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Pearl Academy of Fashion / Morphogenesis

Introduction:
Architects: Morphogenesis Location: Jaipur, India Client: Pearl Academy of Fashion HVAC: Design Centre Project area: 11,745 sqm Project year: 2008
The architecture of the academy is a confluence of modern adaptations of traditional Indo-Islamic architectural elements and passive cooling strategies prevalent in the hot-dry desert climate of Rajasthan such as open courtyards, water body, a step-well or baoli and jaalis.

Climate and Location:


The institute is located in a typical hot, dry, desert type climate on the outskirts of Jaipur in the soulless Kukas industrial area, about 20 kilometres from the famous walled city.

Address: SP-38A, RIICO Industrial Area, Delhi Road, Kukas,


Jaipur-302028.

ARCHITECTS INTENT & RESTRAIN:


The idea was to create a low-cost, environmentally sensitive unique campus. Architects were restrained to complete the building budget to within a tight budget of about 29$ per square foot inclusive of the building, landscape, interiors, furniture etc. This was done by eliminating HVAC & deploying such as the use of local materials, techniques etc.

FORM:

ZONING

PUBLIC AUDITORIUM RECEPTION

SEMI PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE STAIRS

PRIVATE CLASS ROOMS LABS RESEARCH CENTER LECTURE HALLS LIBRARY

PROXIMITY CHART

ADJACENT IMMEDIATELY ADJACENT FAR

COLUMN PLAN:

SECTION OF THE UNDERBELLY:

THE UNDERBELLY:

GROUND FLOOR PLAN:

PASSIVE COOLING CONTROL METHODS:


Morphogenesis was able to develop two passive-cooling control methods to keep the work spaces and courtyards cool at 27 degrees Celsius even when it is 47 degrees Celsius outside. First, the entire building is elevated off the ground, sucking air in around the edges of the building which is eventually released up through the open-air courtyards. A large stepped well in the centre of the building also plays a role in lowering the temperature of the air as it enters under the belly of the building. Fed by recycled water from the on-site sewage treatment plant, the well creates a cooler microclimate through evaporation.

JAALI:
The building is protected from the environment by a double skin which is derived from a traditional building element called the Jaali which is prevalent in Rajasthan architecture. The double skin acts as a thermal buffer between the building and the surroundings. The density of the perforated outer skin has been derived using computational shadow analysis based on orientation of the faades.

The outer skin sits 4 feet away from the building and reduces the direct heat gain through fenestrations. Drip channels running along the inner face of the Jaali allow for passive downdraft evaporative cooling, thus reducing the incident wind temperature.

STEP WELLS:
The scooped-out, shaded underbelly forms a natural thermal sink by way of a water body called a step well. This under belly which is thermally banked on all sides serves as a large student recreation and exhibition zone and forms the anchor for the entire project. During the night when the desert temperature drops this floor slowly dissipates the heat to the surroundings keeping the area thermally comfortable.

COURTYARD:
The traditional courtyards take on amorphous shapes within the regulated form of the cloister-like periphery. This curvilinear geometry is generated through a computerized shadow analysis that tracks the precise movement of the sun through the day and across the seasons. Open courtyards allow sufficient day lighting inside studios and classrooms. The self-shading courts on the internal areas help to control the temperature of internal spaces

INTERIOR DESIGN:
The site-excavated - two stories of classrooms, studios and offices that are raised above this void. The inner, amorphous-shaped courtyards provide ample daylight to classrooms and studio space, reducing the need for artificial light. Open and glass-walled walkways surround these undulating blocks, which define openings to the lower level The second storey projects out above the first level and both are clad in non-uniform panels attached to a metal frame.

ROOFS:
Roof receives significant solar radiation and plays an important role in heat gain/losses day lighting and ventilation. Hence the entire roof surface is covered with inverted earthen pots. it is also an insulating cover of still air over the roof.

MATERIALS:
The materials used for construction are a mix of local stone, steel, glass, and concrete chosen keeping in mind the climatic needs of the region while retaining the progressive design intent.

INTERESTING FEATURES OF THE BUILDING:


The Pearl Academy of Fashion, Jaipur by virtue of its design is geared towards creating an environmentally responsive passive habitat. The institute creates interactive spaces for a highly creative student body to work in multifunctional zones which blend the indoors with the outdoors seamlessly. The radical architecture of the institute emerges from a fusion of the rich traditional building knowledge bank and cutting edge contemporary architecture. incorporating various passive climate control methods becomes a necessity and also reduces the dependence on mechanical environmental control measures Energy efficiency is a prime concern and the institute is 100% self sufficient in terms of captive power and water supply and promotes rain water harvesting and waste water re-cycling through the use of a sewage treatment plant.

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