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Quick Reads about Chemistry
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Popular Science
4 min read
Science

Peeing In The Pool Is Actually Really Bad For You

Chances are, there's a lot of urine in this pool. Flickr via Wade Morgen Everyone pees in the pool. That’s the safe and well-informed assumption that many chemists studying the safety of public, chlorinated swimming pools make. But let’s face it: once you jump in the pool and smell and feel the chlorine surrounding you, you quickly forget about any potential pool-peers and trust the power of the chemicals in the water. That’s probably not the best idea, though. The chemical byproducts that result from your urine and the chlorine aren’t as benign as you may think. And in the end, everyone would
The Atlantic
4 min read

The Mussels That Eat Oil

In 2004, a team of geologists discovered something extraordinary while exploring the Gulf of Mexico. They were searching for sites where oil and gas seep out of the ocean floor, but instead, two miles below the ocean’s surface, they found a field of dormant black volcanoes. And unlike typical volcanoes that spew out molten rock, these had once belched asphalt. They looked like they had been fashioned from the same stuff used to pave highways, because that’s exactly what they were. The team named one of them Chapapote after the Aztec word for “tar.” Even if the volcanoes aren’t erupting any lon
Popular Science
3 min read
Science

These All-natural Microbeads Could Replace Your Horrible Face Scrubs

Traditional microbeads are bits of plastic so small that it would take hundreds of them to cover a penny. 5Gyres, courtesy of Oregon State University Microbeads are tiny balls of plastic whose alleged powers of exfoliation have made them a mainstay of cosmetics ranging from facial cleanser to toothpastes. But in recent years, their distinct downside—they pollute aquatic ecosystems—has led to them being phased out. Now, according to a new study in the journal *ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering scientists and engineers from the University of Bath may have come up with a viable alternativ