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The Salem Witch Trials of

the 1690s
Bryn, Tara, Sydney, Olivia, and Hannah
Introduction
Where:
● Began in Salem Village Massachusetts
● Examination of trials moved to Salem Town
● Involved many nearby communities

When:
● 1692-1693

(Hannah Morstead)
Introduction (cont’d)

What:

● Individuals were accused of practicing witchcraft

● Trials and executions were held

● Hysteria spread

(Hannah Morstead)
Events Leading to the Trials
● 17th century Massachusetts, people feared the devil

● Salem community had a heightened sense of fear of the Devil

● January 1692, witchcraft hysteria began

● Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams

● Felt very ill a few weeks after playing fortune-telling games

● Physician believed the girls were under an evil hand


(Bryn Skippen)
Those Involved
Victims
● 20 executed (14 women, 6 men)
● If accused you were guilty
● Accused for “exotic way of dress” and knowing too much
about herbs
● Outspoken women (social outcasts)

(Tara Ozbay)
Those involved (cont’d)
Prosecutors
● Trial Judges
○ John Hathorne
○ Jonathan Corwin
● Tried “Witches” accused others
● Village residents turned on one another
● Belief in the Devil/Black magic was popular and strong
(Hannah Morstead)
How the Trails Ended
1. Villagers stopped hunting for witches

1. Villagers doubted evidence provided in court

1. Accusations became too bold

1. Late 1692, Governor Phipps’s wife was accused


(Sydney Young)
Outcomes of the Salem Witch Trials
● May 1693, Governor Phipps pardoned all accused
“witches” in custody

● Restitution was made to the victims families

● January 14, 1697, Day of fasting

● Individuals involved in the trial apologized

(Sydney Young)
Outcomes of the Salem Witch Trials
● 1752, Salem village changed
their name to present day
Danvers

● Salem Witch Memorial

(Sydney Young)
Historians’ Interpretations of these Events
Pre 1900s:

● Originally thought to be the work of Aboriginal tribes


● Hysteria around marriage
● Switch in religion
● Results of fortune telling

(Olivia Milne)
Historians’ Interpretations of these Events
Post 1900s:

● Largest theory: - Fungus poisoning (convulsive


ergotism)
● Cold weather theory
● Right to land (cannot be determined)
● Encephalitis Lethargica

(Olivia Milne)
Bibliography
“Villages of the Salem Witch Trials .” Legends of America, www.legendsofamerica.com/ma-witchtrialtowns/.

“Salem Witch Trials .” Edited by History.com, HISTORY , A&E Television Networks, 4 Nov. 2011, www.history.com/topics/colonial-
america/salem-witch-trials.

Brooks , Rebecca Beatrice. “Jonathan Corwin: The Other Salem Witch Judge.” History of Massachusetts, 26 Jan. 2016,
historyofmassachusetts.org/jonathan-corwin-salem-witch-judge/.

Schiff, Stacy “The witches of Salem” The New Yorker. October 19th, 2017 https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/09/07/the-
witches-of-salem

Blumberg, Jess “A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials” Smithsonian.October 23rd, 2007
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/a-brief-history-of-the-salem-witch-trials-175162489/

Wolchover, Natale “Did cold weather cause the Salem Witch trials” Livescience. April 20th, 2012
https://www.livescience.com/19820-salem-witch-trials.html
Rene’ Cooper, Micaela “Mass Hysteria In The Salem Witch Trials” Odyssey. July 12th, 2016
https://www.theodysseyonline.com/mass-hysteria-salem-witch-trials

Purdy, Sean “CONJURING HISTORY: THE MANY INTERPRETATIONS OF THE SALEM WITCHCRAFT TRIALS” Rivier Academix
Journal. Sping 2007
https://www2.rivier.edu/journal/rcoaj-spring-2007/j90-purdy-salem-trials.pdf

P, Shaunak “Court of Oyer and Terminer Dissolved .” The Salem Times 1693 "Salem Times Every Time",
people.ucls.uchicago.edu/~snekros/The%20Salem%20Times/The_Salem_Times_of_1693/Culture_%26_Beliefs.html.