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CONCEPT OF HISTORIC

TOWN
CONSERVATION AND HERITAGE MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT

SUBMITTED TO :

SUBMITTED BY :

Mrs. SANGITA
BARCH/10033/2013

DHIRAJ KUMAR SAHU

ASSOCIATE LECTURER
BARCH/10035/2013

SAURABH KHATI

DEFINITION
'Historic towns' could be defined as all groups of buildings
and spaces that comprise human settlements and whose
unity and integration into the landscape endows them with
historic, artistic, architectural, urbanistic or scientific value.
Such values exist irrespective of the period and the culture
that gave birth to them and do not depend on the manner
of their construction, which may have been planned or
spontaneous.
As living entities, and subject to cultural, economic and
social evolution, historic towns must inevitably change, as
they have done in the past.

A historic urban core is one, which is not only the centre of


activities but also has significance concentration of
heritage structures.
Such an urban place has a different identity of its own and
a distinct townscape value, which is worthy of
preservation.
Thus, in addition with economic importance, the place
gains a symbolic value, which contributes to formation of
common attributes of society.

Historic town of Jodhpur, India

Historic town of Sagunto in Spain

PROBLEMS OF HISTORIC AREAS


Many of the historic fabric are not applicable for modern
use, resulting inadequate use of floor space.
In absence of holistic conservation guidance, new
construction results in deterioration of built form and
historical character, causing loss of identity.
Ever increasing intensity of uses and tremendous
economic pressure leaves to traffic congestion and
problems of inadequate infrastructure development.

Delapitated historical monuments due to lack of holistic conservation, which is now


not applicable for moden use.

OBJECTIVE OF WORKING OUR


HISTORIC AREA
To understand the changing role of the area in context to
the entire city through the study of chronological
evolution.
To access the existing fabric based on economic potential,
Physical condition, Socio-economic object and heritage
value.
To study the activities and peoples perception of areas.
To appraise the future possibilities.
To formulate rules and regulation, Physical strategies and
approximate organisation setup.

PROMOTION AND SENSE OF PLACE


This is where much of the value of the concept of a
historic town lies.
The listing, recognition, classification, declaration of a
historic town has many benefits both within the town and
outside the town.
The sense of a shared history can be a very powerful
uniting tool.
Heritage helps people to recognise and understand the
heritage value of their own place.
To have pride in their place and its role in the town and to
be an integral part of making that town unique.

DELHI-AN EXAMPLE OF HISTORIC CITY


DESCRIPTION
Historically, developments in Delhi took place in a triangular patch of
land with River Yamuna on one side and the northern range of Aravalli
hills on the other two sides.

The wider regional importance of Delhi strategically stems from its


location on an important trade route, the Uttarapatha that ran along
the Gangetic plain and linked up to the Silk Route.
Archaeological findings have revealed continuous cultural layers from
3rd-4thC BC to the Mughal Period, and pottery fragments that date
from approximately 1000-500 BC.

Lal Kot, the 1st city of Delhi was founded by the Tamar dynasty in 1060
AD.
Delhi grew to be the capital of an empire in the time of the Delhi
Sultanate, with the establishment of Siri, the 2nd city of Delhi.
Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq (r. 1320-24), the first of the Tughlaq kings who
followed the Khaljis built Tughlaqabad the 3rd city of Delhi.
In AD 1326-27, Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq linked the older cities of Lal Kot
and Siri with two walls to build the 4th city of Delhi, Jahanpanah.
Firoz Shah Tughlaq (1351-1388) built Firozabad, the 5th city of Delhi, on
the banks of River Yamuna.
Emperor Humayun, in AD 1533, built Dinpanah, the 6th city of Delhi. In
AD 1639

Shahjahan shifted the Mughal Empire back to Delhi and the walled city
of Shahjahanabad, the 7th city of Delhi was built.
The British defeated the Marathas in AD 1803 and took over Delhi. In AD
1911, they moved their capital from Calcutta to Delhi and New Delhi
was built to the south-west of the walled city, Shahjahanabad.

Plan of Delhi

ZONES OF DELHI
Delhi's surviving historic urbanscape comprising of four precincts
of
I.

Mehrauli

II.

Nizamuddin

III. Shahjahanabad
IV. New Delhi

MEHRAULI ZONE

Thiszone includes the original extent of the walled city of Lal Kot extending
south to include Mehrauli village which houses the dargah of the early 13th C
Sufi saint, Qutubuddin Baktiyar Kaki and the Mehrauli Archaeological Path.

This precinct has seen more than 900 years of continuous habitation, leading
to a layering of history which has resulted in a complex socio cultural mosaic.

Mehraull Archaeological Park has numerous graves and tombs, mosques,


gardens and other structures besides the hauz(tank).

Jahaz Mahal, an impressive Lodi period building, exemplifies the mature


Sultanate style, reflecting a harmonious mix of materials grey quartzite, red
sandstone, and glazed tiles; and forms.

Mehrauli Zone

NIZAMUDDIN ZONE

NIZAMUDDINis largely associated with Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya, a revered


14th century Sufi saint and his disciple Hazrat Amir Khusrau (1253 AD - 1325
AD) for over seven hundred years.

The area proposed for nomination comprises of 1) the traditional settlement


that developed around the dargah of the Sufi saint and 2) the Nizamuddin
precinct which saw considerable building activity in the form of tombs and
mosques.

The scale and nature of development in this precinct (impressive complexes Iike
Humayun's Tomb) adds to its coherence demonstrating the level at which the
saint was venerated and continues to be, till today.

In the Nizamuddin dargah settlement, houses line narrow streets and are
interspersed with many historic burial places. Though most of the houses have
been periodically rebuilt, the settlement itself is a very old one.

Nizamuddin Zone

SHAHJAHANABAD ZONE

The walled city Shahjahanabad is the imperial capital city established in the
mid-seventeenth century by the Mughal Emperor Shahjahan.

Though the pattern of land use is totally urban, it was still essentially a
pedestrian city retaining a human scale.

The residential areas are introvert spaces and independent social and
environmental entities.

while commercial activities are located along the spines, closer to areas of
administrative or institutional importance.

NEW DELHI ZONE

The city designed by Sir Edward Lutyens and Herbert Baker, redefined the
architecture and urbanism of Delhi in the process of addressing contemporary
imperatives.

The design blends the two dominant themes of early twentieth century city
planning the City Beautiful (vistas) and the Garden City (verdure), concepts
that had world relevance in city planning of the early twentieth century.

In the architecture of the buildings, Indian elements and motifs were used,
drawing Inspiration from Buddhist religious complexes on the one hand, and
Mughal buildings and the bungalow on the other.

OUTSTANDING UNIVERSAL VALUE OF


THIS HISTORIC CITY

Diverse historical, cultural and environmental exigencies have created the


city that is today recognized globally as the capital of an important developing
nation.

Over several centuries, the city has defined its uniqueness in its ever evolving
morphological and architectural styles as a result of its continuous
amalgamation of Ideas and ideologies.

Such exigencies and syncretism has left a distinct mark on its tangible
footprint with the development of new vocabulary of architecture where form,
function and symbolism played an important role.

Delhi's unique cultural landscape evolved from the mingling of multiple


streams of cultural impulses from the Islamic and European worlds.

The extension of its integrated culture was a result of cross fertilisation in the
process of continuous development as a major centre of power, culture and
learning in the medieval world.

The various cities within Delhi were built as capitals of the ruling dynasty at
different times in response to very specific social, political and cultural
catalysts.

Delhi is comparable to several cities but its uniqueness lies in its tangible and
Intangible elements intertwined together which defines the Outstanding Value
of Delhi.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Sir Bernard M. Feilden; Conservation of Historic Buildings, Architectural


Press, London.

http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5743/

A. G. K. Menon & B. K. Thapar; Heritage Zones

Sir Bernard M. Feilden; Guidelines for conservation; Architectural Press,


London.

THANK YOU

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