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LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

VISION

A PAPER SUBMITTED TO DR ANDY GOWINS FOR CLED 620

IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE MASTERS OF DIVINITY DEGREE BY TODD HINE 22 MAY 2012

CLED 620

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................................2 DEFINITION ...................................................................................................................................2 ADVANTAGES ..............................................................................................................................3 QUALITY OF VISION ...................................................................................................................4 CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................................5 BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................6

CLED 620 INTRODUCTION The operations officer of any organization, civilian or military, secular or sacred, lives and breathes the vision of the commander or Chief Executive Officer. The operations officer, once knowing the destination of the organization, concerns himself with the methods of getting the organization to the desired destination. Take away the vision and the operations of the organization flounder, reacting and responding instead of being proactive and decisive. The perspective presented from the position of operations serves as input into the value and need for the organization to have a vision statement in addition to its mission. DEFINITION The first principle in defining vision is to acknowledge that an organizations vision, though defined is not chiseled out of concrete. Once the organization captures the vision and moves forward progressing to the vision, the organization itself must remain flexible enough to sustain a change of vision. Though not ideal, it can and does happen. What, then, is a vision? Various authors have drafted many definitions to define and describe this word in an effort to make it more clearly understood and appreciated. For example, when making a specific application of vision to a church ministry, Barna defines it as, Vision for ministry is a clear mental image of a preferable future imparted by God to His chosen servants and is based upon an accurate understanding of God, self, and circumstances. (Barna, 26-27). Taking this statement into context, modifying it to reflect a military environment, and it might read, Vision for the unit is a clearly defined set of goals designed to ensure the unit itself reflects the image as put forth by the unit commander and higher Headquarters, based upon the 2

CLED 620 commanders intent for the unit. Under this definition, the members of the unit understand the image of the unit drafted in the mind of the commander, set for an effective date sometime in the future. It then falls upon every member of the unit to ensure fulfillment of this vision within the context of their assigned position. Key points to this definition can be seen in parallel to Malphurs. He describes a picture of where the unit is going, communicating to the unit the vision, inspiring people to embrace the vision, and the drafting of a clear statement reflecting the vision. (Malphurs, Pg 154) The overlapping principles between both authors provide researchers a solid understanding of vision. ADVANTAGES Some advantages can already be seen in the previous section. For the military organization, having a vision statement put forth by the commander provides the members of the unit a clear understanding of the commanders intent. Through the vision statement, no soldier is left without knowing the destination of the unit, and as a result, how the individual participates in the unit to ensure arrival. Additionally, the chain-of-command and the command staff members know the commanders picture for the unit, and this provides them with a compass bearing through which the unit progresses toward the vision. Additionally, the vision statement should provide a link to the regulations and manuals that ensure the military unit operates as designed. Funded by taxpayer dollars, the efficiency in operations is of high importance to the commander and should be as well to the members of the unit. This applies directly to the church as well, as funds are driven by tithes and offerings, and the pastor and staff are accountable not only to God but to the people as well. A vision statement for a church allows credibility to indicate funds being directed toward the vision. 3

CLED 620 QUALITY OF VISION By end-of-year 2013 the 92nd Civil Support Team will reach a training level of T1, fully prepared to respond anywhere in the nation within an hours notice. It will sustain a personnel rating of P1, ensuring every position is occupied. And the unit will schedule, plan, and coordinate several training events for practice ending the cycle with a culminating event that will demonstrate proficiency to standard with all GOs in all Mission Essential Task List tasks at the end of 2013. This vision statement applies to this writers last assigned unit. As a quick response unit, capable and designed to respond to real-world terrorist threats within the United States, these long-term goals are realistic. They also provide the unit with a clear understanding of what the unit should look like at the end of the training cycle, 2013. Finally, the vision statement actually contains measurable outcomes for the unit to focus on. This way, throughout the training cycle the unit can take a spot measurement and compare their progress to the culminating event standards. This vision also meets the six elements of a vision according to Malphurs. It is clear, it paints a picture using words that individual members can draw within their own minds, it presents a future of the unit to the members of the unit, and not only can it happen, but it must happen under the commanders intent woven into its wording. As complete as the visions statement can be, it does not see assembly in a vacuum. This statement, although driven by the commander, received input from various sources. The units staff provided much of the units current situation information to the commander. As a current detailed picture painted for the commander, this initial step gave the 4

CLED 620 commander an idea of where the unit sits. These inputs were most likely completed through briefings and meetings that lasted over two or three weeks. Section leaders provided information to the commander that ensured complete knowledge of the unit. Once a solid understanding of the unit had been developed, the commander referred to the various regulations, manuals, and policies that guide the operational requirements of the team. This includes such references such as Mission Essential Task Lists, Field Manuals, and Army or Air Force Regulations that stipulate what the unit must be capable of accomplishing should the unit be activated. CONCLUSION Goals and objectives are a vital part of any organization, but they only carry the unit so far into the future. The vision statement gives the goals and objectives something to tie into that also provides the organization with a long-term picture for doing all the goals and objectives. It is this picture of what the organization will look like upon completion that drives the fulfillment of all events. For a military organization, the documents that give the unit authority are the regulations that govern the unit. For a church, the Word of God is the ultimate authority that gives the church its marching orders.

CLED 620 BIBLIOGRAPHY Barna, George. The Power of Vision. 3rd ed. Ventura, CA: Regal/Gospel Light, 2009. Malphurs, Aubrey. Advanced Strategic Planning. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 2005. Warren, Rick. The Purpose Driven Church. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1995.

CLED 620

PROJECT 2: VISION GRADING RUBRIC


CHOICE 1: MY VISION STUDENT:

Points Criteria Possible

Points Earned

The project has good content about: Definition of vision Advantages in vision Quality in vision

10 10 10 2 8

The project is 35 pages in length. The project makes correct use of Turabian for Seminary students or APA for counseling students. Good grammar and writing style evident in paragraphing, sentences, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and word choices.

10

TOTAL

50