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HOW TO PREPARE FOR AN INTERVIEW

Dressing Right for The Interview


PREPARATIONS Let's say you are going for an interview tomorrow. You have prepared yourself well for the occasion anticipating the questions and getting ready the answers - but have you given a thought to what you will wear?

MEN
Long-sleeved shirt and dark slacks. White is still the safest and the best color for shirts. The colour is also appropriate for our tropical weather. Also acceptable: pale shades such as beige, blue, and other pastels. Tuck in the shirt and do not roll up the sleeves. Never wear a short-sleeved shirt to an interview or any business purpose. Wearing a short-sleeved shirt will destroy your executive image. Ties. Optional. But if you do wear one, choose a conservative pattern. Solids, small polka dots, diagonal stripes, small repeating shapes, subtle plaids and paisleys are all acceptable. Belts. Belts should match your shoes. Those with smaller buckles with squared lines look more professional. Socks. Black socks are the best, followed by blue or gray, depending on your attire. Never wear white socks! Check your sock length, too--no skin should show when you sit down or cross your legs. Shoes. Black or burgundy leather shoes with laces on them, because tassel loafers are very casual. Other suitable colors are brown, cordovan and navy. Hair. Keep neat, short and preferably parted on the side. And shave off all those facial hair. Jewellery. Wear no or little jewellery. The watch and wedding ring are the only acceptable pieces of jewellery to go with the male attire. Thin gold or leather-strapped watches look professional but not digital watches. Also, avoid political or religious insignias, necklaces or bracelets. Definitely no pierced body parts, and cover up your tattoos! Accessories. As much as possible, use leather briefcases or folders to hold copies of your resume. Use narrow briefcases and avoid plastic folders and plastic ball pens as they are out of place.

Interview DOs and DON'Ts

Interview DOs

Dress appropriately for the industry; err on the side of being conservative to show you take the interview seriously. Your personal grooming and cleanliness should be impeccable. o Know the exact time and location of your interview; know how long it takes to get there, park, find a rest room to freshen up, etc. o Arrive early; 10 minutes prior to the interview start time. o Treat other people you encounter with courtesy and respect. Their opinions of you might be solicited during hiring decisions. o Offer a firm handshake, make eye contact, and have a friendly expression when you are greeted by your interviewer. o Listen to be sure you understand your interviewer's name and the correct pronunciation. o Even when your interviewer gives you a first and last name, address your interviewer by title (Ms., Mr., Dr.) and last name, until invited to do otherwise. o Maintain good eye contact during the interview. o Sit still in your seat; avoid fidgeting and slouching. o Respond to questions and back up your statements about yourself with specific examples whenever possible. o Ask for clarification if you don't understand a question. o Be thorough in your responses, while being concise in your wording. o Be honest and be yourself. Dishonesty gets discovered and is grounds for withdrawing job offers and for firing. You want a good match between yourself and your employer. If you get hired by acting like someone other than yourself, you and your employer will both be unhappy. o Treat the interview seriously and as though you are truly interested in the employer and the opportunity presented. o Exhibit a positive attitude. The interviewer is evaluating you as a potential co-worker. Behave like someone you would want to work with. o Have intelligent questions prepared to ask the interviewer. Having done your research about the employer in advance, ask questions which you did not find answered in your research. o Evaluate the interviewer and the organization s/he represents. An interview is a two-way street. Conduct yourself cordially and respectfully, while thinking critically about the way you are treated and the values and priorities of the organization. o Do expect to be treated appropriately. If you believe you were treated inappropriately or asked questions that were inappropriate or made you uncomfortable, discuss this with a Career Services advisor or the director. o Make sure you understand the employer's next step in the hiring process; know when and from whom you should expect to hear next. Know what action you are expected to take next, if any. o When the interviewer concludes the interview, offer a firm handshake and make eye contact. Depart gracefully. o After the interview, make notes right away so you don't forget critical details.

Write a thank-you letter to your interviewer promptly.

Interview DON'Ts Don't make excuses. Take responsibility for your decisions and your actions. Don't make negative comments about previous employers or professors (or others). Don't falsify application materials or answers to interview questions. Don't treat the interview casually, as if you are just shopping around or doing the interview for practice. This is an insult to the interviewer and to the organization. o Don't give the impression that you are only interested in an organization because of its geographic location. o Don't give the impression you are only interested in salary; don't ask about salary and benefits issues until the subject is brought up by your interviewer. o Don't act as though you would take any job or are desperate for employment. o Don't make the interviewer guess what type of work you are interested in; it is not the interviewer's job to act as a career advisor to you. o Don't be unprepared for typical interview questions. You may not be asked all of them in every interview, but being unprepared looks foolish. o A job search can be hard work and involve frustrations; don't exhibit frustrations or a negative attitude in an interview. o Don't go to extremes with your posture; don't slouch, and don't sit rigidly on the edge of your chair. o Don't assume that a female interviewer is "Mrs." or "Miss." Address her as "Ms." unless told otherwise. Her marital status is irrelevant to the purpose of the interview. o Don't chew gum or smell like smoke. o Don't allow your cell phone to sound during the interview. (If it does, apologize quickly and ignore it.) Don't take a cell phone call.

o o o o

Don't take your parents, your pet (an assistance animal is not a pet in this circumstance), spouse, fiance, friends or enemies to an interview. If you are not grown up and independent enough to attend an interview alone, you're insufficiently grown up and independent for a job. (They can certainly visit your new city, at their own expense, but cannot attend your interview.)

Here are the keys to successful phone interviewing. Follow these simple rules and you should achieve success in this important phase of job-hunting. * Do give accurate and detailed contact information in your cover letter so your interviewers can easily connect with you. * When in job-hunting mode, don't have a disproportionately silly or long greeting on your answering machine or voicemail. * Do ensure that household members understand the importance of phone messages in your job search. * Do know what job you are interviewing for. * Do practice, if possible. Have a friend call you to do a mock phone interview so you get the feel of being interviewed over the phone. * When being interviewed by phone, do make sure you are in a place where you can read notes, take notes, and concentrate. * If you cannot devote enough time to a phone interview, do suggest a specific alternate time to the recruiter. It's often best to be the one who calls back so you can be mentally prepared. * Do consider using a phone interview log. * Do consider keeping some notecards or an outline in front of you to remind yourself of key points you want to cover with the interviewer. You don't want your responses to sound scripted, but you don't want to fumble

for important points either. Do also have your resume in front of you so you can remember highlights of your experience and accomplishments. * Do ensure that you can hear and are being clearly heard. * Do consider standing when being interviewed on the phone. Some experts say you'll sound more professional than if you're slouching in an easy chair. * Do consider dressing nicely for the phone interview. It may sound silly since the interviewer can't see you, but you really will project a more professional image if you're dressed for the part instead of wearing, for example, a ratty bathrobe. * Don't feel you have to fill in the silences. If you've completed a response, but the interviewer hasn't asked his or her next question, don't start babbling just to fill in airtime. Instead, ask a question of your own related to your last response. * Do create a strong finish to your phone interview with thoughtful questions. * Don't panic if you have special needs. If you are hearing-impaired, for example, phone interviews are still possible. * Don't snuffle, sneeze or cough. If you can't avoid these behaviors, say excuse me. * Don't chew gum or food, or drink anything noisy.

Freshers Corner [Plan.. Prepare.. Practice.. Perform]


Planning & Preparation 1. Make sure you are familiar with C(, C++, Database 2. C [Pointers], C++ [OOPS], Database basics[Normalization, basic definitions] 3. Software Engineering [SDLC, Testing Types, Software Paradigms] 4. Data structures [stack, queue, trees] 5. Basics in OS and Computer Networks [TCP/IP, Congestion]

Resume Writing Tips for Fresher 1. Avoid spelling/grammatical mistakes in your resume. Use a good fond and size. 2. Include your percentage of marks in your higher degree and do not miss to add all educational history like SSLC, HSC. 3. Do not expect the interviewer to search your email ID and phone number. Make sure its visible at first sight and double check it. 4. Adding two projects in your resume is enough. Make sure it must be a very good one. 5. Send a separate email while applying for different companies.

During Interview 1. Very easy. Be confidence that you will definitely get the job. 2. If you do not understand the question asked, ask him/her twice. But be clear with your answer. That's it. 3. You should know about the company like the company history, their area of working, number of people, number of countries they work, CEO of the company (ask any employee if you forget to prepare as I did)

before attending interview. 4. Keep in mind that how you are explaining about your projects will give you job. So be clear and well prepare your projects. 5. If you do not know the answer, say "No" frankly.. but not always.

Golden Rules for Freshers How you have to prepare for entry level (Fresher)?
General Aptitude Round Technical Round Group Discussion HR Round

Why Quantitative Aptitude is important especially for Fresher?


Reason 1 - It is the entry for fresher even in a small IT company Or MNCs. Reason 2 - 92% of fresher got job once they clear aptitude round Reason 3 - Only 30% of fresher graduate pass outs clear aptitude round and got job Now you know why you have to get trained for the general aptitude round. Request you to not post any irrelevant answers to the question.

What are the Topics you need to prepare?


1. Number 2. HCF and LCM 3. Decimal Friction 4. Simplification 5. Square Roots 6. Average 7. problem on Number 8. Problem on Ages 9. Surds and indices 10. Percentage 11. profit and Loss 12. Ratio and Proportion 13. Partnership 14. Chain Rule 15. Time And Work 16. Pipes 17. Time and Distance 18. Problem On Trains 19. Boats and Streams 20. Allegation 21. Simple Interest 22. Compound Interest Download

4 Steps for Interview


Step 1: Find out All You Can About Your Prospective Employer. Talk with your friends and colleagues to see if they are familiar with the company. Do they know anyone who has interviewed with the company? Find out as much as possible about the job duties and requirements of the position. Do an internet search and see if the employer has a website. Read their company history and mission statement. Do they specialize in a particular field? Who is the owner or company president? This will help you ask intelligent questions and show knowledge about their organization. Step 2: Do a Pre-Interview Self Assessment. Are you able to convey to your prospective employer positive information about yourself? Do you convey confidence and professionalism? Make a list of your skills and personality traits that would be of benefit to the employer. Make a list of possible interview questions and practice answering them out loud with family, friends or the career counselor. Be able to give specific examples to anticipated interview questions and not just general statements. Why they should hire you? Tell me a little about yourself? Tell me about your training at PCI? What do you enjoy doing the most/least? Why do you want to work here? What were your duties at your last job? Ask for critiques of your delivery style and communication skills. Step 3: The Actual Interview.

DRESS FOR THE INTERVIEW NOT THE JOB


Dress appropriately in professional business attire. This is defiantly not the time to be making any trendy fashion statements. Carry an extra copy of your resume, academic records and personal references. Arrive 15 minutes early. Don't arrive way too early (makes you look desperate for a job) and never ever arrive late. Lateness is an employment killer and sign that you are unreliable. Plan enough slack time so you won't be rushed before the big interview. Use this time to relax and observe how the staff and others in the office interact. Always present yourself in a confident manor - walk briskly, with purpose, and stand up straight. Complete the job application completely and don't leave any blank spaces. Never lie on an application! When you meet the interviewer look him or her in the eye and give a firm handshake. Be yourself. Be confident but not arrogant. Try to relax and make the interviewer feel relaxed. Remain positive and enthusiastic. Speak clearly. Don't talk too much or too little. Listen carefully to the interviewers questions. Ask questions as though you already have the job - What would a typical day be like? When will the job start? Who will be my supervisor? ,etc. Do not make your first question what's the salary. Remember to focus upon your accomplishments and achievements. If you are really interested in the job, let the interviewer know about it. Step 4: The Post Interview The interview process doesn't end when you walk out the door! Be sure to write a thank you letter. Thank the interviewer for their time and the opportunity to interview with their company. If you really want the job, say so in the letter. If you have not heard anything within a week to 10 days, you may want to call. Assure them that you are not trying to be pushy, but that you are just interested in working for their company.

Even If you are not hired, send a thank you letter to the company and ask them to keep you in mind for any other similar job openings in the future. You may want to ask the interviewer if there was any specific reason as to why you weren't hired. Ensure them that you only want to know this information to assist you in your future job searches.

Resume Writing Tricks and Cover Letter Tips


What is a Resume? The word resume is a French word meaning summary. Often times, youll hear a resume referred to as a vitale; a Latin word meaning data about life. They are both the same thing - a simple, well-organized profile of your experiences and qualifications. A resume is your calling card when you apply for a job. Usually, your resume has to sell an employer on giving you an interview. Interviews get the job; resumes can only get an interview. Very often, personnel people will pattern the interview on the resume they have received from you. Thus, it is essential that you have a resume and that it be a good one. A resume should contain brief but sufficient information to tell a prospective employer: Who you are What type of job you would like to do What you can do What you have done What you know Your resume is often the first contact an employer will have with you, so it is important that you present yourself to your best advantage. Your resume must look professional and read professionally.

Part of the Resume: Heading: Be sure to place your name, your current address, and your current phone number at the top of the page. Make it easy for an employer to reach you. Note: If you are away from home much of the time, you might want to list an alternate number. Remember: if you move, change your name, or change your phone number; change it on your resume. Objectives: It is wise to have an objective. The employer needs to know what position you are seeking. You do not need to explain your long-term objective; he is only interested (as far as the resume is concerned) in what you want to do at the present. Objectives should be short and to the point. Do: I am looking for a position of responsibility in the printing industry, utilizing training and hands-on experience in photo typesetting and camera-ready layout. Don't Do: A management or supervisory position where the ability to conceptualize and follow through on new or existing programs is needed, as well as a position with growth and upward mobility that would utilize maximum potential. This is too general or flowery. (What does this person really want to do?) Work Experience: When describing what you did on previous jobs, use action words (like Accepted ,Accomplished, Accounted for, Achieved, Acquired, Acted, Adapted, Addressed, Adjusted, Administered, Advised, Advocated, Allocated, Analyzed, Applied, Appointed, Appraised, Approved, Arbitrated, etc.). Describe job duties and skills - not just job title. If you have done something in a previous job that relates in any way to your objective, be sure to

include this. Point out your strongest experience first. Be sure to mention any jobs where you can say that you made specific accomplishments in your position. Be sure to mention any jobs where you can say that you made specific accomplishments in your position. If you have had little work experience in your filed, but do have the training for this kind of position, put down Education first. If you have work experience in this field, but so far, little training, put Work Experience first. Education: Under education, do not just state that you have graduated from Columbus State Community College in your technology. List some courses you have taken that will show the employer that you have knowledge about this field. If applicable to your technology, list machines you can use, skills you have acquired, languages you have studied. Be sure to list any other training (other than-Columbus State Community College) that you may also have had in this field. Salary: Do not mention salary - either from previous employment or from expectations for your new position. Volunteer: Remember to include volunteer work in the general area of your field. Extensive hobby work in your area can also build up your credibility. Be sure to include co-ops, internships, or field experiences. Experience is experience, paid or not. Personal: Listing your personal information such as birth date, marital status, etc., is sometimes beneficial, sometimes not. This is definitely a personal preference. However, for most positions, no one will care about the color of your hair, your eyes, etc. References: It is generally acceptable to simply put References available upon request. If you list names, etc., some of your references may move, quit jobs, etc., and you will have to do the resume all over again. An alternative to listing references on the resume is to have them on a separate sheet of paper, and take this sheet to your interview. Resumne Checklist: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Did you list educational activity such as training? Do you have experience in money management? Do you have any people management activities? Have you listed organization-building activities? Have you mentioned your people skills? Do you have selling experience? Have you discussed your ability to interact with customers or clients? Have you included your ability to work as part a team? Have you listed your trouble-shooting or problem solving skills? Have you mentioned your ability to organize data? Have you listed activities when you organized projects? Did you include your writing skills? Did you include your ability to lead others? Have you listed all extracurricular and volunteer work?

15. Have you included your particular values and work ethics? General Tips: 1. Keep your resume to one or two pages - do not go beyond two pages. 2. Employers want to look at a resume and quickly find the information they need - keep it clear and concise. 3. Know what skills you can offer, and what type of job you are looking to do. Give your resume a job focus in your objective.

4. Use a resume type that presents your background in the strongest way. There is no one way to prepare a resume. Chose a style that best reflects your strong points, i.e. Educational Resume, WorkExperience Resume, or Skills Resume 5. Use a word processor to prepare your resume. Spell check your document but be sure to proofread it yourself for errors, typos, and misused words, these can ruin even the best resume. 6. Graphics can help make or break the appearance of the resume. Make important points stand out by chunking the information, using shaded boxes, or carefully placed elements. 7. Professionally printed resumes look best, and can usually be copied at a quick-print shop at little expense. Have the printer use a good quality paper - white, off-white, cream or beige. This is no time to skimp. What is a Cover Letter? Resumes are mailed to the prospective employer under the cover of a letter. The cover letter applies for a specific job, highlights appropriate skills and/or experience by referring to an enclosed resume, and requests and interview. It should covey I am interested in you. Heres why you should be interested in me. Can we set up a time an interview? The cover letter should be personal and directed towards one particular employer. If you are sending your resume to 15 different potential employers you will need to write 15 different cover letters. Each letter will have a somewhat different focus depending on how your skills relate to the employers needs. Never use a form cover letter to accompany your resume. Cover letters should be 1/2 - 3/4 page in length; 3 - 4 paragraphs (see example) and typewritten. Be concise, direct and creative. Open with an idea that captures attention and leads to your strongest selling point.

Great interviews arise from careful groundwork. You can ace your next interview if you:
1. Enter into a state of relaxed concentration. This is the state from which great basketball players or Olympic skaters operate. You'll need to quiet the negative self chatter in your head through meditation or visualization prior to sitting down in the meeting. You'll focus on the present moment and will be less apt to experience lapses in concentration, nervousness, self-doubt and self-condemnation. 2. Act spontaneous, but be well prepared. Be your authentic self, professional yet real. Engage in true conversation with your interviewer, resting on the preparation you did prior to coming to the meeting. Conduct several trial runs with another person simulating the interview before it actually occurs. It's the same as anticipating the questions you'll be asked on a final exam. 3. Set goals for the interview. It is your job to leave the meeting feeling secure that the interviewer knows as much as he or she possibly can about your skills, abilities, experience and achievements. If you sense there are misconceptions, clear them up before leaving. If the interviewer doesn't get around to asking you important questions, pose them yourself (diplomatically) and answer them. Don't leave the meeting without getting your own questions answered so that you have a clear idea of what you would be getting yourself into. If possible, try to get further interviews, especially with other key players. 4. Know the question behind the question. Ultimately, every question boils down to, "Why should we hire you?" Be sure you answer that completely. If there is a question about your meeting deadlines, consider whether the interviewer is probing delicately about your personal life, careful not to ask you whether your family responsibilities will interfere with your work. Find away to address fears if you sense they are present.

5. Follow up with an effective "thank you" letter. Don't write this letter lightly. It is another opportunity to market yourself. Find some areas discussed in the meeting and expand upon them in your letter. Writing a letter after a meeting is a very minimum. Standing out among the other candidates will occur if you thoughtfully consider this follow up letter as an additional interview in which you get to do all the talking. Propose useful ideas that demonstrate your added value to the team. 6. Consider the interviewer's agenda. Much is on the shoulders of the interviewer. He or she has the responsibility of hiring the right candidate. Your ability to do the job will need to be justified. "Are there additional pluses here?" "Will this person fit the culture of this organization?" These as well as other questions will be heavily on the interviewer's mind. Find ways to demonstrate your qualities above and beyond just doing the job. 7. Expect to answer the question, "Tell me about yourself." This is a pet question of prepared and even unprepared interviewers. Everything you include should answer the question, "Why should we hire you?" Carefully prepare your answer to include examples of achievements from your work life that closely match the elements of the job before you. Obviously, you'll want to know as much about the job description as you can before you respond to the question. 8. Watch those nonverbal clues. Experts estimate that words express only 30% to 35% of what people actually communicate; facial expressions and body movements and actions convey the rest. Make and keep eye contact. Walk and sit with a confident air. Lean toward an interviewer to show interest and enthusiasm. Speak with a well-modulated voice that supports appropriate excitement for the opportunity before you. 9. Be smart about money questions. Don't fall into the trap of telling the interviewer your financial expectations. You may be asking for too little or too much money and in each case ruin your chances of being offered the job. Instead, ask what salary range the job falls in. Attempt to postpone a money discussion until you have a better understanding of the scope of responsibilities of the job. 10. Don't hang out your dirty laundry. Be careful not to bare your soul and tell tales that are inappropriate or beyond the scope of the interview. State your previous experience in the most positive terms. Even if you disagreed with a former employer, express your enthusiasm for earlier situations as much as you can. Whenever you speak negatively about another person or situation in which you were directly involved, you run the risk (early in the relationship) of appearing like a troubled person who may have difficulty working with others.

Job Interview Questions and Answers


Why should you be hired for this job? Point out how your talents and how they meet what the organization needs. Do not mention any other job candidates and try to make a comparison. Try to tie a few things to your career path and how it is a good fit. Answer this question with confidence. Do not waffle. You show already know why you should be hired. If you have doubts or are tentitive about this answer, your interviewer might also have doubts. Why did you leave (or want to leave) your last job? Stay positive regardless of the circumstances. Never refer to a major problem with management and never speak ill of supervisors, co-workers or the organization. If you do, you will be the one looking bad. Keep smiling and talk about leaving for a positive reason such as an opportunity, a chance to do something special or other forward-looking reasons. What do you know about this company/organization? This question is one reason to do some research on the organization before the interview. Find out where they have been and where they are going. What are the current issues and who are the major players? What have you done to improve your knowledge in the last year? Try to include improvement activities that relate to the job. A wide variety of activities can be mentioned as

positive self-improvement. Have some good ones handy to mention. Do you have any weaknesses? Trick question. If you know about weakness, they are no longer blind spots. Do not reveal any personal areas of concern here. Let them do their own discovery on your bad points. Do not hand it to them. What is your greatest strength? Numerous answers are good, just stay positive. A few good examples: Your ability to prioritize, Your problem-solving skills, Your ability to work under pressure, Your ability to focus on projects, Your professional expertise, Your leadership skills, Your positive attitude. What have you learned from mistakes on the job? Here you have to come up with something or you strain credibility. Make it small, well intentioned mistake with a positive lesson learned. An example would be working too far ahead of colleagues on a project and thus throwing coordination off. Have you ever had to fire anyone? How did you feel about that? This is serious. Do not make light of it or in any way seem like you like to fire people. At the same time, you will do it when it is the right thing to do. When it comes to the organization versus the individual who has created a harmful situation, you will protect the organization. Remember firing is not the same as layoff or reduction in force. Are you a team player? You are, of course, a team player. Be sure to have examples ready. Specifics that show you often perform for the good of the team rather than for yourself are good evidence of your team attitude. Do not brag, just say it in a matter-of-fact tone. This is a key point. Describe your management style. Try to avoid labels. Some of the more common labels, like progressive, salesman or consensus, can have several meanings or descriptions depending on which management expert you listen to. The situational style is safe, because it says you will manage according to the situation, instead of one size fits all. Would you be willing to relocate if required? You should be clear on this with your family prior to the interview if you think there is a chance it may come up. Do not say yes just to get the job if the real answer is no. This can create a lot of problems later on in your career. Be honest at this point and save yourself future grief. Are you willing to work overtime? Nights? Weekends? This is up to you. Be totally honest. What motivates you to do your best on the job? This is a personal trait that only you can say, but good examples are: Challenge, Achievement, Recognition What motivates you to do your best on the job? This is a personal trait that only you can say, but good examples are: Challenge, Achievement, Recognition What would your previous manager say your strongest point is? There are numerous good possibilities: Loyalty, Energy, Positive attitude, Leadership, Team player, Expertise, Initiative, Patience, Hard work, Creativity, Problem solver.

What kind of salary are you asking for? A common loaded question. A tricky little game that you will probably lose if you answer first. So, do not answer it. Instead, say something like, Thats a tough question. Can you tell me the range for this position? In most cases, the interviewer, taken off guard, will tell you. If not, say that it can depend on the details of the job. Then give a wide range. Stay away from a specific job. You cannot win. If you say the job you are contending for is it, you strain credibility. If you say another job is it, you plant the suspicion that you will be dissatisfied with this position if hired. The best is to stay genetic and say something like: A job where I love the work, like the people, can contribute and cant wait to get to work. Do you think you are overqualified for this position? Regardless of your qualifications, state that you are very well qualified for the position. How do you propose to compensate for your lack of experience? First, if you have experience that the interviewer does not know about, bring that up: Then, point out (if true) that you are a hard working quick learner. What qualities do you look for in a Manager? Be generic and positive. Safe qualities are knowledgeable, a sense of humor, fair, loyal to subordinates and holder of high standards. All bosses think they have these traits. Tell me about a time when you helped resolve a dispute between coworkers. Pick a specific incident. Concentrate on your problem solving technique and not the dispute you settled. Describe your work ethic. Emphasize benefits to the company and the hiring manager. Things like, determination to get the job done and work hard but enjoy your work are good.

PRECAUTIONS TO TAKE-UP BEFORE YOU ENTER THE INTERVIEW ROOM


For your first few interviews your background is important - your school, the medium and the place you studied in, all serve to give the interviewer an idea about you. Carry a copy of the bio-data that you have already sent, and the interview letter. Keep the extra copy with you, just in case. Show the interview letter to the receptionist/interviewer to establish your credentials, but keep this letter with you. This gives you, for your future reference, a time and date record of your interview, gives the official address of the company for further correspondence and clarifications, and may give you the name and designation of the person you are to report to. Carry everything you need for the interview in a neat folder - do not have loose papers cascading to the floor because you are desperately hunting for the degree certificate, while the interviewers drum their fingers impatiently. And don't carry your papers in a plastic or cloth shopping bag either: invest in a good folder, plastic or even leather. Incidentally, don't feel shy or hesitant about calling up the office and getting details about location, landmarks/bus routes/other information to help you reach the venue of the interview. Again, if it is not a "mass" interview, where lots of people are being interviewed on the same day, and you do have a genuine difficulty about reaching on the scheduled day/time, many employers will re-schedule if you ask them nicely enough. The reverse is also true: a good impression is created if you take the trouble to inform the interviewer that you can/will not attend the interview. If you are in the same town go and "case the joint" see where the office/interview center is, and how long it will take you to get there. Always arrive at least fifteen minutes before your scheduled time - that gives you time to catch your breath in case you climbed the stairs too fast, allows you to compose yourself and not be too nervous, and

to check out the competition. If the interview is in the offices of the company itself, this also allows you to get a "feel" of the company. See how comfortable you feel, how efficient the interview process is. Says a lot about what the rest of the company is.

Questions To Ask Employers During Interviews


An interview is a two-way street. Ask questions. The employer should provide an opportunity for you to ask questions at or near the end of the interview.

On this page: Tips Samples

Tips 1. Always prepare questions to ask. Having no questions prepared sends the message that you have no independent thought process. 2. Some of your questions may be answered during the course of the interview, before you are offered the opportunity to ask. If so, you can simply state something to the effect that you were interested in knowing about ..., but that was addressed during the interview. You could ask for additional clarification if applicable. 3. Do not ask questions that are clearly answered on the employer's web site and/or in any literature provided by the employer to you in advance. This would simply reveal that you did not prepare for the interview, and you are wasting the employer's time by asking these questions. 4. Never ask about salary and benefits issues until those subjects are raised by the employer. Samples If you are having trouble developing questions, consider the following samples as food for thought. However, don't ask a question if you are not truly interested in the answer; it will be obvious to the employer. 1. What are the company's strengths and weaknesses compared to its competition? 2. How important does upper management consider the function of this department/position? 3. What is the organization's plan for the next five years, and how does this department fit in? 4. Could you explain your organizational structure? 5. How will my leadership responsibilities and performance be measured? By whom? 6. What are the day-to-day responsibilities of this job? 7. Could you describe your company's management style and the type of employee who fits well with it? 8. What are some of the skills and abilities necessary for someone to succeed in this job? 9. What is the company's policy on providing seminars, workshops, and training so employees can keep up their skills or acquire new ones? 10. What particular computer equipment and software do you use? 11. What kind of work can I expect to be doing the first year? 12. What percentage of routine, detailed work will I encounter? 13. How much opportunity is there to see the end result of my efforts? 14. Who will review my performance? How often? 15. How much guidance or assistance is made available to individuals in developing career goals? 16. How much opportunity will I have for decision-making in my first assignment? 17. Can you describe an ideal employee?

18. What is your organization's policy on transfers to other cities?

How To face HR Interview


1. Are your work practices similar or different from ours? (If Experienced) 2. Describe our (products/services). 3. Describe our company for me. 4. Describe our corporate environment for me. 5. Describe your work (methods/processes) in comparison to ours? (If Experienced) 6. Do our competitors do things that we should be doing? 7. Do you have any concerns about working here? 8. Do you have any questions about (our/this) company? 9. Do you know how long we have been in business? 10. Do you know what products we make? 11. How could you have prevented your (judgmental) errors? 12. How do you think our company determines success? 13. How does you present employer communicate with others in your deprtment? (If experienced) 14. Tell me how you found out information about (our/this) company? 15. Tell me what you know about (our/this) company? 16. Was there anything your company could have done to be more successful? 17. What about our company do you like best? 18. What about your present employer (do/did) you like best? 19. What advantages do you think our competitors have over us? 20. What advantages do you think we have over our competitors? 21. What are the greatest challenges that this company faces? 22. What concerns do you have about this company? 23. What direction do you think this company is headed in? 24. What do you dislike about our company? 25. What do you know about (our/this) company? 26. What do you know about (our/this) operation? 27. What do you know about our competitors? 28. What do you know about our customers? 29. What do you know about our products? 30. What do you know about our products or services? 31. What do you know about our stock? 32. What do you know about our web site? 33. What do you know about the way our company (works/operates)? 34. What do you know about this position? 35. What do you think are the challenges facing this company? 36. What do you think are the greatest challenges facing this company in the near future? 37. What do you think it takes to be successful in a company like ours? 38. What do you think it takes to be successful in our company? 39. What do you think the atmosphere here is like? 40. What is the financial stability of your last company? 41. What questions do you have about our organization? 42. What would make someone successful in our business? 43. What is the (best/worst) thing you have heard about (our/this) company? 44. What is the (best/worst) thing you have heard about (our/this) department?

Thank You Letter

Thank you letters can be hard copy typed, handwritten or e-mailed. Hard copies are most formal and are always appropriate after an interview. Handwritten are more personal, and can be appropriate for brief notes to a variety of individuals you may have met during on on-site interview or who may have helped you in other ways. E-mail is appropriate when that has been your means of contact with the person you want to thank, or if your contact has expressed a preference for e-mail, or if you want to send a quick thank-you to be followed up by hard copy. Thank you letters are critical to your job search success, and interviews are not the only occasions to send thank-you and follow-up letters. When to write thankyou letters? A thank-you letter should be written after: 1. An interview; 2. A contact is helpful to you in a telephone conversation or e-mail; 3. Someone provides / sends information to you at your request; 4. A contact was particularly helpful to you at a career fair; 5. Any other contact for which you want to express thanks and develop a good relationship. 6. You visit a contact at their work site; and

Thankyou Letter to Personal Contact 909 Mullai Road Valluvar Nagar, TN 60401 (540) 555-1111 info@prepareinterview.com December 1, 2004 Mr. Sam S Sundar 8 Socker Lane Poorvalley, NA 23219 Dear Mr. Sam: Thank you so much for your time and advice during my visit to your office last week. I very much appreciate your inviting me to visit since this was my first experience seeing the hands-on work which takes place in a design department. I learned a great deal, and hope to share what I learned with members of our student chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers. After January, I will be in contact with you again to explore the possibility of arranging a summer internship with your firm. As I mentioned to you when we met, I had an opportunity to work on an intense, four-day interdisciplinary project judged by faculty in which my team received top honors. I gained valuable teamwork, problem-solving and presentation skills and learned to work effectively with students studying to enter different professions. I believe my skills would make me an asset to an organization like yours which often must produce excellent work under tight time constraints. Thank you again for all your help, and I look forward to talking with you in the coming months. Sincerely, (handwritten signature) Narmadha B. Rajan

49 Common Interview Questions and Answers


Tell me about yourself. The most often asked question in interviews. You need to have a short statement prepared in your mind. Be careful that it does not sound rehearsed. Limit it to work-related items unless instructed otherwise. Talk about things you have done and jobs you have held that relate to the position you are interviewing for. Start with the item farthest back and work up to the present. Do you consider yourself successful? You should always answer yes and briefly explain why. A good explanation is that you have set goals, and you have met some and are on tract to achieve the others. Why did you leave your last job? Stay positive regardless of the circumstances. Never refer to a major problem with management and never speak ill of supervisors, co-workers, or the organization. If you do, you will be the one looking bad. Keep smiling and talk about leaving for a positive reason such as an opportunity, a chance to do something special, or other forward-looking reasons. What experience do you have in this field? Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you do not have specific experience, get as close as you can. What do you know about this organization? This question is one reason to do some research on the organization before the interview. Find out where they have been, and where they are going. What are the current issues, and who are the major players? What have you done to improve your knowledge in the last year? Try to include improvement activities that relate to the job. A wide variety of activities can be mentioned as positive self-improvement. Have some good ones handy to mention. Are you applying for other jobs? Be honest but do not spend a lot of time in this area. Keep the focus on this job and what you can do for this organization. Anything else is a distraction. What do co-workers say about you? Be prepared with a quote or two from co-workers. Either a specific statement or a paraphrase will work. "Jill Clark, a co-worker at Smith Company, always said I was the hardest worker she had ever known." It is as powerful as Jill having said it at the interview herself. Why do you want to work for this organization? This may take some thought and certainly should be based on the research you have done on the organization, Sincerity is extremely important here, and will easily be sensed. Relate it to your longterm career goals. Do you know anyone who works for us? Be aware of the policy on relatives working for the organization. This can affect your answer even though they asked about friends not relatives. Be careful to mention a friend only if they are will thought of. What kind of salary do you need? A loaded question. A nasty little game that you will probably lose if you answer first. So, do not answer it. Instead, say something like, "That's a tough question. Can you tell me the range for this position?"

In most cases, the interviewer, taken off guard, will tell you. If not, say that it can depend on the details of the job. Then give a wide range. Are you a team player? You are, of course, a team player, Be sure to have examples ready. Specifics that show you often perform for the good of the team rather than for yourself are good evidence of your team attitude. Do not brag, just say it in a matter-of-fact tone. This is a key point. How long would you expect to work for us if hired? Specifics here are not good. Something like this should work: "I'd like it to be a long time." Or "As long as we both feel I'm doing a good job." Have you ever had to fire anyone? How did you feel about that? This is serious. Do not make light of it or in any way seem like you like to fire people. At the same time, you will do it when it is the right thing to do. When it comes to the organization versus the individual who has created a harmful situation, you will protect the organization. Remember firing is not the same as layoff or reduction in force. What is your philosophy towards work? The interviewer is not looking for a long or flowery dissertation here. Do you have strong feelings that the job gets done? Yes. That's the type of answer that works best here. Short and positive, showing a benefit to the organization. If you had enough money to retire right now, would you? Answer yes if you would, But since you need to work, this is the type of work you prefer. Do not say yes if you do not mean it. Have you ever been asked to leave a position? If you have not, say no. If you have, be honest, brief, and avoid saying negative things about the people or organization involved. Explain how you would be an asset to this organization. You should be anxious for this question. It gives you a chance to highlight your best points as they relate to the position being discussed. Give a little advance thought to this relationship. Why should we hire your? Point out how your assets meet what the organization needs. Do not mention any other candidates to make a comparison. Tell me about a suggestion you have made. Have a good one ready. Be sure and use a suggestion that was accepted and was then considered successful. One related to the type of work applied for is a real plus. What irritates you about co-workers? This a trap question. Think "real hard" but fail to come up with anything that irritates you. A short statement that you seem to get along with folks is great. What are your greatest weaknesses? Assure the interviewer that you can think of nothing that would stand in the way of your performing in this position with excellence. Then, quickly review you strongest qualifications. Example: "Nobody's perfect, but based on what you've told me about this position, I believe I' d make an outstanding match. I know that when I hire people, I look for two things most of all. Do they have

the qualifications to do the job well, and the motivation to do it well? Everything in my background shows I have both the qualifications and a strong desire to achieve excellence in whatever I take on. So I can say in all honesty that I see nothing that would cause you even a small concern about my ability or my strong desire to perform this job with excellence." Alternate strategy (if you don't yet know enough about the position to talk about such a perfect fit): Instead of confessing a weakness, describe what you like most and like least, making sure that what you like most matches up with the most important qualification for success in the position, and what you like least is not essential. Example: Let's say you're applying for a teaching position. "If given a choice, I like to spend as much time as possible in front of my prospects selling, as opposed to shuffling paperwork back at the office. Of course, I long ago learned the importance of filing paperwork properly, and I do it conscientiously. But what I really love to do is sell (if your interviewer were a sales manager, this should be music to his ears.) What is your greatest strength? Numerous answers are good, just stay positive. A few good examples: your ability to prioritize. You know that your key strategy is to first uncover your interviewer's greatest wants and needs before you answer questions. Prior to any interview, you should have a list mentally prepared of your greatest strengths. You should also have, a specific example or two, which illustrates each strength, an example chosen from your most recent and most impressive achievements. As a general guideline, the 10 most desirable traits that all employers love to see in their employees are: Your problem-solving skills. Your ability to work under pressure. Your ability to focus on projects. Your professional expertise. Your leadership skills. Your positive attitude. Tell me about your dream job. Definiteness of purpose...clear goals. Enthusiasm...high level of motivation. Likeability...positive attitude...sense of humor. Stay away from a specific job. You cannot win. If you say the job you are contending for is it, you strain credibility. If you say another job is it, you plant the suspicion that you will be dissatisfied with this position if hired. The best bet is to stay generic and say something like: "A job where I love the work, like the people, can contribute, and can't wait to get to work." Why do you think you would do well at this job? Give several reasons and include skills, experience, and interest. What are you looking for in a job? Stay away from a specific job. You cannot win. If you say the job you are contending for is it, you strain credibility. If you say another job is it, you plant the suspicion that you will be dissatisfied with this position if hired. The best bet is to stay generic and say something like: "A job where I love the work, like the people, can contribute, and can't wait to get to work." What kind of person would you refuse to work with?

Do not be trivial, It would take disloyalty to the organization, violence or lawbreaking to get you to object. Minor objections will label you as a whiner. What is more important to you: the money or the work? Money is always important, but the work is the most important. There is not better answer. What would your previous supervisor say your strongest point is? Loyalty Energy Positive attitude Leadership Team Player Expertise Initiative Patience Hard Work Creativity Problem solver Tell me about a problem you had with a supervisor. Biggest trap of all. This is a test to see if you will speak ill of your boss. If you fall for it and tell about a problem with a former boss, you may well blow the interview right there. Stay positive and develop a poor memory about any trouble with a superior. What has disappointed you about a job? Don't get trivial or negative. Safe areas are few but can include. Not enough of a challenge. You were laid off in a reduction. Company did not win a contract, which would have given you more responsibility. Tell me about your ability to work under pressure. You may say that you thrive under certain types of pressure. Give an example that relates to the type of position applied for. Do your skills match this job or another job more closely? Probably this one. Do not give fuel to the suspicion that you may want another job more than this one. What motivates you to do your best on the job? This is a personal trait that only you can say, but good examples are: Challenge Achievement Recognition How would you know you were successful on this job? Several ways are good measures: You Set high standards for yourself and meet them. Your outcomes are a success. Your boss tells you that you are successful. Would you be willing to relocate if required? You should be clear on this with your family prior to the interview if you think there is a chance it may come up. Do not say yes just to get the job if the real answer is no. This can create a lot of problems later on in your career. Be honest at this point and save yourself future grief.

Describe your management style. Try to avoid labels. Some of the more common labels, like "progressive", "Salesman" or "Consensus", can have several meanings or descriptions depending on which management expert you listen to. The "situational" style is safe, because it says you will manage according to the situation, instead of "one size fits all." Do you have any blind spots? Trick question, if you know about blind spots, they are no longer blind spots. Do not reveal any personal areas of concern here. Let them do their own discovery on your bad points. Do not hand it to them. How do you propose to compensate for your lack of experience? First, if you have experience that the interviewer does not know about, bring that up. Then, point out (if true) that you are a hard working quick learner. What qualities do you look for in a boss? Be generic and positive, safe qualities are knowledgeable, a sense of humor, fair, loyal to subordinates, and holder of high standards. All bosses think they have these traits. Describe a bad decision you made. The major pitfall that interviewee's often exhibit with this question is that they make the "bad decision"something they did when they were ten years old. The idea here is not to avoid the question. Pick something from the relevant past. We all make mistakes and a hallmark of honesty is admitting that and a hallmark of self-awareness is being able to recognize when we made those mistakes. Do not put your mistake so far back in the past that you are obviously picking something that is "harmless" but if you feel the need to do this, you might say something like, "Well, I have more current answers but I have one from my past that really stuck with me." If you go that route, then explain why that decision "stuck with you" and, more importantly, how it is has guided your actions in other areas so as to not make that kind of bad decision again. The real point here, for the candidate, is to turn this into a "lesson learned" answer. State your bad decision, make it clear why you perceive this was a bad decision, and then talk about what you learned from that. Describe your work ethic. Emphasize benefits to the organization. Things like, "determination to get the job done" and "work hard but enjoy your work" are good. Do you have any questions for me? Always have some questions prepared. Questions involving areas where you will be an asset to the organization are good. "How soon will I be able to be productive?" and "What type of projects will I be able to assist on?" are examples.