wx39”l must see
$35. 570-823-6885
ROCKER,
wood/tapestry,
$75. RECLINER,
Burgundy velour
cloth, $125.
SOFA, CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 6 PM
570-675-5046
SOFA/LOVESEAT,
old, flower green
$65. Small enter-
tainment center
$20. 570-288-1077
SOFA/LOVESEAT.
FREE. Very good
condition.
570-824-7314
TABLE, Magazine,
maple with marble
top 21” x 6’ $300.
570-735-8730/
570-332-8094
ASHLEY
6 Ross St
Sat & Sun. 6/2, 6/3
7am-4pm
Everything must go.
Yard / House Sale.
EXETER
1950 Wyoming Ave
Sundays 8am-4pm
VENDORS
WANTED!
The Discount
Warehouse
Vendor Market.
Indoor spaces,
Outdoor spaces,
& Storefronts
available.
Call Chris at
570-709-1639
after 3:30pm.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
HARVEYS LAKE
19 Brook Street
Sat & Sunday
June 2 & 3, 9-4
Furniture, house-
hold items, clothing,
.25¢ tables.
No Early Birds!
PLAINS
24 Crow St
Saturday & Sunday
June 2 & 3
Starting at 9am
Rain or Shine
KINGSTON
79 N. Welles Ave.
June 2 & 3, 9-2
No Junk!
Household appli-
ances, furniture,
books, art supplies,
clothing, air condi-
tioner.
MOUNTAIN TOP
8 Revere Road
Walden Park
June 1st & 2nd, 8-1
Kitchen & house-
hold items. Out-
door tools, swing,
women’s and junior
clothing, knick-
knacks and
much more!!!!
SWOYERSVILLE
22 Lindberg Street
Sun., June 3, 9-2
Furniture, small
appliances, VHS
tapes, toys, baby
furniture, kid’s and
adult clothing
& more.
SWOYERSVILLE
55 Lackawanna Ave
Friday, Saturday &
Sunday. June 1, 2 &3
Starting at 8am
Tools, Antiques, Col-
lectibles and Puz-
zles galore! Also,
truck stuff, yard
stuff, household,
clothing & more!
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
SUMMER
LEASE
SPECIALS
STOP BY
TODAY
Shop 24/7
valleychevrolet.com
CHEVY MALIBU 2012 CHEVY MALIBU
MSRP $22,890
23
AVAILABLE
Lease
For
Only
$
169
PER
MONTH
FOR
24 MOS.
Stk. #12588, 2.4L DOHC, 6 Speed Automatic Transmission, Air Conditioning,
Power Windows, Power Door Locks, OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
Remote Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD/MP3, XM Satellite Radio
Lease Malibu $169 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per, total due at signing =
$2198.83- includes tax & 1st payment; Lease specials are to well qualified buyers (S-Tier 800+).;
Artwork for illustration. Not responsible for typographical errors. Must take delivery by July 2, 2012.
CHEVY EQUINOX LS FWD
2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LS FWD
MSRP $24,355
25
AVAILABLE
Lease
For
Only
$
219
PER
MONTH
FOR
24 MOS.
Stk. #12607, 2.4L DOHC 4 Cylinder, 6 Speed Automatic, Remote Keyless Entry, Power
Windows, Power Door Locks, Power Mirrors, 17” Wheels, AM/FM/CD, Cruies Control,
OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, XM Satellite Radio, Tilt Steering Wheel
Lease Equinox $219 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per, total due at signing = $2,354-
includes tax & 1st payment; Lease specials are to well qualified buyers (S-Tier 800+).; Artwork for
illustration. Not responsible for typographical errors. Must take delivery by July 2, 2012.
7
5
5
8
9
2
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AAA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
02 Volvo C70 Convertible.......
$
7,450
07 Kia Spectra EX...................
$
6,995
02 Ford Mustang Conv ......
$
6,495
06 Chevy Cobalt Moonroof .
$
5,995
04 Suzuki Verona 79K.........
$
5,675
04 Hyundai Elantra 85K....
$
5,575
04 Ford Focus Wagon..........
$
5,425
01 Mitsubishi Galant............
$
4,695
00 Mitsubishi Eclipse..........
$
4,495
03 Ford Focus...............................
$
4,250
99 Nissan Sentra 83K...........
$
4,250
00 Dodge Neon 73K...............
$
3,995
99 Honda Accord......................
$
3,995
97 Chevy Malibu 78K..............
$
3,750
99 Kia Sephia 64K.....................
$
3,625
98 Plymouth Breeze..................
$
3,450
01 Chevy Malibu........................
$
3,495
97 Pontiac Sunfire Conv..
$
3,250
Cars
03 Subaru Outback 1 Owner....
$
7,450
04 Mercury Monterey 65K.
$
6,575
04 Chevy Venture......................
$
5,650
02 Ford Windstar 88K..........
$
4,950
4x4’s & Vans
31
ST
ANNIVERSARY SALE
WE BEAT ANYBODY’S DEALS
502 Auto Sales
101 Lonesome Rd.
Old Forge, PA18518
“Give Us a Try Before You Buy.”
Discount Prices Only Everyday
Call Today! (570) 457-0825
$8,600
03 MAZDATRIBUTE
Very Clean, 6 Mo. Warranty, 69,000 Miles
$7,990
06 CHEVY UPLANDER
3 Seats, V6, Auto, Dual Air, P-Side Doors,
Loaded, 6 Mo. Warranty, 89,000 Miles
$5,990
05 KIASEDONA
3 Seats, V6, Auto, Dual Air, DVD,
Loaded, 6 Mo. Warranty, 99,000 Miles
$6,990
07 FORD TAURUS
V6, Auto, Air, Loaded,
104,000 Miles, 6 Mo. Warranty
$6,990
05 CHRYSLER PACIFICA2WD
V6, Auto, Air, Loaded,
6 Mo. Warranty, 122,000 Miles
Call Today! Call Today! C ll T d !
$
0
Ve VV
570-459-9901
*
*Drawing held June 24th. No purchase necessary.
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$375 AND UP
ALSO BUYING
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
H
PITTSTON TWP.
633 Suscon Rd.
Friday,Saturday &
Sunday
8am-7pm
10 Gun Metal Cabi-
net, Wii system.
Craftsman table
saw. Precious
moments. Baseball
cards & sports col-
lectibles. Nascar
1/24 scale cars.
Records - 45’s and
much more!
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
TRIMMER/EDGER
Toro electric cut,
100’ electric exten-
sion cord $45.
570-823-2893
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: From
only $3,997.00-
MAKE & SAVE
MONEY with your
own bandmill-Cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext.300N
756 Medical
Equipment
JAZZY SCOOTER,
Golden Companion
red 500. firm. Jazzy
electric wheelchair
for large person
$500. 825-3955
758 Miscellaneous
AUTO PARTS
amber rotating light
for truck roof. $25.
Head lights for plow
truck. 2/$25. Tail-
lights for dump or
box truck, brackets
included 2/$25.
Auto/truck manuals
(10) ranging from
1950-1985. $10.
each. Truck door,
1973-1980 passen-
ger side Dodge
pickup. $75. Pinto
trailer hook for
dump truck. $40.
Railroad jacks 10 ton
each (2) $50. each.
Canvas/tarp, 12’x11’
heavy weight. $20.
9’x8’9” light weight.
$15. Craftsman 3/4”
socket set. 23 sock-
ets in metal box.
$150. EFM oil burn-
er/ motor $30.
570-823-6829
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BICYCLES Girls 20”
& 24” $35. Firm.
Bicycle seat $10.
570-822-4251
CANES & walking
sticks, new batch.
Over 40 available,
made from slippery
maple trees. $4-$5
each. Over 200
Christmas & house-
hold items includes,
trees, lights, vases,
candles, flowers,
old ornaments,
lamps, figurines &
knick-knacks, Sam-
sonite belt mas-
sager, 4 pieces of
luggage all for $50.
Electric sewing
machine, enclosed
cabinet, 2 drawers
$50. 570-735-2081
CARGO CARRIER.
Inside. For Chevy
Trailblazer. Excellent
condition. $60
570-851-0718
CHIPPER SCHRED-
DER MTD, 5 hpr,
$250. Beer tap
equipment, taps,
guages, tanks,
lines, etc. $250. Or
OBO's for both
items. 825-5053.
DECK: 8’ x 10’
treated outdoor
deck with sides.
Take down & haul
away. Free.
570-574-9243
DISHES Phaltzcraft
dishes/Yorktown
pattern, service for
16 plus creamer &
sugar, butter dish &
salt & pepper. may
be split. $75. for all
570-868-3866
FILE CABINET 4
metal file 4 drawer
file cabinets $50.
Gazelle glider
$25.2-4 level plastic
storage shelves/
racks $40., 1-3 level
metal T.V./Video
cart on wheels $60.
570-650-3450
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER ITEMS
Amish built swing
set $50. Small medi-
um boys clothes $1-
$5. Tons of board
games $1. Stuffed
animals $1. Barbie’s
& accessories $1
plus. MiscellanEous
boys toys/ electron-
ics $5. & under.
570-472-9167
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER ITEMS:
Sofa & chair, excel-
lent condition $325.
Glider Rocker $45.
Mahogany desk, 5
drawer $60. 4 snow
tires 225/65R17
$120. Book shelf/
storage shelf, maple
$30. 570-954-1435
HEATER tower
quartz electric $20.
2 Hoover vacuums,
very good condition
$25 for 1 - 2 for $40.
13” Sylvania color
TV works good $25.
570-825-5847
HEATERS Eden Pure
quartz infrared
portable heaters 1
Gen 3 model 500
Paid $197. asking
$100. 1 Gen 3 Model
1000 paid $397.
asking $200.
570-829-2715
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LADDER 24’ fiber-
glass extension lad-
der Werner $185.
Dormitory refrigera-
tor $75. Boxwood
wood stove brand
new never used
with chimney cap,
spark arestor fire-
box size 15”x29”
$250. CST/ Berger
rolatape measuring
wheel 11-1/2’ wheel
$50. Mantis 9” tiller
& attachments
$200. Proform 725
treadmill $150.
Dewalt cordless
drill, charger &2
batteries $75.
Lyksyks router, disc
& manual $15.
570-735-2236
SEWING MACHINE,
Singer. Heavy duty
3115 head with
formica table. $100.
570-740-7446
758 Miscellaneous
MOVING SALE
Offering various
home furnishings.
Cash & Carry.
No reasonable
offer refused.
Call 570-283-0698
for details.
TIRES (2) boat / util-
ity trailer tires 4.80 x
12, 4 hole. $25 each
570-826-9049
WATER COOLER -
Sunbeam stainless
steel; with hot &
cold water dis-
penser, 5 gallon
plastic water jug.
Excellent condition.
$50. 570-333-4325
WHEEL & TIRE SET
(4) Ford Windstar
factory 5 spoke
wheels with mount-
ed tires p21565r16
$200. 696-2212
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WOODEN SHED.
Good/fair condition.
size is 8’Hx8”w,
double doors, shel-
ving inside. Needs
some new wood &
paint Extra wood to
give you. You must
take it down &
remove on your
own. May need to
be dissassembled.
$350 negotiable.
570-814-9859.
762 Musical
Instruments
GUITAR
ELECTRIC GUITAR
$100. CALL Ruthann
at 570-239-7770
GUITAR Martin dc
x1e acoustic-elec-
tric no case
$550. 823-3835.
PIANO. 1980 black,
high gloss Yahama.
Excellent condition.
Must sell! $3,800,
OBO.570-287-1839,
morning calls until
noon.
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA Nikon
N2000 SLR 35mm h
lens cap & cam-
era/accessories
bag. Dual program
exposure control. 2
lenses with caps:
72mm & 52mm with
1 touch focus/zoom
function. 3 filters:
hoya 52mm skylight
(1b), hoya 52mm
color conversion/
amber (85b), pro-
master 52mm spec-
trum 7. all items in
excellent condition.
$200 Promatic ftd
3000 auto flash.
auto power off.
lower power manual
flash. TTL through
the lens, auto flash
operation $20.
Light Meter Sekonic
Studio Deluxe II L-
398M never used.
Lumisphere,
lumidisc & lumigrid
light measurement
sensors. High slide
for direct reading.
Selenium photocell
light sensing ele-
ment. No battery
needed. Excellent
condition. $100.
570-740-1190
770 Photo
Equipment
Canon XTi Digital
Camera w/18-
55mm lens, fully
automatic for the
beginning digital
photographer, or
totally customizable,
manual, lens ranges
from wide angle to
portrait telephoto.
Includes Canon
instruction manual,
pop-up flash, com-
prehensive guide-
book, 3 battery
packs, charger,
4GB memory card,
USB cable, Canon
strap, software.
Both camera & lens
excellent condition.
$279. 479-1463.
772 Pools & Spas
POOL STEPS above
or in ground pool, 4
steps, polyethylene
construction, cake
style, 38”h, 56”w,
45”d, extra wide
steps, hidden com-
partment where
sand bags hold
steps in place, for
FLA-bottom pool
$75. 570-587-2080
774 Restaurant
Equipment
8 foot true
refrigerated deli
case in excellent
$3300. call
570-262-9374
HOOD: Commercial
stainless steel
kitchen exhaust
hood, works great!
Never over grease
or fryers! 9’, 10” L X
30 1/2”W Complete
with filters, lights,
rooftop stainless
steel fan system!
Can see working!!!
$795. 831-5728.
776 Sporting Goods
BIKE LA Choppers
20” peddle bike.
$45. 288-1077
GOLF SETS for
starters $25. for
one set; $40 two
sets; $50. three
woods, irons, putter
& bag. 587-2080
PAINTBALL GUN
Tippmann 98 cus-
tom 20th Anniver-
sary near mint con-
dition includes gun,
mask, 2 air tanks, &
American flag barrel
sleeve all for $250.
570-696-2567
POOL TABLE. 4x8
slate. 3 cue sticks,
cue racks & all balls.
$450. 823-7957
ROLLER BLADES:
Men’s roller blades
size 11 $10. Harley
Davidson snow sled
$20. Fisher Price
Super Wagon $25.
Schlage electronic
lockset w/deadbolt
brand new $50.
570-822-6258
TRAMPOLINE
$75. Call Ruthann at
570-239-7770
TREADMILL Pro-
form, great condi-
tion asking $200.
570-899-3409
778 Stereos/
Accessories
STEREO with record
player. FREE
570-824-7314
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 32” Panasonic,
gray trim. Has
remote. Works
great. Not flat
screen. Asking $60.
570-871-3360 or
852-7523
TVS 2 old, not flat
screen $55.
570-288-1077
784 Tools
CHAIN SAW Mculla,
14” with bar oil,
sharpeners, excel-
lent condition $50.
570-823-6885
LADDER, aluminum
24’, heavy duty, like
new $100. Crafts-
man 10” table saw
$50. Wheelbarrow,
big, 8 cu. ft. 2
wheels $60.
570-740-7446
LADDERS 8’ wood-
en step ladder $30.
& 10’ wooden step
ladder $25. 20’ alu-
minum extension
ladder $225. Elec-
tric Toro leaf blower
$20. Lawn spreader
$15. 570-288-1077
STEEL SCAFFOLD-
ING 26 ends, 48
crossbars, 4 wheels
$1000. firm.
570-822-9625
WELDER Lincoln
electric 220 ac/dc
arc welder, single
phase, 60 hertz,
230 volts, 50 amps,
225 amps hc or 125
amps dc at 25 volts,
79 volts max on
wheels code# 8811-
702 $400. 570-735-
8730/ 332-8094
786 Toys & Games
BIKE boys 16” Mon-
goose child’s racer
bike, excellent con-
dition. $20.
570-735-6638
PIKACHU Pokemon
large, stuffed animal
plush, excellent
condition. Never
used. 24” tall. $25
570-693-2366
ROCKING HORSE
handmade Scottie
rocking “horse”,
wooden toy Un-
usual design fea-
tures a Scottie dog
instead of a horse.
Sell $80. DOLL
CARRIAGE antique
wicker doll carriage
great for the antique
collector or your
favorite doll lover!
$80. 570-655-5419
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
June 1st: $1,606.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTENS (4) free to
good home.
570-575-9984
KITTENS FREE
Beautiful. 4 black
very friendly & fuzzy.
570-693-1088
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTENS 3 beautiful,
fluffy, friendly kit-
tens, 7 weeks old
free to good home.
570-823-7799
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
KITTENS free to
good home also
adult female.
570-779-3705
KITTENS free to
good home, 3
female, 3 males, 6
weeks old. 570-
208-3938/299-1486
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
BOSTON BULL
TERRIERS
Pedigreed. Fat
Teddy Bears. Ready
to go. Home
raised champs!
$250-$350.
Please phone
570-262-5142
CAVALIER KING
CHARLES SPANIEL
PUPPIES
. $700 to $1,500
HAVANESE
PUPPIES
$700 to $1,300
www.willowspring
cavaliers.com
215-538-2179
LABRADOR
RETRIEVERS
AKC registered.
Chocolate & black.
Vet certified.
females, $475,
males, $425.
Ready 6/22/12.
Deposit will hold.
570-648-8613
MALTESE &
YORKIE CROSSES
Shots & vet
checked, to date.
$600.
570-204-2549
PET CREMATION
Country Pets
Local, caring serv-
ice. Pick up & deliv-
ery available. Call
570-256-3847
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Female. $500
Cockapoo, Male,
$600
570-250-9690
TOY
POMERANIAN
Male. 13 weeks
old. Shots,
dewormed and vet
checked. Comes
with pet food, toys,
leash, carrier. No
papers. $400.
570-430-3288
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
We’ll run your ad in the
classified section until your
vehicle is sold.
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What Do
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*2008 Pulse Research
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YOURHELP!
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 13G
House Hunting?We can help.
ATTENTION SMARTPHONE USERS:
Try our new QR Code
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Office
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
HARVEYS LAKE
Grandeur with this spectacular
residence located on the serene,
picturesque Harvey’s Lake. Te 6200
sq ft estate features three floors of
living with soaring ceilings & floor to
ceiling windows throughout supplies
picturesque scenes from every window.
A floor plan that provides abundant
places to enjoy these calming lake
views. Tis home offer some of the
finest examples of design and quality.
$1,475,000 MLS#12-2278
2
6
3
4
9
0
Se Habla
Espanol
~
529 SR 292 E ,
TUNKHANNOCK 12-1987
Beautiful Mountain
Views and Setting.
Spacious & immaculate
home on 2.87 acres
,large modern
kitchen,large bedrooms,
office, Florida Room,
covered patio, deck,
workshop,prepped for
fireplace, new furnace,
dishwasher, B-dry
system, low taxes. Landscaped Beautifully!
CALL CARY 240-3552 $275,000
DIR: 309 North, pass Smiths Ctry Store and make first right onto
Graveyard Rd go 4 miles to end of road (SR 292) Go left 1 mile home
on the left.
Open House!
12:30-2:00
PM
38 PENN AVE, EXETER
12-714
Family owned for
over 55 years and
in great shape!
Many updates and
i mp r o v e me n t s .
First floor master
bedroom, first floor
laundry/mudroom. Very generous room sizes.
Really worth a long look. It’s a value!
CALL CHARLES 430-8487 $117,500
Charming Colonial
E
x
e
te
r
80 E 4TH ST,
LARKSVILLE 12-460
Claim the unique
charms of this
r e m o d e l e d
3 bedroom
two story. Modern
kitchen with
breakfast bar.
Kitchen appliances,
washer and dryer
included. Big comforts, with fresh interior paint, new
carpeting and deck.
CALL FLO 371-2881 $105,000
DIR: E. State St to Nesbitt St. Left on 4th, house on right.
Open House!
1
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p
m
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com
We Sell Happiness!
VISIT ONE OF OUR OPEN HOUSES TODAY
Charles A. Adonizio, III
Broker, GRI, SRES
12-1:30 238 S. Main St. Pittston.....$129,900
12-1:30 48 Lewis St. Pittston..........$147,500
12-1:30 15 Green St. Pittston..........$119,900
12-1:30 2032 Route 92, Harding ......$78,900
2:30-4 118 Trayor St. Exeter...........$124,900
For more information and photos
visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
WILKES-BARRE
Very spacious 5 bedroom, 1
1/2 bath home in very good
move-in condition with with
a modern kitchen, 3 car
garage and fenced yard and
many updates.
$89,500
Call Darren Snyder 570-
825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
2-unit double block
in good condition
with ample off street
parking and separate
utilities.
$65,000
Call Darren Snyder
570-825-2468
KINGSTON
4 Bedroom 1 3/4 baths
with a modern kitchen,
generous room sizes and
ample closet space lo-
cated in Kingston. Natural
woodwork throughout.
Finished attic could make
a possible 5th bedroom.
$59,900
THORNHURST
Low maintanence, single
story ranch home located in
a private golf course commu-
nity in the Poconos for week-
end or year round enjoyment.
Modern kit w/ breakfast bar,
formal living room and din-
ning room. Family room
w/gas FP. Walk-up master
bedroom w/bonus room ideal for an office. New front and rear decks in a
private setting within 30 minutes to W-B or Scranton. $105,000
7
5
9
3
7
0
837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
50 SNOWDEN STREET,
FORTY FORT
Attractive, well-kept 4 bedroom,
2 bath colonial home on land-
scaped corner lot. Features: living
room; dining room; family room;
sun room; modern eat-in kitchen;
hardwood fooring. Lower level rec
room. Great rear yard.
MLS#12-1994
JOE MOORE $152,500
66 GOODWIN AVE N,
KINGSTON
2-story in good condition with fex-
ible foor plan. First foor living room;
dining room; kitchen; TV room; of-
fce; 3/4 bath-laundry. Second foor:
3 bedrooms,full bath. Lower level:
1/2 bath and rec room. Ductless
air-conditioning on frst foor. Private
driveway. MLS#12-2024
JOE MOORE $122,500
33 MARY STREET, ASHLEY
Spacious and charming 3 bedroom,
2 bath home features living room,
family room, dining room all with
hardwood foors; bay windows;
replacement windows; 2nd foor
screened porch overlooking rear
yard. 2 additional rooms on 3rd
foor. Detached garage. Gas steam
heat. MLS#12-2027
JOE MOORE $87,500
N
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G
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE, INC.
288-2514
EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM
Pat Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Pat Today 885-4165
View Our Listings on
Realtor.com
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
HUNTINGTON TWP. - FIELDS,
FLOWERS & SUNSHINE!
Plant your garden here while
you enjoy the comfort of this
quality built home nestled on
one acre, 5 minutes from RT11
Shickshinny, 4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, super kitchen, living
room, dining room, den. Hard-
wood foors, large basement
ready to fnish, two car garage.
Call Jerry Busch Jr.
MLS#11-1680 $249,000
NEW LISTING
LUZERNE!
Here’s The STARTER
Home For You! This
home needs some TLC
but has fantastic location
and a great yard.
Call Pat Busch Today !
MLS#12-1137 $44,900
NEW LISTING - PLYMOUTH
You’ll Pop Your Shirt Buttons....
When You See This One ! This
home has 3-4 good sized bed-
rooms, 2 full modern baths,
modern eat-in kitchen, large
spacious living room and dining
room, family room with cushion
soft carpet, laundry room, ga-
rage and comfortable gas heat.
MLS#12-185
Call Jerry Busch Jr $119,900
PLAINS -
HUDSON GARDENS
Come Relax in the Gar-
dens! 9 spacious rooms,
4 bedrooms, 2 .5 baths,
fnished basement, gen-
erous room sizes, garage
and beautiful lot.
Call Pat Busch 885-4165
MLS#12-307 $159,900
Story and photos
by Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
Ready for you to open the door and move
right in, this four-bedroom, three-bath
bi-level in Huntington Twp. just north of
Shickshinny offers a great opportunity for
country living on 2.4 acres. This up-to-date
home offers 1,832 square feet of space with
a striking oak kitchen and large sunroom
with a view of the surrounding mountains.
Listed by Barbara Strong of Antonik &
Associates, Inc. for $240,000, this listing
has the bonus of a fully finished lower level
that could serve as a separate apartment,
if needed, complete with an eat-in kitchen,
recreation (living) room, separate bedroom
and private entrance.
Throughout the home is fresh paint
and up-to-date carpeting. Two separate
out buildings include a two-car detached
garage and a storage building with room
for an additional (third) vehicle.
The property is located nearly eight
miles from Route 11 near where it inter-
sects with Route 239 in the center of Shick-
shinny. The home’s exterior offers pale
yellow vinyl siding with a front door that
leads into a white ceramic tiled foyer. Steps
lead down to the recreation room and up to
the 15-by-15 living room. It is here you get
a look at the beautiful oak hardwood floors
found throughout the first floor. This living
room has pale yellow walls and a picture
window front. A freestanding fireplace has
an oak surround and propane gas logs.
The nearby country kitchen measures a
spacious 21-by-12 and offers oak cabinets
with black and gray speckled countertops
accented by a white tile backsplash. A
double sink is set under a window and
offers a separate Insta-Hot water faucet.
Appliances include a stove, dishwasher and
garbage disposal. A large dining area is also
set on a white ceramic tile floor. It offers
pale green walls, a side-facing window and
French doors that open rear to a three-
season sunroom.
Surrounded by windows, the 13-by-13
sunroom has doors to the right and left for
easy access to both the yard and driveway.
To the right of the kitchen, the first bath
has a white and pink ceramic tile floor, an
oak vanity with white tile top and white tile
walls. There is a one-piece tub and shower
surround.
The nearby master bedroom is sized at
12-by-13 and has more of the beautiful hard-
wood floors, a double closet with bi-fold
doors and pale lavender walls. There are
windows that face the front and side yards.
The adjacent master bath offers a white
and gray ceramic tile floor and walls, ac-
Country bi-level set on two acres near Shickshinny
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
#12-1983 $121,500
TedPoggi 283-9100 x25
Prime waterfront property with
2-storyboathouse (cottage) on
51’ of lake front. Boathouse has
kitchen, livingroom, bathroom,
bedroom, sewer and water
service. Being soldAS IS.
Fixer-upper.
#12-2012 $325,000
Craig Yarrish 696-6554
Well-built rancher with6 rooms,
3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths.
Hardwood floors throughout
first floor, large living room,
open area dining room&
kitchen, laundry room, ample
level yard in a great location!
7 roomChalet with4 bedrooms,
1 &3/4 modernbaths, modern
kitchen, livingroomwithvaulted
ceiling andwoodburning
fireplace. Convenient to hwys.,
shopping, dining andentertain-
ment. Price includes all contents.
#12-1946 $135,000
Gail &Paul Pukatch696-6559
#12-1997 $134,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
Get ready to move right in! Tis
home offers modernkitchen
withCoriancounters, marble
back-splash, central air, nice size
fencedrear yardwithdeck area
andpatio, hardwoodfloors. A
charming house youare sure
to love!
Plains-Well-Built Ranch! Kingston-Charming Home! Harveys Lake-ARare Find!
© 2012 BRERAfliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAfliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
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PAGE 14G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
cented by a walk-in shower with seat and an oak vanity
with white tile countertop.
Bedrooms two and three measure 9-by-14 and 10-by-11,
respectively, both with a single window front and double
closet.
Sure to be a gathering place for friends and family, the
lower level of the home provides a 23-by-12 family room
with tan and cream Berber carpeting, and a cultured stone
fireplace with stone mantle and raised hearth. This com-
fortable space has two front-facing windows and a built-in
bookcase and corner display cabinet.
The lower level kitchen includes a full wall of oak cabi-
nets, a stove and a two-bowl sink. This space has brown
sculptured carpeting and pale green walls.
A nearby bath features an oversized walk-in shower with
white ceramic tiled walls, burgundy accents and a white
tile floor. A white pedestal sink is decorated with a hand-
painted flower and ribbon border.
The nearby fourth bedroom measures 10-by-18 and has
gray Berber carpeting, white walls and two front-facing
windows. There is a full wall of closets big enough to
require two sets of bi-fold doors.
Even the laundry room is cute offering tan and gray
vinyl flooring and an oak storage cabinet.
This home has electric baseboard heat in addition to the
two propane fireplaces and central air conditioning. Utili-
ties include a private well and on-site septic system.
To get to today’s Open House, take Route 11 south into
Shickshinny and make a right on Route 239. Make a left
on Cottermans Rd. to Town Hill Rd., and make a right on
Waterhill Rd. and a right on Cherry Hill Rd.
For more information or to make an appointment to see
this comfortable country home, contact Barbara Strong,
Antonik & Associates, Inc. (570) 735-7494; (570) 762-7561;
gretast@epix.net.
SPECIFICATIONS:
Bi-level
1,832 square feet
BEDROOMS: 4
BATHS: 3
PRICE: $240,000
LOCATION: 5 Cherry Hill Rd., Shickshinny
AGENT: Barbara Strong
REALTOR: Antonik & Associates, Inc., (570) 735-7494;
(570) 762-7561; gretast@epix.net
Shickshinny
Continued from front page
SHICKSHINNY
119 West Union Street
Out of the food zone!
Large, 2 story frame with 2,
three bedroom apartments. Off
street parking, large, dry base-
ment, oil heat, large front porch
and yard, also 4 room cottage,
with garage in the rear of the
same property. $85,000. Great
home and/or rental.
Please call
570-542-4489
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath home
in great condition.
Located in Park. $18,000
Financing available with
$3,000 down!
570-477-2845
906 Homes for Sal 906 Homes for Sal
906 Homes for Sal 906 Homes for Sal
906 Homes for Sal 906 Homes for Sal
906 Homes for Sal 906 Homes for Sal
570-242-5381
MOUNTAIN TOP
Rockledge Development
Move right into this beautiful 4 bedroom
home in desirable Rockledge Development.
Many upgrades & features including
modern kitchen with granite countertops,
22x20 great room, 2 freplaces, new paint,
carpet, gorgeous 2 tier deck and much more.
Asking $245,000.
For more information
or to schedule a viewing call
Nuangola
LAKEFRONT
• 2 Bedrooms
• Dining Room,
• Living Room/Sunroom,
• Large Deck &
• Dock,
• Year Round
• Move-In Today.
Shown by open house.
$262,000.
Call for dates
(706) 255-6208
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
• Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
• Title Insurance
• Rapid Title Search & Closing
• Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
5
4
2
7
2
HARVEYS LAKE
Ridge Ave
Modern 2 story home on 1+ acre.
Duplex. Excellent starter home,
retirement home, or investment
property public sewer, deep well.
Asking $109,900 Call
570-287-5775 or 570-332-1048
COMMERCIAL!
REAL ESTATE
AUCTION
FIVE (5) BUILDINGS IN ONE!
63,000 SQUARE FEET,
2.59 ACRES
WED., JUNE 27TH @11:00 A.M.
81-83 WALLER ST.,
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18702
Inspection by appointment & two
hours prior to sale.
Payment: 20% Non-refundable Deposit
By Successful Bidder.
Col. Steve Sitar
Ph: (570) 586-1397 Pa.Lic. AU2124-L
www.sitarauctions.com
Sale in conjunction with:
MERICLE
Commercial Real Estate Services
Hanover Township
• Crossroads area
• Commercial building
lot for sale
• High traffic area
• 325 x 80’ corner lot
• Bordering Carey
Avenue
Owner financing
available.
Please Call
1-800-696-3050
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DUPONT
Why rent?
Two story features
newer roof,
replacement
windows, two bed-
rooms, enclosed
porch, 40’ x 175’ lot
with off street park-
ing, great
commuting location.
$55,000.
MLS#12-1238
Call 570-348-1761
WEBUY
HOMES!
Any Situation
570-956-2385
ALDEN
Large home on a
huge lot. Needs
some care so come
put your personal
touch into this great
value. Off street
parking, 2 car
detached garage
and a large fenced
in yard. Did we men-
tioned 4 bedrooms.
MLS 12-1589
$64,900
Call/text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
ASHLEY
Own your own
home-start invest-
ing in your new
home, remodeled
kitchen, Living
room, Dining room,
3 beds, 1 bath, front
& rear porches,
detached 2 car
garage, nice yard.
MLS#12-1074.
Call Susan Pall
696-0876
DALLAS
END-UNIT TOWNHOUSE
3 bedrooms. 1450
sq. ft. 1 3/4 baths.
Central Heat/ Air.
Move in ready.
$150,000.
570-574-4197
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
Exclusive Listing
REDUCED TO
$28,500
127 DONATO DRIVE
Large mobile home,
excellent condition
on double lot, locat-
ed in Ashley Park.
Carport, above
ground pool with
deck, 2 sheds,
fenced in yard,
modern kitchen,
dining room, family
room with wood
burning fireplace, 2
bedrooms, master
bedroom has whirl-
pool tub, laundry
room with appli-
ances, foyer, large
en-closed heated
porch. New hard-
wood floors thruout,
vinyl siding, central
air, skylights, private
driveway, appli-
ances.
Listed
exclusively by
Capitol Real
Estate
Shown by
appointment
Qualified buyers
only!
Call John Today
570-823-4290
570-735-1810
CAPITOL REAL ESTATE
www.capitol-realestate.com
for additional
photos
ASHLEY
Remodeled 2 or 3
bedroom home.
Large yard. Nice
porch. Low traffic.
Not in flood area.
Asking $79,900.
Deremer Realty
570-477-1149
AVOCA
1215 South St.
SpaPcious 4
bedroom home
with in law suite
with separate
entrance. Large
lot, large room
sizes. Split sys-
tem A/C in fami-
ly room. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-963
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
AVOCA
214 Gedding St.
Cozy Cape Cod
home with 2 bed-
rooms, 1st floor
laundry, nice yard
with deck. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-668
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
901 Main St.
Stately 4 bedroom
home with beautiful
woodwork, extra
large rooms with
gas heat and
nice yard.
MLS 12-884
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
BACK MOUNTAIN
Meticulous town-
house, almost new
granite counter-
tops, tile in baths,
hardwood floors,
dock slip available
to homeowner.
MLS# 11-2984
$209,900
Call Susan Pall @
(570) 696-0876
Back Mountain
Newberry Estate
Three story freshly
painted unit at Hill-
side. 2 bedrooms &
loft, 3 bath, modern
kitchen, fireplace in
living room, central
air & gas heat. Con-
venience of living at
Newberry Enjoy
golf, tennis & swim-
ming. MLS#11-4435
$132,900
Call Rhea
570-696-6677
Line up a place to live
in classified!
DALLAS
Great Dallas Loca-
tion. Close to town
& library. 4 bedroom
ranch with lower
level family room,
replacement win-
dows, 16x32 deck,
garage, 100 x 150
lot. 12-1528
$180,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
BACK MOUNTAIN
Dakota Woods
Enjoy maintenance
free living at Dakota
Woods Develop-
ment in the Back
Mountain. This 3+
bedroom condo
features an open
floor plan, first floor
master suite, hard-
wood floors, stun-
ning granite
kitchen, gas fire-
place & 2 car
garages. Large loft
area provides multi-
use space. MLS#
11-3212 $299,000
Call Rhea
570-696-6677
BEECH MOUNTAIN
LAKES
REDUCED!
LAKE VIEW custom
built Chalet with 4
bedrooms, 2.5
baths & 2,600 sq. ft.
Features hardwood
floors throughout
1st & 2nd floors &
bamboo flooring in
the finished lower
level. 2 fireplaces
& central air.
Motivated Seller.
Take a virtual tour at
www.PaHouseHunt
ers.com or TEXT
2308 to 85377 for
additional info & pic-
tures. MLS #12-564
$239,900
Cindy Perlick
Smith Hourigan
Group
Mountain Top
570-715-7753
DALLAS
2 Story Immaculate
Home located in a
desirable neighbor-
hood! Charming
wrap around porch
welcomes you &
your friends to a
beautiful inviting
home.
MLS# 12-1630
$430,000
Call Donna Klug
570-690-2579
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-5406
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
AS-IS, WHERE IS,
Owner says SELL!
No negotiations,
quickest sale.
Private 2 acre lot
with Bi-level in Dallas
School District. 1 car
garage. 3 bedrooms
and nice updates.
REDUCED PRICE
$150,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
DALLAS
Charming Cape Cod
home for sale.
Panoramic moun-
tain & lake views
can be enjoyed from
back yard or back &
side decks. Newly
remodeled to pris-
tine, move in ready
condition. Has to be
seen to be believed!
Ground level includ-
es kitchen, dining
area, one bedroom,
powder room, living
room & family room
with fireplace. Spiral
staircase leads to
second floor which
has two spacious
bedrooms & two full
baths. $205,000
Call 570-430-7077
DALLAS
Huge Reduction
248 Overbrook Rd.
Lovely 4 bedroom
cape cod situated
in a private setting
on a large lot.
Vaulted ceiling in
dining room, large
walk in closet in 1
bedroom on 2nd
floor. Some
replacement win-
dows. Call Today!
MLS 11-2733
$99,900
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Looking for a ranch
in the Back Moun-
tain? Come and
preview this remod-
eled two or three
bedroom, one bath
home. New Pergo
flooring, updated
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances, off street
parking. MLS #12-
1213 $112,000
Call Kathy Murray
570-696-6403
DALLAS
Private & beautiful
lovely brick chalet
on 11.85 acres.
Custom brick work,
tongue & groove
interior & oversized
3 car garage.
Features whirlpool
tub, heated sun-
room, kitchen island
& hickory cabinets,
laundry room. Base-
ment is plumbed &
ready to finish.
MLS# 12-817
$315,000
Call Ken Williams
Five Mountain
Realty
570-542-8800
DALLAS
The Greens at New-
berry Estates. Condo
with special view of
golf course & ponds.
3 bedrooms. Family
room. 5 1/2 baths on
2 floors. 4,000 sq. ft.
living area. 12-1480
$449,900
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DUPONT
Two story with four
bedrooms, remod-
eled oak kitchen
with pantry, first
floor laundry, off
street parking,
newer roof & win-
dows.
MLS #11-5344
Call (570)348-1761
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Two story home
with solar system,
2 car detached
garage. Private
driveway. Property
is also for lease.
MLS# 12-1822
$189,000
Michael Nocera
570-357-4300
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-5412
DURYEA
1107 Spring Street
Superb two story
with 3 bedrooms & 1
½ baths. Hardwood
floors, gas heat,
vinyl siding, large
yard with garage.
Call Jim for details.
Offered at $169,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
FORTY FORT
11 Cayuga Place
BY OWNER
$84,900
2 or 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, 2 car heated
garage
jtdproperties.com
Call 570-970-0650
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
125 McAlpine St
Ideal starter is this
appealing two bed-
room 2 story with
large lot and 1.5 car
garage. Plenty of off
street parking, in
solid neighborhood.
MLS 11-4313
PRICE REDUCED
$79,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
DURYEA
412 New St.
Great starter home
on large lot. Sys-
tems newer, but
needs cosmetic
updating. Ready to
make to your liking!
MLS 12-1732
$59,900
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
KINGSTON
INCOME PROPERTY
DUPLEX
2 bedrooms down,
1 upstairs, off-street
parking. $84,000.
Call (570)704-9446
WAPWALLOPEN
Located in a quiet,
country setting,
New roof, needs
modern kitchen and
bathroom. $50,000
Call 570-379-2202
906 Homes for Sale
OLD FORGE
All brick ranch,
hardwood floors,
with basement
apartment with pri-
vate entrance, net
$6,000 a year.
Beautiful groomed
100x150 lot,
great location!
Asking $189,000.
Call 570-840-1165
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
To place your
ad call...829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 15G
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 6/3
2:30-4:00PM
615 CHARLES STREET, KINGSTON
A must see! Steel & concrete construction put together
this exceptional 4BR, 5 bath home. Great location &
fenced yard, property features maple HW frs - cherry
kitchen cabs - unique bronze staircase ñ tile baths &
much more. MLS# 12-531 JULIO 239-6408 or
RHEA 696-6677 $299,500
Dir: Wyoming Avenue to E. Dorrance to L on Charles,
home on R.
KINGSTON4BR, 1.5 bath, 2.5 story home
in convenient location. Eat-in kitchen, 1st
foor laundry, formal FR, Den & LL recre-
ation room. Large yard. MLS# 12-1902
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $159,000
DALLAS Very well maintained 3 BR, 1
bath home w/hdwd frs throughout. At-
tached garage, deck & lg yard.
MLS #11-3461
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $116,500
SHAVERTOWN Spacious home. Wonder-
ful fr plan & elegant detail throughout.
Fantastic 2 story great rm w/gas FP, great
kitchen, MSTR on 1st fr, 5BRs, 5 baths
& great fnished LL w/custom cabinetry.
MLS# 11-3697
MARGY 696-0891 $425,000
WILKES-BARRE Spacious 4BR, 2.5 bath
home in conveniently located Wilkes-
Barre neighborhood. Amenities include
1st foor HW, modern kitchen & 3 season
porch. MLS# 12-1294
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $129,000
WILKES-BARRE REDUCED Pretty 3BR,
starter in showroom condition w/lovely
modern kitchen & appliances, 2 porches
& lot extends to next street.
MLS# 11-3519
DEANNA 696-0894 $49,900
FORTY FORT Two story w/garage & great
yard! This 3BR, 1.5 bath w/enclosed
front porch awaits your arrival. New roof,
freshly painteed, new laminate fooring.
Move right in! MLS# 12-748
JUDY 714-9230 $89,900
MOUNTAIN TOP Attractive 2 story
home in Laurel Lakes. 7 years young.
Many upgrades. Level lot. C/A, HW
foors. Nice offering! MLS# 12-1961
LISA 715-9335 $289,900
MOUNTAIN TOP Beautiful 2story lo-
cated in Fox Run Estates. 5BRs, 2
baths, gas heat, C/A, above ground
heated pool, fnished basement.
MLS# 12-1966
CORINE 715-9331 $309,900
SHAVERTOWN Attractive 2 Story - al-
most new const. Elegant kitchen w/
bkfst bar, FR w/gas FP, 3-4 BR’s, hdwd
frs, 3 car garage & much more!
MLS# 12-1433
JUDY 714-9230 $459,900
MOUNTAINTOP Elegance with comfort!
4BR on 6.5acres gathering room w/cathe-
dral ceiling highlighted by foor to ceiling
FP, custom kitchen, fnished LL, inground
heated pool, hot tub, screened porch & ev-
erything you desire! MLS# 12-1557
PAT S. 715-9337 $629,900
DRUMS Country living at its best! This
secluded Ranch is situated on .83acres
& offers 3BRs, 3 baths, C/A & lower level
FR! MLS#11-4254 PATTY A. 715-9332 or
EVELYN 715-9336 $139,900
WEST WYOMING NEW LISTING Magnif-
cient masterpiece. Hand carved wood &
stone FP, stairways, baths, pillars & hand-
crafted kitchen. MLS# 12-2032
DEANNA 696-0894 $179,900
MOUNTAINTOP Spectacular Twin w/wonderful
MSTR Ste. Lrg bath & closet, all mod amenities,
stunning granite kitchen w/open fr plan, beautiful
staircase, views from every window, deck. 3BRs,
2.5 bths, HW frs, wonderful moldings, C/A, gas
heat, 1 car garage. MLS# 11-2000
LISA 715-9335 or
VIRGINIA 714-9253 $219,900
DALLAS This almost new 2 story w/
open foor plan boasts eat-in kitchen,
FR w/gas FP, spacious 4BRs, double
lot & more! MLS# 12-1344
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 or
JUDY 714-9230 $289,000
MOUNTAIN TOP Spectacular 4 fn-
ished foors of beautiful rooms6BR, 4
bath home w/heated in-ground pool.
All on 1.80acres. Master Suite w/pri-
vate balcony! MLS# 12-1981
CORINE 715-9331 $449,900
SHAVERTOWN Spectacular views from
this 4300SF 2 story home w/ultra mod-
ern eat-in kitchen, 4BRs, 6 baths on 2
acres. A must see! MLS# 12-995
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $599,000
SWOYERSVILLE Beautiful Townhome
with wonderful upgrades. Nice private
setting with outstanding views & a back-
yard to enjoy & relax. MLS# 12-1307
PEG 714-9247 $195,500
REDUCED Beautifully maintained Town-
house. 4BRs, 3.5 baths, FR w/FP, HW frs
& crown mldgs, fnished LL. Maintenance
free - golf, pool & tennis!
MLS# 11-2608
GERI 696-0888 $179,000
MOUNTAINTOP Woodberry Manor Phase II. Qual-
ity New Construction. 4-5BRs, 4 bath. Great kitch-
en w/Island, dbl ovens, granite counters, walk-in
pantry. 3 baths on 2nd fr, 1 on 1st fr. Still time
to make choices. Some extras. Upgrade mould-
ing package, 2 tray ceilings. Composition deck.
Sidewalk & curbs! MLS# 12-310
TERRY D. 715-9317 $426,900
WILKES-BARRE This home features over
3000SF of everything. Lg FR w/FP, fn. LL
w/wet bar, fenced yard w/in-grnd pool &
pool hs, C/A, sec sys & lots of room to
grow, Most of all it’s affordable! Includes
Hometrust Warranty. MLS# 12-411
JULIO 239-6408 or
DEB 714-5802 $179,900
LAKE ALEEDA 100FT OF LAKEFRONT! Beautiful
4BR, 3 bath home w/open foor plan offers magnif-
cent lake views. Quality evident throughout - Master
on 1st foor, Ashford foors, wonderful kitchen &
baths, bright walk-out LL w/2nd kitchen, State of the
Art heating, cooling & security systems! Lakefront
gives views everywhere! MLS# 12-1388
RHEA 696-6677 or PEG 714-9247 $597,000
SHAVERTOWN Elegant 7yr, 2 story w/
premium fnishes throughout. Open
2 story foyer, custom kitchen w/gran-
ite tops, walk-out fnished LL, private
1.16acre lot. MLS# 12-1617
GERI 696-0888 $432,000
DALLAS Maintenance free living in this
stunning 3BR, 3.1 bath Condo in excel-
lent condition. Eat-in kitchen upgraded
w/granite counters. Gas heat, A/C, wood
burning FP, 2nd foor laundry. Enjoy ten-
nis, golf & swimming! MLS# 12-324
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $269,900
MOUNTAIN TOP Tastefully updated &
repainted Walden Park home w/new
maple & granite kitchen & HW foors.
MLS# 12-1951
ANITA 788-7501 $179,900
HANOVER TWP. Charm galore in this
4BR, 2 bath Bi-level. Modern kitchen,
DR, LR, LL fnished w/built-ins w/sliding
doors out to patio. MLS# 12-1854
GERI 696-0888 $172,000
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Open Daily 12 to 5
Fri. &Sat. 11 to 5
Sand Springs
Real Estate Corp.
570.708.3042 SandSpringsGolf.com
Call 570.708.3042
Single Story“No Steps”
• 3 BR • 2 Bath • 2 Car Garage
• Granite Counters • Spa Style Bath
• Hardwood Floors
N
E
W
P
L
A
N
!
Relocating?
Home Sold?
READY NOW!
HEMLOCK - 3BR, 2.5 Bath
$244,900
SAUCON - 4BR, 2.5 Bath
$264,900
BRECKENRIDGE - 4BR, 2.5 Bath,
Over 3,000 Sq. Ft
$339,900
1
0
th
A
n
n
iv
e
rsa
ry
!
From $199,900!
Sand Springs
• 1 Story Single Family Patio Homes
• Live a maintenance free lifestyle
• Golf Course; Clubhouse activities!
Active Adult
Community
ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.
51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612
(570) 675 • 9880
www.eleganthomesinc.net
New Construction! $198,900
* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft.
* 2 Car Garage
with Storage Area
* 2 Story Great Room
* Cherry Kitchen
with Granite
* Fenced in Yard
with Patio
* Gas Heat/AC
Directions: From Wyo-
ming Ave. take Pringle
St. to the End, take left on
Grove St. Twins on left -
267 Grove St. Kingston
Luxurious Twins in Kingston
Open House Today • 1:00-3:00PM
BESECKER REALTY INC.
Office: (570) 675-3611
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 2-4PM
178 New Elizabeth St.,
Wilkes-Barre
All brick ranch, 3 BR, HW
floors, stone FP, finished
lower level, cenral air, gas
heat, 2 car garage.
Priced to Sell
$125,000
DIR: S. on Carey Ave. to R.
on New Elizabeth Street,
home on left.
www.staufferpointe.com
Stauffer Pointe is a Planned
Condominium Community
OPEN HOUSE TODAY
1-3PM
STYLE
Luxury Townhomes
1,340-2,300 sq. ft.
Three with First-Floor Master Suite!
VALUE
Starting at $219,000.
LOCATION
EXCLUSIVE, RESIDENTIAL
LOCATION - Minutes to NE
EXT. and I-81
OFF SR-315
CALL: 877-442-8439
Susan Parrick
Dir., Sales/Marketing
Like us on
Facebook!
Directions: From Williams St.,
Pittston turn onto Fulton St. at
4-way cross Butler St. and go
straight to Grandview Dr.
Linda Gavio
40 N. Mountain Blvd.,Mountaintop
(570) 474-2231 x19 • (570) 956-0584 (cell)
Linda.Gavio@ColdwellBanker.com
FOR SALE
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, JUNE 3
RD
• 1:30-3:30PM
22 Penny Lane, Plains $274,500
Plenty of space for everyone in this 4/5 bedroom 2 story.
Heated 4 season sunroom; enjoy all year! Large family room
opens to the sunroom, spacious u-shaped kitchen offers
roomy breakfast area. Formal living and dining room. Second
foor has 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths. 2car garage. Above
ground pool/deck. Unfnished basement offers more room for
expansion. Large mostly level private yard. MLS#12-1664
Dir: Exit 3 from Cross Valley. Follow Maffet Street (becomes N
Main Street)to Right on E. Saylor. Left on Penny Lane.
House on left.
Call Linda At (570) 474-2231 x19 or (570) 956-0584 (cell)
Patrick Deats Contractor
Back Mountain Lots Now Available!
Integrity • Quality • Value
Custom Home Builder
with over 25 years
experience in Luzerne
and Lackawanna Counties
570-696-1041
www.patrickdeats.com
Lot/Home Packages or Custom Homes on Your Lot
REAL ESTATE
Shavertown (570) 696-3801
Jill Hiscox
(570) 696-0875
Wilkes-Barre
Convenient city living on almost one acre
corner lot. Beautiful views, quiet street.
Home has large room sizes and wrap
around porch. Additional enclosed porch
in back, finished basement with kitchen,
bath and bar which could be used as sepa-
rate apartment. MLS#12-1651
$114,000
N
E
W
P
R
I
C
E
139 Kestrel Road,
Mountaintop
FOREST POINTE – Outstanding
offering! Meticulously maintained
four year old home. Living room,
dining room, kitchen, family room,
3 bedrooms and 2 ½ baths. Fully
finished walk out basement with huge
rec room and ¾ bath. Two decks,
outside spa, 2 car garage and more!
Price Reduced to
$259,900
Call David P. Hourigan
570-474-6307 • 570-715-7750
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Mountaintop 570-474-6307
David P. Hourigan
Level Building Lots .40 – 1.50 Acres
All Underground / Public Utilities
Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks
Rental / Lease Options Available
Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park
NEPA’s Leader in Energy Efficient Construction
Alternative Energy Solutions
Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40,000
LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION
For Specifics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40 000
EVERY NEWHOME CONTRACT INCLUDES
HEATINGANDCOOLINGBILLS FOR
10YEARS
COUNTRYWOOD
ESTATES
EILEEN R. MELONE
Real Estate 821-7022
EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022
Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre
SUSQUEHANNA
MODULAR HOMES
THE TIME TO BUILD IS NOW
Call 1-866-823-8880 For An Appointment Anytime!
www.susquehannamodularhomes.com
VISIT OUR NEW LOCATION!
Rear 913 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming (Behind McDonalds)
We Will Work With You.
Complete Packages Available
or Customize Your Floor Plan
Designed specifcally for agents that are
fresh out of Real Estate School.
Classes Ofered:
FLEX/MLS Computer Training
Contract Negotiations
Building Your Business
Social Media
Internet Marketing
Space is limited.
Our 11th year of New Agent Training Classes!
Classes taught by:
Whitney Lopuhovsky
Certifed Corporate Trainer
Multi-Million $ Club
Training Classes
Begin Soon!
Contact Carol Shedlock Today
for a confidential interview:
570-407-2314 or
cshedlock@classicproperties.com
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
89 Main St.
Recently remodeled
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths single. Mod-
ern kitchen with
new appliances,
open floor plan,
wood burning fire-
place, gas heat. 2
car detached
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-895
Now Reduced
$105,000
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
DURYEA
97 Chittenden St.
Flood damaged
home with new fur-
nace, electric box,
water heater, out-
lets and switches.
1st floor gutted but
already insulated
and ready for
sheetrock. 2nd floor
has 4 bedrooms
and bath with dou-
ble sinks. Large
yard. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1225
$69,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
NEW PRICE!!!!!
621 Donnelly St.
2 bedroom, 1 car
garage, gas heat.
Already furnished
with furniture. 1/2
double. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 12-1042
$29,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
HANOVER TWP.
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
(570)696-1041
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level.
Built for handicap
accessibility with
exterior ramp, inte-
rior hallways and
doorways. If you’re
looking for a Ranch,
don’t miss this one.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$309,860
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EDWARDSVILLE
263 Lawrence St
Pride of ownership
shows in this nicely
updated & well
maintained home
with possible in-law
suite/apartment.
Enjoy off street
parking, spacious
yard & large deck
with beautiful views
of the valley. 1st
floor has large sep-
arate eat-in kitchen,
living room, bed-
room & bath. 2nd
floor has large eat-
in kitchen, living/din-
ing combo, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath & 2nd
floor laundry. Many
possibilities to fit
your needs! Must
see! MLS#11-4434
Reduced to
$88,900
Call Christina @
(570) 714-9235
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
REDUCED
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen & replace-
ment windows
installed.
MLS11-560.
$44,900
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Nice size 4 bed-
room home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$83,000
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Line up a place to live
in classified!
906 Homes for Sale
FREELAND
Spacious 4 bed-
room, 1 3/4 bath
home. Gas Heat.
Deck. Fenced yard.
One car garage.
MLS 12-832
$62,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
GLEN LYON
Fully rented 5 unit
apt building, new
siding, new roof and
nice updates inside,
off street parking &
near the college.
Call or text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
for more information
or to schedule your
showing. $117,000
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 17G
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
530 Cherry
Drive
Spacious 2 bed-
room townhome
with hardwood
floor, gas heat,
central air, end
unit with one
garage. All
appliances,
move in condi-
tion.
For more info
and
photos visit:
www. atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 12-712
$169,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER
REDUCED
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$119,900
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
EXETER
REDUCED
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$114,900
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
HANOVER GREEN
2 Zack Street
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath bi-level hard-
wood floors on
upper & lower level.
65’x100’ lot. New
Corian kitchen
including new appli-
ances, central air,
gas heat, 3 bed-
rooms, living room
& dining room, new
carpeting, heated 1
car garage. 2 large
sheds, 16’x32’ in
ground pool. Cov-
ered upper deck &
lower covered
patio. Walking dis-
tance to schools.
On bus route. Much
More! Reduced to
$172,900.
Kwiatkowski
Real Estate
570-825-7988
HARDING
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
raised Ranch on 1
acre. Home boasts
a gas fireplace in
living room. Central
A/C, 2.5 car
garage, covered
deck, finished base-
ment, lots of stor-
age, out of flood
zone. $179,900. Call
570-299-5940
570-388-4244
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
1 Grandview Ave
Hanover Twp. Dis-
cover the values in
this welcoming 3
bedroom home.
Some of the delights
of this very special
home are hardwood
floors, deck, fully
fenced yard &
screened porch. A
captivating charmer
that handles all your
needs! $97,500
MLS 11-3625
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
Signature Properties
HANOVER TWP.
19 Lee Park Ave.
Well kept 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
single with eat in
kitchen, 1st floor
laundry area, w/w,
ceiling fans, full
concrete basement.
Gas heat. Home
sits on large lot with
2 car detached
garage and off
street parking.
MLS 12-541
$79,900
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-735-7494
Ext 304
Patricia Lunski
570-814-6671
HANOVER TWP.
2 Betsy Ross Drive
Warmly inviting 3
bedroom, 2.5 bath
Tudor. Striking high-
lights in this beauti-
ful home include
custom blinds, man-
icured lawn, deck,
patio and 3-season
porch. Entertain in
the finished walk-
out basement with
wet bar or relax by
the pool! Outstand-
ing quality!
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645.
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
HANOVER TWP.
78 Luzerne St.
Not a drive-by.
Move right into this
sparkling clean,
bright and cheery
1/2 double. All new
floor coverings and
freshly painted inte-
rior. 2 zone gas hot
water baseboard
heat. W/d hookups
in basement which
has a concrete
floor. All measure-
ments are
approximate.
MLS 12-1129
$45,000
Call Michelle T.
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TWP.
At this price with
today’s interest
rates, now is the
time to buy! This 3
bedroom ranch
offers a spacious
kitchen/dining area,
lower level makes
a great recreation
room, an exercise
room or office.
Large fenced yard
will be great for your
summer picnics.
Call today for your
appointment.
MLS# 11-1793
$109,500
Jill Jones 696-6550
Office- 696-2600
SWOYERSVILLE
Large yard, quiet
neighborhood. 2
bedrooms, dining &
living rooms, unfin-
ished basement, ,
$56,000. Call
(570)704-9446
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
NEW LISTING
3 Dexter St.
Why pay rent when
you can own your
own home!
Recently renovated
3 bedroom home
with 1 car garage &
fenced in yard. New
carpet, flooring &
counter tops. Roof
& windows just 2
years old. Call
Michele for your pri-
vate showing. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.Atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1354
Reduced
$57,500
Call Michele
570-905-2336
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HARDING
105 Circle Drive
Well maintained
Bi-Level on nicely
landscaped corner
lot. Finished lower
level with gas
fireplace & sliding
doors to private
patio. Totally fenced
yard, 1 car garage.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths. $127,900
MLS# 11-1271
Call Cathy
(570) 696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HARDING
Charming home in
very good condition.
Nice woodworking,
replacement win-
dows, new vaulted
ceiling bedroom
overlooking amaz-
ing view of the river.
Vinyl siding, one car
garage, private set-
ting on a dead end
street, but not flood
zone.Reduced!
$89,900
MLS 12-990
Call Nancy Answini,
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
HARDING
Charming home in
very good condition.
Nice woodworking,
replacement win-
dows, new vaulted
ceiling bedroom
overlooking amaz-
ing view of the river.
Vinyl siding, one car
garage, private set-
ting on a dead end
street, but not flood
zone.Reduced!
$89,900
MLS 12-990
Call Nancy Answini,
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
Dallas School
District.
Wooded and private
Bi-Level. This home
features a 1 car
garage, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 bath &
nice updates. plenty
of room on your pri-
vate 2 acre lot.
Call for details.
$166,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
HARVEYS LAKE
Richard Lane
2 story, 3 bedroom,
1 bath home at rear
of Lake Side Drive
between Pole #’s
125 and 126 on
Richard Lane. Lake
view, including front
wrap around porch
and 2 of the 3
upstairs bedrooms.
and rear yard.
Home in need of
updating and
repairs and is being
sold as is. 13,809
sq. ft. lot.
MLS 12-1607
$59,900
Michelle T. Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home
with 4 bed-
rooms and large
rooms. Nice old
woodwork,
staircase, etc.
Extra lot for
parking off Ken-
ley St.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
HUNLOCK CREEK
Beautifully main-
tained cape cod fea-
tures 3 bedrooms
and one and a half
baths. Hardwood
floors in living room,
dining room, foyer
and first floor bed-
room. Newly remod-
eled kitchen and
bathroom. Lots of
storage. New roof
installed in 2010.
Breakfast nook with
built-in table and
benches. Enclosed
porch, above ground
pool and deck.
11-2706. $155,000
Call Brenda Suder
570-332-8924
McDermott
Realty
570-696-2468
HUNLOCK CREEK
Lovely Ranch home
on 1.42 acres.
Features 3 bed-
rooms, full bath, 1/2
bath, kitchen, living
room with fireplace,
dining room, den &
laundry room on
Main floor. Kitchen,
family room with
fireplace, 3/4 bath &
storage room on
Lower Level. Newer
roof, siding, sofit &
gutters plus some
newer carpeting,
pergo flooring, cen-
tral air & whole
house fan, 2 car
garage & paved
driveway. 12-1010
$176,900
Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
JENKINS TWP
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms
1 Bath
Finished Walk-Out
Basement
Corner Lot
Single Car
Garage
$57,900
Call Vince
570-332-8792
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
1182 Main St.
Modern 3 bedroom,
2 full bath, single on
a double lot. Huge
family room, mod-
ern kitchen, 1st
floor laundry room,
additional room on
1st floor could be
used as 4th bed-
room. Landscaped
yard, shed, off
street parking
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1269
$129,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise
Drive
PRICED TO
SELL!
This 4 bedroom
has 2 car
garage with
extra driveway,
central air,
veranda over
garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and
wet bar. Sun-
room
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
JENKINS TWP.
250 Susquehan-
nock Drive
Not your traditional
Cape Cod. Super
large bedrooms, 1st
floor master. 2 car
garage, lower level
family room. Gas
heat, Central air.
Bamboo floors,
above ground pool
with 2 tier deck.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1093
$289,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
297 Susquehannock
Drive
Traditional 4 bed-
room home with 2.5
baths, 2 car
garage. Large ard
with deck and
retractable awning.
Above ground pool,
1st floor laundry. .
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-945
$254,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
JENKINS TWP.
4 Orchard St.
3 bedroom
starter home
with 1 bath on
quiet street.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-254
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
KINGSTON
241 Pringle Street
4 Bedroom 1 3/4
baths with a modern
kitchen, generous
room sizes and
ample closet space
located in Kingston.
Natural woodwork
throughout. Finished
attic could make a
possible 5th bed-
room. MLS 12-211
$59,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
8 Patrick Road
Magnificent custom
built tudor home
with quality
throughout. Spa-
cious 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, 2 story
living room with
fireplace and library
loft. Dining room,
family room and 3
season sunroom
which overlooks
professionally land-
scaped grounds
with gazebo and
tennis/basketball
court. Lower level
includes recreation
room, exercise
room and 3/4 bath.
Enjoy this serene
acre in a beautiful
setting in Highland
Hills Development.
Too many amenities
to mention.
Taxes appealed
and lowered con-
siderably for year
2013. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-723
$399,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
KINGSTON
Beautiful, updated
and well-maintained
3 level townhome in
very desirable
Kingston location.
Many upgrades
include a spacious,
custom bathroom
with large closets,
custom window
treatments, built-in
wall microwave in
kitchen, new roof,
and new garage
door. Convenient
location with plenty
of storage, and a
possible 3rd bed-
room on 1st level.
12-175 $142,900
Call Mary Danelo
570-704-8000
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
KINGSTON
Large, double block
in Kingston with 3
bedrooms on one
side and 2 bed-
rooms (possibly 3)
on the other side.
Both have 2nd floor
baths rooms, gas
hot water base-
board heat, sepa-
rate utilities, fenced-
in yard with off-
street parking from
rear alley. Each unit
is deeded separate-
ly. Let your tenant
pay your mortgage!
#12-387 $84,500
Karen Altavilla
570-283-9100 x28
570-283-9100
KINGSTON
A must see. Steel &
concrete construc-
tion put together
this exceptional 4
bedroom 5 bath
home. Great loca-
tion & fenced yard,
property features
maple hardwood
floors, tile baths,
cherry kitchen cabi-
nets, unique bronze
staircase, & much
more. MLS#12-531
$299,500 Call
Julio 570-239-6408
or Rhea
570-696-6677
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace & more.
11-823
Reduced
$99,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
REDUCED!
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Don’t miss this
great home with
updated kitchen
and granite coun-
ters, private yard
with enclosed sun
room. Garage and
off street parking. 2
large bedrooms.
PRICED TO SELL!
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$109,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
New on the market.
All brick 2 story
home with finished
basement 5 bed-
rooms, 3.5 baths,
on beautiful 223
Butler St. Large eat-
in kitchen, in ground
pool, central air,
new hardwood
floors, den/office. 2
car detached
garage. Sale by
owner! $279,900 To
view pictures go
to Facebook But-
ler St., Kingston,
PA. 570-852-0130
KINGSTON
This 3 bedroom
home offers modern
kitchen, with Corian
counters accented
by marble back-
splash, central air,
fenced rear yard
with deck and patio.
Off street parking
for 2 to 4 cars. Cus-
tom shutters on the
first floor windows
along with natural
woodwork and
hardwood floors
give this home a
charm you are sure
to love!
#12-1997 $134,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
LAFLIN
24 Fordham Road
Lovely cedar shingle
sided home on large
corner lot in a great
development. 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 baths, 1st
floor family room, fin-
ished lower level.
Hardwood floors
throughout, huge liv-
ing room & family
room. 1st floor laun-
dry room & office,
gas heat, nice deck,
above ground pool, 2
car garage. 11-3497
$295,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
LARKSVILLE
Nice country setting
close to town for
your new home!
Lot is 75’ x 107’
with an existing
12’ x 20’ shed.
$15,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
NEW LISTING!
Convenient Laflin
location just minutes
from I-81, Rt. 315 &
PA Turnpike. 4 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, liv-
ing room open to
the modern kitchen,
dining room and first
floor with beautiful
hardwood floors.
H a n d i c a p p e d
accessible with
oversized doors and
hallways. New car-
pet & extra base-
ment ceiling height
make this a great
family home. Land-
scaped yard with
Koi pond & custom
deck that sits in a
quiet, private loca-
tion on a dead-end
street. Move-in
ready! mls 12-1197
$199,900
Chris Jones
696-6558
LARKSVILLE
Charming & unique
remodeled home
with 5 bedrooms
and spectacular
views of Carey Ave
Bridge and the river.
New kitchen, roof
and deck. Three
bedrooms on first
floor and two baths,
2 bedrooms on sec-
ond floor. Three
season porch, first
floor laundry and
office/den area.
Must see. Out of
flood zone.
Reduced!
$109,000
Call Nancy Answini
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
LARKSVILLE
Completely redone!
New roof, windows,
plumbing, electric,
fence & patio
with attached gaze-
bo. Modern kitchen
with breakfast room
& sitting area.
Large living room,
office, & dining/
bonus room. 2
large bedrooms
with private
modern baths.
A MUST SEE!!!
$85,000. CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
LARKSVILLE
PRICE REDUCED!
The price has now
come down for your
4th of July view of
the fireworks…and
of course you can
live in the house
too…Architecturally
built split level with
beamed ceilings,
living room with
view, wood-burning
fireplace and hard-
wood floors, dining
room with view and
hardwood floors,
galley oak kitchen,
2 bedrooms, 2
baths, family room,
hobby room and
green house. Two-
car detached
garage, one ace lot
with raised gar-
dens, grape vines,
perennials, fruit
trees, fenced! gar-
dener’s paradise or
we can provide the
gardener at your
expense….
11-1079 $199,000
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
Prudential:
696-2600
LARKSVILLE
Come put your per-
sonal finishings into
this great value. Out
of flood zone and a
huge yard! Lots of
potential in this 3
bedroom home. Call
today for a private
showing. Could be
your first home or
your first invest-
ment, don’t miss
out. MLS 12-1583
$49,900
Call/text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
NUANGOLA
LAKEFRONT
2 bedroom, dining
room, living
room/sunroom,
large deck &
dock, year round,
move-in today.
Shown by open
house. June 3rd
2pm-5pm, June
9th, 11am-2pm
June 10th 2pm-5
& June 16th
11-2pm.
asking $262,000.
(706)255-6208 or
(570)401-0021
906 Homes for Sale
LEHMAN TWP.
/DALLAS
1233 Market Street
BY OWNER
$134,900
3 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths
includes adjacent
50’ x 150’ lot
jtdproperties.com
570-970-0650
MESHOPPEN
Novak Road
Lovely, nearly com-
pleted, renovated
Victorian farmhouse
sits high on 7.81
acres featuring
panoramic pastoral
views, high ceilings,
original woodwork,
gutted, rewired,
insulated & sheet-
rocked, newer roof,
vinyl siding, kitchen
and baths. Gas
rights negotiable.
Lots of potential
with TLC. Elk Lake
$119,900
MLS# 11-525. Call
570-696-2468
MOUNTAIN TOP
215 Patriot Circle
Townhouse. Very
good condition. 3
bedroom, 1 ½ bath,
living room with gas
fireplace and hard-
wood floors. Kitchen
offers new stainless
steel appliances, tile
floor, laundry area,
dining room with
built in corner cabi-
nets. MLS 12-238
$119,900
James Banos
Realtor Associate
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
MOUNTAIN TOP
Beautiful 3 bed-
room, 2 3/4 bath,
with hardwood
floors under carpet
& 2nd kitchen in
lower level for
entertaining.
screened porch,
landscaped yard,
heated workshop &
much more!
$179,900
Call Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
MOUNTAIN TOP
Move in ready 4
bedroom, 2.1 bath
ranch. Formal din-
ing room, eat-in
kitchen, 1st floor
laundry. Central
A/C. Walk out the
sliding door from
large family room to
yard. New roof,
patio/sliding door &
carpet in family
room. Most of
house recently
painted. MLS# 12-
876 $188,000
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
PLAINS
Corner of 220 Bear
Creek Blvd. & Kelly
St., rear of Veter-
an’s Hospital.
3 bedrooms, single
car attached
garage, dining &
living rooms, elec-
tric heat, A/C,
finished basement.
Adjoining 40’ x 150’
lot. Fenced summer
cabana in yard.
$150,000,
negotiable.
570-820-5953
570-417-2899
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night.
MLS 11-2260
Priced to Sell,
$179,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
MOUNTAIN TOP
Spacious 3 bed-
room, 1 3/4 bath
split level on a
beautifully land-
scaped 1 acre lot.
Large sunroom &
recreation room
with fireplace and
wet bar.
$205,000
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
INSTANT EQUITY-
Modern kitchen and
baths. Tile floors.
Corner lot with
deck overlooking
spacious yard.
Desirable neighbor-
hood. Conveniently
located. Turn-key,
just back up the
moving truck and
start your new life.
Easy to show. Call
for your private tour
today MLS#11-2500
Great Price
$164,900
Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#12-165
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
Prudential:
696-2600
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Original columns,
moldings, and lead-
ed glass windows
are intact.
Reduced $40,000
CALL CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
NANTICOKE
1/2 DOUBLE
Great starter home
in nice area. Close
to schools and
recreation. Large 3
season porch with
cabinetry, great for
entertaining. New
plumbing, lots of
light & huge walk
up attic for storage
or rec room.
$35,000
Call CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
T I M E S L E A D E R PAGE 18G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 PAGE 19G
ONLY 6 LOTS LEFT
Custom Homes by
Romanowski Homes
Spec Home offered at $525,000
Or
Have Romanowski Homes build your
Dream Home on any of these
6 remaining lots
Call Geri for details
BESECKER REALTY INC.
Office: (570) 675-3611
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 2-4PM
126 Manor Dr.,
Shavertown
NO FLOOD INSURANCE NEEDED
2 1/2 baths, HW floors,
3-season room, central air,
2 car garage, gas heat.
$177,000
DIR: Rt. 309 N., R. on
Carverton Road, left to
126 Manor
REAL ESTATE
696-0897 696-3801
Clydette Wagner
56 CRISMAN STREET,
FORTY FORT
Why Pay Rent!! Freshly painted - well main-
tained 3 BR 1 1/2 Bath cape features LR,
DR, eat-in kitchen, lower level family room,
private drive and yard. Quiet street. Move
right in!! MLS#12-1119
New Price $109,000
Directions: From Wyoming Avenue (Kingston)
to left on Crisman in Forty Fort, property on
left.
FORTY FORT
Attractive 3BR l-3/4 bath ranch
features open LR/DR with gas FP.
Spacious fnished lower level with
FR, offce, new 3/4 bath. Newer
roof, windows, furnace. Private
yard and 2 car garage.
MLS#12-1977 $134,900.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12-2PM NEW LISTING
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LAKE LOUISE FRANKLIN TWP.
DALLAS HARVEYS LAKE
BEAR CREEK TWP. Spacious Cape Cod with large rooms on
almost 4 acres. Newer roof, gutters and deck. MLS#114042
DAVE 585-0615 or KIMG 585-0606 $199,900
BLAKESLEE 5BR, 3 bath charming Cape Cod on a 2 acre wood-
ed lot. Cathedral ceiling in FR, large modern kitchen.
MLS# 12-1969
JOAN 696-0887 $390,000
10 DAKOTA DRIVE
DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious
w/3 BR’s, 1st fr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000
DIR: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods
FORTY FORT Gracious 3BR, 3 bath Cape Cod. HW foors, crown
molding, large eat-in kitchen, large lot. Create family memories
here! MLS# 12-2007
LESLIE 696-0841 $249,900
615 CHARLES STREET
KINGSTON A must see! Steel & concrete construction put together
this exceptional 4BR, 5 bath home. Great location & fenced yard,
property features maple HW frs - cherry kitchen cabs - unique bronze
staircase ñ tile baths & much more. MLS# 12-531 JULIO 239-6408
or RHEA 696-6677 $299,500
DIR: Wyoming Avenue to E. Dorrance to L on Charles, home on R.
SHAVERTOWN Extraordinary 1yr old complete w/everything!
6BR, 6.5 bath, ultra modern kitchen & bath. Over 7000SF of
living space! Virtual Tour! MLS# 12-1944
JOAN 696-0887 $739,000
HARVEY’S LAKE Breathtaking beauty - 88 feet of lake
frontage. 5BR home w/new Master Suite & gourmet
kitchen, exceptional boathouse w/dream view.
MLS# 11-605
VIRGINIA ROSE 714-9253 $950,000
BLAKESLEE BEAR CREEK TWP.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 2:30-4:00 PM FORTY FORT SHAVERTOWN
LAKE LOUISE Country roads take you home to this magnifcent
estate just 15 minutes from town. Escape to this 4,300 sq. ft. 2
story all brick home cradled on 15 acres. Offers grand foyer entrance
(20x13) which leads to a stunning great room w/FP and 2 sets of
French doors to oversized rear patio. This 4 BR, 4 BTH home is flled
w/every conceivable luxury. Ultra modern kitchen, marble foors and
the list goes on. Call for a private showing today. MLS#12-1901
BARBARA M. 696-0883 $599,000
FRANKLIN TWP. All the charm of a southern plantation on
4acres w/stunning woodwork, wood foors, period kitchen &
baths. MLS# 12-1959
DAVID 970-1117 $275,000
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WILKES-BARRE
PLYMOUTH
KINGSTON
DALLAS
KINGSTON Price Reduced! Star quality! Great value! LR w/
energy saving gas FP. 3BRs w/ample closet space. Beautifully
remodeled main bath w/granite vanity. Enjoy the expansive
backyard from the covered stone patio w/built-in gas grill.
MLS# 11-3075. MATT 714-9229 $139,900
WILKES-BARRE This home features over 3000SF of
everything. Lg FR w/FP, fn. LL w/wet bar, fenced yard
w/in-grnd pool & pool hs, C/A, sec sys & lots of room
to grow, Most of all it’s affordable! Includes Hometrust
Warranty. MLS# 12-411 JULIO 239-6408 or
DEB 714-5802 $179,900
PLYMOUTH Attractive Ranch w/3BRs, HW foors, ga-
rage, gas heat, new windows, large yard, shed. Well
cared for! MLS# 12-1911
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240 $144,900
DALLAS Unique Lincoln log home. Outstanding LR
w/FP, large deck w/lots of light & privacy, 2BRs & loft.
MLS# 12-1711
SUSAN 696-0876 $269,000
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM
Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop
Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story
model w/ lots of HW & tile. Gran-
ite counters in kit, MSTR Suite
w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath
w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirl-
pool. Home/lot packages avail-
able. TERRY D. 715-9317
Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right
on Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd.
to end. Straight into Woodberry Manor.
Right on Woodberry Dr.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM
WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM
ERA1.com
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
Mountaintop (570) 403-3000
*Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, based upon a discount of the home’s appraised value.
Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC.
©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.
Clarks Summit (570) 587-9999
Peckville (570) 489-8080
Moscow (570) 842-2300
Lake Ariel (570) 698-0700
Mt Top (570) 403-3000
Scranton (570) 343-9999
Stroudsburg (570) 424-0404
Lehighton (610) 377-6066
Toll Free 877-587-SELL
appraised value
Sunita Arora
Broker/Owner
Accredited Buyer Representative
Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro
Graduate Realtors Institute
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
C bbased upon a ddisc dd asedd upo
515 RASPBERRY RD
DURYEA
Bi-Level in Blueberry Hill Estates offers plenty
of storage, finished LL, mature landscaping,
situated on double lot with pool.
$235,000MLS#12-1696
DIR: North on Foote Ave, to L on Phoenix.
At light to L into Blueberry Hill Estates to R
on Raspberry. Home on R
Jennifer Winn 570.760.1622
32 CHURCH ST
EDWARDSVILLE
2-story 3BR home, large lot, OSP, updated
kitchen & bath, 1st floor laundry
$59,000MLS#12-1398
DIR: US 11, turn on to Northampton
leads into Main, left on to Church St,
house is on the left
Jennifer Davison 570.793.1033
163 GREEN ST
EDWARDSVILLE
3BR, 2-story, wood floors, formal dining
room w/ bay window, eat-in kitchen
$59,900MLS#12-828
DIR: Directions: From Rte 309 N - take
exit 6 Luzerne. Straight off ramp to slight
L on Grove St to L on Main St to R on
Green St. House on R
Jennifer Davison 570.793.1033
150 agents serving 12 counties from 8 offices
put the talent of ERA One Source Realty to work for you.
EARN A GOLD STAR!
On average our Gold Star Properties spend 80% less time on the market
SUGARLOAF
Petite Farmette, 3BR split-level, newer roof,
2 garages, pole barn w/stall
$239,900 MLS#11-3966
WHITE HAVEN
Autumn Mountain Woodlands Chalet,
wooded lot in private community
$299,000 MLS#12-1623
LAFLIN
Updated ranch, 4BR, French doors open to deck,
LL family room w/ Sauna
$149,500 MLS#11-3557
PLAINS
Double w/ 3BR one one side and 2 on the
other, garage, nice back yard
$94,000 MLS#11-2398
MOUNTAINTOP
Ranch on corner lot, 4BR, eat-in kitchen,
wood floors, pool, finished LL
$149,900 MLS#12-389
DRUMS
Practically New Cape Cod! 4BR, ½ acre lot,
1st floor master w/ fireplace
$99,900 MLS#11-4335
DURYEA
3BR Bi-Level in Blueberry Hill Estates,
finished LL, double lot, pool
$235,000 MLS#12-1696
SWOYERSVILLE
3BR bi-level, finished LL with full kitchen,
2 fireplaces, pool, deck, patio
$183,900 MLS#12-1051
MOUNTAINTOP
Comfortable 2-story home in Kirby Estates,
2,225SF, Crestwood Schools
$239,900 MLS#12-1995
PLYMOUTH
Renovated kitchen, NEW appliances,
new master suite!, garage + OSP
$120,000 MLS#12-1282
DURYEA
2-unit, new kitchen, baths, roof, siding,
flooring...just about everything!
$104,900 MLS#11-4227
MULTIFAMILY
DURYEA
Renovated Investment property. New roof,
windows, porch, & vinyl siding.
$104,900 MLS#11-4228
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominums nestled in a
quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania
Two-story
Townhomes
• 1st floor master
• Formal Dining Room
• Eat-in Kitchen
• Loft
• Valuted Ceilings
• Front Porch
• Garage
• Garden Area
Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere has never been a
better time to join us…
Prices Starting in the $140s
Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne
Open House Today 1:00-3:00
OPEN HOUSE TODAY! • 13PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY! • 13PM OPEN HOUSE SAT. 6/16 • 122PM
PITTSTON
3,750 SF raised ranch, 12 acre estate, barn,
stocked ponds, breathtaking!
$589,000 MLS#12-1707
DURYEA
2-story traditional in Blueberry Hills,
family room w/ fireplace, much more...
$319,900 MLS#11-3974
MOUNTAINTOP
New Construction Polonia Estates,
upgraded materials, unparalleled quality
$299,000 MLS#12-163
NEW CONSTRUCTION!
(570) 474-9801
If you are buying or selling anywhere
in the county, I can help you!
Only if you call!
Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323 Jim Graham
Associate Broker
MOUNTAINTOP
Stunning 4BR, 2.5 bath home.
Large eat-in kitchen w/granite
Island, C/A, DR w/HW, FR w/FP,
40’ deck, private rear yard.
MLS# 12-1813 $314,900
3BR raised Ranch with HW throughout
except kitchen & bath. 2 car garage. Nice
rear yard. Move-in condition. Newer roof!
MLS# 12-1828 $148,500
3BR Ranch in very nice condition. Large
LR, DR, large eat-in kitchen, huge MBR
w/large closet. 2 car tandem garage,
gas heat. Nice rear yard.
MLS# 12-1754 $129,900
(570) 288-9371
Rae Dziak
714-9234
rae@lewith-freeman.com
5 Baird Street, Harveys Lake 2420 S. Main St., Hanover Twp.
OPEN HOUSE CANCELLED
$119,900
OPEN HOUSE
CANCELLED
Motivated
Seller - 2 homes.
Modern 3 BR w/
upgrades plus 1
BR, 1 BAguest
house or rental.
CALLFOR
DETAILS
$149,900
438 Schuyler Avenue,
Kingston
Well maintained, modern 3BR, 1 bath 2-story.
Large LR & DR, eat-in kitchen w/attractive
cabinets & all appliances, washer/dryer 1st
floor, 2 garages, nice yard, terrific front porch!
DIR: Wyoming Ave to Division St, L on
Schuyler, home on R
New Price $104,500
PENDING
OPEN HOUSE TODAY
2:30-3:30PM
New Listing - Loft @ Elevations
Wilkes-Barre
Barbara F. Metcalf
Associate Broker
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct
metcalf@epix.net Bar B bbbbara F. Metc t alf alf alf alf
Ass A ociate Brokerrrr
Barbara F. Metcalf
Associate Broker
69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA18708
Te latest look... sweeping 2
bedroom, 2 bath loft condo with
ultra modern kitchen opens to huge
“great room” with fireplace. Large
master bedroom with master closet
& bath. Corner unit with high
windows stream in light. Close to
everything. MLS#12-2001
Only $279,900
122 Buck Ridge Drive, Drums
$139,900
159 Terrace Ave., Trucksville
$179,900
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
(570) 696-1195
Open Houses Today • 1:00-3:00PM
I’m Sue Barre and I sell houses, and I can
SELL YOURS! (570) 696-5417
Sun, Fun, Beach, tennis and lazy afternoons on the
lake.That’s what you get with the Beech Mountain
gated community. Modoern contemporary 3BR 2BA
home on double lot.
Directions: 309 S to Beech Mountain, after passing
guard shack stay on Edge Drive, take R on Grouse
Ridge, then take L onto Buck Ridge Drive, House
on L.
Affordable 4 BR 1.5 bath home in the Dallas school
system! HW throughout, Formal DR, eat in kit, large
LR, nicely sized BRs. Roomy fenced in backyard
with deck and water feature! Convenient
Back Mountain location.
Directions: Rte. 309 to Carverton, R on
Spring garden, R on Terrace Ave, house
on Left.
We’re moving lots and this exclusive development
will sell out soon to a fortunate few!
Convenient to Wilkes-Barre with spectacular views
and 1 to 4.5 acre parcels.
16 - Estate sized sites on a private rolling hillside
between Hillside Road and Huntsville Reservoir,
Shavertown.
Public Sewer - Natural Gas
Another Quality Halbing – Amato Development
Expert Construction with attention to every detail
by Summit Pointe Builders – Your plan or ours!
Contact: Kevin Smith (570) 696-1195
Kevin.Smith@Century21.com Kevin.Smith@
Smith Hourigan Group
W ’ W ’ ii ll t dd h thii ll ii dd ll t
Exclusive Jackson Township Location Just Off Hillside Road
Homesites From $155,900
Ready for custom build by
Summit Pointe Builders
www.gordonlong.com
212 GRANGE
HALL RD.,
(BLOOMINGDALE)
SHICKSHINNY
10 Acre Farm field with
Country Views from this
Immaculate Ranch Home,
Ultra Modern Kitchen,
Oversized Garage Listing
#12-1067
All for $274,900
Call Cherub for details
570-762-4641
3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
(570) 675-4400
PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS
Pittston 238 S. Main St. 2-4PM Atlas Realty
Pittston 48 Lewis St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Pittston 15 Green St. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Harding 2032 Route 92 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Exeter 118 Trayor St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty
Jenkins Twp. 51 Union St. 1-3PM Marilyn K. Snyder Real Estate
Exeter 218 Orchard St. 2-4PM Rothstein Realtors
Pittston 264 S. Main St. 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Moosic 2101 Robinson Close 12-2PM Classic Properties
Dupont 230 Wyoming Ave. 1-3PM Classic Properties
Laflin Fordham St. 2-3:30PM Gilroy Real Estate
Duryea 515 Raspberry Rd. 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty
West Pittston 951 Wyoming Ave. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Laflin 155 Haverford Dr. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Duryea 154 Pettebone St. 12-1:30PM O’Boyle Real Estate
Pittston Twp. Stauffer Pointe Townhomes 1-3PM Stauffer Pointe Development
WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS
Wilkes-Barre 115 Noble Lane 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Wilkes-Barre 40 Poplar St. 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Wilkes-Barre 76 Kidder St. 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
Plains 22 Penny Lane 1:30-3:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
Plains Bergh St. 12-1:30PM Gilroy Real Estate
Bear Creek Lot 92 Sandsprings Rd. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Bear Creek 101 Maple Rd. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Bear Creek Village 30 Cove Rd. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Wilkes-Barre 178 New Elizabeth St. 2-4PM Besecker Realty
HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS
Hanover Twp. 159 Red Fox Lane 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Hanover 72 Lyndwood Ave. 12-2PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Hanover Twp. 2420 S. Main St. 1-2PM Lewith & Freeman
KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS
Kingston 131 E. Bennett St. 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
Larksville 80 E. 4th St. 1-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Swoyersville 79 Maltby Ave. 12-2PM Jack Crossin Real Estate
Edwardsville 32 Church St. 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty
Luzerne Waypoint Townhomes 1-3PM ERA One Source Realty
Luzerne 51 Ryman St. 12-2PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Kingston 581 Meadowland Ave. 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Swoyersville 84 Watkins St. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Forty Fort 56 Crisman St. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Kingston 615 Charles St. 2:30-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Kingston 61 W. Walnut St. 2:30-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Kingston 438 Schuyler Ave. 2:30-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS
Tunkhannock 529 SR292E 12:30-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Dallas 14 Mapleseed Dr. 12-2PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 16 Roosevelt St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Trucksville 159 Terrace Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 110 Pinecrest Ave. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Sweet Valley 91 Skurat Rd. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Harveys Lake 5 Baird St. 4-5PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 99 Warden Ave. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 104 Orchard East 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 10 Dakota Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 126 Manor Dr. 2-4PM Besecker Realty
MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS
Mountaintop 478 Strawberry Lane 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 46 Farmhouse Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 24 Walden Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop Lot 1 Woodberry Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
HAZLETON & SURROUNDS
Beech Mountain 122 Buck Ridge Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Conyngham 68 Sugarloaf Ave. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Drums 134 Fairway Dr. 12-2PM Century 21 Bernstein Real Estate
OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, JUNE 3RD, 2012
PAGE 20G SUNDAY, JUNE 3, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
23 W. Grand Street
Totally Remodeled 3
Bedroom home on
large lot on a well-
kept street in move-
in condition! Home
Includes 1 1/2 Mod-
ern Baths w/ stone
countertops, tile
floors, spacious
kitchen with all new
appliances & plenty
of countertop
space! New carpet
throughout!
MLS 11-3473
$57,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
NANTICOKE
415 Jones Street
Adorable home with
charm & character.
4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, eat-in kit-
chen, formal dining
room, family room
with gas fireplace.
3 season room,
fenced in yard with
rear deck & shed.
$119,000
MLS#12-498
Michael Nocera
570-357-4300
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-5412
NANTICOKE
418 Front St.
Check out this large
4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with a formal
dining room, living
room and family
room. This home is
located across the
street from a beau-
tiful park and recre-
ation area. Great
for people who like
the outdoors and
have kids.
MLS 12-1466
$50,000
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NORTH LAKE
Inviting home with
90’ of lakefront &
wonderful enclosed
dock. The huge
great room features
a vaulted ceiling,
hard wood floors,
handsome stone
fireplace, built-in
cabinets & long win-
dow seat with offer-
ing lake view. Mod-
ern kitchen with
large pantry for
entertaining, Master
suite opens to 3
season room, also
lakefront. 2nd floor
guest rooms are
oversized. MLS#
11-2954 $328,500
Call Rhea
570-696-6677
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
NUANGOLA LAKE
28 Lance Street
Very comfortable 2
bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
$119,000
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
NUANGOLA
Nuangola
LAKEFRONT.
Intriguing older
home with hard-
wood floors, natural
woodwork, newer
roof (2005) & most-
ly newer windows.
Private 3/4 acre
setting. Beautiful
lake frontage.
$189,00
MLS #12-887
Call Mary Ann
Desiderio
570-851-2999
Smith Hourigan
Group
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
110 Union St.
Fixer upper with 3
bedrooms, new
roof, gas heat.
Great lot 50 x 173.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1513
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
15 Green St.
Move right into this
newly upgraded 2
story, 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath home with
granite counter
tops, stainless steel
appliances and
slate tile floors.
Rest easy with a
new roof overhead
as well as new
energy efficient fur-
nace, private lot.
Take a tour of this
home before it is
gone! For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Priced to sell at
$119,900
MLS 12-916
Call Lu-Ann
570-620-9280
PITTSTON
175 Oak Street
New furnace,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 1st floor
laundry room, 3
season porch,
fenced yard and off
street parking.
MLS#12-721
$84,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
PITTSTON
38 Johnson St.
Looking for a home
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, modern
kitchen, hardwood
floors? Also fea-
tures gas fireplace,
new gas furnace,
newer windows and
roof, deck, fenced
in yard. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-328
$129,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
38 Johnson St.
Looking for a home
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, modern
kitchen, hardwood
floors? Also fea-
tures gas fireplace,
new gas furnace,
newer windows and
roof, deck, fenced
in yard. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-328
$129,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
ATLAS REALTY,
INC.
570-829-6200
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PITTSTON
45-47 Swallow St.
3 units include dou-
ble block home
with additional sin-
gle family home in
rear. Double block
has 3 bedrooms
and 1 bath on each
side. Single home
has 1 bedroom and
1 bath. Vinyl siding
and off street park-
ing. All utilities paid
by tenants except
sewer. Great
income.
MLS 12-1989
$119,000
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
Beautifully main-
tained & completely
renovated four bed-
room two-
story.Formal living
room & dining
room. Modern
kitchen with a
breakfast bar. Tiled
25 x 11 first floor
recreation room, 1
3/4 modern tiled
baths. Exquisite oak
hardwood floors
throughout. Nothing
left to do but move
in! MLS# 12-1517
$134,900
(570) 714-6110
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
PITTSTON
Prime Location
This three bed-
room, 2.5 bath has
many upgrades,
including new hard-
wood floors in living
& dining rooms, a
big Trex deck, new
fencing in back yard
& an oversized
driveway leading to
a 2 car garage.
MLS# 11-3931
$319,000
RUBBICO
REAL ESTATE
570-826-1600
PITTSTON
REDUCED
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bed-
room home with
2 full baths. 7
rooms on nice
lot with above
ground pool. 1
car garage. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$79,000
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
PITTSTON
REDUCED
238 S. Main St.
Ten room home
with 4 bedrooms, 2
baths, 2 car
garage, great drive-
way, central air,
large yard. A must
see home!
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-477
$129,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1
bath. This house
was loved and
you can tell.
Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb
appeal. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$76,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON
Great Investment
just waiting for a
new owner. Many
updates In both
units. Building has
extra unused space
in attic and base-
ment that be be fin-
ished with many
options. Out of flood
zone, huge lot and
off street parking.
MLS 12-1586
$124,900
Call/text Donna
570-947-3824 or