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Day

3

Thursday
June 7, 2012
Publishers Weekly’s Show Daily is produced each day during the 2012 BookExpo in New York.
The Show Daily press office is in room 1C02. PW’s booth is #3153.

A L L

T H E

B U Z Z

O N

B O O K E X P O

A M E R I C A

By Louisa Ermelino
The quest for booksellers
on the floor of BEA can take
some unanticipated turns,
like meeting Richard Ford
at the entrance to the show.
His latest book, Canada, he
says graciously, is “old
news,” and he’s just arrived
at BEA, but he’s looking forward to James Salter’s new
book, Cassada, out on
September 11 from
Counterpoint. “My God,”
he says, “it’s going to be a
great book because a book
from Jim Salter is a reason
to stop the trains.”
September 11 is a popular
day this year, with Kevin
Powers’s debut, a war novel
about two soldiers in Iraq,
The Yellow Birds (Little,
Brown), generating a lot of
excitement. Mark
LaFramboise from Politics
& Prose in Washington,
D.C., read it in one sitting.
Actually, he says, he read
parts of it “standing up,” he
was so impressed. A big
fan, he intends to do everything he can to promote it,
not only because of the subject but because of the language. “It’s visceral; the
language is so poetic, so literary.” His enthusiasm is
matched by Calvin Crosby
from Book Passage in Corte
Madera, Calif. “I’m dying to
get back to it,” he says. “To
have captured the experience of Iraq while it’s so
current is amazing to me.
Usually, like with Vietnam,
there needs to be some distance, but Powers did it
without that distance.”
“War seems to be a theme,”
Crosby says. He’s also
excited about In the
Shadow of the Banyan

(Simon & Schuster) by
Vaddey Ratner, a novel
about the coming-of-age of
a young girl during the
Cambodian genocide in the
1970s. Ratner was five years
old when the Khmer Rouge
came to power in 1975. “It’s
history that I knew so little
about,” Crosby says. “I wept
for over half the book, it
was so beautiful, well
crafted, and honest.”
Jodie Vinson from
Brookline Booksmith in
Massachusetts is eager to
read the new Junot Díaz,
This Is How You Lose Her
(Riverhead) and also
Barbara Kingsolver’s Flight
Behavior (HarperCollins),
set in Appalachia. Vinson

heard both authors speak
at the author breakfast,
which whetted her interest.
Kathleen Millard from Elm
Street Books in New
Canaan, Conn., really
wants to read The Art
Forger (Algonquin) by B.A.
Shapiro. “I’m always fascinated when famous art
goes missing and stays hidden for so many years.”
She’s also anticipating the
new Tom Wolfe, Back to
Blood (Little, Brown). “He’s
a classic. He’ll live through
the ages. We’re looking for
another Bonfire.” Peter
Malizia of Costco, Canada,
is also high on Tom Wolfe.
“He’s a big name. If you sell
in the States, you sell in

© STEVEKAGAN.COM

The Big Books:
What They’re Saying

Canada.”
Tigers in Red Weather
(Little, Brown), Liza
Klaussmann’s debut novel,
set at the end of WWII, is
generating buzz. (Klaussmann is the great-greatgreat-granddaughter of
Herman Melville.) Margie
Scott-Tucker of Book Inc. in
San Francisco says she
“loved it” and thinks it will

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be a big book club book.
She also “loved, loved,
loved” The Unlikely
Pilgrimage of Harold Fry,
Rachel Joyce’s novel
(another debut from
Random House). “Everyone
over 50 should read this
book,” she says.
For Bill Cusumano, of
Nicola’s Books in Ann
Arbor, Mich., it’s John
Saturnall’s Feast by
Lawrence Norfolk (Grove).
Cusumano calls the story of
the orphan, kitchen boy,
and finally, master chef, set
in 17th-century England
“just a wonderful book.”
He’s also excited to read
Jon Meacham’s biography
of Thomas Jefferson
(Random House) because
“there hasn’t been a full
biography of Jefferson in 30
years.” And then there’s
J.K. Rowling’s first novel for
adults, The Casual Vacancy
(Little, Brown). “This is the
book everyone is scared of.
We’re really worried. What
if people tell their friends
it’s not Harry Potter?”
Land Arnold, of Flyleaf
Books in Chapel Hill, N.C.,
in addition to the new
Barbara Kingsolver, is
looking forward to The
Vanishing Act (Norton) by
Mette Jakobsen. Arnold’s
business partner, Jamie
Fiocco, says that “it does
seem to have a lot of buzz.”
continued on page 6

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29May2012 4:31 PM

COMING NOVEMBER 13, 2012

From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of American Lion

Jon
Meacham

Thomas
Jefferson

PHOTO: © GASPER TRINGALE

THE AR T
of POWER

MEET JON MEACHAM AT BEA THURSDAY, JUNE 7
SIGNING: RANDOM HOUSE BOOTH #3940

TABLE 1

10:00 – 11:00 AM

www.JonMeacham.com
Facebook.com/meachamjon
T H E

R A N D O M

H O U S E

Twitter @jmeacham
P U B L I S H I N G

G R O U P

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

HIGHLIGHTS
OF THE DAY

MEETING AND EVENTS
8–9:30 a.m. Adult Book and Author Breakfast: speakers are Michael Chabon,
Zadie Smith, J.R. Moehringer, with Kirstie Alley as emcee, and a special
appearance by Jimmy Fallon. Also, Publishers Weekly will present its 20th
Annual PW Bookstore and Sales Rep of the Year Awards to Roberta Rubin of
the Book Stall at Chestnut Court in Chicago and Ann Kingman and Michael
Kindness, both from Random House Group.

9 a.m.–3 p.m. Exhibit Hall
9 a.m.–3 p.m. International Rights and Business Center
10 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Author Stages: IDPF Innovation Award; The Real Deal—
Update on the African-American Literary Marketplace; A Conversation with
Dan Rather; Writing Strong Female Characters in Middle Grade Books; The
Power of Storytelling: From Stage to Page; The New Russian Literature: Young
Russian Prize-Winning Authors; and Workman’s Brain Quest Challenge.

11–11:50 a.m. What the Next Generation Thinks: New Voices in Publishing
Speak Out (1E09); speakers include students from the M.S. in Publishing program at New York University—a 20-somethings group that has grown up
largely in the digital age.
Note: Maggie Stiefvater, Tessa Gratton, and Brenna Yovanoff will be signing
ARCs of The Curiosities at noon in Lerner’s booth (2357).
BEA Events including Book and Author Breakfasts, Stage events, and a
selection of Special Events (e.g., a conversation with Neil Young and Patti
Smith) will be livestreamed and available to the public for free viewing.

© STEVEKAGAN.COM

4

Eager and galley-hungry booksellers swarmed the Hachette stand just after the opening
bell on Wednesday morning.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daisy Maryles
MANAGING EDITORS Michael Coffey, Sonia Jaffe Robbins
ART DIRECTOR Clive Chiu
PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Kagan
STAFF REPORTERS Andrew Albanese, Rachel Deahl, Louisa Ermelino, Rose Fox,
Lynn Garrett, Gabe Habash, Carolyn Juris, Jim Milliot, Calvin Reid, Diane Roback,
Judith Rosen, Mark Rotella, Jonathan Segura, John A.Sellers
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Gwenda Bond, Adam Boretz, Ann Byle, Lucinda Dyer, Liz
Hartman, Karen Jones, Hilary S. Kayle, Bridget Kinsella, Claire Kirch, Sally Lodge,
Suzanne Mantell, Shannon Maughan, Diane Patrick, Karen Raugust, Marc Schultz,
Teri Tan, Kerry Weber, Wendy Werris, Kimberly Winston
DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL Craig Teicher
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kady Francesconi, Catherine Fick
TECHNOLOGY EDITOR Ernie Pena
PUBLISHER Cevin Bryerman
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SHOW DAILY Joseph Murray
BookExpo America is owned by Reed Exhibitions and any of its marks used herein are
used under license from Reed Exhibitions.

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Also Happening in

Booth 3632

Thursday,
June 7th

11:00 AM

12:00 PM

2:00 PM

Don’t miss
Lemony
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Advance reading
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two new Poppy titles:
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Pick up greeting
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based on the newest
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bestselling motherdaughter team
of Julie Andrews
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Hamilton.
All items available while supplies last!

Looking for more resources for your store? Visit www.LBYR-Booksellers.com!

6

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Big Books for Kids: Surveying the Scene
By Diane Roback
By all accounts it’s been an upbeat
show, and nowhere was that more
evident than among children’s publishers. Macmillan’s Allison Verost
said, “When the doors opened at 9
a.m., people were making a beeline
to our booth for galleys. That’s exactly
the kind of buzz we’re trying to create.” Jennifer Corcoran at Disney
noted, “People are definitely coming in with an agenda—they know
what they’re looking for. There’s
been a lot of blogger traffic, and they
are enthusiastic for the ARCs.”
YA fiction continues to be an
extremely strong category, and
there were plenty of high-profile
projects. Little, Brown’s big YA
book is The Diviners by Libba Bray,
set in the 1920s. A 150,000-copy first
printing was planned for
September 18, but was upped to
200,000 based on feedback at BEA.
Macmillan’s big YA for fall is Crewel
by Gennifer Albin (FSG, Oct.). She’s
a debut author who was on food
stamps, and wrote her book in
70-minute increments at the public
library. Macmillan bought it in a
major multibook deal.
In July, Disney will publish the
eighth and final Artemis Fowl book
by Eoin Colfer, The Last Guardian.
And in October it will release Rick
Riordan’s second Heroes of

low-up to her 2006 Princess
Academy. Another sequel, the end
of Becca Fitzpatrick’s Hush, Hush
trilogy, comes out in October, fittingly called Finale. A sequel at
Putnam, Prodigy by Marie Lu (Jan.),
was one of the most “hotly anticipated” galleys at the booth, according to Penguin’s Shanta Newlin.
Another was Reached by Ally
Condie (Dutton, Nov. 13), though
galleys weren’t available because
the book is embargoed. And
Houghton Mifflin has Lois Lowry’s
Son, fourth of her Giver novels,
which comes out in October.

Olympus book, The Mark of Athena.
David Levithan’s Every Day
(Knopf, Aug.) represents a “new
direction” for the author/editor,
says Random House’s Dominique
Cimina; his main character wakes
up in a different person’s body each
day. And James Dashner returns
with The Kill Order (Delacorte,
Aug.), a prequel to his Maze
Runner books.
James Patterson (with Maxine
Paetro) kicks off a new detective
series with Confessions of a Murder
Suspect, about a mysterious and
wealthy family. The novel has a
September 24 laydown and a
750,000-copy first printing.
Maggie Stiefvater kicks off a new
four-book series for Scholastic this
September, The Raven Boys, with a
first printing of 150,000 copies.
“There was a stack of several hundred galleys at the booth on
Tuesday and they disappeared in
nine minutes—we timed it,” said
Tracy van Straaten.
YA author Melissa Marr will have
Carnival of Souls, first in a new
series: a world of demons and
witches with Game of Thrones–style
stakes. HarperCollins has a
200,000-copy first printing planned
for September.
There was lots of sequel news.
Bloomsbury had Princess Academy:
Palace of Stone, Shannon Hale’s fol-

Middle Grade
There were some big numbers for
middle-grade novels as well. The
biggest, by far: Wimpy Kid #7: The
Third Wheel (Abrams/Amulet, Nov.
13 laydown), with a six-and-a-halfmillion–copy first printing. The
ninth Captain Underpants, Captain
Underpants and the Terrifying
Return of Tippy Tinkletrousers, publishes in September, with a first
printing of one million. There’s also
a million-copy first printing for

Lemony Snicket’s All the Wrong
Questions: Who Could That Be at
This Hour? with an October 23 laydown.
Infinity Ring: A Mutiny in Time by
James Dashner (Scholastic) pubs in
September with a 500,000 first
printing. It’s first in a seven-book,
multiauthor, multiplatform series
in the vein of the 39 Clues.
The Peculiar (Greenwillow,
Sept.), a middle-grade debut from
Stefan Bachmann, lands with a
100,000-copy first printing;
Bachmann wrote it when he was 16.
Another debut, by Glee star Chris
Colfer, The Land of Stories (Little,
Brown, July), arrives with a 250,000copy first printing.
Newbery Medalist Patricia
MacLachlan has written a prequel
to the Boxcar Children series for
Albert Whitman; The Boxcar
Children Beginning, which pubs on
September 1. Gary D. Schmidt,
whose Okay for Now made a splash
last year, makes his first foray into
the SF genre with What Came from
the Stars (Clarion, Sept.). The big
news for American Girl is the intro-

EDC Publishing hosted an
“Amazon Free Zone” around
its booth. President Randall
White (r.) talks it over with
Michael Norris, SIMBA Information.

Big Books continued from page 1

“It’s another World War II novel. I
was skeptical at first, but after four
pages, I was so enamored, I was
sucked right in. Amy [Einhorn] has
done it again.”
For Gerry Donaghy of Powell’s
Books in Portland, Ore., Prisoner of
Heaven (HarperCollins) by Carlos
Ruiz Zafón has bestseller potential,
as does The Twelve (Ballantine) by
Justin Cronin. On the line to see
Cronin, talk was all about how his
was “the book they weren’t going
home without.” Donaghy is also
excited about Jonathan Evison’s
The Revised Fundamentals of
Caretaking (Algonquin) and Mark
Helprin’s In Sunlight and in
Shadow (HMH). Richard Russo’s
Elsewhere: A Memoir (Knopf), he
added, will likely be a big hit for the
store in November.
And don’t forget Kind One by
Laird Hunt from Coffee House;
Twelve’s Schroder by Amity Gaige
and Albert of Adelaide by Howard
Anderson; Prosperous Friends by
Christine Schutt (Grove); The Polish
Boxer from Bellevue Literary Press
by Eduardo Halfon; Brain on Fire by
Susannah Cahalan (Free Press);
from Knopf: Jo Nesbø’s Phantom,
Harry Hole’s ninth outing, and Neil
Young’s Waging Heavy Peace
(Penguin/Blue Rider). Patti Smith
interviewing the rock icon was the
big ticket event at BEA.

Rachael Ray is putting the burgers on in her new
book, The Burger Book, just out from Atria.
Lee Child signed his new Jack Reacher
novel, A Wanted Man, at the Random
House booth.

© STEVEKAGAN.COM

The other book she’s really enjoying is The Orchardist
(HarperCollins) by Amanda Coplin,
a big debut book that’s getting a lot
of great prepress.
Elliott Bay’s Rick Simonson is betting on Telegraph Avenue
(HarperCollins) by Michael
Chabon, the new Junot Díaz, Zadie
Smith’s NW (Penguin Press), and
casts another vote for Vaddey
Ratner’s debut, In the Shadow of
the Banyan. Telegraph Avenue
takes place in the Oakland neighborhood where Diesel Books is
located. “This will be our big book,”
co-owner Alison Reid says. “It’s
wonderfully written and has reallife characters from my neighborhood—I know everybody in this
book.” The book’s launch party will
be held at Diesel, and the store is
planning a major event for it.
Rosanna Nissen of Barrett
Bookstore in Darien, Conn., is
eagerly awaiting Sweet Tooth
(Doubleday/Talese), the new novel
from Ian McEwan. She’s also looking forward to The Smitten Kitchen,
a debut cookbook by popular blogger Deb Perelman (Knopf). “It’s a
great combination of humor and
wonderful recipes,” Nissen said.
Lanora Haradon, owner of the
Next Chapter, Mequon, Wis., is talking up City of Women (Putnam/Amy
S. Einhorn) by David R. Gillham.

Coauthors Caryn Beth
Rosenthal and Maryjane
Fahey at the Sellers Publishing booth, proudly brandishing their book, Dumped.

duction of a new character in
September: Caroline Abbott.

On the Picture Book Front
A larger-than-life Olivia was walking the floor, heralding the return
of Ian Falconer’s Olivia: Olivia and
the Fairy Princesses pubs in August
for Atheneum. “Everyone has been
clamoring for it,” said S&S’s Nicole
Russo; the first printing is 500,000,
and the on-sale date is August 28.
At Roaring Brook there’s Bear
Has a Story to Tell by Erin and
Philip Stead, their first collaboration since the Caldecott-winning A
Sick Day for Amos McGee. And
Lane Smith has a new book, Abe
Lincoln’s Dream, about a haunted
room in the White House.
Random House’s major picture
books included Kadir Nelson’s I
Have a Dream (Schwartz & Wade),
which he previewed at the BEA
breakfast; it’ll be released in
October ahead of the 50th anniversary of the speech. Sarah Bagby,
owner of the Watermark in Wichita,
Kans., said, “It’s going to be one we
can sell to every age, every season.”
Sourcebooks was looking ahead
to a September bedtime story, How
Does Sleep Come by Jeanne

Blackmore, illustrated by Elizabeth
Sayles. “B&N is getting behind it in
a big way,” said Heather Moore.
The 10th picture-book collaboration between Jamie Lee Curtis and
Laura Connell, My Brave Year of
Firsts, arrives from HarperCollins
in September with a 400,000 first
printing. Mo Willems has an interactive activity book, Don’t Let the
Pigeon Finish This Activity Book
(Hyperion), which introduces a new
character—Mad Cow. For
Candlewick, the most buzzedabout book is Jon Klassen’s This Is
Not My Hat (Oct.), the follow-up to I
Want My Hat Back.
“It’s an energizing time for everyone here, to see all the books we’ve
all worked on get into the hands of
readers, booksellers, and librarians,” said Dominique Cimina,
director of publicity at Random
House. Megan Goel, children’s
book buyer at BookPeople in
Austin, Tex., enjoyed the widening
diversity of attendees at the show:
booksellers, librarians, agents,
bloggers. “And they all love talking
about books.”
With reporting by John A. Sellers,
Carolyn Juris, Matia Burnett, and Joy
Bean.

Celebrating both its 50th
anniversary and its new name
change, from Planned TV Arts
to Media Connect, were Rick
Frishman, founder; senior v-p
Kristin Clifford; and David
Hahn, managing director.

Michael Connelly signed for
throngs of fans at the Little,
Brown booth.

PW’s own Mark Rotella and Rose Fox at the taping of their Book
Radio show for Sirius, at the Sirius booth, where they interviewed
Nelson DeMille.

An international bestseller –
more than 3 million copy sold in
Europe—Hyperion’s Elizabeth
Dyssegard likens The 100 Year
Old Man Who Climbed Out the
Window and Disappeared to her
earlier find, Peter Hoeg’s
Smilla’s Sense of Snow.

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

7

Is Brazil the Next Russia?

Representing an
years. “The idea is to
entire nation isn’t
come every year
easy, but fewer than
with better, larger
30 people are doing
participation,”
just that for Brazil
Linhares says.
at BEA. Most of the
The world’s fifthgroup is authors,
largest country can
who hope that their
be represented by
2012 efforts to raise
so few people
awareness of
because their
Brazil’s rich literary Brazilian authors (l. to r.) Judivan J.
enthusiasm carries
Vieira, Adriana Kortlandt, Marcos
environment will
as much weight as a
Linhares.
pay off in subseforce twice as large.
quent years—with the goal of
Brazil’s publishing industry, curbecoming BEA’s Global Market
rently burgeoned by a translation
Forum country.
grant last year from the National
“The main objective is to show
Library, is increasing its efforts to
everyone that we have quality in our
expand overseas. BEA attendee
work and in our books,” says Marcos
Literarte, a Brazilian publisher, has
Linhares, an author whose Crime in
representatives in eight countries;
the Heart of Brazil was just transLinhares reported that 15 different
lated into English and published by
booksellers approached him about
Thesaurus Editora. Last year,
carrying his book in their stores.
Linhares got together with nine
Brazil could ask for no better
other authors and approached
envoys in its first year at the show,
Thesaurus with the translation
and already the results are starting
idea; after paying for translation
to show. The authors reported high
and publication costs out of their
traffic and high interest in their
own pockets, the authors are now at
books. Said Linhares, “It’s been
BEA with the product of their efforts,
wonderful. Better even than we
—Gabe Habash
making connections for future
expected.”
PHOTO BY GABE HABASH

PUBL I SHERS

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Neil and Patti Perform
for Booksellers
If Javits felt more like a rock conSmith, who agreed with him, addcert venue than a convention cening, “There’s no barrier between
ter Wednesday morning, it was for
the reader and you. I really felt you
good reason: rock musicians Neil
were talking to me. You were, right?”
Young and Patti Smith were in the
The conversation veered back to
building. The first people in line to
music, with a discussion of one of
enter the events
Crosby, Still, Nash
hall as Young’s
& Young’s most
music blared from
seminal songs,
loudspeakers
“Ohio,” written
were Bradley
and composed by
Balfour, the editorYoung in 1970.
in-chief of filmfesAsked by Smith
tivaltraveler.com,
about the backand Beverly Gray,
story to the song,
author of The
Young disclosed
Boreal Herbal
that “Ohio” was
Rockers Neil Young and Patti Smith.
(Aroma Borealis
written far from
Publishing), who had stood for
the Midwest, while he was staying
three hours at the head of a line
with fellow singer David Crosby at a
that snaked its way throughout the
cabin in Northern California. The
lower level of Javits before those in
song was sparked in response to a
line were allowed into the venue.
Life magazine cover, the photo of
But like every rock concert, things
the young woman kneeling over the
got started a little later than adverprone body of a young man shot at
tised: Smith and Young came on
Kent State University by the Ohio
stage at 12:20 and bonded for the
National Guard.
next hour in front of a packed hall
“When were you aware of the
of more than 1,100 booksellers and
impact that the song made?” Smith
other fans, as they discussed their
asked, referring to the Vietnam
music, books, and dreams; the
protesters of that era who took up
impact of technology upon their
“Ohio” as their anthem. The quesart; life itself; and even their love of
tion prompted Young to reveal his
trains.
discomfort that he had profited
As the conversation segued into a
financially from the upheaval,
discussion of his memoir, Waging
declaring, “You didn’t want to
Heavy Peace (Blue Rider Press,
become that which you were sepaOct.), Young described it as more of
rating yourself from.” —Claire Kirch
For a full story, go to publishersweekly
a diary than a memoir. “I would
.com/patti
write what I was thinking,” he told

8

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Marvelous Middle-Grade Panel
The enthusiasm in the room was
palpable as five children’s book editors each introduced a middlegrade title that has them especially
thrilled. The editors were Alvina
Ling, editorial director, Little, Brown
Books for Young Readers; Virginia
Duncan, publisher of Greenwillow;
Kate O’Sullivan, executive editor at
Houghton Mifflin Books for
Children; Jason Rekulak, creative
director of Quirk Books; and Steve
Geck, editorial manager of
Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.
Ling introduced Grace Lin’s
Starry River of the Sky (Oct.), a
companion to her Newbery Honor–
winning Where the Mountain Meets
the Moon. Ling, who has been a personal friend of Lin’s since they were
both 10 years old, mentioned the
“lavish” design and production
value of Lin’s book, which centers
on a boy who runs away to the enigmatic village of Clear Sky, where,
among other unusual events, the
moon disappears. While the novel
stands alone, Ling said that familiar
characters from Where the Mountain
Meets the Moon do appear.
Duncan spoke about the debut
novel from 18-year-old author and
musician Stefan Bachmann, who

lives in
Zurich. She
described The
Peculiar
(Sept.) as a “gothic, steampunk, fairy,
and fantasy” story. Among the phantasmagorical characters appearing
in the novel: a changeling boy named
Bartholomew, a lady who dresses
entirely in the color plum, and a girl
with tree branches for hair.
Houghton Mifflin’s O’Sullivan,
introduced Malcolm at Midnight
(Sept.) by W.H. Beck, which she happily acquired at auction. The novel
is about a secret society of class

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

pets, including a small rat named
Malcolm, who is frequently mistaken for a mouse. Beck’s story is
likely to appeal equally to boys and
girls, O’Sullivan concluded, with its
“intimate, personal arc about
becoming one’s own best self.”
Rekulak at Quirk introduced the
first book in an illustrated paranormal series, Tales from Lovecraft
Middle School by Charles Gilman,
which feature lenticular covers that
depict characters transforming
into monsters. Professor Gargoyle
(Sept.) centers on a 12-year-old who
is struggling to fit into Lovecraft

Bossypants a Big Audie Winner
Tina Fey’s Bossypants was named
Audiobook of the Year and Allan
Wolf’s The Watch That Ends the
Night: Voices from the Titanic won
the award for Distinguished
Achievement in Production last
night at the 17th annual Audies
Gala in New York City.
It was the third consecutive year
that a Hachette Audio title grabbed
the Audie Award’s top honor, with
Fey’s self-narrated Bossypants also
winning in the Biography/Memoir
category. The Watch That Ends the
Night—narrated by Michael Page,
Phil Gigante, Christopher Lane,
Laural Merlington, and Angela

Dawe—was
one of three Brilliance Audio titles
to take home awards.
“This Audiobook of the Year win
was overwhelming for our entire
team. We knew going in that the
competition was incredibly stiff, so
didn’t want to bank on the hat trick,
no matter how amazing our nominee was,” said Megan Fitzpatrick,
associate director, marketing and
publicity, at Hachette Audio/
Hachette Digital. “The creativity
and dedication that went into the
production, marketing, and sales of
all the finalists makes this award
even sweeter. Of course, we felt
strongly that Tina Fey’s Bossypants

Middle School, which is constructed of materials salvaged from
a haunted house.
Finally, Geck at Sourcebooks
presented Mira’s Diary: Lost in
Paris (Sept.) by Marissa Moss. The
book follows a “dazzling” young
aspiring artist named Mira (her
sketches appear throughout the
book) who travels with her brother
and father to Paris. Mina discovers
that she can “time-slip” into the
19th century, where she encounters
impressionist artists and seeks to
right a great injustice.
—Matia Burnett

was clearly Audiobook of the Year,
and are so incredibly grateful that
the judges agreed with us.”
Craig Black, founder and CEO of
Blackstone Audio—who got his
start in the audio industry in the
1980s when he quit his job and
launched Classics on Tape from his
country cottage in Oregon—was
honored with the Special
Achievement Award.
“I am very, very, very humbled by
this award and really know that I
don’t deserve it—I’ve ignored my
kids during their formative years,”
—Adam Boretz
Black joked.
For a full list of audie winners, go to
publishersweekly.com/bea

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10

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

When a speaker at Tuesday morning’s YA Editors’ Buzz Panel rhetorically posed the question: “does the
world need another YA dystopia
trilogy?” the answer seemed clear:
yes, as long as it’s a good story. As
she and the five other panelists
demonstrated, the genre has plenty
of room for dystopias, realistic fiction, thrillers—provided they present authentic teenage voices.
Gennifer Albin’s debut novel,
Crewel—the dystopia mentioned
above—concerns a world in which
young women are tapped at age 16
to become Spinsters, who control

society via their cosmic looms.
Though Spinsters are gifted with
eternal beauty and privilege, they
still answer to men in charge. The
heroine, Adelice, begins to realize
that her world is built on lies. “I like
to think of it as a futuristic Mad Men,”
said Farrar, Straus and Giroux
senior editor Janine O’Malley, citing
the book’s atmospheric descriptions,
all with an undercurrent of repression and feminism. “She’s created a
world so vivid, you think you can
just get on a plane and go there.”
You could visit the world of Ever
Davies, the 15-year-old girl at the

heart of Donna Cooner’s Skinny,
but she may not welcome your company. At 300 pounds, the teen is
plagued by a voice inside her head
that she’s named “Skinny”—which
tells her she’s fat, ugly, and unlovable. After a heartbreaking and
humiliating experience, Ever
decides to undergo gastric bypass
surgery, but even as she begins to
shed pounds and take control of
her life, said Scholastic senior editor Aimee Friedman, “Skinny is still
there, hissing those horrible thoughts.
That’s the power of this novel—we
are all plagued by a Skinny.”

HARPERCOLLINS AUTHORS DISCUSS

THE

EVOLUTION
YA FICTION
OF

TUESDAY, JUNE 5TH • 1 PM • UPTOWN STAGE

MELISSA
MARR

ELIZABETH BETHANY
NORRIS
GRIFFIN

www.epicreads.com

The YA Buzz Panel: (l. to r.) Aimee Freidman;
Ben Schrank; Janine O’Malley; moderator Meghan
Goel, book buyer; Andrew Karne; Kari Sutherland.

All of the novels discussed,
whether realistic or fantastical,
address the teen hot-button topic of
transition. Kat Zhang’s What’s Left
of Me takes place in a world in which
everyone is born with two souls, one
of which is supposed to fade away
by age six. In the case of Eva and
Addie, that never happened, and
only Addie, the dominant soul,
knows that Eva still exists, trapped
inside one body. Because such
“hybrids” are considered a threat to
society, they hide their secret—
until they learn that there may be a
way to bring Eva to the surface and
must decide whether to risk everything in order to do so. Editor Kari
Sullivan of HarperCollins describes
the two as being closer than twins,
but “mixed in with the love are
believable flashes of jealousy.” The
relationship rings so true, Sullivan
said, that she was surprised to
learn that debut author Zhang is an
only child.
Unlike Eva and Addie, the title
character of Ashley Edward Miller
and Zack Stentz’s Colin Fischer is
rather solitary—a boy with
Asperger’s syndrome who is
uncomfortable looking at others,
who doesn’t like to be touched, and
who needs index cards to recognize
facial expressions. He also has
keen powers of observation, which
he uses to try to prove the innocence of the school bully, who is
accused of bringing a gun to school
and blowing up a cake in the cafeteria. Razorbill publisher Ben
Schrank called Colin “an
Encyclopedia Brown for a new generation,” adding that anyone who’s
ever felt socially awkward will
relate to Colin, and perhaps come
away from the novel a little more
forgiving of themselves.”
Andrew Karre, editorial director
of Carolrhoda Books, worked on
Megan Spooner’s violent, postapocalyptic debut, Skylark, when the
entire YA genre seemed in need of
forgiveness, and the question “Is YA
too dark?” was being discussed in
the media. At the time, he said, “We
were up to our elbows in the viscera
of this book,” in which the protagonist, Lark, faces the choice that all
adolescents face: “Grow up or die.
The only question,” Karre said, “is
what kind of adult will you be?” It’s
the authentic teenage voice, he adds,
that makes a novel successful, no
matter the subject. —Carolyn Juris

© STEVEKAGAN.COM

Diversity Rules at YA Editors’ Panel

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12

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

A Chat with Kirstie Alley
Popular actress and product spokesperson Kirstie
Alley is master of ceremonies at this morning’s
Adult Book and Author
Breakfast. Immediately
afterward, she will be
signing book cover art
postcards at the Atria
Books booth (3657),
10–10:30 a.m. Alley
recently penned The Art of Men (I
Prefer Mine Al Dente), pubbing this
November, a tell-all account featuring the men in her life.
What prompted you to write a
memoir about the men in your life?
It dawned on me that 98% of the
influences in my life involve men.
I’ve lived a pretty wild life throughout business and personal, and I
wanted to share the good, the bad,
and the ugly so that my readers can
find humor in their own lives, and
have certainty that they can survive
anything, except a direct hit from
an F6 tornado.
You’re so busy—when did you find
time to write about your love life?
In between shagging.

BEA061202_JUNE7AD_ol.indd 1

Is there a man who
changed your life in a
good way?
The highest percentage of
the men that I speak of in
my book have changed my
life for the better.
Any man who changed
your life in a bad way?
Put it this way: I have had
saints, sinners, and demons as lovers. One in particular, whom I
fondly refer to as “Satan incarnate,”
makes Christian Grey look like
Johnny Appleseed. Read all about
it!
You have millions of fans who have
followed your career for years.
What will surprise them when they
read your book?
Probably the many ways I have
turned lemons into lemons.
What dating advice do you have for
women over 50?
Carry a Glock in your Judith Leiber.
Who are some of the favorite men
in your life?
My dad and my son are at the top of
the list, L. Ron Hubbard, Woody

W E E K LY

Allen, the cast and directors/producers of Cheers, Jonathan Knight,
Santa Claus, and baby Jesus.
Anything you’d like to say to folks
who are obsessed with your weight
gains and losses?
Are there people like that?
What would you like readers to get
out of your book?
A good laugh and accurate data. I

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

guess a view of the world according
to Kirstie.
Whether or not this is your first
experience at BookExpo, can you
talk about your expectations of
being here this year?
I expect a really good organic
breakfast with no GMOs [genetically modified organisms] and to be
slightly funnier than Jimmy Fallon.
—Hilary S. Kayle

A Paradigm Shift in Reading
Differing forecasts for and viewpoints on social reading made for a
lively panel discussion on Tuesday
featuring representatives from Kobo,
Tumblr, and Germany’s Readmill,
all trailblazers in the social reading
milieu.
Tumblr’s Rachel Fershleiser
described social reading as “all the
ways I can talk about books, including the author-reader interactions.”
Tony O’Donoghue, also with Kobo,
said that the book is now a dynamic
entity, no longer static, and that
social reading is a way of tapping
into that paradigm shift. “The idea
that reading is private and solitary is
becoming a thing of the past. Social
reading gives people control of their
experience,” he said, “whether they

engage actively or passively on social
sites.” Berlin-based Henrik Berggren,
founder of Readmill, believes that
social reading is “misunderstood.
Reading is an immersive experience that can be shared in individual ways depending on the person.”
The role of authors in social reading continues to evolve. “For those
engaged in it, there are more
opportunities for sharing ideas,”
Fershleiser said. “This has the potential to change the way books are
written,” noted O’Donoghue.
“Writing no longer has to follow a
linear structure.” Said Berggren,
authors learn from readers’ comments in the margins of e-books as
new light is shed on their work.
—Wendy Werris

5/23/12 3:39 PM

JULY 10, 2012

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MP Publishing

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W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

AUTHORS
AT T HE SHOW

J.R. Moehringer
Sympathy for the Devil

Mix a lifelong fascination with bank robber
Willie Sutton (1901–1980) together with turbulent
economic times, and the chances you’ll come up
with Sutton (Hyperion, Sept.), a historical novel
based on the man’s life, are pretty slim. For J.R.
Moehringer, however, the result was almost
inevitable.
“For me, writing about Willie Sutton was a
really good way of writing about all the great
depressions that for some reason have been
forgotten—we seem to remember only ’87 and
’29,” Moehringer says. “It was a way of writing
about unemployment without writing about
unemployment. Sutton illuminated a lot of pain
in the way he was celebrated. Taking down a bank—people thought there
were worse crimes. There was antagonism for banks then as now. This made
me decide it was time to write about him.”
A former newspaperman (and Pulitzer Prize winner for a feature story
about Gee’s Bend, Ala.), Moehringer wrote the bestselling memoir The
Tender Bar, but novel writing was always out there as a lofty goal, he says. “I
only became a journalist because I couldn’t figure out how to become a novelist. A historical novel seemed a good gateway to fiction—fiction with training wheels.”
Moehringer compares research to kudzu: “It keeps growing and growing
and never stops, especially when it’s fascinating research. At a point I had to
push the research aside. As skilled a criminal as Sutton was, he was a virtuous liar. He left so many myths and stories behind. I thought I would be able
to find the truth about him and then pick off a piece and enlarge or bend it to
my own purposes, but I couldn’t even do that much. For a guy who was so
famous there is so little that can be said about him definitively. This was a
revelation that came slowly.”
What Sutton presents is Moehringer’s version of the notorious but celebrated criminal. “I think it’s as valid as any, including his own. It represents
my image of him and also illuminates how difficult it is to know anyone,
whether it’s someone you love or someone you’re chasing around as a journalist.”
This is Moehringer’s second experience at BEA. “The first was all new and
exciting. I remember the chaos of it. It was something I almost wasn’t able to
process. Now I’m looking forward to seeing that many readers under one
roof. That alone—seeing so many people excited about books. Talking to
authors about books. Meeting writers I’ve always wanted to read. A convention with like-minded people.”
Moehringer is a speaker at this morning’s Adult Book and Author
Breakfast, and he will also be at Table 11 in the autographing area, 10:30–
—Suzanne Mantell
11:30 a.m., for a ticketed signing of Sutton galleys.

Mary Higgins Clark
Follow the MacGuffin

The “Queen of Suspense,” Mary Higgins Clark,
dives into new territory in The Lost Years
(Simon & Schuster) with an ancient parchment
that might have been written by Jesus Christ. If
authenticated, it would be a priceless religious
relic—and the perfect conduit for foul play. “I
love history,” Clark tells Show Daily. “A number of my books have combined the past and
the present when appropriate.”
Clark credits her longtime editor, Michael
Korda, with the idea for The Lost Years, though
he is quick to emphasize he is not her Svengali.
He tells Show Daily, “All Mary’s novels start
with a premise that is believable, intriguing,
and chilling. It’s her trademark. It’s a privilege
and a pleasure to have occasionally suggested

© BERNARD VIDAL

PUBL I SHERS

STAND 4149B

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16

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

First time in English!

The secret undercover mission at Auschwitz

IFTHEY
ONLY
HAD

BELIEVED
HIM...

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

AUTHORS
AT TH E SH OW

the right one and to see where she takes it, often to places that I wouldn’t
ever have dreamed of.”
Korda says he reads the New York Times each morning with Clark in mind
to search for a MacGuffin, a term coined by another master of suspense,
director Alfred Hitchcock. Korda published François Truffaut’s now classic
Hitchcock and describes a MacGuffin as “the generating premise, idea, plot
hook, or a device that serves as the starting point for a story.” He adds that
the moment he saw a story about an archeological find near what may have
been the tomb of Jesus Christ, he thought, “What if?”
After writing more than 40 books, Clark says she remains very disciplined
about her daily writing regimen, but no longer gets up at 5 a.m. “I now start at
8 a.m. and write four hours a day. I have a contract to turn in a book every
December.” She adds that she never turns in a book she feels is rushed, but
knows she sells “a great deal of books at Mother’s Day” and maintains a
healthy respect for deadlines.
Though Clark is a frequent visitor to BEA, she is nostalgic for the days
before downsizing. A self-proclaimed party person who admits “I will climb
out of my coffin to go to the wake,” she misses the lavish parties of yesteryear.
“They were great. My publisher once took over the Los Angeles railroad station for a party. Those days are over.”
Clark will be signing copies of The Lost Years today, 10:30–11:30 a.m., at
Table 15 in the autographing area. Her daughter, Carol Higgins Clark, will be
with her and signing copies of her own new book from Scribner, Gypped.
—Karen Jones

Susin Nielsen

“Remarkable revelations.”
— Publishers Weekly

“Essential reading for anyone
interested in the Holocaust.”
— Rabbi Michael Schudrich, Chief Rabbi of Poland

Visit us at National Book Network, Booth 3757-3772

After being hired in the late 1980s to serve
snacks to the cast and crew of the television
series Degrassi Junior High, Vancouver author
Susin Nielsen wrote a spec script for the show.
The head writer liked what he read and gave
her a shot at writing an episode, which turned
into 16 episodes—and launched her writing
career. Nielsen went on to pen four tie-in novels to the show and then struck out on her own
with YA novels Word Nerd and Dear George
Clooney, Please Marry My Mom. Her third title,
The Reluctant Journal of Henry K. Larsen, will be published in September by
Tundra Books (4051).
“Writing the television tie-in novels really sparked an interest in writing
original YA novels,” explains Nielsen. “But it took me 20 years to do that,
since my TV writing career did quite well, so I always had an excuse not to. I
definitely still keep a hand in television writing, too, since I love the work.”
The author says that The Reluctant Journal of Henry K. Larsen is “a bit of a
departure for me, in the sense that my first two novels had more small elements of my own life in them.” The story centers on a teen whose older
brother six months earlier took their father’s hunting rifle to school and shot
a boy who had long been tormenting him—and then killed himself.
Nielsen found her inspiration for the plot in a line from another novel. “In
Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True, it is mentioned that one of the
Columbine killers had a brother, and that really hit me in the gut,” she says.
“I kept thinking about what it might be like to be the surviving sibling of
someone involved in a horrible tragedy. So I decided to write this novel about
a boy trying to pick up the pieces of his life and of his family.”
As did her earlier books, Nielsen’s latest novel balances the sad and the
funny. “I can’t imagine writing a story without humor—it is an integral part of
my fiction,” Nielsen explains. “This is a lot darker than my previous books,
but there’s a fair amount of humor in the novel, as Henry starts a new school
where no one knows what has happened in his life and he tries to fly under
the radar. He ends up being befriended by kids who are sort of a band of misfits, and he finds a sense of community.”
Nielsen, who is at BEA for the first time, says, “I’m not sure what to expect,
but whatever happens, I’m happy to be here and in New York City, which I
love. Meeting the people who are—at least, I hope!—selling my books always
appeals to me.”
Booksellers can catch up with Nielsen this morning, 10:30–11 a.m., at Table
9 in the autographing area, where she’ll be signing ARCs of The Reluctant
Journal of Henry K. Larsen.
—Sally Lodge

© TALLULAH PHOTOGRAPHY

BalancesTragedy and
Humor

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

—Crissa-Jean Chappell

© ALEX SOMSSEN

Friendship BegetsTeamwork

time alone, smoking pot, playing video games, and performing street magic.
The plot has a “Cinderella element” to it, Chappell says. In his quest to find
the high school drug dealer, Foster begins infiltrating different social cliques,
attending parties and socializing with “the cool kids.” By pretending to be
extroverted and self-confident, Foster actually does become both—and likes
the person he becomes, despite the moral implications of a boy on the cusp
between childhood and adulthood performing an adult’s job. Carrying out
his assignment of deception, Foster learns that he is not the only student pretending to be someone he or she is not. “Pretending is a survival mechanism
for some kids,” Chappell explains. “There’s the funny girl who hides in the
bathroom and cries. Or the popular girl who is a cutter.”
Narc is Chappell’s second YA novel. Her debut book, Total Constant Order,
which centers on a teenager with obsessive-compulsive disorder, was published by HarperTeen in 2007. “Teenagers are the most interesting people on
the planet—I love being in that world,” says the author, a former professor at
Miami International University of Art & Design, describing herself as “forever” a teenager trapped in an adult’s body.
Chappell will sign ARCs of Narc today, 9:30–10:30 a.m., at Table 3 in the
—Claire Kirch
autographing area.

Bob Shea
Pits Dinosaur Against Santa

In his picture book adventures, Bob Shea’s
roaring red Dinosaur has taken on bedtime,
the potty, and the library. Next, the invincible
young dino goes up against a familiar jolly old
elf in Dinosaur vs. Santa, due from Hyperion in
September with a 75,000-copy first printing.
The author will sign f&g’s of the book today, 11
a.m.–noon, at Table 13.
“I know from my school visits that kids just
love anything Christmas related,” Shea says of
the genesis of his new story. “And I know from
watching my own son that the runup to
Christmas is a crazy, happy time for kids. On
Christmas eve, kids have two responsibilities:
to fall asleep and stay in bed. Well, Dinosaur
doesn’t do that. Instead—spoiler alert—he
sneaks downstairs to try to see Santa. Then he hightails it back to bed in fear
that he’s broken the rules and Santa will take his presents away. He’s a wreck
but finally falls asleep. Of course it all works out in the end!”
Before writing children’s books, Shea, a graphic designer, worked for several TV channels, including PBS Kids, Comedy Central, and Nick Jr. Inspired
by onetime PBS Kids colleague Richard McGuire (author of The Orange
Book and What’s Wrong with This Book?), he also dabbled in writing, including humorous essays for adults and a children’s book. After a lucky encounter at BEA eight years ago, his publishing aspirations crystallized.
“I’d compiled some of my humor writing into a booklet in hopes of selling it
to a publisher at BEA,” Shea says. “That was of course entirely inappropriate,
but I didn’t know then what BEA was all about. While I was checking out the
signing corral, I saw Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith autographing Science
Verse. I thought, ‘This is awesome—I love their work!’ So I took a chance and
handed them samples of my writing. Lane e-mailed me a few days later, saying that he thought I was funny. And when I said I’d written a children’s book,
he asked to see it.”

Crissa-Jean Chappell
Spills the Beans

from my school visits that kids
“loveI know
anything Christmas-related.

—Bob Shea

© HARLAN ERSKINE

Her fiction reflects real life, says Crissa-Jean
Chappell, author of Narc (Llewellyn/Flux, Aug.,
3975). To avoid jail after being caught with marijuana in his possession, Aaron Foster, the YA
novel’s 17-year-old protagonist, agrees to
become an informant for the Miami police’s
narcotics team, which is trying to track down a
drug dealer at a local high school. Indeed,
Narc’s story line is practically torn from recent
headlines, as the latest arrests resulting from
the yearlong undercover Operation D-Minus to
crack down on drug sales at several Florida
high schools are receiving extensive regional
media attention.
“It’s been a real-life 21 Jump Street in south
Florida,” Chappell—a Florida native who now
lives in New York City—says, relating a news report about a teenager caught
up in the sting after he’d fallen in love with an undercover female police officer and “wanted to impress the girl” by buying drugs. While Narc contains all
the elements of both police procedurals and thriller novels, what most
intrigued Chappell was exploring the complex universe of high school social
hierarchies. Before he became entangled with the Miami police, Foster
describes himself as “human wallpaper,” a stoner who spent much of his

17

Pretending is a survival mechanism for
“some
kids.

Jenny Han and
Siobhan Vivian
YA authors and BFFs Jenny Han and
Siobhan Vivian have found a, well,
novel way to stay in touch: they’ve
teamed up to write Burn for Burn
(Simon & Schuster Books for Young
Readers, Sept., 3657), the debut title in
a teen trilogy. In the book, “Three girls
come together in an unlikely secret
friendship as they enact revenge on
people who did them wrong in high
school,” explains Vivian. “But revenge
is such a complicated thing,” adds
Han. “Even though the book is getting
billed as something like Heathers, it’s
very grounded in reality. It’s about
revenge but also about forgiveness,
empathy, and friendship.”
These authors’ friendship began in New York City, where they were both in
a graduate children’s literature writing program at the New School. They
lived in the same Brooklyn neighborhood, and they’ve been working
together and critiquing each other’s work since those early days.
Both followed a relatively smooth road to publication after grad school,
landing book contracts for their respective senior theses: Han’s Shug (S&S
Books for Young Readers, 2006) and Vivian’s A Little Friendly Advice
(Scholastic/PUSH, 2008). Vivian has also written for children’s television and
worked as an editor at Alloy Entertainment. The team creative process at
Alloy proved helpful as Burn for Burn was coming together. “We worked
really hard on honing the outline for the series,” Vivian says. Han agrees, but
notes that on her own, “I never outline!”
Han and Vivian will be signing ARCs of Burn for Burn today, 10–11 a.m., at
Table 12 in the autographing area. Their remaining time at BEA will be a
whirl of events, says Han. But the friends don’t plan to be totally overrun by
the hubbub. “We always make sure that we have some ‘us’ time to get manipedis or do something fun,” says Vivian.
Though they look forward to continuing their teamwork on the trilogy,
both authors also have solo books on the horizon. Vivian has just wrapped a
tour for her April release, The List (Scholastic/PUSH), and this summer
plans to devote some solid writing time to her next book project, which she
describes as magical realism.
Han is currently crafting a novel titled For All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,
which has some roots in personal experience. “Whenever I was trying to get
over a boy, I would write him a really long, wrought letter—but never mail it. I
still have some in a box at my parents’ house,” she explains. The protagonist
of her new book composes similar epistles, but isn’t so good about the not—Shannon Maughan
mailing part.

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

Smith liked the book—New Socks—and mentioned it to Megan Tingley,
who got in touch with Shea and acquired the picture book for her Little,
Brown imprint. “Even though I was brand-new to this business, I knew that
this is not how it usually happens,” acknowledges Shea. He later sent Smith
the text of Big Plans, which he’d planned to illustrate himself. “Lane said he
loved it—and wanted to illustrate it,” Shea says. “I fell out of my seat. I know
Lane gets embarrassed when I say this, but he is the nicest person in the
world.”
Given his fond BEA memories, Shea is understandably happy to be back. “I
don’t get much feedback sitting in my room, drawing, so I love to hear people
say that their kids love reading, carrying around, and even chewing on my
books.”
—Sally Lodge

18

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

AUTHORS

there along with the Cheevers and the Salingers. It was thrilling.”
Groth answered phones and took messages for some of the writers and
cartoonists. Because she got to know everyone, she was able to put together
an in-house jazz band. “Lee Lorenz, one of the cartoonists, was a trumpeter;
another cartoonist played cornet. A Talk of the Town writer played piano.
There was a great moment in the early ’60s when another woman and I tossed
what we called a ‘bash’ for everybody at a loft in the Village, at which the New
Yorker band played. People like Charles Addams and Muriel Spark—everybody that we could think of—came.” Laughing, she adds, “We provided the
beer and the pretzels, and Mrs. Spark provided the Dom Perignon.”
Asked what she hopes readers will take from her memoir, Groth says, “I
really do think that men and women alike will feel either recognition or
enlightenment when they see how it was for a person of my age, who was living her young adult life in the late 20th century, in the scene of a storied magazine. I feel that sense of being a witness of my times.”Groth will be signing
—Hilary S. Kayle
books today, 10–11 a.m., in the Algonquin booth (4158).

AT THE S HOW

Janet Groth

© TALLULAH PHOTOGRAPHY

New Yorker Dreaming

“Serendipitous” is the word Janet Groth uses to
describe a CBS science show writer-director
she’d worked with getting her letter about wanting a job in New York City when he happened to
be in Maine with E.B. White. He arranged for her
to have an interview with the legendary writer.
Imagine an attractive, 19-year-old Midwesterner
walking into the offices of the esteemed New
Yorker magazine, where she put the shy, discomfited Mr. White at ease and then stayed for
the next 20-some years. Her experiences there
are detailed in The Receptionist, published by
Algonquin Books this month.
Groth, an Edmund Wilson scholar in her own right, said that she and her
late collaborator, David Castronovo, had exhausted their academic subject
and were both ready to move on to other things. She tells Show Daily, “I had
been thinking about using materials that were in my long-stashed-away
journals and diaries, and I thought, ‘Well, everyone who could be hurt by this
is dead now, so I’ll do it.’ ”
The author actually had hopes of coming to New York and being a writer,
and wanted to be published in the New Yorker. “They probably had no idea
that I harbored these dreams,” she says. “But in the early days, the job had all
of the glamour and thrill for me of someone who had leafed through New
Yorker magazines. Being unable to afford a subscription, I’d gone to the campus drugstore to look at every new issue and imagined that I was going to be

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Rabbi Wayne Dosick
A Name for God to Unite All

Jews call Him Yahweh, Muslims call him Allah,
and Christians call him Jesus. But author and
rabbi Wayne Dosick has another name for God,
one he hopes will unite world religions rather
than divide them.
In The Real Name of God: Embracing the Full
Essence of the Divine, just published by Inner
Traditions/Bear, Dosick tells how the many
aspects of God—simultaneously vengeful and
loving, angry and peaceful, militant and kind—
are paradoxical and fail to capture the full
essence of the being he describes as “perfect.”
So he went back to the Old Testament, and
with much meditation, study, and reflection, he

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during BEA at Michelin!
Come see us at Booth #3757!
Copyright © 2012 Michelin North America, Inc. All rights reserved. The Michelin Man is a registered trademark of Michelin North America, Inc.

• Explore Michelin’s Newly-Published “Like a
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titles arriving Spring 2013.
• Complimentary Wi-Fi in the booth at the
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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

URBAN TEEN FICTION

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

AUTHORS
AT TH E SH OW

with TWO Points of View

Her Point
of View

pinpointed a name for God that he says captures all those facets—Anochi.
“This image came to me of a beach ball,” says Dosick, who has written books
about Judaism, parenting, ethics, and business. “If you look at a beach ball, it
has colored panels, but none of those panels alone is the whole beach ball.
It’s as if each of those panels is one of the names of God but not the whole
beach ball.”
The name Anochi is usually translated as “I,” Dosick notes, but he translates it as “I am,” because it thereby endows God with all possible aspects.
That translation was not revealed until now, according to the author, because
“it was never the right energetic moment in time to tell.”
What has changed? Dosick, who is the spiritual leader of a Jewish Renewal
community in San Diego, believes the world has moved to a place of greater
unity—a place that requires a new name for God that will draw people
together.
“We are coming to a time when people of all faiths are realizing there is
much more that unites us than divides us,” he says. “We all have one mother,
and whether we call her mom or mother or mommy, she is the same—the
source of us all. And the name for that source is in the scriptures we consider
to be the beginning of all our religions. Is that cool or what?”
In the first half of the book, Dosick outlines what set him on the quest for
Anochi and relates how he found it through scripture reading, meditation,
chanting, and prayer. The second half offers prayers, chants, and other spiritual exercises that incorporate this name and the spirit of unity it represents. A Web site—www.godisanochi.com—featuring the chants and prayers
will appear this month.
Dosick will sign copies of The Real Name of God in the Inner Traditions
—Kimberly Winston
booth (2540) today, noon–1 p.m.

Francesca Segal
LIONS
Stephanie Perry Moore
Where there’s cheer, there’s drama ...
Yell Out
Do You
9781616518868
www.lockwoodlions.com

5-BOOK
SERIES!

“I’m a little overly excited” is how debut novelist Francesca Segal, who signs today, 10–10:30
a.m., at Table 11 in the autographing area,
described herself when Show Daily spoke with
her before BEA on an auspicious day—publication day in the U.K. of The Innocents. A few
days later the novel was released here by
Hyperion/Voice (3351, 3352). Given Segal’s
background—and the basis for her novel—she
is entitled to more than an average dose of
publication jitters.
As a book critic herself, she knows what can
happen with reviews, but although she claims
there is some trepidation, there is also understanding. “There is a human being at the other
end who may have had a bad day, filed late, or
simply doesn’t like the book very much,” she said. “In my experience as a
critic, I know that books that came to me could have gone to someone else
that would have loved it. Nevertheless, to be on the other side is humbling.”
She need not have worried. Foreign rights have been sold to numerous
countries, and the Observer called it “Impressive. . . . A compelling read . . .
Segal writes with a delicate, understated elegance.” And the Mail found this
“assured and audacious debut” both “witty and touching.”
Audacious indeed! The Innocents recasts Edith Wharton’s masterpiece
The Age of Innocence in a modern-day Jewish upper-crust suburb of
London, Temple Fortune. Segal took on Wharton’s tale because to her it’s
“an almost classical story that could be anywhere, in any small town or religious community in any country.” She views it as a universal tale about “anyone who has experienced the tension between a life that is expected of them
and something they want for themselves, or for anyone who has been
attracted to the wrong person. It’s about the pull between the safety and
security of the community and freedom and liberation—and the carrot that
goes along with it.”
As if being a critic-cum-novelist who tackles a classic isn’t risky enough
business, Segal’s pedigree leaves her vulnerable. She is the daughter of the
late Erich Segal, the classics scholar and author of the publishing sensation
and bestseller Love Story, which became a blockbuster movie as well. While
she admits, “I’m very wary of ‘Erich Segal’s daughter writes a novel,’ I am
equally incredibly proud of my father. I probably became a writer because I
wanted to be like him.”
—Liz Hartman

© ABC DONNA SVENNEVIK

Risky Business

His Point
of View

20

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22

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

This is the beautiful time, before a
“book
comes out. It still has the sheen
on it.

AUTHORS
AT THE S HOW

—Michael Chabon

Michael Chabon
Fans of Michael Chabon are eagerly anticipating Telegraph Avenue, his first novel in five
years. It will be published in September by
HarperCollins and has already received a
stunning advance notice from the New York
Times.
“It’s a family novel,” says Chabon, “revolving
around two families that live in Oakland and
Berkeley. The husbands are in business
together in a used record store called
Brokeland Records, and they also play in a
band together. Their wives share a practice as
midwives. One family is black and the other is
white, and we meet them at the end of 2004 as
their lives unravel and come together again
over the course of about two weeks.” When a
retired NFL quarterback, now a wealthy black media mogul, wants to open a
mini-mall anchored by an enormous record store, the two families set out to
protect their neighborhood from gentrification.
“I live in Berkeley, right on the Oakland-Berkeley line,” Chabon says.
“Telegraph Avenue is kind of the central artery not only of the area but of the
book and all of the characters. Telegraph is the dividing line.” Why set the
story in 2004, then? “As a writer, I don’t live in the present,” he says. “I need
time and distance to gain perspective and figure out what things mean to

© ULF ANDERSEN / GETTY IMAGES

Worth the Wait

me. Also, the neighborhood I’m writing about, where the record store is, has
changed over the last eight years, and 2004 was the moment it began to
change.”
Chabon has kept busy since writing his last novel, The Yiddish Policemen’s
Union. “I have four children [with his wife, novelist Ayelet Waldman],” he
says, “ranging in age from nine to 18, so I’ve done a lot of fathering.” Besides
completing Telegraph Avenue, Chabon is working with his wife on a dramatic
WWII series for HBO called Hobgoblins. Then there was the matter of the
film John Carter, released in March, which Chabon co-wrote. The film has
lost the Disney Company more than $200 million. “It was a colossal failure.
Now, that was a lot of fun,” he says, tongue firmly in cheek. “The creature for
John Carter looked like a giant carnivorous cotton ball.”
Still, Chabon finds great pleasure in screenwriting work, and Telegraph
Avenue has been optioned by Scott Rudin. “He [Rudin] basically sent me to
screenwriting school for a year and a half while I wrote draft after draft of
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay,” says Chabon. That film has
yet to be produced, but the project gave Chabon a calling card for Hollywood
and membership in the Writers Guild of America. “Now my family has fantastic health insurance thanks to the WGA.”
Chabon is excited about the upcoming release of Telegraph Avenue. “At
the moment, I’m still in the honeymoon period, where I think the book is the
greatest thing since sliced bread,” he says. “This is the beautiful time, before
a book comes out. It still has that sheen on it, and you haven’t gotten any bad
reviews on it yet, and people haven’t come up to you to say, ‘I tried to read it,
but couldn’t get past the first 25 pages.’ ”
But it’s doubtful Chabon has anything to worry about. The Atlantic Monthly
has already predicted that Telegraph Avenue will be one of the “literary
events of the year, akin to the release of Freedom in 2010.”
Michael Chabon is a featured speaker at this morning’s Adult Book and
—Wendy Werris
Author Breakfast.

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8056 pw:Layout 1

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Page 1

SHARJAH
INTERNATIONAL
BOOK FAIR
Gateway to the Arab
publishing world

7 – 17 November 2012

Hosting an international
publishing programme &
translation grant programme
“It was such a great fair, great program, great hospitality, great business
opportunities, great selection of international publishers.
I am so happy to be involved and will be promoting it everywhere.”
Nermin Mollaoglu, Kalem Agency

“Taking part in the discussion panel chaired by Turki Al Dakheel at the Sharjah
International Book Fair was a most stimulating experience and the questions on
Arab Politics led to a most illuminating debate.
I thoroughly enjoyed my time and experiences in Sharjah and look forward to an
opportunity to return”
Robert Lacey

Sharjah: where literature comes to life,
where books feed debate and where
culture creates inspiration

Tues0605_BAIShowDaily11_spread_Layout 1 5/22/12 4:56 PM Page 6

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26

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Milestones Aplenty
While Hal Leonard is generally
about Mick Jagger, Cerullo explains
renowned for publishing sheet
that the inimitable singer will be
music and songbooks, its trade
interviewed for the book. “But he
book division, Hal Leonard
didn’t have any gear, he just sang.”
Performing Arts Publishing Group
November 2012 marks what
(HLPAPG), will be in the spotlight
would have been rock star Jimi
this fall, thanks to a number of very
Hendrix’s 70th birthday. Hal
special anniversaries.
Leonard’s Backbeat Books will pubFirst up is the 100th anniversary
lish two books to celebrate the
year for Actors’ Equity Association.
occasion. First, Jimi Hendrix: The
HLPAPG publisher John Cerullo
Ultimate Lyric Book, which Cerullo
tells Show Daily, “They’re doing a
calls “super-duper special.” The
huge, yearlong program of activirock legend’s stepsister, Janie L.
ties, and the anchor for them is this
Hendrix, who runs the Hendrix
big 100th anniversary book that
estate, is the book’s compilation
we’re publishing with them:
editor. Cerullo says, “The most
Performance of the Century: 100
important aspect of the book is that
Years of Actors’ Equity Association
it has nearly 50 never-before-seen
and the Rise of the American
songs that Hendrix wrote, or parts
Theater” (Applause Books, Sept).
of songs that were never recorded.
Playbill magazine
Some of them are
writer and theater
works in progress,
pro Robert
which is kind of
Simonson authored
cool, too.” The book
the book, which
also has photohighlights some of
graphs and handthe great actors and
written lyrics that
actresses who popuhave never been
lated the stage in
published before.
the past century, as
Also on tap from
well as the history of
Backbeat, a new
this important thebiography of
ater organization.
Hendrix by Keith
AEA launched their
Shadwick, called
centennial celebraJimi Hendrix:
tion with a theatriMusician, which
cal kickoff in Times
adds punch to the
Square Tuesday
tale of his life by
morning with the
including an analytlikes of Angela
ical approach to his
Lansbury, Eric
music.
McCormack, and
Hal Leonard celeDavid Hyde Pierce.
brates another
Here at BEA on the
milestone with the
Downtown Authors
publication of The
Stage (DZ2000),
History of Marshall
André De Shields,
Amps: The First Fifty
Henry David
Years by Michael
Hwang, and Estelle
Doyle and Nick
Parsons will join
Bowcott. Says
Simonson and AEA
Cerullo, “If you look
Caption cap caption cap caption Cappresident Nick
at
any of the live contion cap caption cap caption Caption
Wyman in a discussioncap caption cap caption
cert events that hapentitled “The Power of
pened since the early
Storytelling: From Stage to Page,”
’60s, starting with the Who and the
today at 11 a.m. Blads will be availStones and all the classic big rock
able at the Hal Leonard booth
bands, Marshall amps is the iconic
(4108).
amplifier.” The founder of the comNext up in October, Backbeat
pany, Jim Marshall, died in April.
Books honors the Rolling Stones’
While some might think that
50th anniversary with Rolling
books about rock band gear or
Stones Gear, co-authored by Andy
amps are rather rarified, Cerullo
Babiuk, who penned the popular
notes, “At Hal Leonard, we have a
Beatles Gear, which has sold more
unique view into tapping into the
than 100,000 copies in the past 10
main vein of interest that musicians
years. Like its predecessor, this
and serious fans have when we do
book will chronicle the evolution of
books like this. I can give you a list
the band’s instruments, amps,
of 50 or 60 books we’ve done in condrums, guitars, etc., from the 1960s
nection with amplifiers, guitars,
to the present day. Notes Cerullo,
Hammond organs—all kinds of
“It’s a very big book, over 400 pages,
books that document the history of
4-color throughout, with many
one of these types of products. And
images that have never before been
they all sell very well.”
seen. We’re working closely with
—Hilary S. Kayle
Keith Richards, Bill Wyman, Ron
Wood, and Charlie Watts.” Asked

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28

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Literature Thrives at Bellevue
When you cruise the Consortium
Book Sales and Distribution aisle,
stop to congratulate the small, nonprofit Bellevue Literary Press (3905a)
on both its fifth anniversary and its
prize-winning authors (present in
spirit only). Of the eight fiction titles
BLP has published in its short history, three have received major literary honors: The Sojourn by Andrew
Krivak (a 2011 National Book Award
finalist) recently received the first
annual Chautauqua Prize, The Jump
Artist by Austin Ratner won the 2011
Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish
Literature, and the New York Times

th

Visit Boo

#2332

bestseller Tinkers by Paul Harding
received the 2010 Pulitzer Prize.
And yes: Bellevue Literary Press is
housed inside New York’s Bellevue
Hospital. That’s because BLP is actually a project of the NYU School of
Medicine—and Bellevue is one of
the hospitals where NYU School of
Medicine students are trained. Erika
Goldman, publisher and editorial
director, explains: “We are with
Bellevue not because we work with
the hospital directly, but because the
relationship between NYU School of
Medicine and Bellevue Hospital
dates back to the 19th century.

“In the NYU Department of
Medicine at Bellevue, “ continues
Goldman, there’s a tradition of literary medical writing by the chiefs of
medicine. One of the most famous is
Lewis Thomas, whose collection of
nonfiction essays The Lives of a Cell:
Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974) was
a bestseller. We like to claim him as
our predecessor.”

Heartwarming Reads for
THE CHRISTMAS SEASON

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

In 2001, Dr. Martin Blaser, chief of
medicine, conceived of the Bellevue
Literary Review, so named because of
the writing history of his peers.
Goldman—a publishing professional
who has held editorial positions at St.
Martin’s Press, Simon & Schuster,
Scribner’s (“before it lost its final S”),
and W.H. Freeman—knew Dr. Jerome
Lowenstein, a colleague of Dr. Blaser’s.
“I pitched him the idea of a line of
books. He agreed, saying, ‘As long as
you get your own funding and get distribution, we’ll house you here.’ ”
At BEA, BLP will feature two fall
titles: The Polish Boxer (Oct.), “a
remarkable novel by Eduardo
Halfon, a first-time-in-English,
highly laurelled” young Latin
American author, and The Cage: The
Fight for Sri Lanka and the Last Days
of the Tamil Tigers (Sept.) by Gordon
Weiss, “on our list because Bellevue
has a wonderful program called the
Program for Survivors of Torture,
the only comprehensive torture
treatment center in New York City..”
“It’s gratifying that we are part of a
community of passionate readers,”
asserts Goldman. “There’s nothing
like BEA to remind us of that.”
—Diane Patrick

Lighting Up
The Store

Christmas Roses
An itinerant carpenter and a young
widow learn that Christmas is a time
for miracles in this sweet romance
set in 1882 Wyoming.
ISBN: 978-0-8007-2004-9
September 2012
$14.99

n

The Christmas Pony
A little girl’s Christmas dreams seem
impossible until a pair of interesting
strangers come to town.
ISBN: 978-0-8007-1927-2
September 2012
$15.99

A Happy Trails Christmas
Two classic Christmas books in one
from Hollywood icons Roy Rogers
and Dale Evans
ISBN: 978-0-8007-2070-4
September 2012
$12.99

To order call 1-800-877-2665
To order in Canada call David C. Cook 1-800-263-2664

After a two-year absence from BEA,
Mighty Bright (6275), which designs
and manufactures LED lights for
book reading (as well as doing crafts
and reading music), is returning to
the Javits Center and looking forward to introducing new lighting
designs to indie booksellers.
“We were unsure where the book
industry was going,” says Michelle
Haas, marketing manager of Mighty
Bright, “because of the fast growth of
digital books. But our research
shows that the indie booksellers are
thriving, and we’re excited by this.”
Mighty Bright products are
designed for a variety of low-light
environments, and the original
XtraFlex LED book light has become
the company’s bestseller; it’s now
available in two multicolored
designs. The popular eFlex e-reader
light has been revamped to include
a padded clip that more easily
attaches to the edge of digital reading devices without intruding on the
screen, and the former lithium battery has been replaced with a more
compatible AAA battery. Brand-new
to the line this year is Mighty
Bright’s desktop LUX Dome Task
Light, which adjusts to 24 inches in
height and provides accent and
essential lighting in the office or
home. The dome head swivels 360
degrees and, says Haas, “adapts to
all living spaces, including offices,
studies, libraries, and poorly lit
indie bookstore back rooms.”
—Wendy Werris

www.baker-taylor.com

30

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Saddleback Trots
Out New Series
Founded 30 years ago, Saddleback
Educational Publishing releases a
wide selection of books aimed at
students in middle school and high
school who have poor reading and/
or learning skills. In recent years,
the publisher has launched a number of fiction series with content
and covers suitable for middlegrade and YA readers, yet written
at elementary-grade reading levels. President Arianne McHugh is
at BEA to spread word of the company’s latest series launch,
Lockwood Lions.
Focusing on couples in an urban
high school, the series’ novels are
flip-books that offer two perspectives on the same story—one told
from the point of view of a girl on
the cheerleading squad and the
other from the point of view of a
member of the football team.
“We’ve had tremendous success
with urban fiction, and obviously
part of that is the demographics,
since urban youths tend to struggle
with reading,” says McHugh of the
inspiration for Lockwood Lions.
“But beyond that, we know that 68%
of eighth-graders nationwide read

below grade
level, which is a
huge number.
That has motivated us to find
series, like this
one, with quality content written at an accessible level for
teens.”
The series is
written by
Stephanie Perry Moore, whose husband, Derrick Moore, coauthors
the stories written from the male
perspective. A motivational
speaker and a former NFL player,
he brings a great deal to the novels,
notes McHugh. “Derek is an amazing man and has a lot to give to the
books in terms of providing an
authoritative voice on football,” she
says.
Released this month, the fivebook series’ inaugural installment,
Always Upbeat/All That, will be followed by Keep Jumping/No Hating
in July, with an additional
Lockwood Lions title to be added
each month. —Sally Lodge

Another Presidential Candidate
As a comedian, actor, writer, and
producer of short films, Canadian
Brian Calvert is completely unqualified for most jobs—but especially
politics—which makes him think
that he is the perfect person to go
head-to-head with America’s very
own unqualified presidential candidates. As the self-appointed leader
of the Canada Party,
Calvert, along with
“campaign chairman”
Chris Cannon, have
announced the party’s
CANADAcy for president of the United
States. Cannon, a
Canuck and writer of
numerous books and
articles about rock ’n’
roll, is equally unqualified.
The initial launch of
the party was made on
YouTube, where all
serious campaigns begin, and has
attracted more than 880,000 hits. No
need to worry—the Canada Party’s
effort does not represent an invasion
but rather an intervention. As
Calvert said in his oratorical masterpiece on YouTube:
“Hello, America. It’s us, Canada.
You know, the country you pretend
to be when you’re traveling. Now, I
know you think of us as just a fancy
hat you wear when you’re trying to
hide from a war you probably
shouldn’t have started, but we’re
more than that. We’re your friends.

We’ve noticed you’re hurting, and
we’re here to help.”
The Canada party has as its election weapon America, but Better: The
Canada Party Manifesto; An
Intervention from Your Continental
BFF, which will be published this
August by Douglas & McIntyre
(based in Vancouver, distributed by
PGW). In it are the party’s promises. Among
them: oil pipelines will
carry maple syrup, so
if there’s a spill, at least
the animals will be
tasty, and the phrase
“job creators” will be
changed to “job creationists,” and they
will be given seven
days to actually create
some. And most
importantly, the constitution will be
amended to address
hockey issues. Once the U.S. is set
aright, the Canada Party will turn to
its own country, with its first order of
business being full dental coverage
for hockey players.
As all candidates know, never
mind the Iowa caucuses, it’s BEA
where winners are made. To that
end, Brian Calvert will be in the
D&M booth (4239) today at 10 a.m.,
handing out mini-manifestos (aka
book samplers) and bumper stickers. Join Calvert, join the Canada
Party—“We Canado it.”
—Liz Hartman

CONFESSIONS: A MEMOIR by Jodie Rhodes Stuns the Publishing World
With Her Sizzling Expose I By Stefanie Payne I Posted on March 1, 2012

Internationally known literary agent Jodie Rhodes has stunned the publishing world with her no-holds-barred book CONFESSIONS: A MEMOIR
which, to date, has received 39 Amazon Five Star Reviews and reveals the
startling and in many ways shocking life she lived before becoming an agent.
Published on 9/16/11, it is available on Amazon, Kindle and Barnes & Noble
THE KIRKUS REVIEW – CONFESSIONS: A Memoir
Literary agent Jodie Rhodes grew up in an era when women succeeded in marriage, not business. But her
parents’ toxic relationship, a family legacy of divorce, plus her burning desire to write, all sent Rhodes the
other way. Precocious, tenacious and pretty, she charged into the world of 1960s advertising at the age
of 20 and fairly conquered it, moving on and up like a cyclone, becoming VP Media Director of N.W. Ayer,
but smarts and drive couldn’t save her from personal tragedies. A business primer with winning marketing
gambits, and a romance memoir with all the confessions readers savor.
MMD NEWSWIRE OCTOBER 24, 2011
Released in Early September 2011, “Confessions: A Memoir” is already being lauded by online reviewers as “A startling (in its truthfulness) and compulsively readable story...[It is] told in a streamlined, literary
and wonderfully crafted voice. The writing throughout is beautiful, almost hypnotic, and adroitly-paced. You
would be hard pressed not to want to go on and on...In fact, soon after Confessions hit the literary market,
it received more than 35 Five Star Amazon Reviews.
CLARION REVIEW
Confessions: A Memoir is an illuminating look at the life of a top literary agent and the dramatized story of
her childhood, her personal and professional relationships, as well as her prior career in advertising. Fascinating, funny, and sometimes shocking, this candid page-turner reveals a woman who endured extreme
highs and lows. Those inclined to be envious of Rhodes’ accomplishments and lifestyle should realize that
she has suffered more than average to achieve more than average. Confessions is a valuable contribution
to the industry and will likely attract multiple readers.
Go to jodierhodesconfessions.com to discover the surprising reason Jodie wrote this memoir
and view 45 additional reviews.
To Contact Author Jodie Rhodes: Email: jrhodes1@san.rr.com and U.S. phone # 858-412-3714
EXCERPT FROM CHAPTER ONE
I was a late bloomer and by the age of 15 had come to the glum conclusion I was doomed to end up an
old maid. If anyone had told me then that I’d have more men in my life than Elizabeth Taylor, I would have
assumed they were either so high on drugs that they couldn’t see straight or they wanted to borrow money
from me.
There has never been an old maid in my family tree and I tried to find comfort by reminding myself
that I come from a long line of people who make disastrous marriages. Perhaps fate had decided to stop
this endless chain of misery with me, since I am literally the end of my family as my brother never married,
by turning me into a kindly albeit aging librarian who’d lead children away from their own miserable families
into the wonderful world of books.
EXCERPT FROM LAST CHAPTER
When I started my agency in 1998, my chances of selling a writer’s book were equal to my chances of
starring in Sex and The City. I didn’t know a single editor, didn’t have a single writer, lived 3000 miles away
from the heart of the publishing business in New York and was in such dire financial straits that becoming
homeless was a real possibility.
During sleepless nights I envisioned the headlines: PUBLISHING WORLD STUNNED – WRITERS
DEVASTATED. It has been discovered that the Jodie Rhodes Literary Agency, believed to be a legitimate
business, actually operates out of a shopping cart and its founder is a bag lady.

32

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Swedenborg’s Many Offerings
Swedenborg Foundation
Press, publisher of the writings of Emanuel
Swedenborg in the U.S. for
more than 150 years, is
showcasing its newest titles.
Despite publishing only 10
books a year, the
Pennsylvania publisher sees benefit in attending BEA as part of the
Independent Book Publishers
Association at booth 3047.
“Because we’re so small, we meet
people at BEA we wouldn’t normally
be in touch with,” says executive
editor Joanna Hill. “It’s a way for us
to know what the industry is doing,
as well as getting our name out
there. It gives us more exposure.”
One of the draws at the booth this
year is artwork from the June
release Getting into Heaven—and
Out Again by Albrecht Gralle. Sally
Blakemore’s zany, New Yorker–style
cartoons illustrate images of
heaven and hell that the book
describes. Gralle offers a fresh look
at Swedenborg—an 18th-century
Swedish scientist, philosopher, and
theologian—and the afterlife about
which he wrote most often.
Swedenborg is giving away a lim-

ited number of copies of
Getting into Heaven—and
Out Again at the booth, and
taking orders for full sets of
the Blakemore drawings on
display in the booth.
The publisher is distributing blads—of two other titles

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

with ties to Swedenborg. The Core
of Johnny Appleseed: The Unknown
Story of a Spiritual Trailblazer by
Ray Silverman (Oct.) explores this
American icon’s ties to Swedenborg,
including how he’d rip out passages
from his books and distribute them
along with apple seeds.
Promotional material also is
available for Ghost Brother Angel by
Grant Schnarr (Oct.), one of the

press’s most popular authors. In
what is described as a supernatural
memoir, Schnarr, a minister, recalls
seeing the ghostly figure of a child
who aged through the years. When
he finally revealed this to his mother,
she told him of an older brother who
had died before Schnarr was born.
The memoir reinforces Swedenborg
beliefs about children maturing in
the afterlife.
—Ann Byle

Tristan Scores a 10
Ten years ago, Tristan Publishing
launched at the Upper Midwest
Booksellers Association fall trade
show with a single release, entitled,
appropriately enough, Beginning
by Warren Hanson, a prose poem
about the combination of fear and
excitement one feels when starting
something new. This week, with 50
titles in print by the end of 2012, the
publisher of inspirational books for
all ages is building up steam for a
blowout celebration, to be held this
fall at its Minneapolis headquarters.
As far as publisher Brett Waldman
is concerned, however, the party is
beginning right here at BEA. Tristan
is introducing six fall releases. “It’s
always a joy to create a new author
and to bring them to the world. That’s

Tristan’s four
employees and stable
always exciting
of freelancers include
for us,”
Waldman’s wife of 10
Waldman tells
years, Sheila Waldman,
Show Daily,
who left a high-powexplaining that
ered job in corporate
Tristan was
America four years
launched in
ago to join Tristan as
Sheila and Brett Waldman celebrate.
2002 to publish
v-p of sales, marketing,
books that contain messages that
and relationships.
touch hearts and lives.
“This little Tristan raided a
Include Papa’s New Home by
Fortune 72 company,” Brett Waldman
Jessica Lynn Curtis (Nov.), Words to
jokes, while discussing how mixing
Live By by Sarah Kroenke (Nov.),
Sheila Waldman’s business acumen
and Hope Heals by Daena Esterbrooks
with his passion and publishing
and Sarah Kroenke (Nov.). Fall
experience has resulted in success.
releases by veteran Tristan authors
The press’s bestsellers are A Cup of
include peace in peace out by Joan
Christmas Tea by Thomas Hegg,
Steffend (Sept.), What Really Matters
with sales of 1.7 million, and The
by Warren Hanson (Nov.), and Home
Next Place by Warren Hanson,
—Claire Kirch
by Jodi Hills (Nov.).
650,000 copies sold.

VISIT US AT
BOOTH 4345

M
I
D
P
O
I
N
T
www.midpointtrade.com

34

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

Celebrating ‘the Weird’
Authors Walter Mosley (The Gift of
Fire/On the Head of a Pin) and John
Scalzi (Redshirts) and editors Ann
and Jeff VanderMeer (The Weird)
praised genre-crossing and speculative fiction in a Tuesday panel
sponsored by Tor Books, and moderated by Tor.com columnist Ryan Britt.
Mosley opened by declaring,
“The mainstream hasn’t excluded
SF; the mainstream has excluded
itself.” Looking back over the history of literature, he explained,
speculative fiction has been the
norm; it just wasn’t labeled that way
until recently. “No one told Jules
Verne he was a science fiction

writer,” he said,
“but he invented
the 20th century.”
Jeff VanderMeer added, “Weird
fiction is to the 21st century what
fairy tales were in earlier times”: it
gives readers examples of dealing
with unexpected, peculiar situations and helps to prepare them for
life in the real world.
Scalzi agreed, citing recent popular interpretation of odd news stories as signs of a pending zombie
apocalypse. “Science fiction and fantasy give us a way to name and cope
with the things we fear,” he said.
Scalzi suggested that SF inspires
kids to become engineers and scientists: “They look at SF and decide,

W E E K LY

‘That’s where I want to live.’ ”
Mosley countered: “One thing that
really bothered me about Star
Wars: A New Hope is that everyone
in it is white—in fact, most are even
blond-haired and blue-eyed. Is that
the future George Lucas wants,
consciously or not? So SF can show
us how to make things better, but it
can also make things much worse.”
The VanderMeers deliberately
looked around the world for weird
fiction to include in their anthology
The Weird. “It makes the conversation so much more interesting,” Jeff
said. “And there was a period,
around the 1930s, when it seems
like everyone, in a great many
countries, was writing about the

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same thing,” feelings of estrangement and discomfort.
With the all too brief discussion
drawing to a close, Britt asked the
panelists how they felt about genre
distinctions. No one was fond of
them. “I’m increasingly skeptical of
genres,” Jeff said, “except insofar
as they’re useful for discussing
cross-pollination.” Ann described
genre as “purely about marketing.”
Recalling the earlier discussion
of the origins of “speculative fiction” as a concept, Scalzi said,
“People talk about genre like this is
how it’s always been and will always
be. And neither is true.” What
remains to be seen is whether these
genre-benders will hasten the
extinction of genre, and what will
—Rose Fox
take its place.

Wise-Guy
Wisdom

When Justin Halpern
was about to propose
to his girlfriend of five
years, he decided to
tell his father about
it—the one that millions around the
world came to know
through the author’s bestselling
Sh*t My Dad Says, which started as
a Twitter feed that went viral and
then spent 11 weeks at #1 on the
New York Times bestseller list.
Halpern tells Show Daily, “My dad
suggested I take a day to think
about what I’ve learned so far in my
life in relationships and about
myself, and if at the end of that day,
I still wanted to propose, to do it. So
I did that, and I wanted to propose
at the end of that day, but I also
realized I might have a good structure for a book.”
I Suck at Girls came out last
month from HarperCollins’s It
Books (3339, 3340). “The fun of this
book is that it reminds you of your
first kiss, your prom, the time you
lost your virginity. I hope people
will find it enjoyable to tap into the
nostalgia and remember the things
that made them laugh.”
The author notes that while many
men think they are not great at getting dates or having relationships,
few admit it. As he sees it, dating
has never been easy, no matter
what your age, but people today
have many more ways to meet. “It’s
a more aggressive environment now
—you can meet online, at a bar, at
work. But it’s always been daunting.”
This is Halpern’s first time at
BEA. He signs copies of his book
today, 10–11 a.m., in the autographing area at Table 16. He tells Show
Daily, “I’m looking forward to it!”
and laughingly adds, “I imagine it’s
all models and cocaine? No,
really—I’m just excited about being
around people who read books.
That will be a big kick for me.”
—Hilary S. Kayle

Did you miss the
Open House?
Don’t worry!
You can still celebrate with
this Fall!
To learn how you can participate, visit Simon & Schuster
at Booth 3657 or visit www.dorkdiaries.com/dork day

ON SALE
NOW!

THE
BESTSELLING
SERIES
CONTINUES
OCTOBER 2

36

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Power Readers
Welcome to BEA 2012

This year BEA is proud to welcome
an exclusive number of avid book
fans to BEA. Power Readers will
enjoy the exclusivity and access
to 700+ authors appearing, as well
as tons of book, activities, and
giveaways.
Don’t miss these highlights:
• BEA’s Autographing Area
• Author Stages
• Exhibit Hall
• BEA Education Program

Thursday, June 7, 2012
Javits Center | New York, NY
Use the BEA Mobile app, sponsored
by Publishing Technology, at
www.BEAmobile.com to plan your
day.

Get Social with BEA!

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Licensing at BEA
A number of companies will be
exhibiting licensed properties,
products, and books at BEA. Here is
a selection of some of them.
Atlantyca Entertainment (4008), a
transmedia content producer, distributor, and licensor based in Italy,
will showcase its best-known property, Geronimo Stilton, as well as a
variety of
other
licenses. The
latter include
Lily Lace, the
Enchanted
Emporium
(La bottega
Battibaleno), Minerva Mint,
Spaghetti Gang, Space Gramps,
and Echo and the Bat Pat. Atlantyca
will be introducing its properties to
publishers and meeting with potential licensees at the show.
Bendon Publishing International
(2458) is highlighting new titles
under a range of licenses, including
Batman, the Amazing Spider-Man,
Ice Age, Clifford the Big Red Dog,
Lisa Frank, Dora the Explorer,
SpongeBob
SquarePants,
Teenage
Mutant Ninja
Turtles, My
Little Pony,
Transformers,
and Sesame
Street, as well
as Disney properties. It is also promoting its new Imagine Ink line, a
patented mess-free magic-reveal
technology being launched with
titles from Disney, Nickelodeon,
Hasbro, and Ludorum (Chuggington).
Bendon also is debuting coloring
and activity products.
Carson-Dellosa Publishing (2358),
a marketer of educational materials
for teachers and parents, is highlighting its licensed Guinness World
Records
workbooks,
resource
books, and
learning
cards. Its
goal is to
broaden
distribution
of the Guinness World Records line,
as well as meet with partners and
distributors, explore potential new
licensing opportunities, and introduce new products. Carson-Dellosa
also holds licenses for the World of
Eric Carle and for Olivia.
Kappa Publishing Group (RC149,
150): Kappa’s Modern Publishing
division, which it
acquired in
January, will be
showing its range
of coloring and
activity titles,
many of which
are licensed.

Some featured properties are Rovio
Entertainment’s Angry Birds, Lisa
Frank, MGA Entertainment’s
Lalaloopsy, and Mattel’s Fisher-Price.
Kappa will use the show to connect
with licensors and packagers.
MerryMakers (3557): Doll and toy
licensee MerryMakers will be highlighting its plush figures tied to Z Is
for Moose and the Caldecottwinning A Ball for Daisy, as well as
dolls inspired by
holiday titles,
including Pete the
Cat Saves
Christmas, Llama
Llama Holiday
Drama, and eight
others. At the show,
MerryMakers will promote its new
characters and formats to existing
and new customers, meet with
authors and illustrators (including
to perfect designs for upcoming
products), look for new characters
to license, and explore ways to
work more closely with its publishing partners.
Parragon Publishing (3539) will
be displaying all of its licensed titles
at BEA, with a focus on its core
brands. Those include
its newest licenses,
Marvel and the Trash
Pack, as well as
Power Rangers coloring and activity titles;
Discovery Kids nonfiction, including
Atlas of My World and Encyclopedia
of Everything; and Disney 3D
Magical Storybooks with hologram
covers, among other titles.
Parragon will be looking for multichannel opportunities outside the
book world and meeting with its
existing licensing partners.
Warner Bros. Global Publishing
(RC67, RC68) is supporting its publishing partners for the third film
in the Dark Knight trilogy, The
Dark Knight Rises. Tie-ins for all
ages include The Art and Making
of the Dark Knight Trilogy, from
Abrams; two titles from Insight
Editions, including a history of the
Batmobile; the official screenplay
collection of the Dark Knight trilogy, illustrated with movie storyboards, from Opus; and I Can Read
books from HarperCollins. WBGP
also will lend its support to other
core properties, including the
upcoming films Man of Steel and
The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey; showcase new content;
and talk with publishers, retailers,
and licensees
about WBGP
brands including
Justice League, DC
Super Friends,
Looney Tunes,
Scooby-Doo, and
the Wizard of Oz.
—Karen Raugust

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PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

Hollywood Mixes It Up with Book Publishing
Usually, it’s the book that spawns
the movie. But in Gary Ross’s case,
it was a 1996 movie that spawned
his children’s book, Bartholomew
Biddle and the Very Big Wind
(Candlewick, Nov.). While
Bartholomew Biddle and the Very
Big Wind is Ross’s first published
work, his previous work is quite
familiar to booksellers: Ross is the
director of such popular movies as
Pleasantville and Seabiscuit. He
also wrote the screenplay with
Suzanne Collins and directed last
year’s blockbuster hit, The Hunger
Games, the first of three movies
based on Collins’s bestselling YA
dystopian trilogy.
“A friend [director David Koepp]
was doing a movie [The Trigger
Effect],” Ross explains. “He needed
a character to read a bedtime story
for a child.”
In response to his friend’s
dilemma, as he wanted an unpublished book to work with, Ross wrote
a few stanzas of a tale about a boy
who wants to fly so badly that, when
a huge wind blows past his window
one night, he grabs his bedsheet
and soars off into the night sky.

celebratory

“[Actress] Elisabeth Shue read it
in the movie,” Ross recalls. Ever
since the movie’s release 15 years
ago, fans have inquired in various
forums how they could purchase
the book from which Shue read.
“But the book did not exist,” Ross
says. And there were no plans for
him to complete the manuscript—
until he started filming a “little
movie” called The Tale of Despereaux
and met Candlewick’s publisher,
Karen Lotz.
“I showed it to Karen,” Ross says.
“She said she’d love to publish it.”
So Ross wrote the 96-page book
completely in verse. Writing the
narrative in verse comes naturally,

W E E K LY

he says, because
even more satisfyhe’s always
ing, in some ways,
enjoyed reading
than screenwriting.
and writing poetry.
“In screenwritHe cites T.S. Eliot as
ing, you are buildone of his favorite
ing the foundation
poets, and enjoys
for the movie,” he
reading
explains. “Writing a
Shakespeare. In fact,
book, you are
he says, even though
speaking directly to
For Gary Ross, the book came after
it “didn’t happen all
the reader.”
the movie.
the time,” there were
Asked whether he’s
some days when he forgot he was
enjoying himself, being surrounded
writing in verse, the story flowed so
by booksellers,who aren’t exactly
naturally.
renowned for their glitz and glamWhile Ross has no plans to quit
our, Ross laughs: “Everyone is here
his day job in the film industry, he
because they love books. In a
says he greatly enjoyed writing
media-based culture, it’s exciting to
Bartholomew Biddle and the Very
see so many people who love books,
Big Wind and describes the writing
who read books. There’s something
process as “rich and satisfying,”
very tangible here.”—Claire Kirch

Aptara/PW Survey on Digital Growth
Aptara, which enriches content for
digital distribution, has just completed its fourth annual E-book Survey for Publishers, this year done in
cooperation with PW. The new
results show a number of notable
changes, reflecting the growing
influence of digital in the book
industry; most significantly, there
was a 100% year-over-year increase

in the number of publishers who
reported drawing more than 10% of
their annual revenue from e-books.
Dev Ganesan Aptara president
and CEO, says, “The ‘more than
10% of revenue’ metric has been
used by industry analysts to indicate when e-books cross the
threshold and become big business
for publishers. With more than a

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THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

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38

formerly Marshall Cavendish Children’s Books celebratory

Find out what the buzz is about at Booth #2663

third of e-book publishers there, I’d
say it’s official.”
Among other statistics of note in
this year’s survey is that four out of
five publishers are now producing
e-books. And although most houses
are producing (and releasing) print
and digital copies of titles simultaneously, 11% of publishers reported
focusing on e-only titles.

Hoover Institution Press
Stanford University

Hoover
Institution
Press

Booth 3068

Authors Signing Free Copies
Thursday, June 7

Appearing today!
Mary Tavener Holmes
Signing The Elephant of Baghdad

10:30 am - 11:30 am

9:30AM–10:30AM

The intriguing story of the albino
elephant who journeyed from Baghdad
to Germany as a gift to Charlemagne.

Clint Bolick
Meet author Clint Bolick, a constitutional scholar who examines the
importance and long-term effects
of US presidents’ Supreme Court
nominations.

Three blockbuster teen novels coming this Fall:

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In this story of love and
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Meet author Fouad Ajami, a Middle
East expert who frequently appears
on PBS, CBS, and CNN News as he
offers a detailed historical perspective on the current rebellion in Syria.

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40

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

Hoover Institution Press Experts Have Their Say
Timeliness and relevance is on the
minds of editors at Stanford
University’s Hoover Institution Press,
with two new books that touch on
hot topics of the day: Clint Bolick’s
Two-Fer: Electing a President and a
Supreme Court, about the importance of the coming
election in terms of
the Supreme Court,
and Fouad Ajami’s
The Syrian Rebellion,
about events in the
Middle East.
These titles are
being showcased at
the Hoover booth,
and both are more mainstream in
their goals than the usual titles at
the press, whose mission is to disseminate the intellectual work of
Hoover fellows. The press’s strong
bent is toward such subjects as individual freedom and rule of law,
American individualism, growth of
government, and issues of fiscal
responsibility.
“These two books are focused to a
broader readership, and both have
timely subject matter,” says Julie L.
Ruggiero, director of media relations in the office of public affairs.

“The recent argument over
Obamacare has brought into sharp
focus the importance—and pointed
internal division—of the Court,”
Ruggiero says. “With Obamacare
and the Supreme Court arguing its
constitutionality, Clint’s book is
about a subject that resonates with
people, something they can talk
about at the kitchen table. It’s not
pie in the sky. And Ajami talks
about all that’s gone on in the Middle
East and the tension there, and how
it affects our foreign policy.”
Two-Fer argues that Supreme
Court appointments are one of a
president’s most lasting legacies.
“The Supreme Court is divided 5–4
on many of the most important

Ajami, a senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution, a MacArthur fellow, and
an expert on Arab and Islamic politics, U.S. foreign policy, and contemporary international history, says
his book “wrote itself” as the Syrian
people fought for their liberty. “I was
born and raised in Lebanon, next
door to Syria. In the Syrian refugee
camps on the Turkey-Syria border, I
was treated to tales of unimaginable
grief and noble stoicism. I thought I
would provide this chronicle of a
people tyrannized and betrayed.
This book is a small debt I owed the
good people of Deraa, Homs, and
Hama.”
Both authors will be in the Hoover
Institution Press booth (3068) this
morning to sign their books—Clint
Bolick at 9:30 a.m. and Fouad Ajami
—Suzanne Mantell
at 10:30 a.m.

issues of our time, from federalism
and the powers of the federal government to gun rights, school choice,
affirmative action, and property
rights,” Bolick says. “The switch of a
single vote could dramatically alter
the balance on the Court.” Three
justices, he points out—two conservatives and one liberal—will be in
their 80s during the next presidential term, and the next president will
likely have the chance either to
reinforce the narrow conservative
majority on the Court or to shift the
Court sharply to the left. “In a very
real sense, Americans will be voting
this November not just for a president but for a Supreme Court,” he
says.

Reno to Run RKP
Tosca Reno—author, diet and fitness guru, and reality TV star—is
extremely confident about the
future of her company as she settles
into her new role as president of
Robert Kennedy Publishing (RKP,
booth 3758). Reno took the reins of
RKP following the death of her husband, publisher Robert Kennedy, in
April of this year.

Reno is now in charge of the
popular health and fitness
brands that Kennedy built, which
include the magazines Oxygen,
Clean Eating, MuscleMag
International, Reps! and American
Curves.
In addition to her role as president, Reno has taken on the unofficial role of coach and motivator of
the RKP employees, many of whom
were close to Kennedy, who was a

hands-on leader well into the years
when most would have retired. To
keep up morale, Reno sends out
daily motivational e-mails and has
arranged corporate brainstorming
retreats. “I am driven to make good
on my promise to Bob and my team
to roll up my sleeves and dig in.”
she says. “The future looks bright
for RKP. Our strength is in our
team—and our time is now, more
—Daisy Maryles
than ever.”

GLOBAL
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BOOTH # 3153

www.publishersweekly.com
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PUBL I SHERS

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

BESTSELLERS

TOP 25 CHILDREN’S
FICTION OVERALL FRONTLIST THROUGH MAY 27, 2012

RANK

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

TITLE

AUTHOR

IMPRINT

PUB
DATE

The Hunger Games
Catching Fire
Mockingjay
The Hunger Games
The Hunger Games
The Hunger Games Trilogy
Wimpy Kid 6: Cabin Fever
The Lorax
The Serpent’s Shadow
Green Eggs and Ham
One Fish Two Fish Red Fish...
Oh, the Places You’ll Go!
The Fault in Our Stars
Goodnight Moon
Little Blue Truck
Miss Peregrine’s Home...
Inheritance
Lego Ninjago
The Son of Neptune Book 2
Big Nate Goes for Broke
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Wimpy Kid 5: The Ugly Truth
Wimpy Kid 3: The Last Straw
Wimpy Kid 2: Rodrick Rules
Wimpy Kid 4: Dog Daze

Suzanne Collins
Suzanne Collins
Suzanne Collins
Suzanne Collins
Suzanne Collins
Suzanne Collins
Jeff Kinney
Dr. Seuss
Rick Riordan
Dr. Seuss
Dr. Seuss
Dr. Seuss
John Green
Margaret Wise Brown
Alice Schertle
Ransom Riggs
Christopher Paolini
Shari Last
Rick Riordan
Lincoln Peirce
Eric Carle
Jeff Kinney
Jeff Kinney
Jeff Kinney
Jeff Kinney

Scholastic Press
Scholastic Press
Scholastic Press
Scholastic Press
Scholastic Press
Scholastic Press
Abrams/Amulet
Random House
Disney-Hyperion
Random House
Random House
Random House
Dutton
HarperFestival
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Quirk Books
Knopf
DK
Disney-Hyperion
HarperCollins
Philomel
Abrams/Amulet
Abrams/Amulet
Abrams/Amulet
Abrams/Amulet

Jul-10
Sep-09
Aug-10
Feb-12
Oct-08
Aug-10
Nov-11
Aug-71
May-12
Aug-60
Mar-60
Jan-90
Jan-12
Aug-91
Oct-09
Jun-11
Nov-11
Jan-12
Oct-11
Mar-12
Mar-94
Nov-10
Jan-09
Feb-08
Oct-09

YTD

2,283,28
1,982,869
1,673,923
501,738
497,831
389,870
309,688
268,127
227,687
221,925
185,286
176,156
156,191
105,407
104,397
104,064
103,872
100,831
98,735
98,258
89,545
85,780
81,127
80,018
79,270

41

Collins
Leads the
Kids’ Pack
Though the books were already
sitting atop many bestseller lists
before, the odds have been ever
more in Suzanne Collins’s favor
since the March 21 movie release
of The Hunger Games, which has
a domestic gross of $400 million
and still climbing. The books aren’t
doing too shabbily either: Nielsen
BookScan reports just over 7.4 million Hunger Games books sold
year-to-date. Giving Collins a run
for her money are Jeff Kinney
(923,238 Wimpy Kid books sold
YTD) and Rick Riordan (846,861
copies of his various series sold
YTD). A few standalone works of
fiction have muscled their way
onto the top 25 as well, elbowing
Dr. Seuss and Goodnight Moon
aside: YA novelist John Green’s
The Fault in Our Stars and Ransom
Riggs’s debut novel Miss Peregrine’s
Home for Peculiar Children.
—Diane Roback

INFORMATION SUPPLIED BY NIELSEN BOOKSCAN. COPYRIGHT © 2012 THE NIELSEN COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Time to register for GABBS Boston, the Great American Bargain Book
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THURSDAY, JUNE 7

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42

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Staff Picks for Summer Reads
As a respite amid our staffwide
preparations for BEA, we thought it
would be nice to remind ourselves
(and readers) of what this is all
about: good books. Sixteen staffers
offer up the current or forthcoming
books (or galleys) they are excited
about and heartily recommend.

than amazing) girl band’s West
Coast tour in a VW bus, has what
you need: an unpredictable road
trip, romance and relationships put
to the test, humor, music, and unexpected moments of self-discovery
and revelation.
—John A. Sellers

Dreamland: Adventures in the
Strange Science of Sleep
David K. Randall (Norton)
A warm, lazy, summer day, the
sound of waves rushing in the background—what
could be more
sleep inducing?
But why is that nap
so refreshing? And
why is sleep so elusive at other times?
Before dozing off in
your hammock,
read this entertaining, informative look at how
and why we sleep. —Sarah F. Gold

The Infinite Tides
Christian Kiefer (Bloomsbury)
Kiefer’s fiction debut follows astronaut Keith Corcoran—returned to
Earth, abandoned by his wife, and
coping with the
tragic death of
his daughter—
as he rebuilds
his life by smoking pot, drinking beer, and
stargazing in an
empty lot with a
former engineer from Ukraine who now stocks
shelves at Target. Not as sunshiney
as other summer reads, but I sunburn easily.
—Samuel R. Slaton

Whiplash River
Lou Berney (Morrow)
In this entertaining sequel to
Gutshot Straight, Berney has a great
time tweaking the familiar: there’s
the ex-con trying to go straight; the
local drug lord making it awfully
hard on him; the evil fracking executive (that’s not an
adjective). And, uh,
a former stripper
turned venture capitalist. Okay, so not
everything’s that
familiar. Which is a
good thing. Set in
Belize and featuring
a number of great
set pieces, snappy dialogue, and colorful characters, the plot hums
along like a mosquito cloud over a
puddle.
—Mike Harvkey

Mother and Child
Carole Maso (Counterpoint)
There is lyricism and then there’s
Carole Maso’s lyricism. In her first
novel since
1998’s Defiance,
each evocative
sentence is an
incantation that
embraces the
reader and
refuses to let
go. Maso’s surreal exploration of the fraught mother-daughter
bond (complete with magical journeys and mysterious creatures)
should be read in the afternoon
shade, when you can savor each
line.
—Jessamine Chan

In One Person
John Irving (Simon & Schuster)
As a longtime John Irving fan, I was
naturally excited for his latest—
about one man’s
struggle with identity and sexual
exploration. But
after reading PW’s
amazing q&a with
Irving, I knew In
One Person was not
to be missed.
—Adam Boretz
The Disenchantments
Nina LaCour
(Dutton)
Looking for a
last-minute
graduation gift?
Or just a great
poolside read?
LaCour’s sophomore YA novel,
about a (less

My Cross to Bear
Gregg Allman,
with Alan Light
(Morrow)
I find myself
looking forward
to reading about
the story of this
great Southern
rock band—and
a 1970s glimpse
into my home state, Florida, where
the band got started.—Mark Rotella
I Hunt Killers
Barry Lyga (Little, Brown)
Seventeen-year-old Jazz received a
grisly education
at the hands of
his father, an
imprisoned
serial killer.
When another
murderer targets Jazz’s small
town, he channels his intimate

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

knowledge of the killing mind to
help the police find the perpetrator.
Blisteringly entertaining, Lyga’s YA
mystery features a troubled but
redeemable outsider with a serious
set of daddy issues. —Matia Burnett

a mute stranger and a dangerous
secret set during WWI. The prologue features a hideous surprise
in a bucket drawn up from an old
well, but fear not, it’s a love story!
—Louisa Ermelino

Dispatch from the Future
Leigh Stein (Melville House)
I have been looking forward to this
debut poetry collection for months
now, having previously enjoyed
some of these
“dispatches”
in various
journals. Stein
possesses a
comic’s honesty and sense
of timing,
simultaneously enchanting and dark, yet never cynical.
She’s already published a wonderful debut novel this year, but I think
she’s arguably an even better poet.
—Alex Crowley

The Guardians: An Elegy
Sarah Manguso (FSG)
Summer is the best time for short
but sweet
books—The
Guardians;
Home by Toni
Morrison; and I’ll
hopefully get
around to Denis
Johnson’s Train
Dreams.
—Gabe Habash

Butterfly in the Typewriter: The
Tragic Life of John Kennedy Toole
and the Remarkable Story of A
Confederacy of Dunces
Cory MacLauchlin (Da Capo)
As a fan of Toole’s A Confederacy of
Dunces, I’m looking forward to
reading the
first biography
to make full use
of the Toole
papers and
interviews with
the people who
knew the creator of that brilliant misfit,
Ignatius J. Reilly. An unexpected
bonus: the index lists a real-life brilliant misfit, horror writer H.P.
Lovecraft.
—Peter Cannon
Ravishing the Heiress
Sherry Thomas (Berkley Sensation)
I love books where the wedding
precedes the
romance, for
whatever reason—scandal,
arranged marriage—and love
and friendship
slowly develop
between two
people trying to
make the best of a difficult situation. Thomas’s take on this age-old
story sounds like the perfect summer escape: thoughtful and sweet,
with very sympathetic characters.
—Rose Fox
The Cove
Ron Rash (Ecco)
Dark and ominous (an antidote to all that
seasonal sun and
exposed flesh),
Rash dishes up
Appalachia with

The Forever Marriage
Ann Bauer (Overlook Press)
I’ve always enjoyed Ann Bauer’s
writing, her nonfiction magazine
articles and blogs, as well as her
debut novel, A Wild Ride Up the
Cupboards (Scribner, 2005). The
Forever Marriage is the tale of a
widow, reflecting
upon the decisions she made
years earlier that
made her the
woman she has
become. It’s a
provocative
theme that resonates with me
when I ponder the paths not taken
in my own life: what minor decision
I may have made years ago irrevocably set me on one journey as
opposed to another? —Claire Kirch
The Beginner’s Goodbye
Anne Tyler (Knopf)
No contest here. I’m always near
the head of the
line for the newest
Tyler. This one,
about a widower
whose dead wife
appears to him—
he’s a classic Tyler
character, a gentle quirky fellow—
reminds me that she’s getting older,
so possibly I am, too.
—Marcia Z. Nelson
James Joyce
Gordon Bowker (FSG)
It is bold to follow up on Richard
Ellman’s classic 1959 bio of Joyce, a
writer about
whom few mysteries remain
(especially after
the wonderful
recent bios of his
wife, Nora, and
daughter, Lucia).
Still, Bowker’s
light, fresh touch
animates the striving and at times
ridiculous ex-pat Dubliner, whose
body of work continues to sparkle
with genius.
—Michael Coffey

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PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

The Infinite Digital Possibilities
The opportunities and mysteries of
digital were at the center of the
panel “Secrets from the Other Side:
Lessons Learned from People Who
Have Worked for Both Print and
Digital Companies,” on Tuesday.
The panel, moderated by JVNLA
Inc. v-p Jennifer Weltz, covered
many areas affected by digital, from
distribution to data and pricing—
not to mention the companies born
from digital’s new opportunities.
“We are all about marketing,” said
Tina Pohlman, publisher of Open
Road, a company that builds its
marketing strategy around milestones like holidays and anniversaries, which in turn dictate what
content is fed to which audience at
what time. Byliner, another digital
publisher, represented at the panel
by its editor-in-chief and cofounder,
Mark Bryant, has a strategy
designed “to eliminate as many layers [between the author and
reader] as possible.” Digital, among
many other facets, has affected timing, and Bryant said that Byliner is
making last-minute changes to its
first release, Three Cups of Deceit
by Jon Krakauer, about six hours
before its release.

Digital has also changed selection. Whereas retailers once distinguished themselves by their different selections, now they want
everything—not only every title but
every title in every possible format.
And retailers’ expectations for
more have only increased because
of the increased expectations of
consumers. “You have to give the
customer the choice,” said Steve
Kasdin, Curtis Brown’s director of
digital strategy. Kasdin said that we
need to stop thinking in “versus,”

W E E K LY

i.e., “print vs. digital vs. audio,” and
instead look at the different formats
of a common product, because consumers have different preferences
and expect to have the choice.
Data has also become essential
because of today’s digital influence,
with metadata as the gateway for a
publisher to unlock streamlined
information. Larry Norton, senior
v-p of business for Inscribe, said
that while data isn’t new, the various types and the speed of data are.
“The sources are beginning to
explode,” he said, pointing to social
media data and hourly updated
Amazon rankings. And getting at

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

the speed of today’s digital publishing world, Kasdin added that data
from six months ago is “Jurassic.”
The main takeaway: digital has
allowed for unprecedented freedom in an astounding number of
areas in publishing. Digital backlist
has unlocked older content for a
whole new generation of readers;
digital pricing has allowed publishers and authors to play around with
different price points and adjust on
the fly. And if an author wants to
experiment and branch out into a
new genre altogether, the time and
cost are no longer prohibitive.
—Gabe Habash

Gift Pavilion Offers Sideline Diversification
For booksellers looking to invest in
sidelines, the Gift Pavilion is the
place to go. This year marks the
area’s second appearance at the
show, and it features companies
that sell a variety of nonbook products. This year’s Gift Pavilion, in
booths 4544–4546, has also grown
notably; in 2011 there were 34
exhibitors in the area, while this
year there are 50.
Among some of the wares booksellers can explore for their stores
are glasses, pens, and personalized
journals. Eye Bobs Eyewear (pic-

tured), based in
journals and sells
Minneapolis, sells
in stores ranging
high-end reading
from Urban
glasses and, with
Outfitters to the
established relaCanadian chain
tionships with
Indigo Books.
museums and
Other companies
other organizain the Gift Pavilion
tions, has just
At the busy Gift Pavilion, Pat Nichols of Eye include Puzzle
Bobs presented high-end reading glasses.
begun expanding
Pen and Word
into bookstores. Up with Paper,
Teasers, which features “conversabased in Alexandria, Va., sells poption starter” card decks.
up greeting cards, as well as pop-up
A BEA rep said the Gift Pavilion is
books. Life + Style, a local Manhattan
part of an effort to help booksellers
outfit, deals in innovatively designed
diversify their nonbook offerings.
© STEVEKAGAN.COM

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©2012 O’Reilly Media, Inc. The O’Reilly logo is a registered trademark of O’Reilly Media, Inc. 12451

44

46

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 , 2012

At the Children’s Breakfast, Dreams and Responsibility
he’s been asked “on the red carpet about The Land of Stories,
such as ‘Do you make a cameo
appearance in the book?’ ”
Colfer described the long process of illustrating the book,
including showing off illustrations of two drawings he’d created as a third-grader and as a
10th-grader, which inspired
illustrations included in The
(L. to r.) The children’s breakfast club–Kadir Nelson, Lois
Land of Stories.
Lowry, John Green, Walter Dean Myers, and Chris Colfer .
Next up was John Green,
books, including his latest YA
whom Colfer introduced as the
novel, The Fault in Our Stars, which
“Justin Bieber of the literary world.”
was released in January by Dutton.
Green revealed that he’d found fan
Reading is “quiet and contemplafiction about himself and Colfer on
tive” and takes concentration, Green
the Internet, prompting Colfer later
said. “It takes focus—it’s not an
to admit that he was responsible for
activity you can do while doing
writing the fan fiction and had titled
other things.” In contrast, he said,
it, “50 Shades of Green.”
social media is for scanning, for
Green is renowned for success“looking for what’s next.”
fully using social media to promote
Lois Lowry, whose YA novel Son,
himself and his books, and with his
the conclusion to the Giver trilogy,
brother, Hank, created a wildly
will be published by Houghton
popular virtual community called
Mifflin in October, recalled the first
Nerdfighters, who “work together
booksellers convention at which
to increase awesome and decrease
she spoke, in 1987, in D.C., with a
world suck,” according to their Web
record 22,000 attendees.
site. Nerdfighters currently boasts
Lowry visibly moved the audi77,000 members. But Green wasn’t
ence as she spoke about “young
at Javits today to talk up the
people, who believe they can fix this
Internet: he was there to talk about

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Gulliver
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world.” The Giver, published
in 1993, was written, she
recalled, in response to her
son’s question as he fought
with the U.S. military in the
Middle East: “Why do people
do such terrible things to each
other?”
It’s a question, she says, that
remains unanswered, but it
haunts her even more since
her son was killed in an F-15
fighter plane crash in 1995.
Kadir Nelson made the case for
the extraordinary things young
people can do when called upon to
act. Recalling the first time he heard
Dr. Martin Luther King’s historic “I
Have a Dream” speech in fifth grade,
when he later had to recite it from
memory in front of his class, Nelson
described both the emotional and
the creative process of illustrating I
Have a Dream, a children’s book containing excerpts from the 1963 speech.
I Have a Dream will be released by
Random House/Schwartz & Wade
in October. “How [could] I possibly
add anything to Dr. King’s powerful
words?” Nelson said, recalling that
reciting the speech in fifth grade
made him “stronger, more confi—Claire Kirch
dent.”
© STEBEKAGAN.COM

If there was a theme to Wednesday’s
Children’s Book and Author
Breakfast, it was that reading books
does not just educate and entertain
young readers, it can inspire them
to, in speaker Lois Lowry’s words,
“fix this world.” National
Ambassador for Young People’s
Literature Walter Dean Myers set
the tone for the event in his welcoming remarks to a packed hall of
1,100 booksellers. “Reading has
made my life, reading has transformed my existence,” Myers
declared. “We need to develop the
next generation of readers. We can
make children believe that books
can take you far.” Following Myers,
the event’s youngest speaker, actor
Chris Colfer, 22, a star of the television program Glee, exemplified
what young people can do.
Colfer—whose debut children’s
book, The Land of Stories: The
Wishing Spell, will be published by
Little, Brown in July—told the starstruck audience that The Land of
Stories was a fairy tale he’s wanted
to tell since he was a child, when he
was “obsessed” with a book of fairy
tales his mother read to him. After
entertaining the audience by
recounting some of the questions

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The truth can be
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5/24/12 10:09 AM

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2005 Garry Wills
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Since February 2000, nearly 140 of the nation’s
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ction
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Richard Norton Smith
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Watch live on the first Sunday of each month,
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noon to 3 pm ET, on C-SPAN2.
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Hewitt Temple Grandin Joy Hakim
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Goldberg Salman Rushdie
2011 Phyllis Bennis R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr. Julie Nixon Eisenhower
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Ellis Cose Michael Moore Ben Mezrich David Brooks
2012 Chris Hedges Mark Steyn Randall
Kennedy Richard Brookhiser Tom Brokaw Anna Quindlen
2000 John Lukacs Richard Rhodes
William F. Buckley Joan Didion Milton Friedman Gore Vidal Stephen Ambrose Arthur Schlesinger
2001 Cornel West Norman Podhoretz Toni Morrison James McPherson Studs Terkel Jacques
Barzun Shelby Foote David Halberstam David McCullough
2002 Phyllis Schlafly Tom Clancy
Peggy Noonan Robert Caro bell hooks David Herbert Donald Howard Zinn Edmund Morris George
Will Bob Woodward
2003 Martin Gilbert Susan Sontag Bernard Lewis Harold Bloom Noam
Chomsky Carlo D’Este Camille Paglia Jeff Shaara Stanley Crouch John Keegan Douglas Brinkley
2004 Thomas Fleming Ken Auletta Victor Davis Hanson Margaret MacMillan Niall Ferguson Harold
Holzer Forrest McDonald Simon Winchester Angela Davis David Hackett Fischer Tom Wolfe
2005
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