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Normocytic Anemia's

Normocytic anemias
Normocytic anemias are classified as
anemias with a mean (average) corpuscular
volume (RBC volume), decreased
heamatocrit and hemoglobin levels
These types of anemias are typical found in
elderly patients (85yrs and older) but can
be seen in ages as early as 44yrs.
The prevalence of these anemias increases
with age and can be found predominately in
males

Causes

Malnutrition
Malabsorption
Poor dieting
Mixture of macro and microcytic
anemia

B2 Deficiency
(ariboflavinosis)
Dietary deficiency of riboflavin (ariboflavinosis) is
characterized by sore throat
cheilosis (lesions on the lips)
angular stomatitis (lesions on the angles of the mouth)
glossitis: fissured and bright pink colored tongue)
normocytic, normochromic anemia
Severe riboflavin deficiency may affect the conversion
of vitamin B6 to its coenzyme, as well as conversion of
tryptophan to niacin.
Concentrations <1 mcg/L are considered significantly
diminished

Know your symptoms b2 defficiency

Treatment
measurement of urinary riboflavin can be used to
confirm riboflavin deficiency.
Treatment generally involves oral riboflavin
supplements
a dosage of 2 to 10 mg is to be administered 3 times
daily until symptoms improve
The dosage is reduced to 2 to 4 mg once daily until
you completely recover.
Failure of oral supplements are can be compensated
for via riboflavin injections.
higher doses are recommended for pregnant and
lactating women.

Types of Normocytic
anemias (NA)
Anemia of Chronic Disease
Aplastic anemia
Anemia resulting form sickle cell
disease (not SC anemia)
B2 deficiency anemia
B6 deficiency anemia

Aplastic Anemia (AA)


Causes:
Damage to the stem cells in bone marrow, which are responsible for
making red blood cells (RBCs), White Blood cells (WBCs) and platelets
(plats)
AA is generally an acquired disorder. However, some hereditary
diseases such as Fanconi anemia and other congenital disorders may
cause AA.
Acquired causes:
Exposure to toxins: Pesticides and arsenic (farmers at risk)
Radiation: chemotherapy patients. (cancer patients at risk)
administration of chloramphenicol (an antibiotic rarely used in the
US)
HIV patients and autoimmune disease patients are also at risk
Pregnancy (temporarily)

Aplastic Anemia (AA)


Signs and symptoms:
RBC:

Fatigue
Shortness of breath
Dizziness
Cold sensation in hands and feet

WBC:
Fever
Frequent infection
PLTS:
Bleeding gums
Easily bruised, easy to bleed
Abnormally long bleeding
Heavy menstruate
Nose bleeds

Aplastic Anemia (AA)


Treatment:
Isolating the cause is the primary focus for
treatment.

Physical examination
History
Blood count
etc

Known treatments include:


Blood transfusion
Bone marrow stem cell transplant (curative
depending on the cause).

Aplastic anemia

REFERENCES
National Center for Biotechnology
Information, . ( 2014, June 11).Aplastic
Anemia.Retrieved March 9, 2015, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealt
h/PMH0062936
Brill JR, Baumgardner DJ (2000,
November).Normocytic anemia.Retrieved
March 9, 2015, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1112
6852

REFERENCES
Elson M. Haas, M.D (2006).Treatment for a Riboflavin
Deficiency.Retrieved March 11, 2015, from
http://www.livestrong.com/article/427637-treatment-for-ariboflavin-deficiency/
Mayo Clinic. (N/A). Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Plasma. Retrieved
March 11, 2015, from
http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/testcatalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/61637
Larry E. Johnson, MD, PhD
(2014,October ).Riboflavin.Retrieved March 11, 2015, from
http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional_disorde
rs/vitamin_deficiency_dependency_and_toxicity/riboflavin.htmlSee more at: http://reffor.us/index.php#sthash.cnpQM46v.dpuf