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Investigate the ways spoken language is used by the TV

chefs Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver.

Band 5  perceptive analysis and evaluation of aspects of how Lawson and Oliver adapt spoken
Sophisticated, language for specific purposes
 sustained and sophisticated interpretations of key features found in spoken language used
Impressive
by Lawson and Oliver
17-20  sophisticated analysis and evaluation of key issues arising from public attitudes to the
spoken language of Lawson and Oliver

Band 4  confident explanation and analysis of how Lawson and Oliver use and adapt spoken language
Confident, for specific purposes
 confident analysis and reflection on features found in some spoken language used by Lawson
Assured 13-16
and Oliver
 confident analysis of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language of Lawson
and Oliver

Band 3  explanation of how Lawson and Oliver use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes
Clear,  exploration of features found in some spoken language used by Lawson and Oliver
 exploration of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language of Lawson and
consistent 9-12
Oliver
genre:
television chef
Reassuring the viewer Second person address
(‘you’)

Use of people’s names Pauses and hesitation

Exact measurements Jokes

Approximate measurements Personal opinions

Simple language Complicated jargon

Individual Style: Personality:


list as many different
public talk examples of public talk
as you can

LO: to explore features of


public talk
sort the following into
scripted or two columns
scripted spontaneous
spontaneous?
stuttering

Dramatic
pauses

No
Is television
overlaps Repetition for chefs’ speech
effect scripted or
spontaneous?
unfinished
vague
sentences
false starts language
genre:
television chef
Chef Scripted Spontaneous
Nigella
Lawson

Jamie
Oliver

Gordon
Ramsay
Paralinguistic
features
Stress - emphasising
particular words can change
the meaning

Tone - how something is said


(e.g. playfully or
sarcastically)

Volume - loudness, for


example, might reveal anger,
excitement or confidence
paralinguistic features
dramatic pauses
What other examples of
stress - emphasis on certain paralinguistic features did
words you notice?

rhythm (e.g. three part lists) tone eye contact


and repetition facial expressions

volume hand gestures

pace body posture

pitch
audience and purpose
Do these TV chefs appeal to the same
audience?
Annotate the following transcript for spoken language features discussed earlier

This recipe is a Ramsay family tradition on Christmas Day (1) smoked salmon
scrambled egg and croissants (1) it’s rich scrumptious and incredibly easy to do
(1) first the croissants (.) slice them into rounds (.) and season them lightly with
salt and pepper (.) the secret behind a really good breakfast (2) is in the timing
(.) I want the croissaints done first smoked salmon on top and then the
scrambled egg (1) put the croissants in a dry pan and toast (.) we don’t need oil
because the croissants have a lot of butter in them (.) this is a great way to
transform day old croissants giving them a delicious new life (.) [---] just start to
see them toasting (1) almost glistening (2) in the pan (.) and that’s the butter (2)
inside (.) that smell (.) is amazing it almost smells like a sort of caramelised
waffle (.) absolutely delicious toss them around both sides (.) and then out next
just get the smoked salmon just sort of twist it an let it fall over the croissant (2)
let it sit (.) naturally (.) on top of the toasted croissant (4) twist (.) an over (.)
right scrambled eggs (1) eggs into the pan (1) never whip up the egg
beforehand (1) you break down the egg too much what I want is a really nice
rich creamy scrambled eggs (.) eggs in no seasoning at this stage a nice
generous knob of butter now (.) from there (2) onto the heat and all I’ve gotta
do is stir (.) stir and stir and stir (8) now the butter’s melting (.) an it’s given a
really nice creamy texture (.) to the eggs (.) it looks (.) rich (.) delicious (.)
sumptuous (.) luxurious (2) [-ve to be] very careful making scrambled eggs all of
a sudden it looks runny but within thirty seconds it’s cooked (1) working it all
the time (3) right
Annotate the following transcript for spoken language features discussed earlier
S1 so if we jump back to the recipe for a second what we’re gonna do is do a curry marinated chicken skewers and serve it with a
fantastic satay sauce made from peanut butter (.) coconut milk onion and garlic (.)
S2 wow
S1 that work for you
S2 sounds amazing
S1 awesome in that case you can do the chicken first so we can take some chicken breast and we’re [gonna] slide it onto our board and
remember like always when we take a chicken breast make sure we cut any sinew or bits of fat off first so check its underneath //
S2 // mmmhmm
S1 take off any of these fatty bits in particular along the edges and then what’s left into bitesize chunks about that kind of size // ok and
that can go into the bowl
S3 //ok
S1 and Jamie (.)
S3 yes
S1 you’re gonna marinate it for us (.) this is where our recipe is simple from stage one and this is where our first cheat comes in this is
simple chicken satay we’re gonna use a shop bought curry paste this is balti ok you can of course make your own we often do in a lot of
our videos but this one we’re gonna use the cheat for our satay so if you pack a table spoon of that in with our chicken we’ve also got the
glug of oil already in there and then you need to get your hands mucky and get that all massaged up
S3 you gonna help me
S2 I’m gonna help you let’s go (2)
S3 go
S1 right skewers what I need you to do is put these chicken onto the skewers so you’ve got three or four pieces on each skewer (.)// [----]
// that’s fine that’s why you’re both mucky and I’m gonna stay clean ok (.) so skewers //
S3 //yeah
S1 make sure you thread them on don’t press them too close together so that all pieces are individual and can be cooked completely
around (.) ok (.) so then I’m going to dice our onion and then peel and crush garlic as well and this is gonna be the basis of our satay
sauce (.) satay or satay
S3 satay satay you’re posh satay
S2 satay
S1 what are you guys
S3 isn’t it obvious
S1 if you’re unsure exactly how to dice the onion all these details in the book itself
S3 can we wash our hands now Ben
S1 um before you do that (.) one of you can wash your hands (.) and one of you can line them up onto our grill tray
S3 yep
S1 while you’re still a bit chickeny
S3 I’m guessing they’re on skewers because they’re good for a barbecue
S1 they’re perfect for barbecuing also really a succulent chicken cause the skewer gets hot (.)
S3 uhuh
S1 conducts the heat and then cooks the chicken from the inside out as well as the outside in so it cooks really quickly // and keeps it
nice and succulent
S3 // aah
keys from today’s lesson

Spontaneous talk differs from scripted speeches in a number


of ways.

Public talk relies on a number of paralinguistic features to be


effective.

The audience and purpose are taken into account when


constructing a speech.
Keys to success:

Television chefs use both spontaneous and scripted speech.

Television chefs use paralinguistic features both to


communicate instructions and also show personality.

Do television chefs have different audiences because of their


spoken language and their paralinguistic features?
Accent and Dialect
What can
you tell
from a
speaker’s
accent?

Dialect?

LO: to explore how


identity is established
through dialect
accent
is the way words are
pronounced

and depends on where the


speaker comes from

Do Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver


and on their social have accents? What are they? Do
background you think it matters to their audience if
they have accents?
Do Nigella Lawson and
Jamie Oliver use dialects?

dialect What are they? Do you


think it matters to their
audience if they use
dialect?

wee
is a variety of language

it costs four
and have specific features of pound
vocabulary, grammar and
pronunciation

Regional dialects are considered by some people to


be less prestigious than Standard English
accents and dialects are not fixed

• Dialect-levelling: when different accents or dialects come


into contact with each other

• Code-switching: using different accents or dialects


depending on where you are and who you are with

• Geography and media: travel and exposure to spoken


media can influence how one speaks
Standard English
is a social dialect
is not specific to one region

the representative of the language; the variety that is thought


to be acceptable and correct

originally the regional dialect used in the East Midlands, which


gradually spread around and became the dialect used in print,
associated with education, class and power
the most widely understood version of
English

Dad was tired because the children couldn’t


sleep.

Dad were tired coz the bairns couldn’t sleep.

Standard English is used in education, the media (in


newspapers and by newsreaders), formal documents
(business letters and reports) and formal speech (public
announcements).
Received pronunciation
is an accent associated with Standard English

is used on the radio and TV and is sometimes called BBC


English

is associated with a respectable, educated and well-off


section of the society and lends speakers overt prestige

rather than covert prestige, which may result from using a


regional accent to appear rebellious and independent or
trustworthy and down-to-earth.
Received pronunciation
My little brother’s three years old.

My li-ow bruva’s free years owd.

Estuary English borrows from the Cockney accent and is seen as


trendy in the entertainment industry (e.g. Lily Allen).

Multicultural london English is influenced by Carribbean, South


Asian and West African dialects used in the entertainment
industry (e.g. Dizzy Rascal) and contains slang words like ‘bare’
and ‘buff’
sounds, vocabulary and grammar

• 1. How the language sounds:


• the speaker’s pronunciation might tell you something about where they’re from - their
regional background
• it might also tell you about their social background - e.g. that they’re middle class

• 2. The speaker’s vocabulary

• some words are only used in certain regional dialects

• people’s vocabulary changes according to who they are speaking to

• 3. The speaker’s grammar

• non-standard grammar gives you clues about where the speaker is from
Down-to-earth
Sociolect and idiolect pure

Judgements
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfkjvagVsRI

How does Catherine


Tate use accent, slang

sociolect and idiolect


equally
to create humour in
the comic relief clip education
of Lauren Cooper
and Tony Blair?

LO: to explore
influences on an
individual’s talk
The humour is created through the
mixing of accent, sociolect and
idiolect.

Think about how Tony Blair


changes his speech to speak to
Lauren. Why is this unexpected?
Attitudes towards Standard English
Some people see it as the
correct or pure form of People make judgments
about someone’s background
language. and education based on how
Such people might worry they speak.
about slang and text-speak in
multi-modal texts. Since regional varieties of
English can be seen as more
down-to-earth, some
Other people argue that companies deliberately put
language is always changing their call centres in places
and that all varieties of English where people have strong
regional accents.
should be valued equally
sociolects
or social dialects - varieties of Occupational sociolect
language used by particular is the distinctive
social groups. language used by
people who do
Sharing a sociolect gives a group particular jobs.
a specific identity.
It is made up of jargon
What social factors do you think (specialist terms) and
the language itself depends on? makes communication
quicker and more
What other purposes might precise.
jargon be put to?
idiolect
Your idiolect is the
is the unique language of an product of a range of
individual factors and it changes
depending on the
Idiolect is influenced by where context you are in.
you are from.

and by your age.

and your sociolect


sociolects change depending on
context
• Sociolects are features of group language and individual
speakers use different sociolects depending on who they
are talking to.

• Give examples of how you adapt your language, depending


on where you are and what you are doing.

• Multi-modal texts can also reveal someone’s social


background because people often write in the same way
that they talk, when they are texting or emailing.
Keys to success

Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver have different accents.

Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver use different dialects.

The accent and dialect of these TV chefs may influence their


audiences attitudes towards them.
Slang

LO: to explore how


conformity is resisted
through slang
informal vocabulary

goes in and out of fashion People often use


slang to identify with
is informal and colloquial, a particular social
used in casual speech group.

It can transfer quickly


is often inventive and between cultures
creative, adding meaning to through the influence
existing words and inventing of the media.
new ones
Cockney rhyming slang
is specific to
London I don’t Adam and Eve it.

outsiders have trouble


understanding it
I’m off to the Fatboy.

Climb the I’m Calvin,


apples and thanks. I just had some
pears. posh.

“A dialect found mostly in East London, where people obviously have more time to
say what they want to say, and are more paranoid about being overheard. The
principle is to decide what it is you want to say, and then find words which bear no
real relation to what you're going to say, but which rhyme loosely with your phrase.”
people usually try to be polite
Pragmatics - hidden or
implied messages

Politeness strategies -
different ways of saying the
same thing

Feedback - how you show


someone you are listening
Who do you think you’re talking to?
Formality: tells us about
relationships (strangers and
superiors or friends and
family)

Address terms: what people


call each other reveals a lot
about their relationship

Power: how is it
demonstrated through
spoken language features?
The following newspaper articles convey public attitudes towards spoken
language - particularly ACCENT, SLANG and RECEIVED PRONUCIATION .

What are the public attitudes?


How can you apply this information to Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver’s
television programmes?

Essex school gives pupils elocution lessons to lose their accents


A primary school in Essex has become one of the first in the country to offer its
pupils elocution lessons to help them lose their accents

There's nowt wrong with slang


Emma Thompson of all people ought to appreciate that Shakespeare's slang
became part of our everyday language

Joan Bakewell: 'It was all going so well, then the subject of my accent came up'

As this latest fuss proves, the way we talk is still very important to a lot of
people.
Essex school gives pupils elocution lessons to lose their accents
A primary school in Essex has become one of the first in the country to offer its pupils elocution lessons to help them lose their accents.

27 Jan 2012
Pupils at Cherry Tree Primary School, in Basildon, are being taught to ditch their Essex accents during weekly lessons from a private
tutor.
Teachers say they have seen a vast improvement in their pupils' spelling and writing since the lessons were introduced – with some
parents even admitting they are now corrected on their pronunciation at home by their own children.
The Essex accent has been thrown under the spotlight around the country following the success of the reality TV show The Only Way is
Essex.
However, Terri Chudleigh, English literacy coordinator, who first came up with the idea, said: "This is not about being ashamed of the
Essex accent. I have an Essex accent and there's nothing wrong with it.
"It's about helping the children to speak properly so they can improve their reading and writing and obviously have a better education.
"I really wanted to get someone in because I noticed the children weren't saying words correctly and were therefore misspelling them.
"We had lots of youngsters writing 'sbort' instead of 'sport' and 'wellw' instead of 'well'.
"They now have half-hourly sessions where they get taken through exercises and learn to use the 'posh voices' in their heads. They
really enjoy the sessions.
"The feedback we've had from parents has been very positive. We've had them tell us their children are going home and correcting
them on their speech."
Lucy Stapleton, eight, has only been having elocution lessons since September but says she is already notices the difference.
She said: "I like the lessons because I used to say 'computa' instead of computer."
Elocution lessons have enjoyed a resurgence in popularity over the past year following the success of Oscar-winning film The King's
Speech, in which King George VI overcomes his battle with a lifelong stammer thanks to help from a therapist.
During weekly sessions at the school, children run through fun speech exercises including "ho hum", "stifled smile" and "tongue boot
camp" before being encouraged to use "posh voices".
Francesca Gordon-Smith, who runs the sessions through her business Positive Voice, says she has been pleasantly surprised with how
far the children have come in such a short space of time.
"I've definitely noticed the difference since I started coming here and I really enjoy being with the pupils.
"I'd never heard of a primary school having elocution lessons before I started here. Some exclusive grammar schools have lessons but
not many, so it's great to see a primary school like Cherry Tree wanting to do this."
There's nowt wrong with slang
Emma Thompson of all people ought to appreciate that Shakespeare's slang became part of our everyday language
Friday 8 October 2010 12.00 BST

Emma Thompson with Kenneth Branagh in Much Ado About Nothing. Photograph: Sportsphoto Ltd/Allstar
That epitome of Hampstead luvviness, Emma Thompson, has apparently started a campaign against the use of "sloppy slang" and "street
talk". It follows a visit to her old school, Camden High for Girls. What's to be expected from a Cambridge graduate? It is still an institution of
received pronunciation. She is not alone in this call to arms against slang. Fellow north Londoner Tom Conti agrees, as does Kathy Lette, that
writer of such timeless classics as Puberty Blues, which is about "top chicks" and "surfie spunks", and Alter Ego, about a "knight in shining
Armani". Lette attempts to show off her punnilingus by calling slang a "vowel cancer" and urging teens to study "tongue fu".
This kind of talk has got me well vexed. Listen up, yeah, there's nowt wrong with slang, so you need to stop mitherin', d'ya get me? Those
who are from the north will recognise nowt as nothing and mitherin' as bothering. And "d'ya get me?" is, well, comprende? Slang has been
around for a long time. Far from showing the user as "stupid", as Thompson contends, it demonstrates inventiveness and quickness of
thought; a language plasticity, if you like; a language on the go, evolving not just from one generation to the next, but one year to the next. Its
use shows that students are able to learn and speak a wide range of vernacular. The British Library certainly seem to think so, with its
upcoming exhibition on evolving English.
Types of slang can be seen as distinct dialects in their own right. Yet there are those who would complain that it excludes many more than it
will let in. The same argument has been made regarding novels such as Irvine Welsh's Trainspotting – the use of the Leithian dialect a clear
statement that, to get "them", requires work; the same work it would take for them to learn RP. British literature is served well by slang – it
can energise prose – and there is also Will Self's "Mokni", from The Book of Dave.
I remember reading Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange, with its "nasdat" and being so blown away that I rewrote a contemporary
female-centric version called A Clockwork Apple. I used archaic and old Celtic words in order to get away from the language so favoured by
the Blytons (think Thompson). This use was then mocked when a middle-aged male reviewer attempted to write a nonsensical review on it.
What Thompson et al may be put out at is feeling out of touch with the reality of this younger generation. Slang can be seen as a
sophisticated attempt to communicate in a semi-private language, only a step removed from Wittgenstein's "private language". Also a
Cambridge graduate, Wittgenstein came to believe that the idea that language can perfectly capture reality is a kind of bewitchment. Yet
teenagers in each generation seem intent on trying, which is to their credit. They may not consciously know this is what they are doing, but
they are seeking a language that represents their reality, and a way of creating a private space for those with whom they identify.
The issue is, perhaps, what makes people feel in the right to say that anyone who does not speak like them, or in the way they were taught, is
wrong and "stupid"? What is stupid is the ignorance of such highly educated public figures who seem not to have realised that Britain's
greatest writers used slang and those words became part of our language. Shakespeare helped popularise words such as nervy, rancorous,
puke, assassination and sanctimonious. Allow me to illustrate the use of these words: Sanctimonious Oxbridge grads are rancorous at the use
of teenspeak and slang, which makes them so nervy that they want to puke, which could be avoided if they stopped the slang assassination.
I am not saying that slang is a substitute for "standard" English, but should be recognised and capitalised upon for what it is – a love of
communication and an inventiveness of speech that continues to make English one of the most interesting languages.
Joan Bakewell: 'It was all going so well, then the subject of my accent came up'

As this latest fuss proves, the way we talk is still very important to a lot of people.

ANDREW CROWLEY 19 Jan 2012

I should have kept my mouth shut. But then that’s what all the fuss is about. Or call it simply a slip of the tongue. These things happen
when those of us who step on stage at literary festivals and theatre venues feel we are comfortably among friends and begin to let our
hair down. That might even be why people come to hear us. And that’s how it was 10 days ago. There was I, happily regaling the
welcoming audience at the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford with tales of my life and times; there we were enjoying a boisterous Q
and A session, when the matter of my accent came up.
It is an oft-told tale but one that develops new twists and turns at every telling. None of them is untrue: but the issue of accents
continues to raise hackles and prompt accusations of snobbism and discrimination. Here’s my version: I grew up in Stockport talking
like my friends and neighbours.
My parents had the aspirations of lower middle class people and wanted my life to have more chances than theirs. So I was sent to
elocution lessons, where I was told emphatically that my voice wouldn’t do. Arriving at Cambridge University confirmed as much: I was
among girls who didn’t come from Stockport and whose voices did very well. I made an effort to change and developed a strangled
sort of upper class speech that struck my startled parents as phoney for the simple reason that it was.
On then to the BBC, where as a studio manager I auditioned to make announcements in the middle of the night to countries behind
the Iron Curtain. I failed the audition. Eventually I had the good sense to stop trying to please everyone else, and speak as, by then,
came naturally.
My career as a broadcaster followed. It has lasted some 40 years and is still going. So I have no complaints. Well, perhaps small niggles.
Some years ago I asked of a producer friend why I wasn’t offered any television series any more, given that I had, along the way, won a
shelf of awards and the Dimbleby Prize at Bafta. “Oh, well,” came the reply, “it’s all stand-ups and jokers these days. You probably
sound too posh.” “Too posh”… my mother would have been so proud. Those elocution lessons had paid off after all. And when I asked
the audience at the Yvonne Arnaud what they thought I sounded like, back came the reply – “the BBC!”
Some storm! Some teacup! But the truth is, accents still matter to people. In this country particularly we are alert to the nuances of
speech to a remarkable, class-conscious degree. It isn’t an accident that George Bernard Shaw, an Irishman, wrote Pygmalion about a
young girl losing her cockney tones and marrying well. Wodehouse is full of perky barmaids putting on the posh to worm their way
into the affections of upper-class duffers; John Osborne’s Jimmy Porter was angry enough to mock the gentility of his hapless wife.
How you dress, speak and behave conveys all the clues people need to pass judgment. And people enjoy passing judgment.
Annotate the following transcript for spoken language features discussed earlier

Hi guys (.) welcome to ministry of food (.) er we’re gonna make some beautiful
meatballs with spaghetti and tomato sauce so whether you’re passing it on at
home or passing it on at the workplace I wanna give you a clear demonstration
of how to do it and basically make sure you’re gonna make a brilliant job of it (.)
so we’ve got lovely ingredients here (.) we’ve got some minced beef we’ve got
some Jacobs cream crackers (.) I’ll explain those later (.) an egg some rosemary
some (.) mustard some oregano (1) spaghetti but you can use any pasta you like
really (.) a little parmesan cheese (.) literally (.) that much (.) couple of tins of
tomatoes (.) some garlic (.) onion and chillies (.) and some basil (.) so real time
(1) let’s get our mincemeat into a bowl here (1) I’m gonna put in this bowl er
about a tablespoon of oregano (1) you want about a teaspoon of mustard (.)
that’s gonna give you good flavour (1) then we’re gonna crack (1) one egg into
your burger (2) and then some rosemary (.) rosemary and beef best friends you
can get this just about everywhere you can get this in the supermarkets you’ll
find this growing everywhere as well er if you haven’t got it in your own garden
it’s quite good to plant some cause it just goes on an on for ages (.) er when you
slice it put your hand on the knife so it’s safe and just rock it up and down like
this (3) erm so that goes straight in there (1) I need breadcrumbs in this recipe
to make it stick together bind together so to make it work every time(.) literally
half a pack of these crackers (.) put it into a tea towel (.) like this (1) just pulling
(1) the tea towel like that so it’s like(.) a little parcel and then just bash the hell
out of it
Annotate the following transcript for spoken language features discussed earlier

This salad (1) prawns and black rice and a sort of Vietnamese dressing didn’t (.)
start off life this way by which I mean (.) I had them left over in the fridge and
just put them together and they worked (.) this fabulous black rice had gone
with fish curry (.) I had the Vietnamese dipping sauce (.) which I’m using here as
a dressing (.) to go with some roast chicken stuffed with lemongrass (.) did have
a fresh consignment of prawns (1) and it just shows that in life (.) and in the
kitchen the really best things that happen to you are not [words muffled by
saucepan rattling] the planning (1) I’m gonna get the prawns in (.) I’m gonna
poach them which means they’ll keep lovely and tender (.) just pour over (2)
some water (.) from a recently boiled kettle (3) some lemon (2) [---] a rather
clumsily spritzed piece of half a one (3) and salt (1) thereby reproducing the
brine in the marine environment from which they come (2) put them on to
poach and while these are cooking I’m gonna get on with the sauce which is
incredibly easy (2) so a couple of cloves of garlic minced whizzed whatever you
want I just find this (.) easiest (3) ginger about this amount about a spoonful or
so once you’ve got this [golden?} pulp this is definitely the best way of getting
that (6) chilli (.) you can either use a fat juicy one like this (.) or a couple of those
lethally fierce birdseye chillies (.) however much heat you want you go for
Investigate the ways spoken language is used by the TV
chefs Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver.

Band 5  perceptive analysis and evaluation of aspects of how Lawson and Oliver adapt spoken
Sophisticated, language for specific purposes
 sustained and sophisticated interpretations of key features found in spoken language used
Impressive
by Lawson and Oliver
17-20  sophisticated analysis and evaluation of key issues arising from public attitudes to the
spoken language of Lawson and Oliver

Band 4  confident explanation and analysis of how Lawson and Oliver use and adapt spoken language
Confident, for specific purposes
 confident analysis and reflection on features found in some spoken language used by Lawson
Assured 13-16
and Oliver
 confident analysis of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language of Lawson
and Oliver

Band 3  explanation of how Lawson and Oliver use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes
Clear,  exploration of features found in some spoken language used by Lawson and Oliver
 exploration of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language of Lawson and
consistent 9-12
Oliver
data analysis
Your controlled assessment will be based
on the following transcripts of Nigella
Lawson and Jamie Oliver.

You must annotate these transcripts for


all the features of spoken language we
You will be
have explored in this unit. analysing the
You must also apply ideas about public
data in the
attitudes to spoken language that you following
explored in the newspaper articles.
transcripts:
You should also apply the views of the
journalists who have reviewed Lawson
and Oliver.
Nigella Lawson Hokey Pokey

I don’t suppose that it’s any surprise but when I take a present to someone for a dinner party (.) I take something
edible (.) and what I love to take is some honeycomb ? (.) well I call it by the Cornish name (.) Hokey Pokey (.) I want
some golden syrup (of course I do) (.) I want sugar (.)and I want bicarb (.) and it’s the bicarb that creates all those
lovely crunchy bubbles (.)And the thing is this isn’t just cooking this is kitchen alchemy (.)three ingredients (.) only
three ingredients and they create something (.)well I find it very exciting anyway (1) I want 100 grams of caster sugar
(.) Ingredient 2 (.) 4 tablespoon fulls of golden syrup (.) I like to stir these two ingredients together now because I don’t
think it’s good to stir once heat is applied (.) it makes it go gritty (.) and heat is going to be applied (.) and a lot of it (1)
In a few moments what will happen is that the sugar and syrup will fuse together and melt to become a molten pan
full of golden caramel (.) One of the reasons I like taking this apart from the fact that it is really quick to make is that
it’s very personal and anyway my mother always told me (.) “Do not take flowers when you go to people’s houses for
dinner because then they’ve got to go and find a vase!” (1) I am going to indulge myself with a bit of a swirl (.) stirring
is not good (.) but swirling is permitted (1) Ok (.) we are now about to hit ingredient three but I am going to turn the
heat off first (.) Ingredient three is one and a half teaspoons of bicarb (1) and whisk in (.) And you can see it’s a golden
(.) foamy cloud that just needs to be poured out (.) look at that (.) and it’ll set within fifteen minutes which gives me
more than enough time for to get ready (1) Well (.) I’m ready (.) Mmm (.) the hokey pokey is ready (.) So we can go
out for dinner now (1) Now first I want to break the hokey pokey into luscious shards and here goes (.) I like some to
be like gold dust and some bits still to be quite large and biteable (.) I’m inhaling this honeycomb dust as I do this (.)
it’s rather fabulous (.) I don’t really need to present this in anything to make it look even more beautiful but I think it is
just as well to put it in a tin so that I don’t eat it all before I get there (.) It’s like putting golden nuggets inside a
jewellery casket (.) A final sprinkling of gold dust (1 I know it’s awful but I would so much rather stay in just me and the
hokey pokey than go out and have to give it away
Jamie Oliver Chocolate Cake

Two nuts chocolate torte (.) Cheese cake mould but you can pretty much use anything you like y’know I just find it easy
cos you can take the click it out (.) Butter 250grams of butter (.) Erm (.) what do I need? (1) ooo (1) greaseproof paper
right just rip off a bit a little square that you know is going to cover it yeah (.) and what I do it’s a bit like making a paper
aeroplane (.) actually it’s nothing like making a paper aeroplane (.) You fold the paper in the middle and then you turn it
around and fold it to the middle and you (.) basically you just keep folding it to the middle like that (.) I’ll do one more (.)
So you guess how much that is to the middle put your finger where it is and just rip it up oooo lovely! (1) So that’s going
to line the bottom yeah? (.) We just need to get a bit of butter on it and that’ll stop anything from sticking so just very
thinly line the bottom and the sides and just put a bit of butter on this (.) lovely then stick that on the bottom nice and
snug alright? (.) so there’s nothin’ that’s gonna stick (.) Alright? (.) Forget that now (1) So (.) I need 300 grams of nuts (.)
it’s called two nuts torte because it’s got two nuts in it basically (.) got walnuts and almonds and I need 150 grams of
each yeah? (.) which is pretty simple to remember and um and these are 100gram packets (.) so there’s a hundred
grams of almonds (.) there’s a hundred grams of almonds and then I’m not gonna get the scales out or nuthin like that
just pour out the nuts and divide it into two same with the walnuts I think where at all possible do not use the scales ok (.)
so just divide the old nuts in half again (.) what I’m gonna do (.) got the old magimix (.) chuck the nuts in there ok and
we’re gonna whiz it up until it’s a powder (.) 30 seconds 40 seconds (.) lovely (.) so look what we got yeah (.) it’s
fantastic that’s what it should be (.) it’s like powder (1) Right chocolate it is a chocolate torte we need 300 grams of
chocolate one we’re gonna put here (.) Two (1) we’re gonna crumble up 200 grams of this and chuck it in with the nuts
and we’re gonna whiz that up as well (1) it makes a bit of a noise but we just wanna break it up into pieces alright? (.)
It’s better than watchin’ telly (1) Anyway (.) we lose this into a bowl now we’re gonna put the butter in here just plonk the
whole lot in there whip it into two or three, we need 100grams of sugar (.) lovely (.) pour that in and that’s just for a little
bit of extra sweetness and we wanna whiz this up whip this up (.) whizz this up so it gets nice and shiny and creamy (1)
So I need six eggs yeah? (.) Organic (.) of course(.) I gonna crack me eggs in here (.) very carefully then what I do (.) I
pinch the yolk and plop ‘em in (.) one by one and that’s gonna really enrich that and make it nice and silky and beautiful
(1) Lovely (.)All we have to do now is get it all together (.) So, just mix this up until it’s nicely mixed (.) Right (.) Now the
best bit (.) egg whites (.) flavour (.) lift (.) We have to get them together but I want to get them really stiff so at the last
minute add a good pinch of salt that kind of helps them to be stiff and whisk it up me old darling
Attitudes towards Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver.

Do you agree with what these people think?


How to make a food show the Nigella way
Thursday 11 November 2010 11.50 GMT by Tim Lusher
Nigella Kitchen is a lesson in how to sprinkle with choice words, smile sadistically and present with a flourish

Nigella Lawson serves up a generous helping. Photograph: Pacific Films/BBC


She keeps an "anchovy priser" in her kitchen drawer and a jar of Tabasco on her bedside table. She thinks cheesecake should have "a hint of inner-thigh
wibble" and that "nothing gets a party started like a lagerita". So what if you don't want to cook everything demonstrated in Nigella Kitchen? Lawson is
the queen of the short cut and, more important, the enemy of boredom.
Her latest cookery show is as entertaining as it's useful. Maybe you aren't rushing to make her grasshopper pie (a gaggy blend of marshmallows, cream,
creme de cacao and creme de menthe on a bed of crushed bourbons, which is "how I imagine the earth of Mexico to be"). And yes, the crustless pizza
knocked up from batter is only going to wow someone who's been on a 10-hour pub crawl. But you're not supposed to be scribbling down the recipes.
Just look, listen and laugh: it's campy, vampy, saucy fun. Who else takes a huge pan of "slut spaghetti" to bed? Got lots of friends who cook pork knuckle
by fairylights, wearing leopardskin mules and a satin peignoir? Here's how to make a food show the Nigella way.
Soak your ingredients with colour
"I feel a bit more partified with a red onion," says Nigella, who places them "pinkly" in a roasting tin. Black is only really for dresses, squid-ink risotto ("the
perfect date dinner for goths") or olives ("I love the way they look like teddy bears' noses"). Her food world is kaleidoscopically colourful. Prawns turn
coral. Avocado forms "jade cubes". Ideally, all food should resemble a jewel or precious metal. Pleased with your meat? Take a moment to "bask in all this
bronze beauty". But choose your colours ruthlessly: "The only pepper I cannot abide is a green pepper. I cannot see any excuse for them."
Sprinkle with choice words
Do not stick, throw, bung or bosh ingredients into a dish. Leave that to Jamie. Nigella likes to "tumble" things into the mix – seasoned liberally with
adverbs. (Try to tumble chopped apples and potatoes, for instance, "joyously" into a roasting tin.)
Smile constantly and sadistically
"I love and respect a chicken but for all that I am going to behave pretty brutishly to it." CRUNCH "That sound is the chestbone being broken." Nigella
snaps on pervy black rubber gloves to make her "squink" risotto – think Agent Provocateur, not Marigold.
Make everything sound filthy
With a coquettish, sideways smirk, announce: "My gleaming lemon cream is ready." Sigh giddily: "Ah, look at these gorgeous golden globules." Purr at the
male guest ineptly assembling a fajita: "It's a very artistic package you have there." See? Easy.
Or whimsical
Remember: you're not slapping together a trifle with a stale Mr Kipling sponge, a defrosted bag of fruit from Iceland and a hurriedly whipped half-carton
of UHT that's incubating an uncatalogued strain of super-bacteria. You're crafting an artery-blocking poem: "How beautiful these juicy beaded
blackberries look glinting darkly out of that pale billowing duvet of cream."
Present with a flourish
Cherry tomatoes belong on a cakestand. Serve celery in a vase. Even a humble egg and bacon salad involves a "momentous moment of assembly". Before
you take your stew out of the oven, wink and growl: "It's time for the carnal unveiling."
Do not overheat
"Obviously if you don't have any parsley no one's going to sue you." Nigella cracks jokes and never a sweat – and neither should you.
What other pearls have we missed? Share your favourite Nigella lines with us...
Jamie Oliver's dinners – served with a legendary dollop of mega branding
These are the words staff allegedly should use at the chef's restaurants. Can words influence our experience of food?
o Felicity Cloake
o theguardian.com, Friday 24 August 2012 17.24 BST

A list allegedly from a Jamie Oliver restaurant listing 'words to use when selling our fab specials'.

The leaking of a list of words staff at Jamie Oliver's restaurants are allegedly encouraged to use when selling the day's "fab specials" has
provoked online mirth of the kind not seen since Wozza's unfortunate misunderstanding with that cheese. Although the authenticity of
the document – which includes such classic foodie terms as "rocking", "pimp" and "outrageous" – has not been verified, it has the
stamp of Oliver's ever-expanding empire about it.
Anyone who's ever visited one of the former Naked Chef's restaurants (the first incarnation of Brand Jamie has been quietly sidelined in
favour of his newer persona as a crusading family man) will know that, although the food is mostly fairly decent, here at least, it comes
second to concept. The insistence, at branches of Jamie's Italian, on serving antipasti on an rustic plank, balanced on a couple of retro-
looking tins of tomatoes, for example, is a classic example of style over substance, and so impractically large that on my last visit we had
to consign our wine glasses to the floor. You can't even order chips without having to specify "posh" (with truffle oil and parmesan) or
"funky" (garlic and parsley) through gritted teeth.
But can certain words influence our experience of the food itself? Certainly if I were asked to describe Oliver's style of cooking, "proper
rustic", as name-checked in the list, would get a look-in, as would gutsy (a surprising omission, that) and perhaps "hearty". The studied
simplicity of his food ("humble green salad", "Italian nachos") and its artfully casual presentation ("messy") encourages expectations of
big, punchy flavours – understated sophistication is not the name of the game here.
In contrast, another chain, Cafe Rouge, which nobly aims to recreate an old-school French bistro in venues including the Gateshead
Metrocentre and Gatwick airport, uses the word "classic" no fewer than 21 times on its menu, and is also fond of "luxury", "delicate"
and "sumptuous", vocabulary which, I suspect, wouldn't even make it through the door of Jamie's marketing department. Whether
their extensive use of French makes Cafe Rouge's corbeille de pains more authentic than Jamie's "beautiful bruschetta" selection is
unclear.
Interestingly, the further up or down the scale you move, the sparser the adjectives become. You don't get many caffs trying to tempt
you in with their "feel-good" full English or "legendary" liver, while menus in the Michelin-star brigade tend to read more like a list of
increasingly incongruous ingredients – "beef tongue in coal oil, mustard, scurvy grass, onions" is currently on offer at London's Roganic –
the idea being, presumably, that the cooking will sell itself.

Do you find elaborate descriptions on menus helpful, or are they the verbal equivalent of a parsley garnish? And would such heavy-
handed branding put you off a restaurant, or is it largely irrelevant, as long as the food's good?
TV review: Nigella Kitchen
Nigella Lawson's new show, like her puddings, is almost illegally decadent by Lucy Mangan
The Guardian, Friday 1 October 2010

Insinuate yourself onto the sofa! Scrumple yourself into its gorgeously forgiving depths and lovingly introduce an ample measure of gin
from the winking green bottle on the superbly broad windowsill into the slim, sparkling cylinder of glass by your side! Scatter
exclamation marks across your life with a lavish hand, remove all distractions, ugly things/people and nearby apostrophes and enjoy the
first episode of the new Nigella Kitchen (BBC2). She's still big – it the punctuation that got small!
We begin with roast seafood with extra absurdity. "Tumble them into the roasting tin," urges Nigella, before assuring us that with the
clams, squid and spuds: "You could just as well use an ordinary, everyday yellow onion, but red onion is just more partified! Scatter it
pinkly amongst the potatoes! There's just something so reassuring about the taste of potatoes!" She's so happy! She smiles all the time!
It is most unappetising!
For feeding hordes of teenagers, Nigella recommends pasta with cannellini beans and salami. Take the ingredients from a larder the size
of a decent bedsit. Smile! Cook them all together. While the water boils, string fairy lights around your larder and kitchen. Or kill yourself
– whichever seems easier.
For pudding, it's chocolate peanut butter cheesecake. This is an almost illegally decadent dessert so first, catch your black satin
nightgown! Smile! Making sure it is firmly fastened in case the cameraman gets his erection caught in the blender, blitz peanuts,
chocolate and biscuits together. Smile! Add more fairy lights/pills to your evening. Cream the other ingredients together and pour the
resulting "gorgeous, golden, gleaming gloop" into the case. Bake until the top is done with: "a hint of inner-thigh wobble". Step carefully
around the cameraman and move on to Mother's Praised Chicken.
Praised means: "something between poached and braised, and appropriate because both cooking and eating it feel like an act of
devotion." Boil the chook with some red peppercorns (mortals, please don't worry – ordinary pepper will work just as well if you're a bit
thick, poor or simply more of a low chicken church devotee) until it is ready to "fork into tender shreds". Serve with rice and a rictus
grin.
I was deeply drunk and exhausted by the end. How was it for you?
Jamie Oliver programme exposes shocking abuse of English language Posted: Jan
13th, 2008 by NewsBiscuit

An extended television special on poultry farming in Britain has exposed the shocking
abuse meted out to the English language by television presenter Jamie Oliver.
‘It was horrible’ wept one unwitting witness who had been duped into thinking they
were just taking part in an everyday expose about farm animals. We had to just sit
there and witness the brutal murder of the language of Shakespeare and Milton’.
‘Alright darlin’’ chirped Jamie ‘What we is doin’ right, is showin’ yers that there ain’t no
reason why dem birds should have what’s happenin’ like at the moment, not never,
know what I mean Sweetheart?’
Well-dressed diners winced as they were forced to listen to a mockney accent mincing
up words and systematically murdering traditional sentence construction. ‘I had no idea
this still happened,’ said Jennifer Myers who was a member of the studio audience on
the night. ‘These sentences are being deprived of their natural verb endings. Nouns are
systematically deprived from definite and indefinite articles, grotesque double
negatives are being artificially produced and infinitives are being split at birth.’
Channel 4 defended the shocking programme saying that it had warned viewers
beforehand that they may find some sounds offensive. But it was necessary to show
this abuse of English at first hand in the hope that the laws of grammar might be finally
enforced. But Jamie Oliver was unrepentant; ‘Wha’ever Sweet Pea! We warned dem
folks they might find it upsettin’ and that, we weren’t wrong darlin’. I say old bean, is
Investigate the ways spoken language is used by the TV
chefs Nigella Lawson and Jamie Oliver.

Band 5  perceptive analysis and evaluation of aspects of how Lawson and Oliver adapt spoken
Sophisticated, language for specific purposes
 sustained and sophisticated interpretations of key features found in spoken language used
Impressive
by Lawson and Oliver
17-20  sophisticated analysis and evaluation of key issues arising from public attitudes to the
spoken language of Lawson and Oliver

Band 4  confident explanation and analysis of how Lawson and Oliver use and adapt spoken language
Confident, for specific purposes
 confident analysis and reflection on features found in some spoken language used by Lawson
Assured 13-16
and Oliver
 confident analysis of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language of Lawson
and Oliver

Band 3  explanation of how Lawson and Oliver use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes
Clear,  exploration of features found in some spoken language used by Lawson and Oliver
 exploration of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language of Lawson and
consistent 9-12
Oliver