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NEWS VS.

ENTERTAINMENT:

HOW INCREASING MEDIA CHOICE WIDENS GAPS IN


POLITICAL KNOWLEDGE AND TURNOUT

BY MARTIN PRIOR
MARCUS PRIORS ARGUMENTS

With advent of cable TV with numerous channels and Internet, people


are no longer forced to watch the news like before
Even if they do, there are umpteen number of options to choose from,
which aligns with their views
This is making people narrow minded or uninformed.
Gap between people watching news for political knowledge and those
watching TV and Internet for entertainment has widened due to mass
amount of media.
MY TAKE

I believe that there are other situations where the younger voters are
getting their political knowledge
The gap hasnt essentially widened
There are other avenues for younger voters to gain political knowledge,
form opinions and participate in political debates
Prior, for ex., totally missed out on Social media and its current role in
shaping political views
NEW TRENDS

America, in general, shifting away from politics


Gap had been widening even without the media for entertainment
being there
Media for entertainment created because of the presence of audience
for it
FLAWS
The information on people who watch television outdated - one figure shown in
the article is from the early 1970's.
Either the article is now outdated or the credibility of the article is not strong
founded due to the usage of outdated data
Choice of watching television station is deliberate and not as unconscious as
Prior states
Peoples views are shaped not only by the news they consume but also by their
own beliefs and biases
Argument about the amount of info. one can absorb also weak
CONCLUSION

When differences in political knowledge and turnout arise from inequality in the
distribution of resources and skills, recommendations for how to help the
information have-nots are generally uncontroversial.
To the extent that knowledge and turnout gaps in the new media environment
arise from voluntary consumption decisions, recommendations for how to narrow
them, or whether to narrow them at all, become more contestable on normative
grounds.
Even if a consensus emerged to reduce media choice for the public good, it
would still be technically impossible, even temporarily, to put the genie back in
the bottle. Avoiding politics will never again be as difficult as it was in the
golden age of television.