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Current Status of

Municipal Solid
Waste Generation
in Malaysia
EVT732 - Waste Treatment and Technology
Students Name

Students ID

Mohd Nadzely Bin Abd. Karim

2015611544

Halimatunsaadiah Binti Shafiai

2015487292

Ratna Aqilah Binti Muhd Basri

2015658118

Lecturers Name

Dr. Faeiza Buyong

Date of Submission

17th March 2016

Assessment

Journal Review and


Discussion

Title

Current Status of Municipal


Solid Waste Generation in
Malaysia

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Scenario

Development of Kuala Lumpur State Territory


Economic growth and business activity
Increasing Consumption Rate
Acceleration of Daily Generation
Increasing of Volume Rate of Municipal Solid
Waste.

1.2 Objective
To achieve United Nation Agenda 21
Waste minimization strategy and control
To collect, process and transmit garbage that
really can not be recycled into the location or
the last shelter system in accordance with the
terms of the social, economic and
environmental values.

1.3 Issues
Solid waste management
Increasing traffic density problems affect the
removal and collection of municipal solid
waste transportation, which will affect the
productivity rate from the source of waste to
the place of final disposal.

1.4 Challenges of Handling and Management


To meets the values of economic, hygienic,
and ecologic.
To improve performance and productivity of
municipal solid waste management; to bring
economic benefits for local government which
will the improve the quality of service to urban
environmental management.

2. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
2.1 Data Collection
Populations
Generation rate
Characteristic of municipal solid waste
Management system

The survey was restricted only to local


authorities managed by Private Company
rounds in each authority area following the
criteria :
survey had to be based on all of Kuala Lumpur
local authorities.
There have to be two authorities from each
community type (domestic and commercial)

3. RESULT AND DISCUSSION


A. Financial Barrier
Allocation of budget in the range of 20-50 %, while Urban
solid waste which cannot be handled for about 30-60 % of
the total amount of waste throughout the urban areas.
The total urban population that can be covered by solid
waste management services by local governments amounted
to less than 50 percent.
Transport equipment and solid waste collector who are not
suitable to be used anymore has reached 80 percent range.
Many industry practitioners are reluctant to apply the waste
management technique.

B. Role of The Government


Since 1993, it has been launched Recycling Program
which involves 23 local authorities or Pihak Berkuasa
Tempatan (PBT).
Role of Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and
Local Government (Malaysia) ion municipal solid
waste management is gibing advice and notification
automatically.
Role of Department of Environmental in terms of only
pollution control and handling in order to protect and
maintain the quality of community environment.
Economic Planning Unit (EPU); involved in
development program in national level.

Approach undertaken specifically;


i. Uses the original remains in the from of solid
waste without going through the process of
physical change.
ii. Recycling a solid waste Orin ally for
producing a raw materials that may be used for
further process.
iii. To deduct the expenses of existing solid waste
generation from the sources.

Role of PBT and KPKT


allocated between 30 to 70 percent of manpower
for their responsible in environmental management
practices.
40 to 50 percent of PBT officers get involved in
cleaning, including the solid waste management.
KPKT helps and support PBT to provide the
financial allotment to purchase the appropriates
machines and vehicle maintenance.
KPKT also provide the financial allotment for
upgrading and constructing several new solid
waste container.

C. Previous Condition of Municipal Solid Waste in


Malaysia
In 2001, Kuala Lumpur State Territory estimated the total solid waste at 2.500
tonnes per day or equal to 912,500 million tonnes a year.
With total population estimated around of 1.5 million, then the average of solid
waste generated from any person is as many as 1.7 kilograms a day.
According to the solid waste accretion of 1.2 percent tons a year, the 2020
estimation will be around of 3.317 tonnes per day or 1,210,705 tonnes a year.
Estimation of Kuala Lumpur Waste Generation based on 2001

Waste generated (tonnes/day)

3.5

1400

1200

2.5

1000

800

1.5

600

400

0.5

200

Figure 1.

Waste Generation (10 tonnes/year)

Year
Waste generated (tonnes/day)

D. Latest Condition of Municipal Solid Waste in


Malaysia

In 2009, population of Kuala Lumpur


City Area has reached 1.66 million
people, population growth rate of 6.1
percent, then the population in the year
2010 can be estimated at least to 1.69
million people.
MSW generated from Kuala Lumpur
Municipal Solid Waste Composition from Kuala Lumpur of Sample State Territory and delivered to TBTS
was recorded of 2,000 tonnes per day.

1% 1% 1% 2%
21%

74%

Food Waste
(and its
mixture)
Plastic (and its
mixture)
Paper (and its
mixture)
Mixed Organic
Wood
Others

Solid waste samples collection at Taman


Beringin Transfer Station (TBTS)
location around 100kg weights per
sample.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.
Waste Generation Rate from Kuala Lumpur City

In 2009, total solid waste generation

rate for each person is about 1.2


kg/capita/day

0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4

1.2 kg/capita/day
and following the below statement, for
each generation rate of solid waste
type shown in Table 2.

0.3
0.2
0.1
0

Generation Rate/person/day (kg/capita/day)

Figure 4.
Percentage of Composition of Solid Waste Sample
Generation Rate/person/day (kg/capita.day)
74.00%
0.6

0.24
21.00%

0.18

1.00%

0.18

2.00%

Potential value of recyclable solid


waste collected from Kuala
Lumpur city
The price of solid waste (plastic)
collected from plastic used market
at Kuala Lumpur City area is about
RM 0.45 per kilogram, due to data
taken on May 2010
If the population in 2009 is about
1.66 millions, then the plastic value
per day will be RM 179,280. The
potential gross value calculation
for one year period can be reached
about RM 43,027,200.
This potential value should be an
additional income for the
Government if they can build and
develop an integrated plastic
recycling market.

E. Materials of Solid Waste in Kuala Lumpur


In 2009 worldwide, study by Wilson et al. highlighted the in waste
minimization through recycling aiming at the recovery of paper, glass, plastics,
aluminum and non-ferrous metals from MSW with recycling rates typically at
20-50%. Also Pappu et al. (2007) outlined the present status on generation and
utilization of both non-hazardous and hazardous solid wastes.
Unfortunately that the role of the Government may not fixed recent solid waste
issues with respect to municipal solid waste management at Kuala Lumpur
State Territory. In an effort that increasingly done, the Government needs to
encourage more efforts around to develop the solid waste recycle industry in
the Kuala Lumpur State Territory

F. Zero Waste Campaign


The Selangor government had declared its plans to make
every Saturday a plastic bag-free day effective on January
1,2010. A 'No Plastic Bag' campaign observed involving 20
big retailers that includes hypermarkets, supermarkets,
pharmacies and convenience stores throughout the state, and
were urged to reduce the use of plastic bags.
Few complaints from consumers at its stores, and the
shopper said that he will support the campaign but it should
be made and well known by every consumers. Without an
appropriate information, so many consumers will miss this
campaign and it was actually a matter of educating the
public.

Method
Questionnaires survey
Study location
Kuala Lumpur City
Duration
3 months (Jan 2010-June 2010)
Participants
100 respondents in randomly.

Community Perception
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

94

91

83

77
14

Figure5:Communityperceptionregardingsolidwaste

Agree

Recycle
Reason do recycle

42.9

57.1

Recycling program participation

The right thing


to do
Following
closest friend /
nearby
community

Figure6:Reasonofrespondentsindoing
recycling

51

49

Figure7:participationofrecycling

yes
no

Situation of Taman Beringin Transfer Station


(TBTS)
At present, TBTS manages 2,100 tones per day.
Capacity of waste generation keep increasing since initial operation 2002,
from 1700 tones.
TBTS received facility improvement after increasing waste volume
capacity in 2007 and 2008.
TBTS receive municipal solid waste from KL State more than 2,700 tons
per day.
Requires very larges financial issues.
Estimate 30k for a year in simple operational cost.

4. CONCLUSION
Waste campaign program in early 2010 still not
bring positive feedback to the communities
especially KL areas.
The waste generated in each day still same.
More time needed to realize the Government
zero waste program.

Recommendations
Solid waste composition generated from KL areas
containing big economic potential value which
contribute side income generation.
As reducing the jobless
Government should followed up in order reducing
daily waste generation and extend the lifetime of
Bukit Tagar landfill.

References
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8.

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