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LAWS

OF
LEARNING
Prepared by: MAZO, CLINTON M.,
MSPED-1
Edward L.
Thorndike
Psychologist
(1874-1949)

Edward
Thorndike has
developed the
first three laws of
learning and
three more had
been added ever
since.
PRIMARY
AWS OF LEARNIN
1. Law of Exercise
2. Law of Effect
3. Law of Readiness
1. Law of Exercise

The more a person


repeats something,
the better he is able
to retain that
knowledge.
2. Law of Effect

Students are more


likely to learn when
they are rewarded
for learning,
rather than
punished for not
learning.
3. Law of Readiness

Learning can only


take place when a
student is ready to
learn.
SECONDARY
AWS OF LEARNIN
1. Law of Primacy
2. Law of Recency
3. Law of Intensity of Stimulus
4. Law of Multiple Response
5. Law of Set Attitude
6. Law of Analogy and Assimilation
7. Law of Associative Shifting
8. Law of Partial Activity
1. Law of Primacy

Learning that takes


place in the beginning
is the best and lasting.
2. Law of Recency

Recent acts
are lasting.
3. Law of Intensity of
Stimulus
If a stimulus is strong,
the response will be
strong, and vice-versa.
4. Law of Multiple
Response
Confronted with a new
situation the organism
responds in a variety of
ways arriving at the
correct response.
5. Law of Set Attitude

The learner performs


the task well if he has
his attitude set in the
task.
6. Law of Analogy and
Assimilation
The organism makes
responses by comparison
or analogy and
assimilation.
7. Law of Associative
Shifting
We can get any response,
from the learner of which
he is capable, associated
with any situation to which
he is sensitive.
8. Law of Partial Activity

Teaching should be
done in parts.
EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATION
Learning by doing is a good advice.
One learns to do what one does.
The amount of reinforcement necessary for learning
is relative to the students needs and abilities.
The principle of readiness is related to the
learners stage of development and their previous
learning.
The students self-concept and beliefs about their
abilities are essentially important.
Teachers should provide opportunities for meaning
and appropriate practice.
TRANSFER OF
LEARNING
Why is it important?
Transfer of learning is the very
essence of understanding,
interacting and creating.
Furthermore, it is the ultimate
aim of teaching and learning.
FORMS OF TRANSFER:
General transfer
The ability to apply knowledge or skills
learned in one context in a variety of
different contexts.

Specific transfer
The ability to apply information in a
context similar to the one in which it was
originally learned.
Types of Transfer of Learning
1.Positive transfer
2. Negative Transfer
3. Simple Transfer
4. Complex Transfer
5. Near transfer
6. Far transfer
Positive Transfer
When learning in one context improves learning
or performance in another context.

Negative Transfer
When previous learning or experience inhibits
or interferes with learning or performance in a
new context.
Simple Transfer
happens when little or no effort is required to
apply what has been learned in one situation to a
new situation
Complex Transfer
engaged in gathering data for a research project
and thought about the ways in which the
spreadsheeting program could assist with the data
management and analysis
Near Transfer
transfer of learning within the school
context, or between a school task and a
very similar task.

Far Transfer
refer to the transfer of learning from the
school context to a non-school context.
Other Types of
Transfer of Learning
ow-road transfer
High-road Transfer
orward-reaching transfe
Backward-reaching trans
Conditions /Factors Affecting
the Transfer of Learning
1. Similarities between two learning situation
2. Degree of meaningfulness/relevance of learning
3.Length of instructional time
4.Variety of learning experience
5.Context for learning experience
6.Focus on principles rather than tasks
7.Emphasis in metacognition
EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATION
Transfer of learning to new situations can
be horizontal (across subject matter) or
vertical (increased complexity of the same
subject).
Learning should be goal-directed and
focused.
Positive feedback, realistic praise, and
encouragement are motivating to the
teaching learning process.