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Height vs.

Jump Length
By: Andrea Bankovich, Reagen Werner, Jake LaMorte
Introduction
● Our project is comparing height to jumping distance.
● We predict that if you are taller, than the distance you jump will be
farther with a positive and strong correlation.
● The method we used to collect our data was an experiment using
students in the high school.
● This experiment consisted of obtaining the student's’ height, then
measuring how far they could jump with two meter sticks.
Data Set
● Population is the entire group of individuals being studied.
● Our project’s population was the individuals of the DuBois Area High
School.
● The sample is a part of the population from which we actually collect
data.
● The sample of our project was the 25 students of the DuBois Area High
School.
● A variable is any characteristic of an individual.
● The explanatory variable of our project is the height of the individual.
● The response variable of our project is the distance the individual
jumped.
We chose height as our explanatory variable
because it determines the distance jumped. We
did not choose it the other way around because
how tall you are does not depend on how far
you can jump.
One outlier on our graph is (160,201).
This is an outlier because the person
has a shorter height, but they jumped a
farther distance. Another outlier on our
graph is (170,120). This is an outlier
because the person has a greater
height, but they did not jump as far as
they should have.
r & r2
● Correlation describes the direction and strength of a straight line
relationship. Our correlation value is 0.665. It has a positive direction
because the taller you are, the longer you jump. It has a moderate
strength because it is above 0.3 and below 0.7, meaning the correlation is
somewhat valid.
● The coefficient of determination is r2 variation in the values of y that is
explained by the least squares regression line of y on x. Since r=0.665,
then r2=0.442 meaning any prediction has a 44.2% variation.
Prediction
● The least-squares regression line is the line that makes the sum of the vertical distance as
small as possible.
● Our equation of regression line is y=2.384x-242.576.
● To calculate how far someone jumps when they are 195.98 cm tall, you would plug 195.98 in
as your x value.
● For example, y=2.384(195.98)-242.576. y=467.216-242.576. y=224.640. If the height is 195.98
cm, then we predict that the distance of the jump will be 224.640% with a 44.2% variation.
The validity of our prediction is somewhat valid.
Lurking Variables

● Lurking Variable is a variable that has an important effect on the relationship among variables,
but is not one of the explanatory variables. Possible lurking variables could have been due to
BMI( Body Mass Index), because the more fat in the body compared to muscle, the shorter
you will jump and vice versa. Another lurking variable is clothing wore while jumping. If you
have sandals and skinny jeans on, you are less likely to jump as far as someone wearing
athletic clothing. The causation would be confounding because x and z, representing height
and the lurking variable, would cause y the jumping distance to change or vice versa.
Conclusion

● We predict that if you are taller, than the distance you jump will be
farther with a positive and strong correlation. Our hypothesis was
partially correct, the direction was positive but our correlation was
somewhat valid. We had a correlation of 0.655 which is moderate and it
is going in the positive direction, meaning it is somewhat valid.
WORKS CITED
Oberlin, Jimmy. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.

Bankovich, Andrea. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017. Frano, Jordan. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.
Pyne, Brant. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.

Bryan, Alicia. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017. Gray, Gavin. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017.
Ray, Alexis. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.

Cotter, Nick. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017. Guernt, Elijah. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.
Royer, Ezra. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.

Dawson, Thalia. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017. Knarr, Noah. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.
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Deemer, Tino. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017. Kott, Dale. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017.
Stevens, Kaleb. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.

DeSalve, Chelsea. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017. Krise, Jeremy. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.
Werner, Reagen. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.

Ellis, George. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017. Lamb, Lauren. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.
Zaffuto, Bethany. Personal interview. 6 Dec.
LaMorte, Jake. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2017.
Farrell, Nathan. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017.
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Zartman, Alexa. Personal interview. 7 Dec. 2017.