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211: Medical School For International Students and More Q&A: Session 211 In this episode, Ryan answers a few questions that came in through voicemail, Facebook, and email. If you have any questions, go to www.medicalschoolhq.net and fill out the Feedback box. Ryan tackles some topics about international...

211: Medical School For International Students and More Q&A: Session 211 In this episode, Ryan answers a few questions that came in through voicemail, Facebook, and email. If you have any questions, go to www.medicalschoolhq.net and fill out the Feedback box. Ryan tackles some topics about international...

A partir deThe Premed Years


211: Medical School For International Students and More Q&A: Session 211 In this episode, Ryan answers a few questions that came in through voicemail, Facebook, and email. If you have any questions, go to www.medicalschoolhq.net and fill out the Feedback box. Ryan tackles some topics about international...

A partir deThe Premed Years

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Comprimento:
27 minutos
Lançado em:
Dec 7, 2016
Formato:
Episódio de podcast

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Session 211 In this episode, Ryan answers a few questions that came in through voicemail, Facebook, and email. If you have any questions, go to www.medicalschoolhq.net and fill out the Feedback box. Ryan tackles some topics about international students, choosing between multiples acceptances, choosing the best undergrad premed school, and more. Q: Is it true that it's harder for international students to be accepted into American medical colleges? Could you suggest a few schools that I'm most likely to be accepted into? A: As an international student and you're going to an undergrad university here in the U.S., you are still considered as an international student when you apply to medical school. If you're here on a visa, you're considered an international student. When applying to medical school as an international student, it is very hard for you to get into a U.S. school as an international student for these reasons: There are lots of US applicants applying to US school. Public schools are funded by their states to train students that hopefully stay in the state and work. International students don't have access to government loans going to medical school which is expensive. Understand that a lot of medical school will ask for really big deposit if they do accept you as an international student. However, there are medical schools (ex.Ivy League schools) that have the ability to loan you money to pay for school or get a scholarship. Why admissions committees don't like taking international students: There is no guarantee of a visa to work as a resident so they don't want to risk the idea of you going to school and not being able to work. Where should you go: MSAR - tells you data on applicants to each of the medical schools to get an idea of which schools are international students-friendly College Information Book Q: Can you still work as a physician and get involved in healthcare policy? A: As a physician, you can do whatever you want, see patients part-time, research part-time, and run a business part-time, and that includes getting involved in policy. It would help to get involved in policy in areas where there are a lot of policy makers involved such as the DC area or near your state capital because that's where lobbying happens. Q: How do you choose between multiple acceptances? School #1: Well-established and good reputation but couldn't picture living in a city it's in and too large class sizes. School #2: Located to a state where she's from and where she wants to be and near a good city. School #3: A lot closer to where she is; loved the interview and comfortable interacting with everybody but it's a newer school and worried how it would affect her residency applications. A: Go to the medical school that is going to give you the best ability to be who you want to be. If you don't want to be in a large class, then that rules out the first school even if it's well-established. If you can't see yourself in that city, then don't go there. If you're unhappy there, your grades may suffer as well as your general happiness so you might not do well. You can't choose the medical school based on what you think is going to be a determining factor for the residency program director because you have no control over it. What you have control over is understanding who you are, knowing what is going to make you happy, and choosing to follow that direction. So go to the school that is going to make you the happiest and where you can see yourself going there. Q: What to say when asked about your strength and weakness? A: When talking about your strengths and weaknesses on your interviews, don't say something that is your strength and then turn around and say it's your weakness too. When asked about your greatest strength, tell a story about what that looks like and move one. The same thing with your weakness. Tell a story about what it looks like and how you're working on fixing that weakness so that it won't be a problem moving
Lançado em:
Dec 7, 2016
Formato:
Episódio de podcast