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Advanced Professional

Communication
COMM 6019-05 W2016
Professor Kari Townsend
Module 3 Week 3
Topics: Memos (review), Business emails
(review) and letters, Direct structure
(review) and Indirect structure,
Summarizing, paraphrasing and quoting
sources, Email and Letter Assignment
Reminder, Due Dates for Research proposal
and Research report, Grammar and English
language help

MEMOS, LETTERS and


EMAIL

Review: Memos
In-house
communications

Format: Memo Header


TO:
CC:
FROM:
DATE:
SUBJECT:

Mike Smith
Jane Doe
Arthur Billings AB
October 11, 2012
Memos

See Figure 7.3, page 151

Margins
Standard default it 1 all around
Some have 1.25 for left margin and 1 for
the rest
Can alter to fit the memo on one page

Justification
Left justify and ragged right as illustrated:
At vero eos et accusam et justo duo
dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd
gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Consetetur
sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod
tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna
aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua

Paragraph Indentations
Generally not indented:
Consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam
nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et
dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam
voluptua.
At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores
et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no
sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor
sit amet.

Line Spacing, Style, and Type


Line Spacing: Single-space, leaving one line
between paragraphs
Font: Times New Roman or Arial are
standard
Type Size: Generally, 12 point type size, but
no smaller than 10 and no larger than 14

Paper
8.5 x 11 standard office paper
White or corporate stationary
Designated colour code for some
organizations

Continuation page
Name (to)

Page

date

Consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam


nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore
et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam
voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo
duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd
gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est.

Ending
Memos are not signed (i.e. no yours truly,
John Doe or yours sincerely, Lee Wong)

Did you know?


To use alphabetical lists when there
is more than one specific primary
audience
TO: Bob Brown, Ted Green and Susan Scott
To copy (CC) secondary audiences
TO:
Bob Brown, Assistant Manager
CC:
Linda Richards, Personnel Officer
That memos are usually initialed
From: Betty Grant

BG

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

CHAPTER 7
Business
Letters pg.
Emails

Memos

149

pg. 150

pg. 151

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

REGARDING SPACING

NOTE: in Word click on No Spacing


for formatting Memos & Letters
NOT Normal or addresses, etc will
appear double-spaced (not professional)

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Review: Letters and


Memos

Letters messages to
people outside your
organization
Memos messages to people
within your organization

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO1

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

REMEMBER TO ASK YOURSELF FIVE


QUESTIONS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

see Adapting Message to Audience, page


48

Whats at stake to whom?


Should you send the message?
What channel should you use?
What should you say?
How should you say it?

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

Recap: Analyzing and


Anticipating:
Audience, Purpose

Copyright 2013 Nelson Education Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

3 TYPES OF MESSAGES
1.ROUTINE MESSAGES
Informative and Positive
Messages
2.NEGATIVE MESSAGES
3.PERSUASIVE & SALES MESSAGES
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

1. ROUTINE MESSAGES
(Chpt. 7)

BUSINESS
NOW7)
1.
ROUTINECOMMUNICATION
MESSAGES (Chpt

Think/pair/share:
What is a routine message?
Give examples.
Positive answers
Confirmations
To requests

Routine requests
and orders
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

The Direct Structure

Ideas
Into
Patterns
:
Direct
for
Receptiv
e
Audience
s
Copyright 2013 by Nelson Education Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Direct Pattern
Use the direct pattern when you
expect the reader to be pleased,
mildly interested, or, at worst,
neutral. Put your main point the
purpose of your message in the
first or second sentence.
The direct pattern saves the
readers time, sets a proper frame
of mind, reduces frustration by
frontloading the main idea.
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Informative and
Positive
Messages
Informative message
Explain or tell readers something
Readers reaction is neutral

Positive message
Readers reaction is positive (good
news!)

Both build good relationships between


writer and reader.
Neither message asks the reader to do
anything.
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO1

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW


Direct Pattern for
Routine Messages
1. summarize main point
2. Provide the
clarification, details,
and background
3. Present negatives (if
any) as positively as
possible
4. Explain reader benefits
5. Use a forward looking,
positive, and personal
closing statement
*
Has YOU Attitude!
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO3

Main Point
Details
Negatives
Benefits
Goodwill Close

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

A Look at 8 Types
of Routine Messages p

LO6

159-

165

1. Summaries
2. Confirmation
s
3. Fact Sheets
4. News Release
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

5.Thank You
6.Congratulat
ions
7.Adjustments
8.Complaints

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Routine Messages 1.
Summaries

To summarize a
conversation:
People present, Topic,
Decisions, Actions

To summarize a document:
Start with main point
Give supporting
evidence or details
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO6

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO6

Routine Messages 1. Summaries


continued

To summarize a visit with a


client:
1.

Give main point in companys point of vi

2.

Provide umbrella paragraph list points

3.

Cover each point / support conclusions

4.

Use lists/headings to clarify structure

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Routine Messages
continued:

2. Confirmations -

Keep short,
giving only the information spoken earlier;
at start, note its a confirmation

3. Fact Sheets -

Organized in
various ways (depending on purpose,
audience
and topic):
Question and answer
Who, what, where, when,
why, and how
Step by step
Chronologically

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO6

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Routine Messages
continued:
News Release - Answers Who, What,

LO6

4. News Release

Where, When, Why, How (announcements, product


recalls, promotions, etc.); use a well-chosen
attention-grabbing headline and lead paragraph

5. Thank You Notes

Short, prompt,

sincere

6. Congratulatory Notes

Specific,

sincere, builds trust

7. Adjustments

Grant adjustment in
first sentence; dont discus how/why decision
made; give reason for mistake ONLY if it makes
your organization look better

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Routine Messages 8.
Complaints
Because:
Dont:
Use were
busy
Say no
Say we cant
Say its our
policy

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

Focuses on you
instead of customer
when can you attend to
customer?
Is inflammatory
offer alternatives
Is inflammatory
what can you offer?
Focuses on you what
alternatives are
there?

LO6

2. NEGATIVE MESSAGES
(Chpt. 8)

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO1

Think/pair/share:
How do you react to negative messages?
Examples:

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

The Indirect Structure

Grouping
Ideas
Into
Patterns
:
Indirect
for
Unrecept
ive
Audience
s
Copyright 2013 by Nelson Education Ltd.

Indirect Pattern
When you expect the audience to be
uninterested, unwilling, displeased, or
perhaps even hostile, the indirect pattern
is more appropriate. In this pattern, you
dont reveal the main idea until after you
have offered explanation or evidence. This
approach works well for bad news,
persuasion, and sensitive news. The
indirect pattern has these three benefits:
1.Respects the feelings of the audience
2.Facilitates a fair hearing
3.Minimizes a negative reaction

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Negative Messages
Primary
Purpose
To give reader bad news

LO1

To have receiver read,


understand, and accept message
To maintain readers goodwill

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Parts of a
Negative
Message

Buffer
Reasons
Negatives
Alternatives

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

Goodwill Ending

LO3

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO3

Neutral or positive statement


Buffer
Prepares reader for negative news
(eg. state facts or give history of events)
Use a buffer when:
Reader values harmony
Buffer serves another purpose (eg. states a
general principle)

Reasons

Clear, convincing reasons should precede


negative news:
To prepare reader for refusal/negative news
To help reader accept refusal/negative news
Avoid saying you cant do something
Dont hide behind policy

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO3

Negatives

Put negative message with reason to


de-emphasize
Imply dont state refusal if
you can
Make it crystal clear
Make it the last message on the
subject

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO3

Offers ways to get what reader


wants
Alternatives
Shows you care about readers needs
Returns readers psychological freedom
(freedom of choice)
Allows you to end on positive note

Goodwill Ending

If there is a good alternative refer to


it in ending:
Please let me know if you wish to pursue
this option.
The best endings look to the future

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO4

Negative Messages - TONE


Check carefully for
positive emphasis and you
focus
Show requests/negative news
is taken seriously
Consider the appearance and
timing of message
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Tone
Avoid:
Im afraid were
unable
Im sorry we are
unable
Im sure you will
agree
Unfortunately

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO4

continued

Because:
Youre not
afraid, empty
phrase
You probably can,
if youre sorry
change the policy
Dont read the
readers mind
Negative

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
COMMUNICATION NOW
NOW
BUSINESS
LO5

Think/pair/share:
When do you think it is important
for organizations to apologize?
Give an example of a recent
experience you had with an
organization where you received or
felt you deserved an apology.
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

To Apologize or Not
WARNING!!! Do not apologize in the form of
taking blame unless you have first obtained
permission from your organizations legal
counsel and/or communications group. This is
VITAL because acknowledging blame on behalf of
the organization could have serious legal
repercussions for the company and/or you!
If you apologize

Follow EXACTLY the script you have been given by


legal group or communications team
Be sincere
Be brief
Avoid being negative
Explain how errors
will be corrected

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO5

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO6

Varieties of Negative Messages


Refusals/Rejections
To an external audience

Try to use a buffer


Be specific
Phrase refusal indirectly; de-emphasize
Give alternative if any
Be sure the reason cant backfire in
another context

To an internal audience
Use knowledge of culture, individual to
craft reply
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

3. Review: SALES &


PERSUASIVE MESSAGES
(Chpt. 9)

BUSINESS
COMMUNICATION
3. SALES
& PERSUATIONNOW
MESSAGES

Think/pair/share:
Are you more easily persuaded by:
1.An appeal to your values and
beliefs (Pathos)
2.An appeal to your logic (Logos)
3.The credibility of the
speaker/message (Ethos)
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO1

Purpose of Persuasive
Messages

Several primary purposes:

To motivate reader to read the


Message
To have reader act
To provide complete information
so reader knows what to do
To overcome objections that may
prevent or delay action
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Analyzing a Persuasive
Situation

LO1

1.What do you want people to do?


2.Anticipate any objections your
audience could make.
3.Determine the strength of your
case.
4.Determine the type of
persuasion best for the
organizations culture.
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Persuasion & Direct


Requests

Use a direct request when:


When reader will do what you ask
without resistance

Simply asks for what is needed


Dont include reader benefits
Dont try to overcome objections

Be direct and clear about what


you want
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO2

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO2

Persuasion & Indirect


(Problem-solving) Requests
Use indirect requests
when:
When audience may resist
doing what you ask
When decision will be
based more on logic than
emotion
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO2

Pattern for an Indirect


Request

1. Find common ground to get readers


attention and create interest
2. Define the problem you share with
reader (that the request will solve)
3. Explain the solution to the problem
4. Show that advantages outweigh negatives
5. Summarize additional benefits of the
solution and build emotional appeal
6. Ask for the action you want and
motivate the action

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO2

Showing Positives Outweigh


Negatives

Strategies:

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Tone in Persuasive
Messages

Depends on your relationship


with the reader
Avoid parental or preachy
messages

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO2

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Tone in Persuasive
Messages continued

LO2

Tone down requests to superiors


Show youre not taking yes
for granted

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Tone in Persuasive
Messages
continued
careful of tone in email messages

Be
Subject line should be clear you are
asking for something

Dont use email for requests requiring


changes in culture, values, or
lifestyle. These are major requests
and require a different channel
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO2

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Organizing Sales Messages


AIDA
Gain Attention
Create Interest
Build Desire
Motivate Action
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO3

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO3

Gain Attention

Create Interest

provocative headline
startling statements
Facts
audience benefit
Compliment
Quotation
Question
summary of
problem/action
Stories
point of agreement

supporting
argument in
concrete and
specific terms
facts, figures,
examples, experts
underline
benefits
appeal to
fairness

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO3

Build Desire

Motivate Action

while reducing
resistance
imagine and
anticipate
scenarios
underline
credibility
cite testimonials
and test results.

reinforce
benefits
ask for specific
response
give deadlines
linked to
incentives.

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Strategy in Sales
Letters

Basic strategy satisfy need


Make offer early in letter
exact price later
To make price palatable:
Link price to benefit
Show cost per day/month/year
Allow credit

Offer guarantee
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO4

Recall The Power of Persuasion:


The Don Draper Approach to the
Direct Sales Pitch

http://www.criticalmediaproject.org/cm
l/media/mad-men-don-draper-salespitch/

Recall: Secrets from the


Science of Persuasion

http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=cFdCzN7RYbw

LO6

APA Citation

See Chpt. 10, Figures 10.9 (p. 241), 10.10


and 10.11 (pp. 242-244)

Attributing an idea, concept, or fact


to its source in the body of your
report

Dont forgetthe Fanshawe Librarians are


here to help!

Go Here First

Go Here Next!

https://exowa.fanshawec.ca/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?
URL=http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

LO6

Citations - Benefits
Gives credit for intellectual debts
Reinforces and supports your line of
argument
Adds credibility of supporting
authorities
Protects your reputation and reassures
readers of your honesty
Gives readers access to further
sources on a particular topic
Shows honesty

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

LO6

Differences: Quoting,
Paraphrasing & Summarizing
Quoting
The sources expression is especially effective, vivid,
or original.
The source depends on specialized or technical terms.
You want to dispute the terms of the sources argument.
Integrate quotes into your own grammar or argument
Must cite

Paraphrasing

Rephrasing an argument/information in your words


following the same structure as the source
Must cite

Summarizing

Condensing the sources information/arguments in your


own words
Use when you want to give the main idea without details

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW

Citing - Tips
No need to cite
Common knowledge
Your own observations
Common knowledge dates
Familiar sayings
Proverbial sayings

When in doubt, CITE!


Bibliography means works cited
AND works consulted
2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

LO6

APA Documentation
in Business
Research Reports

http://blog.efpsa.org

First, what is the


difference between MLA
and APA?
MLA = Modern Languages Association
Generally used in English Literature
Essays

APA = American Psychological


Association
Generally used in Business, Sciences,
more technical writing
APA is required citation style for
all COMM courses

Why bother?
The Unexciting Reasons for
Documentation:
o It makes research easier and faster if you have
to return to a source everything is
consistent.
o It prevents you from duplicating your research.
o It gives others confidence in your research
you went out and found credible sources.
o It shows you did not plagiarize! Woohoo!
o You have to for this assignmentand others in
your future educational career paths.

Things to Remember #1
References page
List entries alphabetically by the last name
of the author (the first author, if there
are multiple authors
listed).
Environmental
Awareness 9
References
Bourette, S. (2002, March). Planespotting.
Shift. Retrieved March
14, 2005, from
Http://www.shift.com/content /10.1/53/1.html
Patterson, K. (2000). The water in between: A
journey at sea. Toronto: Vintage.
Spearing, M. (2004, February). APA format.
Library & information science: Citation guides
for electronic documents. Retrieved October
31, 2010, from http://www.ifla.org/I/
training/citation/citing.htm

APA: Website
Spearing, M. (2004, February). APA format.
Library & information science: Citation
guides for electronic documents. Retrieved
October 31, 2010, from http://
www.ifla.org/I/training/citation/citing.htm
Last Name, First Initial. (Date the site
was last updated). Page name. Website
title. Retrieved Date you looked at the
site, from URL

APA: Article in an
Online Journal

Bourette, S. (2002, March).


Planespotting. Shift. Retrieved March 14,
2005, from
http://www.shift.com/content/10.1/53/1.
html

Last Name, First Initial. (Date of


publication,
Month of publication).
Article name. Publication title.
Retrieved Date you looked at the
source, from URL

APA: Book
Patterson, K. (2000). The water
in between: A journey at sea.
Toronto: Vintage.

Last Name, First Initial. (Date


of Publication).
Book title:
Subtitle. Publisher Location:
Publisher.

APA: Lecture (PPT)


Meahan, P. (2011, September 16).
Metamorphosis. HUMA 3003.
Lecture conducted from Fanshawe
College, London, ON.

APA: All Together Now


Environmental Awareness 9
References
Bourette, S. (2002, March). Planespotting.
Shift. Retrieved March
14, 2005, from
Http://www.shift.com/content /10.1/53/1.html
Patterson, K. (2000). The water in between: A
journey at sea. Toronto: Vintage.
Spearing, M. (2004, February). APA format.
Library & information science: Citation guides
for electronic documents. Retrieved October
31, 2010, from http://www.ifla.org/I/
training/citation/citing.htm

Things to Remember #2
Page Headers for
References
&
Body
MLA (which you may have used in the
past for citations) and APA use
different headers:
MLA = Last Name + Page Number (Smith
9)

APA = (Key Word(s) from


Article Title + Page Number
(Environmental Awareness 9)

MLA example (for information only, to show you the


difference from APA which you will use)

Smith 9

Works Cited
Bourette, Sarah. Planespotting. Shift.
Mar. 2002. Web. 15 Mar. 2005.
Patterson, Kevin. The Water In Between: A
Journey at Sea. Toronto: Vintage, 2000.
Print.

QUOTATIONS
Direct Quotations MUST be copied
accurately, word-for-word and they
must be placed in quotation marks
APA recommends an AUTHOR/DATE style
of citations-page # follows material
As Davis (1998) reports, smaller
cars are the way of the future
(p.26).

Short Quotations
If you are directly quoting from a work, you will
need to include the author, year of publication,
and the page number for the reference (preceded by
"p.").
Introduce the quotation with a signal phrase that
includes the author's last name followed by the
date of publication in parentheses.
According to Jones (1998), "Students often had
difficulty using APA style, especially when it was
their first time" (p. 199).
If the author is not named in a signal phrase,
place the author's last name, the year of
publication, and the page number in parentheses
after the quotation.
She stated, "Students often had difficulty using
APA style" (Jones, 1998, p. 199).

Long Quotations
Place direct quotations longer than 40 words in a
free-standing block of typewritten lines.
Indent the first line of any subsequent paragraph
within the quotation 1/2 inch from the new margin.

Jones's (1998) study found the following:


Students often had difficulty using APA style,
especially when it was their first time citing
sources.
This difficulty could be attributed to the
fact that many
students failed to purchase a style manual or
to ask
their teacher for help. (p. 199)

Quotations (Unknown
Author)
Unknown Author: If the work does not have an
author, cite the source by its title in the
signal phrase or use the first word or two in
the parentheses. Titles of books and reports are
italicized or underlined; titles of articles,
chapters, and web pages are in quotation marks.
A similar study was done of students learning to
format research papers (Weight Watchers Diet,"
2001).
Note: In the rare case the "Anonymous" is used
for the author, treat it as the author's name
(Anonymous, 2001). In the reference list, use
the name Anonymous as the author.

Quotations (Electronic
Sources)
If possible, cite an electronic document the
same as any other document by using the authordate style.
Kenneth (2000) explained...
Unknown Author and Unknown Date: If no author or
date is given, use the title in your signal
phrase or the first word or two of the title in
the parentheses and use the abbreviation "n.d."
(for "no date").
Another study of students and research decisions
discovered that students succeeded with tutoring
("Tutoring and APA," n.d.).

Quotations(Electronic
Sources) continued
Sources Without Page Numbers
When an electronic source lacks page numbers, you
should try to include information that will help
readers find the passage being cited.

When an electronic document has numbered paragraphs,


use the symbol, or the abbreviation "para." followed
by the paragraph number (Hall, 2001, 5) or (Hall,
2001, para. 5).

If the paragraphs are not numbered and the document


includes headings, provide the appropriate heading and
specify the paragraph under that heading.
According to Smith (1997), ... (Mind over Matter
section, para. 6).

Quotations (Lecture
Powerpoint)
If you are directly quoting from a
professors ppt, you will need to
include the professor and year in
class.

It is important to note that human


creativity is sometimes seen as a
great and terrible force (Meahan,
2011).

HELPFUL LINKS
From Purdue OWL:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
From Fanshawe Learning Centre:
http://www.fanshawec.ca/sites/default/files/assets
/the~learning~centre~-~tlc/apa1.pdf
From Fanshawe Library & Media Services Citation
Help page:
http://fanshawec.libguides.com/content.php?
pid=192084&sid=1613390http://fanshawec.libguides.co
m/content.php?pid=192084&sid=1613390

Online Sources for


Citations
Your friendly Librarians have
created the following site for you:
http://fanshawec.libguides.com/content.php
?
pid=192084&sid=1613390http://fanshawec.l
ibguides.com/content.php?
pid=192084&sid=1613390

QUESTIONS!

http://www.stu.ca/inkshed/nletta03/hunt.htm

Proposal for Research


Report Projects

see Chapter 11 Writing Proposals and Reports, p. 250-278


** Research Proposal (worth 5%) is due week of Module 7 ;
Research Report (worth 25%) is due week of Module 12 **

A proposal for a student


report has these sections:
1. Introductory
paragraph
2. Problem
3. Feasibility
4. Audience
5. Topics to
investigate

6. Methods and
procedures
7. Qualifications
includes
facilities and
resources
available
8. Work schedule
9. Call to action

REPORT DUE DATES


As noted in the CIS, the short research
proposal report is based on the research
report. The research proposal report is
due by 11:59pm on Friday, February 19
(Module 7). Per the CIS, report formatting
and criteria will be discussed in Module 5.
The Research Report is based on a current
topic within your field (topic approval is
required by professor) and it is due by
11:59pm on Friday, March 25 (Module 12).
Please note: these reports are to be
completed individually, however students
may use the work conducted in their
research reports for their group
presentation.

QUESTIONS?

English Language Help

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION NOW


APPENDIX A:

WRITING CORRECTLY p. 347

GRAMMAR
LO1 Define and explain
the logic of
grammar
LO2 Discuss how to
identify and
correct common
punctuation errors
LO3 Explain the uses
of punctuation
within sentences

LO4 List uses of


special
punctuation
marks
LO5 Distinguish
words that are
often confused
LO6 Describe the
proofreading
process

FANSHAWE LEARNING CENTRE


The Learning Centre is located in "A" building on the second floor in room number
A2019.

Monday: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


Tuesday & Wednesday: 8:30 a.m. to 7:30
p.m.
Thursday: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon