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Quick Reads about Physics & Mathematics
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NPR
2 min read
Science

Maryam Mirzakhani, Prize-Winning Mathematician, Dies At 40

Nearly three years after she became the first woman to win math's equivalent of a Nobel Prize, Maryam Mirzakhani has died of breast cancer at age 40. Her death was confirmed Saturday by Stanford University, where Mirzakhani had been a professor since 2008. Mirzakhani is survived by her husband, Jan Vondrák, and a daughter, Anahita — who once referred to her mother's work as "painting" because of the doodles and drawings that marked her process of working on proofs and problems, according to an obituary released by Stanford. "A light was turned off today .... far too soon. Breaks my heart," for
Newsweek
2 min read
Science

Soccer Players Act Like Turbulent Particles, Study Says

New research shows the way soccer players move about the field bears similarities to the manner in which particles behave under the chaotic conditions of turbulence. This discovery is one of the many made in an effort to better understand turbulence, which is a surprisingly active and pressing field. More than half a millennium after Leonardo Da Vinci first coined the term, in 1507, physicists still don’t have a complete understanding of what goes on under conditions of turbulence, and no equation exists to accurately describe the phenomenon. That matters greatly, because turbulence is one of
Nautilus
17 min read
Science

Chaos Makes the Multiverse Unnecessary: Science predicts only the predictable, ignoring most of our chaotic universe.

Scientists look around the universe and see amazing structure. There are objects and processes of fantastic complexity. Every action in our universe follows exact laws of nature that are perfectly expressed in a mathematical language. These laws of nature appear fine-tuned to bring about life, and in particular, intelligent life. What exactly are these laws of nature and how do we find them? The universe is so structured and orderly that we compare it to the most complicated and exact contraptions of the age. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the universe was compared to a perfectly working cloc