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Table of specifications

Contents CEF Number


Skills competences Test items of items Marks
Topics Language

The smart Exponents and Linguistic


I – Listening functions • Multiple choice 3 35
consumer • lexical
• grammatical • True / false
Vocabulary in
context • semantic • Matching
• orthographic • Sequencing
Conditional
sentences Pragmatic • Short answer
II – Language • functional (gap filling; 6 105
and Reading If not vs. unless • discursive sentence completion;
rephrasing)
• Short answer
(text comprehension)

• Essay 1 60
III – Writing (80-220 words)

• Short exchanges
with examiner
IV – Oral • One-minute long turn
production and follow-up 3
and discussion 200
moments
interaction
• Collaborative
talk involving
two candidates

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 1
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Prova de Equivalência à Frequência


11º Ano de Escolaridade

1ª Fase 4 páginas

Duração da Prova: 90 minutos

2018
Utilize apenas caneta ou esferográfica azul ou preta.
Pode consultar dicionários unilingues ou bilingues, sem restrições nem especificações.
Não é permitido o uso de corretor. Em caso de engano, deve riscar, de forma inequívoca, aquilo que
pretende que não seja classificado.
Escreva as respostas de forma legível.
As respostas ilegíveis ou que não possam ser identificadas são classificadas com zero pontos.
Para cada item, apresente apenas uma resposta. Se escrever mais do que uma resposta a um mesmo
item, apenas é classificada a resposta apresentada em primeiro lugar.

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 2
I – Listening 35 marks

Listen to the following TV report.

1. Listen and complete with the correct word from the box. 10 marks

sci-fi virtual succeed webpages Wi-Fi proceed

a. Shops are replacing their ….…………………………….…… for something completely new


called ….…………………………….…… or augmented reality.
b. It looks like something out of a ….…………………………….…… movie.
c. Time will tell if this method of shopping will truly ….…………………………….…….

2. Complete the sentences. 10 marks

a. Some retailers consider this method ….…………………………….……….…………………………….….


b. A few major retailers have already started ….…………………………….……….……………………….

3. Match the topic in column A with the appropriate information in column B.


Use all the expressions. 15 marks

A B
Shopping online a. 1. Lacks that tactile feeling of buying in-store.
Augmented reality b. 2. Don’t feel as flat as on screen.
Furniture and appliances c. 3. Works especially well with large objects.
It may not become popular d. 4. Is easy and convenient.
5. Are shown in proportion.
6. Allows you to use the camera in your phone.
7. As you need a high tech phone camera.
8. Gives you a virtual sense of reality.
9. Due to the slow pace of app development.

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 3
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II – Language and reading 105 marks

1. Complete the following text with seven words from the box. Use each word only once.
15 marks

ahead pace information customised shaping up


mobile moving retailers revolutionising

Consumers are now demanding more a. …………..…………….……….… than ever. The


growth of the internet and the spread of b. …………..…………….……….… devices mean that
information on almost any subject is at our fingertips. This is c. …………..…………….……….… the
way that people work, play and shop.
According to research from PWC we are entering an “Age of Disruption,” where
retailers that deliver a d. …………..…………….……….… experience to consumers across all
devices will be the most successful. The e. …………..………….……….… of change shows no signs
of slowing, and f. …………..…….……….….… and manufacturers need to keep abreast of the
shifting demands of an increasingly “savvier” shopper to keep g. …………..…………….……….… of
the competition.

https://www.traceone.com/fr/blog/the-modern-shopper-is-getting-savvier-2-2/, accessed in April 2018

2. Complete the following sentences using the appropriate tense of the verbs in brackets.
Make other necessary changes. 15 marks

a. If consumers’ habits hadn’t changed, stores ….…………………………….…… (not feel) the need
to innovate.

b. If you don’t shop wisely you ….…………………………….…… (find) yourself in trouble.

c. If you were asked about your personal info online, what ….…………………………….…… (do)?

d. If you don't feel like going out you….…………………………….…… (buy) everything online.

e. In spite of ….…………………………….…… (find) a great pair of shoes on the internet Jane


preferred to go to the shop instead.

3. “I prefer to shop in-store. When you buy online you don’t see what you’re buying.”
Say whether you agree or disagree with this statement and give at least two reasons.
Write about 30-40 words. 15 marks

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 4
Read the text.

New directions
in consumer shopping habits

The retail world is changing quickly, and the


last five years have shown just how challenging it
is for brands to adapt to these changes. Last year
The Limited, once a thriving brand, shut down all
5 250 of its stores and let 4,000 workers go, all in
one day. A few months later Bebe announced that
they would also close all of their stores.
What so many brands are struggling with is the fact that consumer shopping habits have
changed dramatically over the last five years, and in many cases retailers aren’t making changes
10 fast enough to keep up. Sales cycles that often span a year or more have long been considered
“normal” in the retail world, but the most innovative brands and retailers are moving much faster,
leaving once-competitors often stuck in decision paralysis and never-ending consumer tests. The
companies that have thrived during what many are calling a “Retail Apocalypse” are those who
have embraced change, put a real focus on innovation, and stayed in lock step with consumers.
15 1. Shoppers are now more comfortable than ever answering questions about themselves
online. Rewind ten years ago and shoppers were very cautious when it came to sharing data
online. This meant that many retailers steered clear of asking asking shoppers questions. Fast
forward to 2018 and some innovative retailers have used this to their advantage, asking shoppers
questions that you probably couldn’t have asked 5-10 years ago, which means they’re amassing
20 more data to better personalise the customer purchase experience.
2. Shoppers are less brand loyal than ever, which means they are also changing brands
more frequently than ever before. For brands this means the assumptions they make about who
their customer is could change dramatically over the course of a year or two. It’s very unlikely that
the customer they were targeting five years ago is the same customer they have today. On top of
25 that, brands have to work even harder to provide shoppers with a great experience since their
customer can easily change brands overnight.
3. Shoppers are buying more online, full stop. While many brands and retailers have
embraced a virtual approach to their business, for most this has often taken too long. The brands
that have fared the best over the last five years are those that have seen eCommerce as a real
30 business opportunity. The retailers that have had the hardest time are those that have found
themselves clinging to their in-store business rather than embracing change and trying to keep up
with changing shopping habits. Many people are put off by long queues at shops and opt for a
more comfortable way of buying and clever retailers are addressing this reality. This is also true
for food shopping, as more and more people are adopting the “click and collect” method of
35 choosing what they want from the shops’ online service and having their selected goods delivered
at their front doors.

http://blog.boldmetrics.com/3-ways-consumer-shopping-habits-have-changed-over-
the-last-five-years/ (based on), accessed in April 2018

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 5
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4. Identify the ideas mentioned in the text. 10 marks

a. A new generation of consumers is stepping forward.


b. Retailers must change their ways to stay in business.
c. Shoppers’ devotion to particular brands is a thing of the past.
d. Shoppers avoid buying groceries online.
e. Most people are put off by having to give information online.
f. Why should you wait in line to be served when you have other options?
g. Despite innovation shopping cycles have remained stable.

5. Find words in paragraphs 1 and 2 that mean the same as the words/expressions below.
15 marks
a. flourishing ………………………………………………..……………………………………
b. having difficulty in……………………………………………..…………………………….…………
c. last for …………………………………………..…………………………………….…………………
d. trapped ………………………………………………..…………….………………
e. adopted ………………………………………………………………………………………………………

6. Complete the following sentences using the information in the last three paragraphs.
15 marks
a. The brands can no longer rely on ………………………………………………………..…………..
b. Retailers try hard to provide customers with …….……………………………….
c. Shoppers are ………………………………………………………………...…………more than ever.

7. Explain what is meant in the text by the following expressions. 20 marks

a. “… they’re amassing more data to better personalise the customer purchase experience”
(ll. 19-20)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

b. “It’s very unlikely that the customer they were targeting five years ago is the same
customer they have today.” (ll. 23-25)
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

II – Writing 60 marks

What are possible negative aspects of online shopping?


Write an opinion text stating at least two arguments or reasons to support your opinion.

Write between 150-220 words.


You may use the input provided by activities in Parts I and 2.
Do not sign your text.

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 6
III – Oral production and interaction 200 marks

Duração da prova: 20 a 25 minutos


Domínio de referência: Os Jovens e o Consumo

1º Momento
Intervenientes e
Descrição das atividades
Tempos
Examinador Hello …………… (A) and …………… (B). (Use first names)
I’d like to know more about you so I’m going to ask you some questions about yourselves
for about three minutes.
Answer the questions, please, but do not interrupt your partner.

[1. O examinador usa a lista que se segue, escolhendo o número de estímulos adequados
ao tempo. 2. As perguntas poderão ser colocadas seguindo uma linha vertical
(entrevistando um examinando de cada vez) ou em alternância (entrevistando
simultaneamente os dois examinandos).]

A B

Examinador e  …………… (A), do you live in the city or in  What about you, do you like the place
Examinandos the countryside? you live in, ………… (B)?

 Would you rather live in a different  Why do you like that area?
place?

(negative response)

 Why wouldn’t you like to live in a


 Why not?
different place?

 Do you think the place you live in has  And you? Does the place you live in have
environmental problems? Why/not? any environmental problems? Why/ not?

[O examinador fará referência à resposta do [O examinador fará referência à resposta do


examinando.] examinando.]

Total:  Name two things you think you should  Name two things you think the city
3/5 minutos do to help the environment. council should do to minimise those
problems.

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 7
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2º Momento
Intervenientes e
Descrição das atividades
Tempos
Examinador • Right, now I’d like each of you to talk on your own for about two minutes.
You have one minute to prepare.
You mustn’t interrupt your partner while he/she is speaking.
Here is some paper and a pen, in case you want to make some brief notes.
Please do not write a text.
[O examinador entrega o papel e a caneta aos dois examinandos.]

Examinador  …………… (A), I’d like you to start.  Now it’s your turn ………… (B).
[O examinador entrega o material: Picture [O examinador entrega o material:
A.] Picture B.]
Examinandos • Look at this picture and then talk about it.
2 minutos As well as the picture, there are also some prompts to help you.
I’ll ask you to start talking in one minute.
[O examinando prepara o seu discurso.]
Examinador  Please begin now, ………… (A).  Please begin now, ……… (B).

A B

[Prestação do examinando. Caso o discurso [Prestação do examinando. Caso o


Examinando A
2/4 minutos do examinando seja insuficiente, revele discurso do examinando seja insuficiente,
pouco conteúdo ou o examinando tenha revele pouco conteúdo ou o examinando
dificuldade em começar a falar, o tenha dificuldade em começar a falar, o
examinador poderá ajudá-lo com algumas examinador poderá ajudá-lo com
perguntas, por exemplo: algumas perguntas, por exemplo:
 What do you see in the picture?  What’s happening in the picture?]
 What shape does it have?]
Examinando B [Se as perguntas forem insuficientes, o
[Se as perguntas forem insuficientes, o
2/4 minutos examinador poderá fazer ainda as
examinador poderá fazer ainda as seguintes
perguntas: seguintes perguntas:
 Do you think the picture reflects reality?  How real do you think the situation
depicted is?
Why?
 What does the picture suggest?
 What message is the picture trying to
convey?
 In your view, what is a suitable title for  In your view, what is a suitable title
this picture? Why?] for this picture? Why?]

Examinador [O examinador pode ainda ajudar o [O examinador pode ainda ajudar o


examinando a expandir o seu discurso, por examinando a expandir o seu discurso,
exemplo usando: por exemplo usando:
Total:  Why?  Why?
6/12 minutos  What do you mean by…?  What do you mean by…?
 Could you be more specific?]  Could you be more specific?]

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 8
3º Momento

Intervenientes e
Descrição das atividades
Tempos
Examinador • Now I’d like you to talk together for about four minutes about the type of
+/- 30 segundos shopper each of you is, while I listen. Here is a card with some ideas on it, which
+ you can use if you like.
Examinandos
4/5 minutos Remember you have to talk to each other. Please speak so that I can hear you
both. I’ll ask you some questions about each other’s comments. Here is your
card.

[O examinador entrega o material a cada aluno]


Examinador

[Prestação dos examinandos. Os examinandos podem usar algum tempo para


lerem o “Card”. Caso nenhum dos examinandos tome a iniciativa, ou tenham
decorrido mais de trinta segundos, o examinador poderá dizer “Would you start
Examinador e
now?”]
Examinandos
4/5 minutos
Thank you!

 …………… (A), in your view, what concerns you most as a consumer?

 …………… (B), do you agree?

Examinador [Caso o examinando A não tenha fornecido uma resposta à última pergunta
suscetível de ser comentada, devido à pouca qualidade ou extensão, a pergunta
inicial poderá ser adaptada e dirigida ao aluno B, substituindo aquela que pede a
sua reação. Por exemplo, o examinador poderá dizer: “How easy / difficult do you
think it is to be a smart consumer?”]

 …………… (B), in your view, what is the greatest benefit of being an organised
consumer?

 …………… (A), do you agree?

Examinador e [Caso o examinando B não tenha fornecido uma resposta à última pergunta
Examinandos suscetível de ser comentada, devido à pouca qualidade ou extensão, a pergunta
Total: 2/4 minutos inicial poderá ser adaptada e dirigida ao aluno A, substituindo aquela que pede a
sua reação. Por exemplo, o examinador poderá dizer: “Are young people more
concerned about the money they spend on things they don’t need?”]
Examinador
Total: 6/8 minutos Thank you both. That is the end of your test.

Total final:
20/25 minutos

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 9
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Picture A

Picture B

Prompts:
 What can you see in the picture?
 Do you see yourself in that situation?

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 10
Card

Makes a budget
and sticks to it.

Buys online and


Only buys what
enjoys opening
he/she likes.
the packets.

What kind
of shopper
Is concerned
with the impact are you? Hates going
of consumerism shopping; it's a
on the waste of time.
environment.

Spends more Likes shopping


than he/she and goes with
should. friends.

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 11
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Answer key
I – Listening

Video: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/retail-workers-suffer-as-shopping-habits-shift/

1. a. webpages; virtual; b. sci-fi; e. succeed


2. a. more interactive; b. to try out the feature
3. a. 1/4; b. 3/6/8; c. 2/5; d. 7/9

II – Language and reading

1. a. information; b. mobile; c. revolutionising; d. costumised; e. pace; f. retaillers; g. ahead


2. a. wouldn’t have felt; b. will find; c. would you do; d. can buy; e. having found/finding
3. Personal answer
4. b; c; f
5. a. thriving (l. 4); b. struggling (l. 8); c. span (l. 10); d. stuck (l. 12); e. embraced (l. 14)
6. a. shoppers loyalty; b. a great experience since their customer can easily change brands overnight;
c. buying/shopping online
7. Suggested answers: a. They are gathering a lot of information to make the shopping experience better; b. The type of
customer is constantly changing over the years.

III – Writing
Personal answer

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 12
Marking scheme
Parts I to III
I – Listening Criteria

N3 = 10 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
appropriate; language mistakes virtually non-existent.
N2 = 7 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
1. 10 marks almost always appropriate; few language mistakes that don’t affect understanding of the message.
N1 = 3 marks – Answer doesn’t meet all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of
words mostly inappropriate; many language mistakes that may affect understanding of the message.
• Texts failing to meet the task required will be given 0 marks.

N3 = 10 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
appropriate; language mistakes virtually non-existent.
N2 = 7 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
2. 10 marks almost always appropriate; few language mistakes that don’t affect understanding of the message.
N1 = 3 marks – Answer doesn’t meet all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of
words mostly inappropriate; many language mistakes that may affect understanding of the message.
• Texts failing to meet the task required will be given 0 marks.

3. 15 marks N3 8 correct = 15 marks N2 4 correct = 10 marks N1 2 correct = 5 marks

II – Language
Criteria
and reading

1. 15 marks N3 7 correct = 15 marks N2 5 correct = 10 marks N1 2 correct = 5 mark

2. 15 marks N3 5 correct = 5 marks N2 3 correct = 3 marks N1 1 correct = 1 marks

N3 = 15 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
appropriate; language mistakes virtually non-existent.
N2 = 10 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
3. 15 marks almost always appropriate; few language mistakes that don’t affect understanding of the message.
N1 = 5 marks – Answer doesn’t meet all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of
words mostly inappropriate; many language mistakes that may affect understanding of the message.
• Texts failing to meet the task required will be given 0 marks.

4. 10 marks N3 3 correct = 10 marks N2 2 correct = 7 marks N1 1 correct = 4 marks

5. 15 marks N3 5 correct = 15 marks N2 3 correct = 10 marks N1 1 correct = 5 marks

6. 15 marks N3 3 correct = 15 marks N2 2 correct = 10 marks N1 1 correct = 5 marks

N3 = 20 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
appropriate; language mistakes virtually non-existent.
N2 = 15 marks – Answer meets all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of words
7. 20 marks almost always appropriate; few language mistakes that don’t affect understanding of the message.
N1 = 9 marks – Answer doesn’t meet all the requirements: type of text, topic, information, number of words; choice of
words mostly inappropriate; many language mistakes that may affect understanding of the message.
• Texts failing to meet the task required will be given 0 marks.

III – Writing Criteria

45-50 marks – The student shows excellent writing skills; totally respects the topic or the text type; presents his own
ideas about the topic, contextualises and develops them; uses appropriate and varied cohesive devices; organises the
text in a coherent manner; mistakes (structure or spelling) are irrelevant for the comprehension of message.

40-44 marks – The student shows reasonable writing skills; respects the topic or the text type; presents some ideas
about the topic and contextualises them; uses simple cohesive devices to organise the text, but not always successfully;
choice of words is good; makes few mistakes (structure or spelling) which hardly affect message.

25-39 marks – The student shows some writing skills; respects the topic or the text type; presents some ideas about the
topic and tries to contextualise them; uses some cohesive devices but the text is slightly disorganised; choice of words is
1. 60 marks reasonable; makes some mistakes (structure or spelling) which sometimes make message slightly confusing.

10-24 marks – The student shows poor writing skills; mostly respects the topic or the text type; presents some ideas
about the topic but the text is slightly confused; uses few cohesive devices but the text is not well organised; choice of
words is poor; makes many mistakes (structure or spelling) which sometimes impede meaning.

0-9 marks – The student shows very poor writing skills; doesn’t fully respect the topic or the text type; ideas are scarce
and mostly decontextualised; uses few cohesive devices and the text is disorganised; choice of words is very poor; makes
many mistakes (structure or spelling) which sometimes make message incomprehensible.

Note: the student will get 0 marks if the topic or the text type is not respected, or if the whole text is incomprehensible
or illegible.

© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 13
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Assessment criteria and descriptors


Part IV

Performance Level Descriptors


Criteria Excellent Good Average Limited Poor
Use of language 40 32 24 12 8
(range) • Uses a wide range of • Uses a limited range of • Uses a very limited
complex, appropriate simple linguistic range of elementary
linguistic resources to resources, some of linguistic resources,
express ideas which are inappropriate most of which are
inappropriate
Fluency 40 32 24 12 8
• Fluent natural stream of • Speech is reasonably • Stream of speech is
speech, with good fluent often hesitant
rhythm • Rhythm is sometimes • Makes frequent pauses
• Hesitations and pauses broken by hesitations or doesn’t finish
are rare and pauses sentences
Accuracy 40 32 24 12 8
• Speech is grammatically • Speech is not always • Speech reveals
correct grammatically correct numerous errors that
• Minor errors do not • Some errors, but these often prevent
impede understanding do not interfere with understanding
• Minimal interference understanding • Frequent interference
from mother tongue • Some interference from from mother tongue
• Intonation is clear and mother tongue • Intonation is mostly
understandable • Intonation is at times unclear and at times
unclear but makes speech difficult to
understandable understand
Conversation 40 32 24 12 8
development • Shows a very good • Shows a reasonable • Shows limited ability to
ability to maintain a ability to maintain a maintain a
conversation/ discussion conversation/ discussion conversation/ discussion
• Arguments/ideas are • Arguments/ideas are • Repeats or rephrases a
numerous, clear and sufficient and pertinent limited number of
pertinent • Speech is usually arguments/ideas, not
• Uses appropriate coherent, with simple always adequate
cohesive elements to cohesive elements • Speech is sometimes
connect ideas incoherent
• Uses basic cohesive
elements
Interaction 40 32 24 12 8
• Interacts naturally and • Sometimes shows a few • Is frequently unable to
usually shows no problems in understand what is
problems/a few understanding what is being said
problems in being said • Shows difficulty in
understanding what is • Is ready to ask for or asking for or giving
being said give explanations when explanations when he
• Is ready to ask for or he doesn’t understand, doesn’t understand
give explanations when but is not always • Shows much insecurity
he doesn’t understand successful when asking or
• Asks and answers • Shows some insecurity answering questions
questions confidently when asking or
answering questions

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II – Language and reading IV – Oral production


I - Listening III – Writing Total Total Mark
and interaction
No. Name
1 2 3 Total 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total 1 Total 1
200 200
10 10 15 35 15 15 15 10 15 15 20 105 60 60 200
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
© ASA • 2017-2018 • Upgrade 11 • Isabel Filipe │ Maria Adelaide Rabaça │ Paula Simões | 15

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30