Inc.
6 min read
Entrepreneurship

Immigration. Trade. Health care. Taxes.

Jan Willem van der Werff is reeling from his queasy ride on the “solar coaster.” That’s the insider nickname for the solar energy industry, which—while surging—remains vulnerable to the whims of policy and trade. Van der Werff is CEO of Ecolibrium Solar (No. 443 on the 2017 Inc. 500), a $27.2 million maker of hardware that connects sunlight-absorbing panels to roofs. In 2015, companies like his, which had packed their production schedules to take advantage of an expiring tax credit, found their timelines completely upended when Congress unexpectedly extended that credit by five years. Then c
NPR
3 min read
Politics

Why Donald Trump Likes To Surround Himself With Generals

When White House chief strategist Steve Bannon was pushed out of his job last week, it underscored the growing clout of President Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general. And when Trump announced he was increasing U.S. troops in Afghanistan on Monday, after suggesting for years that he wouldn't, administration officials were quick to note that he was heeding the advice of "the generals." Trump, who attended the New York Military Academy as a teenager, has made clear he admires the toughness and discipline of military life and has appointed four former generals to top
The Atlantic
3 min read
Society

Are There Black 'Queen Bees'?

This article is a response to Olga Khazan’s Atlantic article “Why Do Women Bully Each Other at Work?” In a recent Atlantic article, Olga Khazan examined the finding that the longer a woman has been in the workforce, the less likely she is to want her boss to be a woman. One possible explanation Khazan discusses—and this isn’t settled—is that women fear their female superiors will cut them down in the workplace; this happens because, the thinking goes, female higher-ups are eager to distance themselves from other women in male-dominated workplaces, where their gender might seem like an impedime
The Atlantic
8 min read
Society

The Field Where Men Still Call the Shots

For teenagers aspiring to make it onto a high-school sports team, the summer-vacation days of sleeping in are drawing to a close. By mid-August, many hopeful athletes will be exerting themselves before a cadre of school coaches, striving to demonstrate their fitness or conceal their summer sloth. Younger kids, too, soon will be back on the playing fields—if they ever left—and will begin training for their miniature versions of  various varsity sports.   Maggie Moriarty was one of those kids. Long before she began competing for the women’s lacrosse team at Holy Cross College, she shined on doze
Ad Age
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

You Are Not Your Customer

Most business books will tell you that the secret to success is grounded in becoming a customer of your own products and services. Put yourself in customers' shoes to see how they interact with your product and what the overall experience feels like. The main idea is that being a good customer will make you a good leader. That idea is wrong. All too often, leaders think that their personal experiences with their brand are accurate reflections of all customers' experiences with their brand. They make decisions based on what would personally make them happier, and focus on details of the experie
NPR
3 min read
Psychology

Is Your Boss Too Controlling? Many Employees Clash With Micromanagers

Micromanagement is routinely the top complaint people have about their bosses, and in today's good job market where workers have more options, that's a bigger problem for employers. People might have their own definition of when a manager crosses into being too controlling, but most people would probably agree that Marjon Bell's former boss would fit. On her first day on a marketing job at a Virginia Beach, Va., insurance company, Bell's boss sent an email barring employees from bringing cell phones to the office. The email said that moms, especially, spent too much time on their phones checki
STAT
3 min read
Society

More Female Leadership: A Different Kind of Health Care Reform

As health care reform continues to dominate the national debate, one concern from patient advocates arose recently when it was revealed that a Senate health care “working group” didn’t include any women. Sadly, it’s not unusual for a group of health care leaders to be dominated by men. With significant policy changes headed our way, there is no better time to leverage the unique capabilities of our female colleagues to help guide the health care industry in this new era. Solving that stubborn challenge in our industry — one that long predates the current policy debate — will require a sustaine
The Atlantic
5 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

How Princeton Is Trying to Get More Women to Be Student Leaders

In the fall of 2009, there were nine candidates for president of Princeton’s freshman class. All nine were white men. Concerned by this fact, a group of Princeton faculty and administrators began gathering data about gender diversity on campus. They found that, over the past 29 years, Princeton had only six female chairs of the honor committee, nine female editors-in-chief of the college newspaper, and four female student-body presidents. And so the university did what all universities do when faced with a pressing problem: It formed a committee. The Steering Committee on Undergraduate Women’s
Mic
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

Leslie Miley: Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick Is Not — and Never Was — a Leader

There's a petition circulating at Uber to bring back former CEO Travis Kalanick. For those supporting his return to the ridesharing company, I have a small piece of advice: Take your heads out of your collective asses. Kalanick is not and was never a leader. I won’t bore you with what I believe leadership is, but I will submit that creating a company and culture that has allowed, enabled and encouraged potentially illegal, immoral and unethical behavior for several years is not leadership. I would also invite you to reflect upon how people who thrived in this environment were rewarded and pro
Financial Times
8 min read
Entrepreneurship

Executive Choice: To Build or Buy the Next Leader?

General Electric's newest product is a balding 55-year-old American executive with a background in finance and an international pedigree. John Flannery rolled out of GE's factory for corporate leaders last week, ready to succeed Jeff Immelt in August as only the 10th chief executive in the multinational's 125-year history. His annunciation is the outcome of a process as meticulous and intensive as the manufacture of a composite fan blade for one of its aircraft engines. The news came in the wake of recent pressure on Mr Immelt from investors, but GE says it began planning the succession in det
Men's Health
2 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

MH World

Serious muscle doesn’t have to be totally serious. Enter Gainz, our new comedy video series starring BJ Gaddour. (That’s BJ above, doing his part to help build our office deck.) Shove a meat-and-bean burrito into a blender and call it a protein shake? No rules, man. Let other guys get swole—you want Gainz. Load This App, Load Your Bar Muscles respond well to new workouts, so make our app your source. You’ll find exclusive routines, like Kettlebell Shred and Unleash Your Alpha, from such in.luential trainers as Keoni Hudoba of Barry’s Bootcamp in New York City and MH Mexico cover guy Brian Mazz
Ad Age
9 min read
Society

Advertising Is Still a Boys' Club

Advertising Is Still a Boys' Club 15 Months After Martinez Little Has Changed by Lindsay Stein Suzanne and a colleague are hard at work on a new-business pitch for a toy targeted to little girls. The day before the big meeting, the duo's male creative director points to Suzanne and says, "You're going to the meeting because we need more women in the room." On the morning of an important pitch, one of two men in the client service department approaches Leah and asks her to take the coffee orders since no one on his team is in yet. She looks around and notices that she is the only female in the
The Atlantic
9 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

How to Recruit Black Principals

CHICAGO—Principal Macquline King-Morris stepped out of the way of two lines of students heading to the Courtenay Language Arts Center gym. But the stream of elementary-school kids rerouted themselves to deliver hugs, high fives, and huge grins. Creating a pre-k-8 school where every student feels welcome is at the top of King-Morris’s list of priorities. With a student population that is 48 percent black, 35 percent Hispanic, 9 percent white, and 6 percent Asian, Courtenay is one of the most diverse schools in Chicago, a city known for its stark racial segregation, and King-Morris thinks about
Fortune
2 min read
Entrepreneurship

Lessons in Uber’s Rough Ride

WHEN A COMPANY as successful as Uber stumbles as dramatically as the startup did this year, the blame game begins. Uber’s leaders should have earlier addressed allegations of sexism and workplace harassment. Investors should have pressured management to fire HR policy violators. Certainly the board of directors should be held accountable for something. “It’s been a tough 24 hours. I know the company is hurting,” CEO Travis Kalanick wrote to staff before announcing an independent review of the company’s workplace environment. For years, Uber’s toxic culture was a poorly kept secret in Silicon
Inc.
2 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

Tech is Disrupting HR But the Human Element Remains Critical

Technology is disrupting human resources (HR), and, in most cases, for the better. In a recent report on HR technology, Josh Bersin, principal and founder of Bersin by Deloitte, predicts the HR technology industry “is on the precipice of a total reinvention.” The pace of change has been accelerating since 2010, when the market began “steadily racing to the cloud.” Advances in HR technology are keeping pace with—and in some cases driving changes in the strategic concerns of growing businesses. Emphasis has shifted from talent management through integrated processes and systems, to people manag
Inc.
2 min read
Tech

Gabriel Flateman

As told to JON FINE Why only one mattress? There’s all this choice in the mattress industry and much of it is wildly mundane. When the problem is an overabundance of choices, the answer is pretty simple: Focus on one core thing that works for many people. With T-shirts, I wouldn’t advise the same strategy, because there is inherent choice in fashion. It’s got to stem from user need. But there is a lot of opportunity, in efficiency and clarity of purpose, gained by making and marketing one product. Still, there are long-established companies in your business. How do you chip away at them? W
The Atlantic
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

How Office Culture Can Crush Women’s Ambitions

Researchers have long been looking for solutions to what could be called the ambition gap. That’s the nagging discrepancy which often shows up in polling, where women express less interest in becoming senior executives than their male counterparts. It’s a frustrating dilemma, and one without simple answers. Encouragingly, companies are starting to investigate the problem and what can be done about it. But at least part of the problem, it seems, is companies themselves. A new report from the consulting firm Boston Consulting Group investigates why women seem more reticent to compete for top job
Fast Company
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

The Elements of Wisdom

Conceiving a breakthrough product or navigating administrative entanglements is exponentially more difficult when you—and your staff—are distracted by what feels like the fourth disturbing news brief of the day. But, according to Krista Tippett, a Peabody Award–winning public radio host and author of Becoming Wise: An Inquiry Into the Mystery and Art of Living, there’s a way to offer stability and foresight in the face of uncertainty. It’s a subject she’s covered widely in On Being, the radio show on which she has discussed such topics as the intricacies of evil, forgiveness, and prayer with E
Nautilus
10 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

Why Power Brings Out Your True Self: Are you a tyrant or a servant?

At the 2012 Democratic National Convention, Michelle Obama told the crowd, “Being president doesn’t change who you are. It reveals who you are.” Growing up, Michelle said, she and Barack learned important lessons from their families about “dignity and decency” and “gratitude and humility.” “At the end of the day,” she said, “when it comes time to make that decision, as president, all you have to guide you are your values, and your vision, and the life experiences that make you who you are.” Research in cognitive science reveals the former First Lady is right: Power exposes your true character.
Fortune
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

How to Get on This List

TWENTY YEARS AGO, when Great Place to Work produced the first 100 Best Companies to Work For list for Fortune, only the most forward-thinking business leaders appreciated the concrete value of creating employee-friendly workplaces. Today, countless studies acknowledge the link between culture, trust, and business success. And for most companies, the mission of creating a great workplace has become an integral part of their strategy. After its debut, Fortune’s list played a role in changing the way American companies viewed their greatest resource—their human capital. And at the same time, it
Fast Company
5 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

How to Lead in 2017

I didn’t know what to do. A protester had just stood up in the audience, shouting questions toward the stage, where I was moderating. As host of the event, it was my responsibility to defuse the situation. But how? That’s when PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi, one of my guests onstage, stepped in. Nooyi calmly and firmly addressed the question with no hint of defensiveness. The audience applauded. When another protester tried to interrupt the session again several minutes later, the people seated nearby shouted down the disrupter. Completely unruffled, Nooyi continued on with our interview. The crowd
Fortune
2 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

Forging a New Social Compact

WE OFTEN TALK, in these pages, about how to become a great leader—and who we think the best leaders are (see our cover package of stories in this issue, beginning on page 65). But we don’t focus enough on the where: Where, that is, should today’s chief executives and other managers lead their companies? The question is an important one—and perhaps never more so than now, at the end of a bitter election season in which at least two major candidates for President (and tens of millions of voters) have asserted that Big Business has lost its way. We think the question is so fundamental that, this
Fortune
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

The Moral Imperative for Leaders

WE LIVE IN A TIME of moral outrage. If you listened to partisans on either side of Election 2016, it was a contest between—or a protest of—a criminally corrupt politician and a serial sex offender, even though neither candidate had been formally charged with, much less convicted of, such crimes. Elizabeth Warren recently eviscerated Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf—a man once known for his own and his company’s core values—as a “gutless” leader, squeezing “employees to the breaking point so they would cheat customers and you could drive up the value of your own stock and put hundreds of millions in